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I JUST DIED IN YOUR ARMS TONIGHT Edition

This is the invertebrate general. If you have any questions about invertebrates, want to look into owning one or more, or want to simply discuss them, this is the thread to do so, whether its

>Tarantulas and other spiders
>Myriapods
>Mollusks
>Crustaceans
>Insects
>Or anything without a backbone

Feel free to post it.

Resources/help and information

>Tarantulas
https://tomsbigspiders.wordpress.com/beginner-guides/
http://www.theraphosidae.be/en
>Mantids
http://www.mantisonline.eu/index.php?lan=en
>Phasmids
http://www.phasmatodea.com/web/guest/home

Discord
https://discord.gg/28V2Yua

old >>2636768
>>
>>2655808
Could someone give me a really detailed picture of how something like a mantis' mouth works?
>>
Why do some spiders have venom that is supposedly strong enough to kill 3 elephants when most of the most venomous spiders only eat small bugs?
>>
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Bought my first Xenesthis this sunday.

X. immanis, had no idea they were this leggy. Looks kinda weird for a tarantula actually.
>>
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>>2655843
all biting insect mouthparts are built the same way

there are 4 main parts, from top to bottom:

the labrum is just a cap that sits on top of the mouth

the mandibles are made of a single hard part and do most of the chewing work

the maxillae have most of the taste organs, a sharp surface for cutting and palps (mini legs) for holding and manipulating food

and the labium is just another pair of maxilla that are fused and prevents the food from falling out the bottom

not that complicated really, just looks confusing because in situ they are all very close together
>>
>>2655909
That's exactly what I needed, thank you anon.
>>
>>2655909
God this general is too fucking good for this place
>>
>>2655902
either as defense from common predators (birds, reptiles and small mammals) or it's randomly venomous to mammals just because of bad luck of the interaction of their body chemistry with that particular venom
>>
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>male tries to eat the female
>gets wrecked
I tried to intervene instantly, but they were clinging tightly together and biting each other. His mandibles were too weak to hurt her, but she incapacitated him immediately with one bite into the abdomen. They let go by themselves, but he's done for.

This male was quite weird, he didn't manage to successfully copulate even once for some reason while the other one has to do all the work.
>>
>>2656011
Damn.

Well at least the other male is going to work.

How big are yours? Mine are growing quite rapidly but I have no idea how far along they are.
>>
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>>2656014
My females are around 3-3,5cm. The smallest one being about 2,5cm currently. The abdomen bloats a ton, so it varies. Males are 2cm.
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>>2656011
>>
>>2656011
at least you wont get beta nymphs
>>
>>2656011
>>2656022
What species is this?
>>
>>2656803
Eremiaphila rotundipennis
>>
Think she's fertile? Lmao, too bad I'm not an ant man
>>
Did we ever get an update on the guy who bought the horned baboon tarantula for his kids? I want to see some pictures.
>>
>>2657005
He was trolling. No need to give him any further attention.
>>
>>2657051
Why would anyone troll /an/? Seems like a fruitless venture.
>>
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>>2657097
Some people from the "inner city" (/b/, /v/, /pol/, etc) get bored of their ghettos and attempt to trash whatever places remain untouched by their rampant shitposting rates. Apparently, for undeveloped people like that, the best cure for misery is to pass it around. Not that it ever works, though.
>>
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>>2655808
>the way the other scorpion starts bulging
>>
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>>2655808
What is this bug on my tomatoes (Australia)? Should I kill it?
>>
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>>2657051
Haha you fucking wish dude I am still around and when the new iPhone comes out im gonna take hella pictures with this sweet ass spider, he is chill as fuck and speaking of a pet hole, and not my wife's, he loves to snuggle up to her warm breeding hole. I dropped my phone in a big as fuck puddle when I was getting this horned nigger out of my Ford Expedition so I couldn't take pictures but like I said when the new iPhone comes out and I can get a camera working I'll have your pictures
>>
>>2657222
Assassin bug

Let him kill other bugs you don't like.
>>
>>2657229
Based, I didn't want to have to kill such an attractive animal
>>
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>>2657222
>>2657229
That's a crusader bug(Mictis profana) nymph, not an assassin bug. These do eat plants.
>>
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my cat killed it soon after taking the pic...
>>
>>2657241
whoops
>>
>>2657222
Haha, where I live there are bugs similar to that one that spread chagas' disease.
>>
>>2657241
That seems to be it. The deed is done I just wish I didn't feel so bad about it. F
>>
>>2657243
based cat
>>
Would it be ill-advised to get an arboreal for a first T?
>>
>>2657636
Oops, meant fossorial
>>
>>2657097
I miss bugguy so much.
>>
>>2657636
Depends on species
>>2657771
My interest is piqued.
>>
>>2657785
He was my favourite thing on /an/
>>
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are moths evil?
>>
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>>2657801
>>
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>>2657801
>>2657803
>>
>>2657801
Moths are pure!
>>
>>2656854
kek good find.
Of the 10 queens I caught last summer, 9 were fertile, I havent really had a problem with infertile queens.
>>
>>2657247
>chagas' disease.
Brazil?
>>
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>>2657801
you tell me
>>
>>2658366
Northwestern Argentina
>>
>>2656808
>rotundipennis
Hahhahahahaha
>>
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Managed to pick up a 14cm N chromatus female, eclosure included for $30
total score
>>
>>2658505
Nice.

How nasty is she? I heard most of them are assholes.
>>
>>2658508
shes kicked quite abit of hair when i trasfered her back after completely cleaning the enclosure
but other than that shes been a total cutie

managed to get a hair on my back somehow
itches like hell
>>
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About to be one molty boi. Look at that booty and that dark color.
>>
>>2658511
I always take a hot shower to open my pores after a nasty rehousing. Helps loosen the hairs and wash them out After finishing the shower I put on antibac itch cream and it's just absolute heaven.
>>
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Why is it that the most popular assassin bugs in the hobby are also blandest looking? Most US native species put Psytalla horrida to shame in terms of aesthetics.
>>
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ITT: post species you would like to see make it into the hobby.
>>
>>2658954
>>
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>>2658954
Breeding pic related would probably require a small greenhouse since they either require a certain plant or living fruits like many weevils.
I'd be more than happy with any obscure Dynastid species becoming available too.
>>
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>>2658954
What in the hell is that.
>>
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>>2658954
>>
>>2659150
some sort of mite
>>
>>2659150
>>2659281
hooded tick spiders are their own order of arachnids, with fossils dating back to over 300 million years ago. the name comes from the hood at their head that hides the chelicerae beneath it. they are really fucking small, with the largest species reaching 11 millimeters in size. they are rare and hard to find in the wild too.
>>
>>2659291
interdasting.
What do they feed on?
>>
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my P irminia slings first molt in my care
it lost a leg a bum leg about 2 weeks ago
really glad it didnt fuck up the molt process
>those abdoment stripes though
>>
my moths emerged

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mfSh8Teym8
>>
>>2659417
holy shit that's cool. are you breeding them or did you just raise caterpillars?
>>
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T newbie here. I have wanted one for awhile and ideally I would like to get a G. pulchra. I have a question about temperature. I've read that many tarantulas do not need heaters of any kind, that they can adapt to room temperatures unless they are a very specialized species.

Can a G. pulchra withstand low 60s room temp? I live in Washington and that's what my house hovers around for the most part, getting hotter in the summer but not too much so. If the G. pulchra can't, what are some other species that could?

Thanks guys.
>>
>>2659427
60s should be fine, most tarantulas can survive lower temps
but they become less active and tend to retreat into their borrows and block up the entrance if it gets too cold

its low 50s here at night, only my G pulchripes is burrowed in, still eats though
i only keep my very small slings in a micro climate during winter

but if youre concerend about low temps, a space heater should do fine
>>
>>2659427
>>2659446
in the low 60s the spider will survive but the metabolism will be extremely low and it might not even grow (and eventually die because it can't really digest things)

60s at night would be fine for many species but constantly it's definitely much too low

usually anything in the 70s is meant when people say they do not need extra heat, which is normal room temperature for most people

I know of no tarantula that would be fine with these temps over a long period, please don't get a spider if you're gonna keep it in the 60s
>>
>>2659460
i do agree with that, in regards to long term low temps
but theyre really not that fragile, iv never had a winter death
only my G pulchripes has retreated to its burrow, im going to transfer it to the micro climate soon anyway.
but most of my Ts are still eating, and even molting.

just watch their behaviour, and adjust accordingly
>>
>>2659446
>>2659460
>>2659479
What do you guys recommend for heating? I heard under tank heaters are bad, and overhead lights could possibly be too hot.
>>
Does anyone keep stick or leaf insects? Do you recommend them?
>>
>>2659552
You heard right, heat mats are the worst possible source of heat for them since they are programmed to dig down if they think it's too hot. Also they unnaturally dry out the bottom layers of the substrate. Avoid them for any invertebrate.

Lights are very easy to adjust so that you get the right temps though. Get some halogen bulbs (35 or 50W, depending on enclosure size), put them into a lamp that you can adjust for height and then just do that until you've found a good distance (get an IR thermometer for like $15, they are super useful). G. pulchra especially will really appreciate some warmer temps actually. At night you can switch off the light of course (put it on a timer), low night temps are natural and no issue.

The best way to heat spiders is just heating the room to a good temperature but I realize that's overkill for a single tarantula.
>>
>>2659692
yes and yes
i had some extatosoma tiaratum but as I'm quite busy right now I only have eurycantha calcarata and phyllium giganteum
always do research on the species you're interested in but many phasmids are relatively easy to keep
>>
>>2659854
Do they reproduce asexually? I heard they can have thousands of eggs without a mate
>>
>>2660040
Not the same guy, but yep. A single healthy female will constantly drop eggs on the bottom of the enclosure, you'll end up with 100s. They take like 5 months to hatch, so you have plenty of time to prepare or line up buyers for the nymphs. A lot of people just freeze them to abort and not deal with it.
>>
>>2660043
Damn that kind of sucks, I don't think I'd want to bother selling but wouldn't have the heart to kill them either. Too bad, they look amazing
>>
J U I C Y
>>
>>2660047
>doesn't have the heart to freeze some eggs
???

Also, there are enough phasmids who are not capable of parthenogenesis, Heteropteryx dilatata being one of them.
>>
>>2660048
IT WAS ALL A DREAM
>>
>>2660051
What can I say, I'm a puss who doesn't like playing god. I used to work in a pet store and the amount of small animals I had to euthanize got to me.
>>
>>2660057
Kek, wasn’t expecting that
>>
I can't wait until more people breed these guys and they lower in price, because I just cannot justify spending nearly £600 on a sling.
>>
New species I'm buying soon - Neostenotarsus sp Suriname
Looks pretty cool in my opinion.

Anyone got much experience with these? From what I know they're pretty rare in the pet trade?
I hear they're quite docile.
>>
>>2660247
That in the pic is an adult female btw. They are a dwarf species.

Just be patient anon, with how they look many people will breed them and the price will come down in 5 years or less.
>>
>>2657222
>(Australia)?
>Should I kill it?
The answer is yes.
Australia is where god put his mistakes, far away from the rest of humanity.
>>
>>2658954
I'd sell my left arm for a Dinomyrmex gigas Queen. Too bad they're rare as fuck and you'd have to venture balls deep in some godforsaken South Asian jungle to even have a low chance to catch one during their nuptial flights.

I think there was one for sale a couple years back but it was like 2000€ if I remember right.

Thinking about it.
What are the rarest/most expensive inverts you know /inv/?
>>
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>>2660391
I've once seen a shop offer juvenile Birgus latro for like 800 bucks. I imagine adults would be a whole lot more epxensive.
>>
>>2658954
The Costa Rican Chrysina, any large Buprestid. My absolute dream species would be Toxodera though, any of them.

I will get them some day too. Either go myself and collect some ooths or pay some brown kid to do it for me.

>>2660391
>What are the rarest/most expensive inverts you know /inv/?
Probably still the Metallyticus splendidus. They are not getting any cheaper or more common it seems, you need to be quite dedicated to breed them.
>>
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>>2660399
>My absolute dream species would be Toxodera though, any of them.
Insecthaus has been recently posting pics and videos of Toxodera maxima nymphs, which I presume he hatched from an imported ooth or something. So maybe there's hope.
>>
>>2660404
They have been imported and hatched several times, but they always die.

Also if I can avoid it I don't want to buy from this self absorbed kid.
>>
>>2660393
These things can really fuck shit up.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIRfCoauxbo
>>
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>>2658954
>>
>>2660428
dude, honeypot ants are popular to keep. Go find yourself a queen m8
>>
>>2660411
poor bird must have already been dying, imagine your last moments being crushed slowly by a giant crab
>>
>>2660073
first guy here, as he said, you can take phasmids that do reproduce sexually
it just limits your choice on species
>>
>>2657801
I hate moths with a burning passion. They're sch annoying cunts. They're the only insect other than ants I find inside and black flies that I kill on-sight.
>>
>>2660459
Unless you're in the deep southern US or Australian outback you won't find a honeypot Queen.
>>
>>2660994
>Unless you are where the ants live you won't find the ants
Well no shit. But if you want a queen, consider taking a road trip.
>>
>>2658954
Marine isopods would be neat. I'm sure there's plenty of species that would do well in captivity.
>>
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>Psalmopoeus irminia
Anyone have experience with these? They look wicked.
>>
>>2661186
Yo

A good species, provided you're familiar with arboreal and defensive type tarantulas.
I wouldn't call them aggressive, just it's pretty easy to get them riled up - and they're not shy when it comes to biting.
They're also really fast.

They LOVE the dark, so if you decide to get one, I'd recommend putting some black paper on some of the sides of your tank.

Other than that - they're nice spiders. Eat a lot. Grow fast.
>>
>>2661189
Also forgot to add - only the females look bright and colourful.
The males are more dull, greyish.

So you might want to buy a sexed juvenile/sub-adult than a sling if it's the colours you like most.
>>
>>2661191
The male I had looked just as vibrant and colorful until his ultimate molt. The problem is that the ultimate molt comes really really quickly
>>
>>2661186
The only thing I have to add to what the others have said is that some of them are really really shy and very hidden while others, like mine, are fairly visible and come out often.

It's a bit of a gamble with them and I can see how it's disappointing when you don't see this spider in months.
>>
>>2660724
https://www.newscientist.com/article/2152805-giant-coconut-crab-sneaks-up-on-a-sleeping-bird-and-kills-it/

The bird was sleeping in its nest up on a tree and got dunked by the crab.
>>
>>2660391
I keep Dryococelus australis, Lamprima insularis, and Panesthia lata if that counts?
>>
>>2660391
Camponotus gigas (Not used to the new classification yet) are awful for captivity. Knew someone on a forum whi managed to import quite a few and just couldnt get them to take. They stress really easily and seem extremely susceptible to death from stress.
>>
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>>2657801
What makes you say that?
>>
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>it's a giant house spider charges toward your feet at full speed while you're on the toilet episode
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>>2658371
>>
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>>2659356
They are predators that will eat any invertebrate it is strong enough to seize.
>>
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It was this fast, lads. Came from under the door and scared the shit out of me.
>>2661652
>>
I'd pay an obscene amount of money some Liphistiidae species
Just look at this beast
>>
>>2661704
That can't be natural. That's got to be some breeder fuckery, right?
>>
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>>2661704
Why would you want a trapdoor spider? You would only get to see it for a split second when feeding.
>>
>>2661664
neato. Bigger than I was thinking
>>
Look at this stunner.
>>
>>2661132
It's illegal to move ant queens between states in the US and in a lot of countries it's illegal to export or import them.
>>
>>2661720
ya I would think a trapdoor would be taking the 'pet fernature' meme to the limit
>>
>>
>>2661734
Yeah I know, I'm not the one wanting an exotic ant species.
I'm just saying if you want one, go get one. Cops don't usually check people to make sure they arent smuggling ants.
>>
>>2661728
scientific name?
>>
Are hermit crabs expensive/hard to upkeep? I'm a college student and while I'm certainly not oozing with money, I have enough on the side to get them if they don't require a whole lot, plus crabs are my favorite animal.
>>
>>2661850
hermit crab industry is pretty unethical. you should get moon crab, a tarantula or a beginner freshwater fish.
>>
>>2661896
Moon crabs are also unethical and very hard to keep properly. And you absolutely never see them.
>>
>>2661900
well that sucks. a crayfish then
>>
>>2661717
Nope, Malaysian Trapdoor spider

>>2661720
>>2661752

You can encourage them to make their traps near the side of their enclosure, thus = you get to see them all the time.

I don't currently have any trapdoors atm, but when I did, I would use transparent tubes, and place them next to the side of the enclosure.

Didn't always work of course, sometimes the spider was all "fuck it" and made their own, but more often than not they were happy to use these tubes.

Also, occasionally I'd use items like pictured.
I tend to find most trapdoors preferred the tubes (probably because they're narrower) but sometimes they'd use this.
>>
>>2661974
The transparent tubes I used were somewhat like this.
I'm not sure what they're exactly called in English, I think they're plumbing materials however.

But basically, they are flexible tubes that don't have a perfectly smooth texture (so the spider can grip onto them).

But yeah, I've had a fair amount of success with these, because I think a spider would prefer not to have to expend energy and just use existing "burrows" if they can?
>>
>>2661850
vampire crabs are easy to keep and reproduce in captivity

as the others have said hermit crabs are pretty unethical since they are all wild caught, also they really are a lot of work compared to other inverts
>>
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First adult Eremiaphila!

Wew these grow quick
>>
>>2660411
Well Tamatoa hasn't always been this glam
>>
>>2661844
Hoggicosa bicolor
>>
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*blocks your path*
>>
>>2661985
>vampire crabs
I'm pretty dumb when it comes to animal breeds and hadn't heard of these before but they're basically my ideal pet, thank you so much anon :)
>>
>>2662088
species, not breeds
>>
>>2661998
Thanks man, effin beautiful
>>
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Wow no one posted the monarchs of the inverty world? I think they're totally tubular
>>
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>>2662256
ssssllluuuurrrppp
>>
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>>2661631
>death from stress.

I've seen this a lot but 99% of inverts don't feel "stress". They'll die if you don't give them the right conditions or if they're sick.

Stress is just a meme word for saying "lol I dunno why they died"
>>
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my little guy just molted 2 hours ago,he looks like lapis
>>
>>2662413
Don't hold the little dude so soon, let his exoskeleton harden up.
>>
>>2661805
I wouldn't recommend it. You're right that cops aren't likely to check your bag for ant queens, but it's actually pretty common that ant collectors get stopped by police, park rangers, or property owners. Poking around in the middle of nowhere tends to look suspicious. If you're from out of state and get stopped, there is a slight but very real chance you might be accused of breaking a federal law. It's also worth noting that these rules are actually enforced more strictly than you might imagine in the Southwest. They take conservation laws pretty seriously.
>>
>>2661725
Pic related is a bit of an exception, most are much smaller preying mostly on mites.
>>
>>2662413
>molted 2 hours ago
>on arm
My nuts just jumped into my stomach man.
>>
>>2662413
you stupid cunt
>>
>>2662413
[classic /invert/ General overreaction to Tarantula handling]
>>
>>2662871
It's two hours after a molt dude, that is definitely too soon.
>>
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These melt my heart :3
>>
>>2662941
They're like chibi mantids
>>
I'm thinking of getting a Vietnamese giant centipede. What are they like? I head centipedes in general are kind of jerks.
>>
>>2663036
They are and their venom will send you straight to living hell. Even Coyote Peterson couldn't take it.
>>
>>2663036
Have you any experience with centipedes?

They're fast, aggressive and their bite is incredibly painful.
If you don't have experience with fast and potentially dangerous animals - don't get one.
>>
>>2663053
I once heard a story about someone being bit by a centipede in South Asia, and the pain was so intense, they plunged the hand that didn't get bit in a bucket of boiling water, just to distract from the bite pain.

That's probably an exaggeration/made up story - there is a lot of exaggeration when it comes to centipedes - but their venom really is no joke.
I know someone that got tagged by a Scolopendra mutilans and I swear, his hand doubled in size. He said the actually bite wasn't so painful, but that was scary to see.

I'd imagine a bigger centipede could do more damage.
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>>2663060
I should add that the centipede that bit him was fairly small - a 9 inch individual.

Centipedes are really interesting, but some of them are hellbeasts for sure
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>>2663036
I assume you mean Scolopendra subspinipes, or something belonging to that species complex.

They are nervous and defensive, very fast and people usually don't know any of the warnings they show before biting. The venom is extremely painful but not lethal or systemic.

They are also escape artists so they require a well planned setup and experienced keeper that makes no mistakes during maintenance or the chance that they will escape is high.

Absolutely not a beginner animal, get something else if you have no experience with inverts.

>>2663054
They are not aggressive.

>>2663062
Scolopendra mutilans gets to around 20 cm (7.8") and not bigger than that.
People love to exaggerate the size of pedes. S. dehaani might rarely get to 22 to 25 cm, S. gigantea and galapagoensis can reach 30cm (absolute maximum is one individual that was measured to be 35) but usually stay around 22 to 25 too.
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>>2663074
>Scolopendra mutilans gets to around 20 cm (7.8")
Sorry, you're absolutely right - I meant cm rather than inches.
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>>2661896
>>2661900
Vampire crabs are the answer.
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>>2663054
what do you keep to get practice for centipedes then? old world tarantulas?
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>>2663110
Both are fast, secretive, and defensive, so I would guess so.




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