[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/diy/ - Do It Yourself



Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.



File: 4-types-tubular-locks.png (28 KB, 570x249)
28 KB
28 KB PNG
So I've been learning picking locks over the past 4 years or so, and I'm thinking of branching out to the cylinder/drum locks now. I'm no expert of course, but my skill with deadbolt and the basic styles of padlock (like, with few security pins) has increased quite a bit, where I'm able to pick my house door within a couple minutes.
I watched a few videos on cylinder picking tools and they seem fun and easy.

What I'm not sure about is which tool to get?

I know the 10pin variety of cylinder locks are apparently quite rare. But should I get a 7 pin or 8 pin? Also, is there a tool which can do both? I'd like to just get 1 thing, of course. Can an 8 pin also do 7 pin? Is there a "does it all" picking tool? I've searched a bit but didn't get a real clear answer. Hopefully someone on here knows picking and can help!
>>
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4rCUK5K6wwY

It varies. Sometimes they make them at nonstandard sizes to thwart common impressioning tools. Check out LockpickingLawyer on youtube.
>>
>>1290814
interesting, i had a look at this set, i wondered why they were so cheap, where the southord ones would run me almost 200$
>>
File: Oxy-AcetyleneCutter.jpg (690 KB, 1704x2272)
690 KB
690 KB JPG
>>1290788
>Is there a "does it all" picking tool?

yes
>>
>>1290840
lol. i've done it that way...
>>
Xxx
>>
>>1290788
>>
Cylinder locks are fairly basic to pick, believe it or not. I can pick one with nothing but a pen.
>>
>>1290896
Once opened, do you need to "re-pick" it to get it to shut again? I know with my deadbolt, for example, when I single pin pick it, and open it, i need to pick it all over again to close it.
>>
Why do people learn to pick locks as a hobby? It just seems like it's such an impractical thing that you'd almost never need to do unless you're a professional locksmith or a criminal.
>>
>>1290840

yes because nobody will notice you carrying this montrosity around and using it on a lock
>>
>>1291171
Who cares if you're seen, you're doing it as a hobby or a job, right?
RIGHT?...
Because i'll tell you this now, I'm not about to teach a nigger how to break into my house.
>>
>>1291100
Technically, if its a 7 pin, you would need to re pick it 7 times for it to shut again. However the picking tool retains its shape and can be locked in place so this is usually negated
>>
>>1291166
Well for me there are a lot of locks in my life. Not sure why it worked out that way but, cottages, sheds, tool boxes, etc. It's not that unheard of to find yourself in a "ah shit i grabbed the wrong key set/forgot the keys to my uncles shed and need to mow the lawn here" etc. So i picked up a set just to see how it worked. I carry it on me quite often now, and surprisingly have helped a number of random people who were locked out, etc.
Oddly enough, i sort of doubt many criminals have picks/ability to pick where i am. Seems much more common for them to simply smash a window or something.
Just for example, there was a filing cabinet that was laying around since i was a kid, last summer I had a few beer and messed around trying to pick it, actually got it open after a while. Was really satisfying. Inside were some old comics and baseball cards... Not highly valuable but still fun to check out. Didn't need to destroy the cabinet/lock on it either, and big surprise, there was a spare key in the top drawer.
>>
>>1290896
Only the cheap ones.
>>
>>1291166
>>1291187
think people just like feeling they're doing something they shouldn't or to know they could break into somewhere but they can do it legally just as a hobby
>>
>>1291166
I got a set and learned how to pick simple locks because all my family and friends have at some point locked themselves out, or needed something retrieved for them when they couldn't make it back home. I've used it for that a couple times this past year.
Also practicing keeps my hands occupied while watching a movie or show.
>>
>>1291166
Surely you're joking, Mr. feynman
>>
>>1291305
It's like knitting, it's a nice hobby that keeps your attention, has some level of skill, and some real practical applications (working in an office, I've picked no fewer than 10 filing cabinet / desk locks, saving money on replacing furniture or calling a locksmith). On top of that, there's some sudo-science to these types of hobbies to helping prevent dementia or altimeters.

But really, it's fucking empowering knowing that only expensive locks require more than a few seconds of picking to break... and the majority of locks in everyday life as basic as shit.
>>
>>1291337
altimeters lmao
>>
>>1291171

Why does it matter if you're seen, Jamal?
>>
>>1291341
hahahaha autocorrect and I didn't even check.
>>
>>1290834
They're fairly shitty. The Southord ones are excellent. Dunno about other countries, but i just have the 7 pin version and it's all I ever find (UK)
>>
>>1291166
It's just fun and engages you. Quite addictive.
>>
>>1291344
But then there'll be po-pos and rubberneckers and I'll hafta work and run faster. I don't like that.
>>
>>1291166
I started because I wanted to do all sorts of naughty sneek breeki things as teenagers are wont to do, but I kept at because it's just an engaging thing to do while idle, especially with ADHD. It's kind of like those wrought iron puzzles, but a bit more practical if it comes down to it.
>>1291337
Yeah, this basically. It's something that keeps your hands and brain engaged, and if you aren't being urgent about it, you can easily absorb a movie or lecture at the same time.
>>
>>1291359
Yeah southord is kind of the brand name from what i've researched. My regular picks are sparrows and even though its a simple small kit, i find them really good. I went with a really basic kit because i was told it would be harder to pick with, and thus more challenging.
I might just bite the bullet and get southord combo 7pin and 8pin set i guess...

>>1291380

Another reason i enjoy it, I can kind of absent mindedly mess around with a lock while waiting for something or watching a movie. I had a long trip a while ago and picking during that was a great way to pass the time...beats chainsmoking or something.


Op here by the way. In my searching the past day or so, I also looked into Jigglers... Any anons have any input on those? I've heard they're fairly useless for any car that isn't some 1990's shitbox or something... Do they open non automotive double sided locks as well? Or would it require a different set of jigglers for each kind of lock? (like one for fords, one for toyota, one for padlocks?)
>>
I wish I would have known how to pick locks when I got locked out when I was locked out of my house. Had to rip a screen off and force a window (breaking that locking mechanism) up then hop in to let my dogs out. Their faces when I crawled through a window above their crate was worth it.
>>
>>1291166
>or a criminal.
This, why wouldn't I steal if I can easily get away with it?
I remember when I was 19 and first learned how to pick locks, going out at night and opening all the cigarette machines and the like in my small town because they all had those basic locks. Made a lot of cash.
>>
>>1291166
It was recommended as physical therapy after wrist surgery
>>
Thinking of picking up lockpicking for urban exploration shit




Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.