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/diy/ - Do It Yourself



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Didn't see one in the catalogue; I shall correct that.


I bought some padauk and walnut to make a tongue drum out of today. But I'm not finding any good answers on what I should finish it with. Obviously not any sort of poly. I have paste wax, BLO, and shellac on-hand.

Any ideas? Does it even matter?
>>
Behlen makes a descent acoustic guitar sealer and lacquer. Cellulose paint will give you a great look but you might only fine them at model shops. Even better is you have an air brush. If you want more of a natural look and want the wood fraud to shine then stick with old fashion linseed oil. It smell good, dries in 15 mins or less then you can use a sandable sealer, maybe a light water based lacquer, 1-2 coats, light sanding up to (800-1000 grit) buff the fuck out. Maybe skip the lacquer...
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Thoughts on Jet Bandsaw? Kiwifag so options are extremely limited
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>>1240763
The aesthetic 14 inch one.
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>>1240750
If you want full DIY then I recommend using coffee staining with bee's wax as the sealer. It is super easy to make. Just make some coffee and apply some of it using a rag. Once dry coat with bee's wax. You can make all manner of stains other than coffee if you wish. Most just require sourcing the stuff and boiling it in water. Like the green pericarp/husk of walnuts or vinegar and rusty metal or even berries/juice.

>Does it even matter?

Yes. The more natural a product is, the less you have to worry about when handling it.
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>>1240763
>options are extremely limited

Coping saw.
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I want to make a walnut case for my LED display and its driver.
I can only design the plans for the case, I own zero woodworking tools.
Will it cost me 9000000001 USD to get someone to CNC route a slab of walnut for me? It's just a couple of extrusions and I can fit the display driver and lcd in. Sure it'll take a few screws and a hinge but those I can manage.
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>>1240822
This is really good advice. You seem erudite. What other hobbies do you cultivate?
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Just made this but I'm wondering if I also should also put some varnish inside the mug. I'll coat it at the end with some natural bee wax but I'm afraid that putting wood varnish might get me sick when I drink what's inside.

Also, does someone know how I can do to restrain the rope from unraveling in lot of thread?
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>>1242532
I wouldn't put anything inside other than food safe wax.
>>
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>>1242532
You need to use a different type of rope and it needs to be multiple ply, not single ply. Jute cord works pretty well, but when you put it on, you need to keep twisting it so that the cord is properly tight. Once you have it in place, run a lighter over it to get rid of stray ends. Because it is multi-ply, it will resist making more stray threads.

This is what jute cord looks like without having the stray threads burned off. They are much softer than the stuff in your image so they don't feel prickly and didn't need to be removed for these.

Yeah, don't put anything on the inside of the mug that isn't food safe. Be sparing with the wax, you won't need much. I personally wouldn't put anything on the inside.
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>>1242552
>>1242532
I forgot to add, very nice looking mug.
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>>1242536
>>1242552
I see I'll just use beewax then, the interior of the mug will be a bit lighter than the outside but it's better this than getting sick!

Also thanks for the advice about ropes, I didn't know much about it. I won't make the same mistake on the next one.
>>1242554
Thanks!
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>>1242503
>Will it cost me 9000000001 USD to get someone to CNC route a slab of walnut for me?

It shouldn't, especially if it's a single setup worth of machining.

I'd offer to do it myself if I wasn't about to tear my router apart for a major tune-up.
>>
>>1242565
Make a paste wax instead.
Mix melted beeswax with some mineral oil, 5050 mix should do just fine. Mineral oil is food safe, it'll help the application process as the mix is way easier to smear than a solid block of wax, and it penetrates very well to give longer lasting seal.
You can even use a heat gun on the smeared wax paste to get the wood to really suck it up in an instant.
Apply once a week for a month, then once a month for 6 months, and you'll have yourself an immortal mug.

If you just want to buy something, look for something called salad bowl finish.
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>>1240750
Tru-Oil is the best wood finish known to man.

Do a thin base coat in shellac for an improved moisture barrier.
>>
>>1242532
99% of wood finishes are food safe once fully cured. (Exception: those that contain lead) Unless it flakes off and you swallow the flakes, which shouldn't be an issue with a mug.

I'd go with shellac. The stuff is literally food. It's what they coat M+Ms and gelcaps with. Dissolves in alcohol though.

Epoxy resin will be the most permanent and watertight.
>>
Anyone here ise an RAS? I just got one, and it's actually really nice to rip on. I know and understand the inherent danger, but it's giving me good results(i can actually get it into the basement unlike a cast iron top cabinet saw). I'm going to make a fence with adjustable featherboards. About to buy a dado stack today and stock for a book shelf.

If anyone here uses one, what blades do you prefer. Mine is a 10 inch, I believe.
>>
I dont know if i should ask here but, anyone know some site with projects for cutting wood with a laser cut machine? better if they are in some vector format.
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>>1242532
That is, without a doubt, the ugliest looking mug I have ever seen in my entire life.
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>>1242503
Why not just make a mitered frame that wraps over the edge of the screen and is deep enough to house the driver behind it? Would use relatively little wood and make it pretty easy to make.
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>>1244909
Sure it'd be easier but it wouldn't be as good looking as I envisioned.
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>>1240822
>Yes. The more natural a product is, the less you have to worry about when handling it.
I use olive oil for a food-grade finish.
It really brings out the color in cherry.
I've also toasted oak to make it darker, using a counter-top convection oven.
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>>1246033
Olive oil polymerizes if you bake it to about 350, but it never dries otherwise. Rancid wood is icky.
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>>1242532
tried and true makes some food safe finishes. that would work with a few coats.
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>>1240822
like arsenic - totally natural - use it as an ice cram topping.
>>
>tfw too poor to buy tools and rent a shop.

How you make it lads?
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What do you guys think of my new miter saw table?
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>>1247515
Not entirely horrible, just cringey from all the dewalt tools and shitty mitre saw. I'd recomend turning those slots into draws and making some cupboards for under the bench. When you really get into woodworking you'll understand just how much of a cunt dust is.
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>>1247518
He doesnt recognize the prize saw there...

feel free to look up the model number.
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>>1247518
>When you really get into woodworking you'll understand just how much of a cunt dust is.

Woodworkers don't know the horrors of dust. Ya'll fancy bastards get to work with real wood and shit.

You ever routed out pieces of MDF? Being basically dust glued together, turning it once more into dust produces a dust to transcend all other dust.
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>>1247529
You fags don't know dust until you get into turning raw hardwood from your backyard into shit.
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>>1247531
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>>1247534
note the dust behind the baton.
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>>1247535
By the time I finished turning all of the pieces from this tree, I had(ve) like 3 contractor size garbage bags filled with shavings for firestarting.
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>>1247535
nice dildo. how much?
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>>1247535

Weak shit. Imagine that same pile, except, instead of shavings, it's just this. Literally nothing but this.

MDF is the actual devil. Even the worst hardwoods can't compete.
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>>1247560
Fine sure, but I measure my shaving by the pound.

Besides, I'll raise your mdf dust with fiberglass/epoxy dust. I do experimental rocketry and I have about a gallon ziplock full of this dust, its some nasty shit. Like Instant silicosis bad. The first time I sanded down a body tube I did it in my shop, which has the furnace and it pumped the glass dust through the entire house.

I swear I'm still cleaning it up.
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Need to bleach out an old color. It barely responds to bleach and it's immune to oxalic acid. It penetrates about 1/4" deep into the wood so sanding it out is impossible. It must be a dye and not a pigment. What do.
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>Bought ikea table
>Top is dirty
Pic before.
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Pic after sand paper and bistrot vernis x2.
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>>1247587

>take all your wood dust, make paste and coat
>do several times until you are sure you can not see any off colors
>do more coats
>rough sand
>seal to glue dust to piece
>sand properly
>seal properly
>>
>>1249016

>literally using MDF as a finish for real wood

Abso-fucking-lutely disgusting.
>>
>>1242532
That's cool.
Saved.
>>
First time posting here, hope this is the right thread. I have a wooden table (no idea what type of wood) that I want to color black/dark grey without it losing its vein. It's currently varnished, but it has lost a lot of color on one side due to direct sunlight. Is sanding it first, then staining it black and then applying oil the right way to go? Could you recommend any materials I should use? (I'm sorry if I used any wrong terms to describe what I want to do, English is not my first language and woodworking was not part of my English education)
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>>1249201
>without it losing its vein

I assume you mean "grain"?

If so, then, yes, sand it to bare wood, stain it, and then finish it with whatever you want. If it's a soft wood (or porous hard wood), you may want to use a stain conditioner to keep it from getting blotchy.
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>>1251037
>>1251001
I just read up on chemical staining with ammonia, do you think this would be an option too?
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>>1251001

After staining it dark, finish it with spar urethane, it's designed to protect from sunlight.
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>>1251090
Sunlight is not really an issue anymore as it will stand at a different place without direct sunlight. I just want it to lose as much of its natural brown color and make it black or dark grey instead.
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>>1240750
You don't want shellac or cellulose either. This is a percussion instrument. Oil and wax, bro.
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>>1242532
You absolutely need some sealing to prevent mold and bacteria growth in the wood. There are plenty of food safe poly or acryllic or even epoxy compounds. You want to use one.
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>>1240750
Was looking into stabilizing wood and wikihow listed the salt paste method. Basically, dry wood out, apply paste made of 1 gallon water, 3 cups table salt, 3 egg whites, and enough cornstarch to give it a cake batter consistency. Paint it on, leave it for a couple days/weeks to cure, then finish it as desired. I looked around, but didn't really find any other websites talking about this method. Does anyone have experience doing this/can anyone speak to the efficacy of this method?
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>>1253133
Forgot link.
http://m.wikihow.com/Stabilize-Wood?amp=1
Can't apologize for phone posting, laptop is tits up right now.
>>
I need help building a wooden table. It needs to be as flat as possible, within reason.

I have the parts to build the Mostly Printed CNC. Its just a CNC router project I am gonna cut wood and maybe laser engrave with. Its not TOO critical but it important enough.

Like throw a straight edge on it and see little to no light tolerances.

How would you do it just using like 2x4s and MDF or particle board from the hardware store?

I already built one and it was flat, but after a few months the top warped and was off by like a 1/4
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>>1253179
This is what the guy who designed it uses as a table
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>>1253179
>Like throw a straight edge on it and see little to no light tolerances.

That's actually really fuckin' flat. Assuming it's a decent straightedge, that trick will show irregularities down to around 0.002" or so.

Anyway, you don't need to make it that flat. It can flatten itself, assuming your axes are straight. That, of course, is the trick. In my case, I made a torsion box (rigidity is critical for any machine tool) and then cast the beds for the rails out of slow-curing epoxy. Seems to have worked pretty well (pic highly related; pretty damn flat), with the caveat that it's basically impossible to get them coplanar. If you're using round linear bearings, however, that isn't really an issue as long as they're not visibly way off.

If you stick with the shitty unsupported rail design that the MP CNC uses, you don't really have to do anything other than make sure the corners are approximately the same height via a water level (which is literally just a tube with water in it).


Don't use 2x4s if you want it to stay flat. MDF is the material of choice for this because, even though it sucks in every other way, it does have the all-important trait that it has no grain. Therefore, it will expand and contract evenly without warping. Same for particleboard, though that's much less popular. Not entirely sure why.
>>
>>1253179

2x4s aren't usually totally dry from the store. They won't change dimensions much length-wise but they'll shift in all other directions, so you don't want to screw the top into the edge of boards or it'll pull it out of flat. Try completely sealing the top piece with fiberglass followed by epoxy finish, or you could probably get by with just the epoxy finish. MDF is incredibly moisture sensitive, but you can use that method to totally waterproof plywood for aquarium building, so I imagine it would work well for MDF too.
>>
>>1253179
2x4 frame with 1 foot spacing on top, screw a piece of good quality 3/4 ply down to the frame, good quality means cabinet grade not the plytanium type stuff they put on outside of houses. screw your MPCNC to the plywood and then put a 1/2 inch waste board on top inside the cutting area then run a cut file to level that waste board and youll have a flat top that is vertically level with the MPCNC.
>>
>>1253179
Also protip using a RAMPS board for MPCNC is bullshit, it really sucks when you are doing non-3dprint type stuff like 2.5 axis cutting, On mine i use 12v 0-3A adjustable stepper drivers with a separate controller and i use Mach3 to do cutting. Which means you can actually use dynamic clearing, adjustments for different cutters in your CAM program and you can run your stepper motors at their full power. Using a Ramps board you can only get half power on standard Nema17 steppers because the drivers are running two motors per axis. Or you have to run parallel wiring and you loose torque at higher cut speeds.
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>>1253179
Torsion box is what you want.
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Joints like this .. wouldn't the part marked in red be really weak and snap off easily? I really like thinking about woodworking joints but a lot of the time I decide my ideas wouldn't work despite having very little experience.
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>>1254589
It could (though not as easily as you might suspect), but that's partially an aesthetic joint. It's not meant to be super strong so much as be adequately strong along while looking good.

If glued, it should actually be pretty strong, even if that bit was gone completely.
>>
>>1254589
What is it supporting? A cup of tea or an aircraft carrier?
>>
Why should I not use the tenon of a stretcher as a drawbore dowel for another stretcher meeting the same leg at a right angle?
>>
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So attached is my first dovetail. It is lined up properly, but loose. When I cut it, both the male and female parts were oversized. AKA, the slot was tight, and the finger was big. As such, it needed finely finished on both sides to fit. I made these adjustments with a mixture of files and my chisels, but I wasn't able to reliably adjust the size of them so now there are low spots that leave gaps when assembled. It's kind of hard to explain. It fits tight, but there are gaps in some areas.

Anyways, any ideas on how to better go about the dovetails? Is it just a matter of fucking a dozen up?
>>
>>1256215
>Is it just a matter of fucking a dozen up?
Yes, pretty much. Start with it oversized (which you did) and very slowly trim it down to fit the notch. If you're removing too much at once, or in the wrong place, and you end up with gaps, that's basically a matter of practice. Forget speed to start - that's also a thing of practice. Also, you can fit the joint while it's *slightly* oversized - just enough that you need a mallet to fit it together. This will compress the fibers of the wood and guarantee a gapless fit.Don't make it so oversized that it splits though.

For bonus points, make the notch/tail first and use it to mark the tail/notch, instead of laying both out ahead of time. Easier for a novice, in case your first cuts go stray from your layout.

Things I noticed in your pic that may help out-
>bottom of notch is not square
>tail is too short (may be related to shoulders pulling it out)
>shoulders of tail are not square
>>
>>1247534
There are still surfaces visible in their own colour in that shot, that's not dusty.
>>
>>1244891
speak for yourself anon, i think shes beautiful
>>
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What YouTuber has a good intro video to woodworking? I've seen a few and it seems like a interesting hobby to get into
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>>1256215
hey did u follow a guide or a youtube video or something to do this?
>>
>>1253199
>2x4s aren't usually totally dry from the store

I want to build a few things, I was going to use 2x4s

If I spend the extra money and buy the "kiln dried S4S" pieces of wood, will they be much better?
>>
>>1240750
What is that? A goatse box?
>>
>>1256383
Well I just made a cad doc of a dovetail to the dimensions I wanted, then printed 1:1 scale copies of the joint. Then, pulled the ink off the paper with scotch tape. I stuck the tape to the wood, and followed the lines with a scalpel to transfer the lines to the wood.

I don't have the spare cash right now for a proper gauge.


>>1256255
Thank you very much! I'll try making the tail and marking the notch to fit on my next one. Thank you for your help, I really appreciate it.
>>
>>1256383
>>1256433

oh- i don't really know what any of that is. did you follow a guide or youtube video or something to get instructions?
>>
>>1256442
No.
>>
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>>1256442
Ok so pretty much I do all of my plans in cad software. I jump between Solidworks and Creo, Creo if it involves any machining, or a lot of compound curves. For everything else, Solidworks.

I model every single component for my projects. This allows me to then map out components on my boards in order to cut as efficiently as possible, and gives me a way to get nearly perfect cost estimations.

Also, for anything that requires precisely placed holes, or scroll saw work, I can print 1:1 scale templates, and use spray adhesive to attach directly onto my boards.

Pic related are the components for my current project.
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>>1256489
Pic related is the dovetailtemplate I made for the component I showed earlier. I can precisely map out my lines in the modeling software.
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>>1256491
And lastly, I can print off the template in 1:1 scale, which allows me to transfer my design directly to my project.
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>>1256442
>>1256491
oh that's pretty cool.
>>
>>1256374
Paul Sellers.

Also, Paul Sellers.

If you like power tools, Steve Ramsey.
>>
>>1256412
They will reach working dryness faster. Doesn't mean it will be better.

Wood dries on it's own over time. 2 weeks sitting in your shop should be enough to dry a 2x4 to where it's workable, unless it was full green in the store, then you'll want a month.
>>
>>1256504
Even still, you can DIY a kiln. Get the 2" green foam insulation board at lowes. Build a box of it w/ plywood. Then use the coils from a toaster and a blower fan and some ducting to circulate the air inside past the coils. Use a thermister and an arduino to control the temp and keep it steady.

<$50 and you can dry green wood in 3-4 days. I use it whenever I mill any hardwood into turning blanks from trees that fall in the spring.
>>
>>1253179
>I already built one and it was flat, but after a few months the top warped and was off by like a 1/4

Just fucking plane it down flat goddamn
>>
>>1256596
Planing MDF doesnt work well
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>>1256600
If you are making furniture out of MDF you don't deserve a good result.
>>
>>1256621
This.

.75" birch is what, $50 for a 4x8? You cheap fuck. You are doing a CNC router and you cant spend an extra $30 to make a far superior table?

Let me guess, your going to assemble it with nails instead of screws too, so you can save a few bucks?
>>
>>1256622
3/4 birch ply that comes 4x8 is different than the holy grail soviet birch that comes 5x5
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>>1256700
If only tools exist which allowed the cutting of wood.
>>
hey guys, im a beginner joiner, does some of you have some projects that could help me progress?
>>
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Anyone know anything about wood veneers? There are no antique restorers anywhere around here so I have to do this myself (unless I sell it and make it someone else's problem)
This has been sitting around in an attic or garage for some 150 years and the wood has discolored in some places, but not all. I want the wood veneer to be uniform in color like its supposed to. The first pic shows the part with the lenses, which has darkened, and the base part which is lighter and closer to what the wood must have originally looked like.
I've scrubbed the darker parts with Pledge furniture cleaner/polish and they are slowly getting lighter, but its still too noticeable. I can't stain the lighter areas dark because they are too polished/lacquered.
Is there something heavy duty I can use that won't damage the wood? Should I just keep wiping it with Pledge?
>>
>>1256700
Same price, although you gotta pay shipping

http://www.publiclumber.com/store/pc/3-4-x5-x5-Baltic-Birch-48p21.htm
>>
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i want to mount some hooks on a stained board to put my helmet and boots on. i have no tools and don't want any. can i just sand the edges of a board and get a reasonably decent rounding on the edge like in pic related, or will it look awful?
>>
>>1256794
Yes, but find something you can use as a sanding block with the concave side of the roundover. Just walk around the hardware store and find something that has the right shape.

DESU though, really consider how much you value your time. Are you okay with spending several hours sanding, or would you rather buy a used router for $30 and a roundover bit for $10?
>>
>>1256809
i'm pretty bored today so some menial labor is just what i need.
>>
>>1256769
That's not going to come out without a bleaching chemical, which you do *not* want to use on something that old unless you plan on doing a complete restoration. tldr, there is no simple fix.

Check out Bob Flexner's blog for random info about restoring wood.

FYI, pledge is just soap + silicone oil. It doesn't do anything to stains, it just makes shit shiny.
>>
>>1256794
Sandpaper, rasps, files, planes, and routers will all produce the same results, it's just a matter of how much time you want to spend. And how steady your hand is :P If you are Gud, you can even use a pocketknife.
>>
>>1256743
Not the point I was trying to make.

>>1256780
http://www.rockler.com/how-to/difference-baltic-veneer-birch-plywood/
>>
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>>1256828
Hi fags, how would you go about milling this into turning blanks?
>>
>>1242532
Poly is food safe. It's inert when cured. Salad bowl finish is just poly repackaged.

That said, most wooden mug makers have moved to using a "two part medical grade resin" - which in English means epoxy. But then, most of their buyers are stupid hippies. (Stupid BC of the terminology - epoxy is fine for coating). Plus you don't have to put on several coats like you do with poly.

A two part with a spray activator would probably work best. Can coat thoroughly and evenly then spray to harden.

But really, several thin coats of poly forms a nice plastic interior.
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>>1257027
Chainsaw or a large crosscut saw.
>>
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>>1257065
my chainsaw bar is only 16" ):

This is going to be interesting.
>>
make a sticky with a reading list you fags

t. new woodworker




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