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I dont have a circular saw.
I would like a circular saw.
Corded or cordless? It would be for casual stuff around the house. I have some ryobi batteries already. Is the Skil saw in pic related a good deal or are their better for the value?
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I prefer corded for home use just because I might not use it for 6 months and batteries will be flat by then.
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>>1254919
Corded
I was actually going to recommend that Porter Cable in the picture, its good for the price
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>>1254919
I have a Milwaukee M18 brushless.

If I were ripping through plywood all day long, every day of the week, I'd have a corded saw.

For my occasional use as a homeowner/contract work, cordless adds convenience.

The 9 amp-hour battery will go the better part of a day under moderate use. The 5's (and even the smaller ones) still fit and work while the 9's charging.

If you're already invested in a battery system, go with a tool for that system.
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>>1254927
>For my occasional use as a homeowner/contract work, cordless adds convenience.

For the homeowner who rarely uses it, cordless is less convenient because the batteries are always going to be dead
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>>1254919

Corded tools have more balls behind them.
but not being bound by a cord + extension cord is nice.

I have one of each. A corded saw for when im gonna be sawing heavy duty stuff or sawing a lot and a cordless one for lighter duty work, if im only gonna make a few cuts or if im going to do some work at a friends house or out on the back of my property or something.

If i could only have 1 i would go corded hands down. but i like me muh saws.

If you are not planing on using it much then there is nothing wrong with the skil or portercable one. I would say portercable over skil in general, however without looking at the product details i will say the laser on the skil is a REALLY nice thing to have.

I have a lot of money is DeWalt 20v cordless tools so i naturally went with that brand for my cordless one. but if you have ryobi batteries then look into that brand if you decide to go cordless. got a friend who has 4 different battery platforms and he has to have a few shelves in his garage dedicated to battery and charger storage.
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Thanks for the input guys.
>>1254937
When I got my house I invested in some ryobi tools for the battery and pricepoint of the tools but I come to realize that you cant go cordless in some instances i.e., leaf blower. Wasn't sure if circ saw was the same but it seems split. I'm going to settle for a corded for now and add a cordless if i ever feel the need.
I liked the Skil saw since it had the laser but in reality I just want best bang for my buck at around $50 USD. I live in Canada but can ship to another address in the USA (hence amazon.com). Here's one a bit out of price bracket but on clearance for 99 CAD. probably overkill for my needs though.
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It's generally easier to find left blade cordless and right blade corded. I prefer left blade, and I move around a lot so I mainly use a cordless. I have plenty of 5ah batteries that are always charged. If i'm cutting sheets all day I may reach for a corded. I use a chop saw most of the time for lumber. I also prefer cordless because they have brakes that stop the blade from spinning when the switch is off.

I own a Milwaukee cordless, but I like Dewalt cordless as well.
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>>1254919
I got a used Skil, corded, and it's great for the thrice a year I use it
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>>1254937
>Corded tools have more balls behind them.
Ideally all your balls should be behind your power tools
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>>1254955
I've only ever used right blade but I feel like a left blade would be more comfy. I have ryobi 4ah battery and a couple of 1.2ah. Would a cordless make sense if I have a 4ah then?
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corded dewalt magnesium here
cordless circular saw are meme
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>>1254919
Cordless circular saws are a joke. Make one or two cuts in a piece of plywood and it's gone unless you already have a $100 battery.
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>>1254919
mitre saw and table saw if you want straight cuts
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>>1255008
If you're using the harbor freight special or an old nicad battery then yeah. I replaced the subfloor in my kitchen and bathroom on one battery, way more than 2 cuts. Albeit, I do have the highest amp hour battery available, but I probably could have got by just barely with half the capacity.

Even when I was on a crew almost a decade ago we'd more than that with nicads, unless the temperature was above 85 or below 45.....but battery tech has come a long way since then.
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I have both from Dewalt. 60V cordless and the magnesium corded. I use the 60V cordless one 90% of the time. It's incredibly handy to go anywhere with it. I have trouble telling the difference between the two. I would not use a 20V model though. 60V > Corded > 20V
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>>1255048
>op wants a cheap saw
>buy this $300 60v saw with one battery!
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>>1254927
I bought a whole set of the Milwaukee Fuel brushless tools. love them. weren't cheap, but between the brushless having more power, and the lithium having longer battery life, these tools work better than any battery-operated tools I've used in the past, and are a genuine corded replacement, IMO.
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>>1254933
bullshit. i've got my battery on the charger, and it's ready when i need it. even the spare that's not sitting on the charger is always ready to go with 4 bars.
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>>1254919
corded

used off CL

I saw a nice version of pic related a while ago and should have got it....terrific model
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Somewhat related, I want to build a panel saw. I'd mainly use it for cutting aluminum sheets with thickness around 5mm and under and some wood, maybe occasional steel.
>should I just use a handheld circular mounted on or it's better to use a small-ish induction motor?
>What sawblade? Probably around 250mm 60T+ with carbide inserts, although initially was considering going smaller blade dia just to get more torque
>why are fucking V-belt pulleys so expensive?
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>>1255095
>i've got my battery on the charger, and it's ready when i need it.

Thats one way to destroy your nice and expensive batteries.
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OP here.
Feel like I'm back at square one, I have a 4ah ryobi battery if I go cordless I just don't want it to lack power when I need it for the few times a time. Id work mainly with 2x4 or sheetboard.
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>>1255104
Its only 10amps though
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>>1255140
if you've got a saw that still runs perfectly after 20 years of use, you don't really care what the little writing on the side says
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I need a cordless drill for making holes in various materials, I got about £200 to spend maybe more if it's worth it. Any recommendations on makes or specific drills?
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>>1254919
dude just get a used one on craigslist or a random garage sale or a friend might give one away for free. This is the kind of tool that you should just get used unless you need it for work or something.
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>>1255095
batteries die eventually

corded you can throw in the corner and pick up years later and use
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>>1255139
Cordless circular saws are great if you buy proper ones
Ryobi is great for budget drills

I would never waste the money buying cheap level corded circular saw. Why wear your drills battery out for an under powered circular saw?

You dont want it kicking back when the battery starts to fade
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>>1255336
You should be able to buy into an 18V battery family for the monies, I went for Makita much the same way this summer.

The body only powertools become quite affordable once you've already got 3x3ah batteroes of the same system. I love may impact driver way too much - never would have got one otherwise.
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>>1254955
>chop saw most of the time for lumber. I also prefer cordless because they have brakes that stop the blade from spinning
Wut? My DeWalt compound miter I got in the 90s is corded and has a brake.
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>>1254919
>corded
sub $100 7" blade will handle any job you asked of it and can be kept for a long ass time.
>cordless
A 7" blade here will cost you more especially one that will be comparable in job performance as a corded. Longevity is at the mercy of battery lifespan and or them being discontinued. Sub $100 range here will get you a 5" or 6" blade design which tackles fewer jobs and becomes gimped in performance.

Now im not writing off the cordless but they have their place. You want one circ to handle as much as possible? 'Corded. Not expecting tough jobs and need portability? 'Cordless. If I were in your position I would pick corded as it makes the most sense for your needs. The Skil in your pic will handle practically anything - new deck, new shed, new addition...anything home related.
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If you dont use tools at work then the only chordless thing should be a drill and impact driver. Not worth the cost of batteries and a lifespan of 5 years.

If you do use tools at work then get everything cordless with the same batteries. Except for nailguns, go paslode or go home.
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>>1255139
I have a 2ah lithium Ryobi batteries and they are ridiculous on the saw, I'm the guy that can only make two cuts in a sheet before it gives up. Doing 2x4s is a little better, but you have to go pretty slow and careful to not bog it down.

>>1255138
It's not really relevant with lithiums. It slightly reduces your theoretical maximum life but you're still going to get two or three good years and probably six more of marginal performance before it's almost useless.
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>>1255447
I have some 1.2ah and a 4ah ryobi battery since I have the drills, weed whacker, trimmer and sawzall.
This refurb is a good price and looks good enough for the small projects i have in mind,. See anything wrong with it?
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>>1255488
You could buy a corded Ryobi or skil for $30, and it would be better in almost every way.

http://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Power-Tools-Saws-Circular-Saws/N-5yc1vZc2dc?Ns=P_REP_PRC_MODE%7C0
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I would have to say corded for a first saw. Corded saws maintain steady power so not having to worry if you're going to have to charge up is worth it at home. As far as brands go The skil is fine but I prefer the ridgid 7 1/4. I use both at work but only bought the cordless for doing small cuts or using in areas that are tight. I work in burnt out houses with no power so not having to break out the generator and everything comes in handy when it's relatively simple.
TL;DR corded
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>>1254946

Cordless saws can do some ripping before the battery dies.

My carpenters prefer the cordless saws even when working with green heart (hardest commercially available wood at the moment).

We only tend to use the corded saws when we set up a specific work station on a site
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>>1254933
Who doesn't charge the spare battery ready to swap out when you need it? Swap in spare, put the dead one on the charger while you work. Done.
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>>1254919
Makita for corded, Milwaukee for cordless.
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>>1255599
they deplete retard
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I prefer cordless. I hate carrying cords up and down stairs and from one place to another.
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>>1254919
When I got started, I bought fairly cheap stuff. Not junk, but usually pawn shop stuff. If I had to buy retail, my budget was always 2 x [cheapest available retail tool] +- 10%. That usually meant I got a decent tool for dicking about and didn't spend far too much. If I ever used it until it wore out then I knew I could safely buy a better/more expensive model and it wouldn't be wasted.
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>>1254919
OP here. Going to get this for 40cad. Looks alright.
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Battery op for casual homeowner type use. If youre doing something more extensive and plan on cutting 2x's all day then go with a corded. Avoid the cheapest models regardless of anything else. Middle tier is good for the avg homeowner.
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Cordless tools add convenience, but they sacrifice power and longevity, and are usually a lot more expensive when you factor batteries into it.

Regardless of how well you take care of the tool, all of your batteries will inevitably run down over time and have to be replaced. Good luck trying to buy spare batteries for your tools 15 years in the future when they have been replaced by newer technology and the manufacturers don't allow them to be backwards compatible with your old tools.

So you just have to ask yourself if the convenience and cost is worth it to you.

I personally see no reason to ever buy a cordless circular saw. The only exception is would be a professional carpenter that is working on a new building that doesn't have power, but if that were the case, there should be a generator there too.
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>>1255934
Good choice. A good combo IMO is a 7" corded with a cheap 5" cordless to handle the quick easy cuts. You have ryobi batteries so pick up a $25 5" cordless circ instead of trying to get a $60+ one that'll handle at most medium cuts. The performance/price curve is much steeper with cordless.
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>>1255488
I have this, do not buy it unless you like wasting your time because it takes fucking forever to cut through anything with it. it just doesn't have the wattage
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>>1256443
explain.
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>>1256463
Cordless circular saws have a terrible reputation for a reason
If you arent buying a proper high end one, expect it to be garbage
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>>1256473
My bad i thought you meant
>>1255934
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>>1256463
it doesn't have enough power. takes about 20 seconds to cut through a 2x4 with mine because the motor stalls if you go any faster. mine is an older model but it's still the "one plus 18v" batteries and the housing looks similar except for the colors.
this doesn't happen with any of my corded saws using the same blades but they're old as fuck so maybe saws these days are just shit but I doubt it.
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>>1256478
>20 seconds to go through a 2x4
I wonder if i can handsaw faster than that.
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>>1254919

How come no one is posting the superior west coast style of circular saw?
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>>1256501
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>>1255383
Cordless circular saw, just saying i normally don't use the skilsaw for lumber.
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>>1254933
So much this. Just get the corded one.

For the average home builder it really doesn't matter if it's brush or brushless. Just get whatever non-harborfreight saw is on sale.
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>>1256501
Weight. Unless you are building a house it's entirely unnecessary.

OP, cordless circ saws are a joke. The only battery powered saw worth a fuck is the reciprocating, and its only good for demo.
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OP here, I got the craftsman >>1255934. I'll pick up a cheap ryobi cordless for easy cuts as some of you suggested as a combo to a heavy 7" corded saw.




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