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Is the brand trash or good enough for the occasional DIY job?
>>
>>1255764
Its not the best but better than your walmart black and decker garbage for sure
>>
>>1255768
If I get a couple of extra 2. Ah batteries would that be fine for general work around the house?
>>
>>1255764
I bought a full package (18v) a couple of years ago.
Circular saw, reciprocating saw, drill, impact driver, oscillating multitool, flashlight, 20 min charger, two 2.5ah batteries and a soft case (zippered bag) ~$225
I do maintenance work and they are used daily.
All have held up well and I don't have any complaints about power.
I bought two extra batteries (4ah) when I got the tools.
I recently decided I wanted a small lightweight pole saw and chainsaw.
>getting old and my Stihl pole saw is a bitch to handle for very long when fully extended.
>my 40yo ProMAC 55 is great but often too much saw for a really small job.
I got a Ryobi 18v pole saw with an extender tube and battery for $100.
I got a Ryobi 18v, 10-inch chainsaw with a battery and charger for $125.
I'm well-pleased with the new tools too. I've used the crap out of both of them.

>would recommend to a friend
>would buy again
>>
>>1255770
>If I get a couple of extra 2. Ah batteries would that be fine for general work around the house?
If you have one more battery than you have tools you'll have enough.
You can still use both tools while the extra battery is charging.
If you find you're running one tool down faster than the other you can swap batteries between tools.
>>
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>>1255764
>Is the brand trash or good enough
First, a little background.
Ryobi is a Japanese company that makes all kinds of stuff, but they _don't _ make the Home Depot Ryobi tools.
Instead Techtronic Industries (from China) makes these tools, and pays the real Ryobi a licensing fee.
Techtronic also makes Milwaukee and Hoover products, because they bought those companies.
They also make some Craftsman tools under contract for Sears.
It seems really unlikely Ryobi tools are any better (or worse) than Milwaukee, since they come from the same outfit.

In my experience, Harbor Freight sells similar quality tools for FAR less.
In particular, I bought a Ryobi table saw and it's about as good as a flaming bag of dog shit.
Then again, I paid $150 for a table saw (they've raised the price since then).

On the plus side, Home Depot does the warranty repairs right there in the store, so you don't have to ship the thing back to China.
>>
>>1255794
Compared to some of the combo packs available at home Depot the harbor freight stuff is way more expensive
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>>1255764
My father runs his tools pretty hard. He's not a contractor or construction worker, but he's constantly building various barns, extensions, structures, etc. He likes these Ryobi ones a lot. I do too, but I dont out anywhere near the hours on mine as he does his.

The battery pack has stayed the same forever. The tools themselves are durable and get the work done (plenty of torque/power within reason), but do expect to replace them occasionally. Other than that, there's nothing much to say.

The trick is to buy the bulk packs that go on sale about once a year at Home Depot or the like. You get a new set of tools, a couple batteries, and a charger for the price you would pay for two battery packs off-sale. Even if you don't need the tools, it's always good to have spares and beaters, and it always helps to have more batteries.
>>
>>1255764
The new green Ryobi tools are trash. The old, blue ones were great for the price, but those days are past.

They are better then Harbor Freight, although not by a lot. They'd be fine for Joe Homeowner, but not for anyone who wants to do real work.

Also, the new batteries are interchangeable with the old Blue tools, so if you have those, it may be worth getting a set just to upgrade to LI batteries.
>>
>>1255764
You can prob pick up a dewalt combo for the same price on sale. I'd suggest you wait.
>>
>>1255764
I've had lots of Ryobi tools since they first brought out their One+ line. They still have grades within the line too. My first set had a circular saw that was weak crap. I recently upgraded it to one of the new versions and it's much better. Since they all use the same batteries I've accumulated three of the lithium batteries and two of the new chargers. The tools are decent enough but the long backwards compatibility bought my loyalty. At this point I look at Ryobi first since I can often buy just the tool without the battery and save some $$
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>>1255847
>The new green Ryobi tools are trash. The old, blue ones were great for the price, but those days are past.

This is exactly opposite of my experience.
I had some of the blue ones over the years when I used woodworking tools all day professionally and they really sucked.
Things like on off switches would constantly fail and I was always taking them apart on jobsites to bypass for a permanantly on tool (you had to unplug them to turn them off after this hack)
The new green stuff is about the quality porter cable was 10 years ago.
All tools have gotten better and the worst ones have come the farthest because they were so horrible to start with.

Years ago anyone who bought cheap tools was a fool who was headed for failure.
Not true today.
>>
>>1255969
>Things like on off switches would constantly fail
on mine, it was the battery contacts inside the tool
>>
>>1255859
>They still have grades within the line too
There are several different nut-drivers (all 18v) that look similar but have quite different specs.
>>
>>1255764
The Ryobi drills are very good for the price.
They are popular on here and on youtube for a reason.
>>
>>1255794
>It seems really unlikely Ryobi tools are any better (or worse) than Milwaukee, since they come from the same outfit.

Thats a lot of conjecture and projecting, especially from a guy who is sucking harbor freight cock.
Half of the power tools harbor freight sells break the first time you use them

The ONLY argument anyone ever has against Ryobi is "made in china!" and "I hate milwaukee!"

I guess Mac, Stanley, and Proto tools are all exactly the same because they all are the same company too!

You sound more and more retarded every time you post this horse shit.
>>
>>1255770
I'd recommend getting the 30 minute battery/charger combo. Charges in the time it take to wear down your old battery
>>
Anyone else in the thread work at Home Depot? What do your contractors think of ryobi?
More pertinent to the thread, I've found ryobi to be the most underrated brand they sell, I've drilled holes in steel and concrete with their cordless tools, that's all I ask to see come out of a cheapie
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>>1255999
>for a reason.
what is shilling
>>
>>1256014
>what is shilling

Or because they are cheap and they work well
Nobody does paid promotions to review them. Only Dewalt does that shit
>>
>>1255969
Eh. I have the green tools, I put thier batteries in my blue tools, which are about 12 years old. Can't argue with success.

DESU, by "tools" I mean "drill." Most of the green tools are actually ok, except for the drill, which has a chuck from hell. Fucker won't stay closed to save it's life - or mine. The saws are actually improved over the old blue versions though.
>>
I use them as a maintenance plumber.
The tools have been fine for the last 5 years, the batteries only last a couple of years though.

The warranty on the new tools is pretty good.

I wouldn't recommend them for all day/everyday use.
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>>1256008
I've worked in returns for the last 2 years. The only bad tools I've seen are the basic drills you find in the combo packs. The 18v drills with metal chucks and the impact drivers with the tri-led and metal gearbox never get returned. I got one impact back that was 3 years old once, but it was literally broken in half. It looked as if it had been thrown off a few roofs and then run over with a truck. It still worked, but the handle was snapped in half.

I've taken several of the batteries apart. Most of the batteries use 1.5Ah cells from LG chem, this includes the 40V batteries as well as the 18v. The exception is the big 4Ah battery, which uses much better Samsung 20Q cells. The 4Ah battery is a great deal in the 2 for $99 package you'll find during most holiday sales. The P102 battery is a piece of junk, with 1.3Ah cells (also from LG chem) and a mild BMS problem that causes them to deactivate prematurely. The pack deactivates itself at a very high voltage threshold, so a brand new battery that's been used once and been allowed to self-discharge for a day or so away from the charger will read as defective. No other Ryobi battery comes close to the 4Ah pack's durability or current capacity.

It's usually easier to sell contractors on the orange tools, or the red ones. Orange tools get new batteries when they fail, if they're properly registered, and service when they break. I've seen tools from the '90s come back and get repaired.

If you buy the HDPP on your green tools, you'll most likely get a gift card to replace them when they fail after the manufacturer's warranty, but lifetime service is included with the orange tools.

I don't know why the red tools are so popular, since TTi makes them all. If you buy from the Depot, you might as well cash in on the lifetime warranty on the orange tools.
>>
>>1255770

I use to use them for hotel maintenance. They got used everyday and took some hits.

The only thing I didn't like is that the spindle on the grinder and chuck on the hammer drill didn't run true
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>>1255855
wrong. not even close.
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>>1255764
Definitely good enough for the occasional diy job. I really like mine. I don't really beat on them too hard but you probably wouldn't either
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>>1255764
TRASH. SHIT. The mark of a homeowner who doesn't know anything or a hack who will fuck your house up.
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>>1256332
had no problem at all with them for the last 10 years, even took one to work for three years.
>>
>>1256332
Perfect for a homeowner but yeah, if a contractor showed up at my house with green tools it would be a red flag for sure
>>
>>1255794
Milwaukee tools are made to a higher degree of quality than Ryobi ones, so it's like comparing Volkswagen to Audi. There's a price difference for a reason, and that reason isn't just TTI leeching off brand loyalty. Milwaukee drills typically have pretty damn good chucks, which is more than most people in this thread can say about their Ryobi drills.
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>>1256332
>The mark of a homeowner who doesn't know anything or a hack who will fuck your house up.

Yes goy, spend more money to impress some mexican on the internet
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>>1255794
>chink company bought Hoover
Fuck, now what am I supposed to do?
Dyson?
>>
>>1256588
Hoover has been garbage for 2 decades
>>
>>1255764
someone gifted me a set with a drill, reciprocating saw, circular saw, and flashlight, all cordless. I give them light to medium usage. The drill is okay, but it's basically an enormous screwgun. It's fine for wood but it won't drill metal. The reciprocating saw has been surprisingly useful and is my favorite out of them all. I've gone through thin sections of metal with it with no problems, cut up tons of firewood, it'll go through nails no problem if you're cutting up pallets or something. I cut the exhaust off an old car with it very easily. The cutting head doesn't rotate is the only downside. The circular saw has been awful for me no matter what blade I use, the saw always binds and stalls the motor unless you saw very slowly.

Drill is fine if you don't need to drill metal with it. I find myself working on rusty cars for more often than doing any drilling in wood and the ryobi drill can't drill out bolts whatsoever. reciprocating saw is surprisingly great, avoid their circular saw.

I like their batteries a lot, they charge quickly and have had good battery life for my usage. I'm sure any brand with lithium batteries is the same though.
>>
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Pic related. All that timber (45x190mm pine) was cut with a Ryobi 165mm cordless saw and assembled using a Ryobi impact driver for the 170mm long self drilling screws. Fully charged 4AH battery in each. Still had charge in the saw when all the cuts were done, but ran out with maybe 1/3 of the screws to go with the impact.

The saw is quite sensitive to blade binding (it'll stop at a hint of grab) but using a square is the no-brainer solution to this. Thinking of buying the larger cordless and brushless 184mm saw simply because it has the motor on the left hand side like most corded saws, which I'm more used to.
>>
Better than dewalt so there's that.
>>
>>1255764
It's perfect for that or home grade stuff. Cheap lineup. I have the drill,impact,sawzall, trimmer and wheedwacker. Nice that it's 1battery for all.
>>
>>1255764
>the occasional DIY job?
Yep
I've had a few of the corded Ryobi tools over the last 2-3 years simply for that DIY/hobby things, there's really nothing wrong with it and haven't had anything shit the bed. At this far along they're so damn cheap the cost of replacing something that died would really only be the inconvenience of getting another.

Cordless stuff, kind of hard to say as the batteries all tend to come from about the same 2-3 factories, so it really comes down to how well they're assembled and the peripheral chargers look after them, but that's hardly a rocket surgery science lesson today.
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>>1256541
This. Milwaukee is top of the line right now I think in mid tier cordless tools. But they are expensive.

Dewalt and Makita are good options as well.
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>>1256564
Fuck off.
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>>1257115
Quite some bait you've got there.
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>>1257175
I was serious every dewalt i hve used has craped out on me in one use
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>>1257213
Statistically that says more about you than it does about DeWalt.
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>>1257213
My drill has been working fine for 7 years now. Dropped that fucker 20ft on to a cement flood and it didn’t even scratch it. Original batteries too
>>
>>1257616
>flood
Floor
>>
>>1257611
Put in 10 hours on new dewalt drill dies 100+ hours on makita drill still good. 3 hours on dewalt sander dies 20+ hours festool sander still good. Pick up dewalt skillsaw shoots sparks. Makita skillsaw still good after cutting subfloor for 5 houses.
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>>1257631
Well, Makita is considered marginally better than DeWalt since it's not made in China, and Festool definitely is, though your tools definitely are dying prematurely. You got your money back, right? By the sounds of things, your tools are under some level of stress, and I guarantee that a Ryobi will have a lower build-quality than a DeWalt. It might not necessarily have the same susceptibilities to the same failure modes that your DeWalts had, but averaged over a few hundred people doing a variety of tasks and you should see DeWalts being able to take more abuse than Ryobis.
>>
>>1257631
Sound like you need to learn how to use tools properly.
>>
>>1257633
>Makita is considered marginally better than DeWalt since it's not made in China

Dude, Dewalt is made in Mexico and Makita absolutely is made in china. What are you talking about?
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>>1257633
I use my tools every day inside and outside sometimes outside of the manufacturers recommend parameters. I have used tools from almost every brand on the jobsite. In my experience ryobi are underpowered but as reliable as better brands.
>>1257644
Brand seems to matter more than made in china different manufacturers have different standards for tolerances and materials.
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>>1257688
>Brand seems to matter more than made in china different manufacturers have different standards for tolerances and materials.

I agree, which is why its a load of horse shit when people whine about country of origin. China makes most of the internal parts no matter what country its put together at
>>
They are great for diy projects
>>
Electrician for 10 years hear.

This is the brand i recommend to every layman that asks. I've seen tradesmen use them out in the feild, and while I never would, they seem to hold up very well.

They're certainly worth the money and the average DIY-er should get plenty of mileage out of them.

For the love of god, just don't store the batteries on the charger.
>>
Carpenter here. Don't listen to >>1257728. Electricians are known to pound their apprentice boyholes on break time.
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>>1256332

Lots of electricians, tilers, and cabinet installers, use Ryobi drills.

Their drills are some of the best deals for people who don't need a lot of specialty tools or power.

If the carpenter or brick mason was using them, then you're right about that being a major red flag.
>>
>>1257760
Honestly, I just say get some craftsman drills and screw guns. The shits last forever & they'll be gone once sears bankrupts
>>
I've been using that drill for home improvement projects and works well
>>
>>1257767
I had a craftsman drill, impact, and light set. Older NiMH 19.2V batteries.
For a typical homeowner it was okay. The impact was pretty solid, never had any issues with it.

I did kill two drills though.

Replaced that with a Milwaukee M18 brushless. No regerts about that upgrade.
>>
>>1255764
I've used the impact wrenches until the brushes have burned out. That's two years of riding them hard. They're a good tool. The Dewalts pack more kick, but the lower torque and speed lets me get away with using an impact where you'd normally have to switch to the driver. No, the brushes cannot easily be replaced.

The ryobi jigsaw is harder on the surface of material than I'd like. I find it tends to worm up the wood more than the better dewalt.

The Ryobi router works well. The plastic depth adjustment is a bit frustrating to fuss with, otherwise it's solid.

Their bateries are universal, so any generation is compatable! Probably the best feature. I use the double capacity weedwacker battery for about everything.

Good for diy, a few items can hack professional usage, some items are a waste of plastic. At least get a Rigid if you need a table or miter saw.

>>1255969
I found the switch failed secondary to the old brushes.

>>1256077
I've seen the same samsung cells in laptops, these drills, and other brand's. I think the battery management system on these is shit. Once you lose a cell, it's barely worth the hastle of repair even if you have the cells on hand. But yeah, the fact that other brands charge double for the same five pack of 18650s is a joke to me.
>>
>>1257688
Perhaps the lower power means there's less stress on the tool? Did your DeWalts die because they overheated from reefing on them too hard?

>how to make a drill that people won't break during use:
>remove motor
>>
>>1256509
>if a contractor showed up at my house with green tools it would be a red flag for sure
What about the other green?
>>
>>1256588
>Dyson?
Sucks money out of your wallet even better than it sucks dust off your floor

Their cordless vacs are great but way too expensive
>>
>>1258005
I have a green drill for my wife to use around the house but i have makita in my work van.
>>
>>1257631
Yeah you’re doing something seriously wrong. That our you’re just talking out your ass
>>
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>>1255764
I picked up the set with drill, recip saw, circ saw, and flashlight when I bought my house around Christmas two years ago when it was on sale for $130.
Drill: Strong AF, will strip screws no problem, has a bit of chuck wobble that might be my fault
Recip saw: Also surprisingly strong, I've cut through branches thicker than the length of the blade with it, IDK about durability though
Cric saw: Works fine when perfectly straight but binds easily. I've cut 2X6s and 3/4" plywood with it, it's the only one of the three main tools that feels underpowered
Flashlight: Self explanatory
My verdict: It's an insane deal for the average homeowner. I got 3 decent tools and two batteries for 130 and they do not feel like toys.
>>
I'm in the market for a drill, only for DIY and car work but I want something decent. I was looking at this but if there's any more recommendations feel free to comment, don't want to spend more than £300 though really
https://www.screwfix.com/p/dewalt-dcd796d2-gb-18v-2-0ah-li-ion-xr-brushless-cordless-combi-drill/6114j
>>
>>1258111
If you don't know enough to interpret the ad then you probably don't need a £300 drill
>>
>>1258193
Watch me faggot
>>
>>1258204
Ok but I'll buy 6 tools and a few batteries for that price and get it as much use out of them as you will
>>
>>1258088
that stuff is sketch

The drill is weak imo. I wouldn't even go for that zall. Anytime you go for the zall, shit has already hit the fan and you need to rip something tough to cut apart.

Some people like battery circular saws, but it's torque and clean cuts that I'm looking for. So the worm drives almost always win out.

Still if you get $130 of work out the the gear, then you're ahead.
>>
>>1256541
Volkswagen: Volkswagen
Audi: Expensive Volkswagen
>>
>>1259167
>Audi: Expensive Volkswagen
with a couple fancy bits tacked on to make you feel that maybe it's worth paying twice as much for
>>
Can't beat them for the price. I have 1 cordless driver of theirs and we use a few of their grinders at the shop. No real complaints save for battery life. Keep an extra or maybe even 2 so you can swap them. They charge quick so you'll always have one ready to go
>>
It's good enough.

I have a cordless drill from them, and it's not failed me yet. I'm reluctant to actually buy into the ryobi ecosystem, they work, sure, but I figure I do well enough that one of these days I'll get around to buying a nice set from makita or something, but for now I get by with corded tools.

>>1255794
>In my experience, Harbor Freight sells similar quality tools for FAR less.

Eh? Harbor Freight's Hercules drill retails like $109 vs $99 for the Ryobi, both with 2 batteries and a charger. The Hercules is 20V vs 18, sure, but at least if you go with the ryobi, you can get other tools that use the same batteries. Harbor freight can be had 20% off most days, sure, but if you go on amazon, you can get bare ryobi drills for $30-50, and if you don't care about getting off-brand chinesium, there's knockoff batteries available for cheap.

Harbor Freight's prices haven't impressed me much for years now.
>>
>>1259398
>Harbor freight can be had 20% off most days

They are excluding pretty much everything you might actually buy from the coupons nowadays. Hercules is explicitly not eligible for the coupon, neither is earthquake, predator, bauer and all of the other "higher end" names they fabricated.

Harbor freight seems to be trying to make higher priced but decent quality homeowner tools and move away from the coupon on trash tools deal
>>
>>1259167
Of course
A Chevy Malibu is the same as a Cadillac CTS
>>
>>1259398
>The Hercules is 20V vs 18
20 under load is 18. 18 at rest is 20.
>>
>>1255786
>I recently decided I wanted a small lightweight pole saw and chainsaw.

yeah, i got a Ryobi pole chain saw as well. i mostly needed it to trim Crepe Myrtle and pear limbs off the neighbor trees that reach over the fence. it does this job just fine. but then i took it to my dad's house to trim some limbs off of an oak tree that is too close to the roof and some utility lines. medium size limbs were plowed through slow and steady, but the battery that came with the saw wasn't up to the job on two levels. first, probably less than an amp-hour of power. second, it got a bit warm, and the charger had to wait on the battery to cool down before recharging so that the lithium doesn't catch on fire.

so, a decent tool for small jobs. less than adequate for large jobs, but if you've got more time than money and aren't trying to make a living with it, it's bearable.
>>
>>1255764
I've had one for 5 years probably. The factory chuck was a crappy gripper but after I replaced it with a better one it was all good.
>>
>>1255764
I'm a professional house remodeler and ryobi is the only brand I trust. Ive found it cheaper to replace all of my nailers with hot glue guns.
>>
>>1255794
>In my experience, Harbor Freight sells similar quality tools for FAR less.
The vast majority of Harbor Freight stuff is garbage, and I honestly cannot see touching many of their power tools at all.

You also left out that Techtronic makes RIGID power tools at Home Depot too.
>>
>>1259167
There's a bit of a difference, I wont say to justify the price but there is a difference, a more accurate example....
Toyota: Toyota
Lexus: Expensive Toyota
>>
>>1261014
Hows your swollen balls treating you ?
>>
>>1261014
you work for one of those cable tv shows where they have a budget of like $1000 to totally white trash up someone's home?
>>
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>>1261024
>RIGID
I swear this must be the same dude who can't spell just posting in every thread. Just like your girlfriend, its missing a good sized D.

Not that their power tools are anything special. Their plumbing tools are still the gold standard though.
>>
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>>1261014
do you always ask for a shot of black at the paint department ?
>>
>>1255794
I see this post is old, but anyone who can compare Ryobi to HF deserves eternal unironic shitposts.

Sure, it's not DeWalt™ brand DeWalt™, but it is much better than harbor freight garbage. This comes from someone who used a HF impact for a year as a daily for work. Dark times.
>>
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>>1255764
We used them at work on a regular basis. Some of the tools were a little beat or missing plastic latches, but they still worked. For home use I actually use Ridgid because fuck dealing with dead cells. Ridgid covers batteries for life as well as the tools so long as you aren't retarded and register them. I also buy tools from Harbor Freight. I bought a variable speed disc sander that was on sale that I liked and an oscillating multi tools for $5 with a coupon. I got it to cut a bolt head off and it sucked ass, but I started to use the cordless ryobi one at work for drywall work and the thing was amazing. Now I kinda wish mine were cordless, but for $5 I can't really complain.
>>
>>1258056
>for my wife
pretty sure those Hitachis are white.
>>
>>1259499

Really makes you think
>>
>>1255764
I've been a handyman for the last twelve+ years. I use Ryobi tools. I've been using the same ryobi drill for the last...I don't know, five years?

I've never had a ryobi tool fail on me on the job.

They aren't the best. The table saw is a pain to get to cut true.

But they've outlasted every member of my family's Dewalts. None of which are used by people on their day jobs.
>>
>>1256509
Handyman here. Fuck you, you judgemental cunt.
>>
>>1261851

Really makes you realise how American's are so susceptible to marketing that shit like that actually exists.

>Latter half of 2017
>They are already selling cars from 2018
>They are advertising cars from 2019

>I just gave you 20 gallons!
>Rubs hand maniacally
>20 babby gallons
>>
>>1262474
Its human nature
>>
>>1262456
Professional doll house builder?
>>
>>1262651
Isn't anonymity wonderful?
You can say shit to someone you'd never consider saying face-to-face.
>>
>>1256077
>>I don't know why the red tools are so popular, since TTi makes them all.
Most power of anything you can get at Lowe's/Home Depot, pretty consistently. If not the very top, one of the top. That said, some of their tools lack in the finesse that other brands have. Jigsaw is a bulky bricky brick, and I returned my M18 oscillating tool, but I'm very pleased with my PC and DeWalt corded ones. Top tier batteries, warranty second only to a registered Ridgid warranty, on par with Kobalt, plus they cover shipping both ways.




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