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Welcome to /wwg/! Come and let anon tell you how best to handle and polish your wood!

Links;
None, if anyone has some please post ITT

Resources;
Lol none, as above, would be neat if we could get this running with some good info for those who wish to know how best to wield their might wood
>>
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So I am restoring a sideboard I picked up from a deceased estate, I have two questions.

Top of pic related; My retard daughter left an icecream container she used to change the oil on her bike on top of the cabinet, leaving this mark. I have found a few guides that state to use detergent and turps to soak it out, letting it dry in between, and repeating till gone. Does this seem legit?

Bottom of pic related; After sanding the old varnish off the doors, I noticed there were dents and gouges in the wood that still had varnish in them. No biggie I thought, I'll hit them with paint stripper and clean them out, pic related was the result. Before I commit to paint stripping the whole thing, do we think this discolouration will affect the final varnish? I only ask because the rest has been sanded and to have the doors match the rest I'd likely need to hit the rest with paint stripper, which will be a bit of a cunt.

Cheers anons.
>>
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No project right now, but I do like planing for no reason.
>>
>>1325531
>do we think this discolouration will affect the final varnish?
I wouldn't risk it, if you're going to the effort of restoring an item you should do it properly. Strip the lot then sand. Whats the item?
>>
>>1325614
You make me want to finish setting up my plane. Found a No. 4, Soviet made Stanley knockoff, cleaned everything, oiled, squared the sole - still need to square the iron. Fucker is hard steel - which I guess will work in my favour once I've squared and sharpened it.
>>
>>1325528
does anyone else own this book?
>>
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>>1325528
Is this a QTDDTOT thread?

If so, hear me out:

I'm going to be building a dining table. It should fit three on each side. I have a circular saw, sander, heavy drill. I'm going to take a look in a local shop tomorrow.

This will be my first project. I'd like some general advise on the basics. The table will be a pretty simple design (probably something like this, although I prefer the look of the top incorporating a frame with boards layed in it like pic related).

I'll take any tips on:
>types of wood
>screws (which to get/avoid)
>etc
>>
>>1325682
Are you using a one-piece table top?

That sort of changes things.
>>
>>1325684
I'm not sure if I misunderstand your question, but I intend to use a couple of boards as a table top similar to this.
>>
>>1325689
How are you going to make sure the sides of the wood are perfectly flat and straight for gluing without some kind of planer?
>>
>>1325696
I kind of assumed the boards you buy at your local shop are pretty straight. I went to get some supplies last time and even though they are probably more expensive than actual wood suppliers because they market themselves for plebs like me, the wood seemed pretty straight. Most of it was sanded down already as well.
>>
>>1325697
As someone who made that mistake not that long ago - no.

They'll be straight-ish, most probably somewhat warped, and, once you get the edges flat enough to be joined with no gaps, you will need to sand the top a fair amount.

I used a power planer to do mine, you could do the same with a hand plane, I suppose. It is doable - just expect to spent half the time you end up needing for the project on this.

Also - get F clamps, for both gluing the table top (and ffs use D3, not regular wood glue), and for attaching it to the apron.
>>
>>1325711
F-clamps are already on my list. Thanks. I guess I'll buy a handplaner, too. Any idea what a fair range would be for a decent quality handplaner? So I know how to avoid the too-cheap-to-be-useful ones.
>>
>>1325726
Someone else can probably comment better than me, I found mine in the attic.

An okay power planer might be at the same price level, so perhaps have a look at those at well, they're not terribly expensive, my only green Bosch tool is my power planer, which is perfectly adequate, and that was like 75 euros (under $100).
>>
>>1325531
Top: Scrubbing with an acetone rag can remove most of the oil from situations like that. I've never gotten 100%, but if you refinish with an oil-based finish, it will blend with the remaining discoloration.

Bottom: You can blend colors after stripping/bleaching but only by custom color matching and mixing your own pigments, or if you have the original stain. Even then ,the blend will never be 100% perfect, maybe just 90%. Probably easier to do a full strip. I suggest citrus strip, you can leave it on the wood longer to soak into the divots.
>>
>>1325682
There's a lot more then it seems that goes into table design, because you have to account for wood expansion. Wood WILL expand and contract over time, very slowly, as the humidity changes. Your joints and design has to account for that or the table will end up looking like a picnic table in a few years, no matter how straight it is when you put it together.

If you want the rustic look or it's outdoor furniture that's fine. Do what other anons suggested and screw it together and power plane it. If you want more then that, I suggest looking for an old woodworking book at a used book store. They are not hard to find.
>>
>>1325653
I saw it in a used bookstore once. I didn't have enough cash to get it, though.
>>
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>>1326618
Can you give me the gist of what sort of things go in accounting/desiging for expansion and contraction?
I take it simply using screws is not the way to make a lasting table? Granted, I'm not really expecting this table to be passed down to my grandchildren, since it will be my first I know it will not be as solid as it could be and probably won't look as nice either. So if it lasts a few years and I can make a new one (with those years of experience) that's fine, still I'd like to at least be aware of what to pay attention to from the start.

I was thinking of attaching the frame to the legs as in pic related.
>>
>>1325531
>my retard daughter
>draws penis on table
The fuck?
>>
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>>1325637
Pic related. Has some nice leadlight in the doors, removed for now while I work. Original varnish was a glorious golden colour till it got molested by 30 years around a heavy smoker, got glimpses of it as I cleaned/stripped it. Going to hit the inside with some feed-n-wax to bring its colours back out. Dead keen to see this finished.

>>1326616
I made my daughter critter hit it with a some turpentine on a rag which seems to have lifted a lot out, there is still a shadow of it that I cannot unsee though. I was planning on an oil based varnish so hopefully that will get it over the line, but I'll grab a tin and try some acetone before just to be sure though. I also ended up biting the bullet and stripping it as you folks suggested which removed the cock from the veneer.

> citrus strip, you can leave it on the wood longer to soak into the divots.
Noted for future, they were a bastard to clean out with chemical stripper, which is just generally nasty shit anyway

>>1326797
If you can't draw a crowd anon, draw dicks on the.. door..
>>
>>1326791
>Can you give me the gist of what sort of things go in accounting/desiging for expansion and contraction?
1. Wood WILL expand and contract over time. This is part of it's physical makeup, and changes in humidity will make it happen. The only question is how much, which will depend on your local weather and how well the wood is sealed.
2. It expands accross the grain (ie, from center of tree outward) but not along the grain (ie, from the bottom to top of tree). So you can control the expansion somewhat by orienting your boards.
3. Screws will eventually loosen. No exceptions. The only question is how long it takes.
4. There are two techniques to control it - constraining it, or leaving space to account for it. Both require real woodworking joinery.

Borrom line, it's not as big a deal as I'm making it unless you want someone to inherit it. Screwing it together is fine, you'll probably get 10-15 years out of it. You'll get more life if you glue the joints in addition to screws, and if you seal it thoroughly (on all sides, not just the top) with either paint (best seal) or several coats of varnish (best look).

Check this out: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYXPl7B1Vpc
>>
>>1326827
Wipe some rubbing alcohol or mineral spirits on the wood to get an idea of what it will look like under a varnish, without damaging the wood permanently. You can also hide discoloration by using a dark-ish wood stain.
>>
>>1325726
>Any idea what a fair range would be for a decent quality handplaner
<30 bucks used if you need to restore it. This is the cheapest way to get quality. >50 bucks used if it's in usable condition. New ones that have any quality at all are well over 100. Go with ebay, or a flea market.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYyV6IUpsYk
>>
I picked up an ""antique"" hand plane at an antique store, how the fuck do I sharpen/restore it? I don't care if it's got a perfect silvery finish and all the painted parts are mirror smooth and in my dream Hello Kitty LoliPunk livery, but I want to be able to use it at all.

I took it apart and got some of the rust off but the blade just won't sharpen no matter how much I attack my whetstone with it. Is the steel just Too Fukken Hard or something? It's chipped and pitted to fuck, too. Was I sold an irreprable lemon?
>>
also why the FUCK do my bar clamps not FUCKING hold anything to my table to work, they just slip immediately, I can pull the fuckers apart with my bare hands despite them supposing to be locked or whatever

why does literally nothing I bring into my house fucking WORK ffs
>>
>>1326968
This is really exaggerated, it is really no where near as complicated as you are making it seem, if it is a frame make it rigid, if it is a panel make it float. A table is a frame made up of legs and apron with a panel for the top, so mortise and tenon the apron into the legs and attach to top with figure 8s or screws through over sized holes. For optimum strength a mortise should be 1/3 the thickness of you stock, you got 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" (2x2) so your mortise should be 1/2." Use 3/4" stock for your apron, that means you have 1/8" shoulders on your tenons, just enough to hide the mortise and give you a clean look. The standard stock sizes tend to work out nice like that for many furniture projects.

>>1326791
This would work, but dowels are weak when it comes down to it. $40 will get you a mortising chisel and a 2x4 to practice on, takes about 30 minutes to get the technique down. Sorby makes a Sash mortise chisel that is a good deal, forget the model number, has a big red impact resistant plastic handle, forget how thick they go up to, both Sorby and Hirsch have mortise chisels in the framing sizes for $60ish, might need to step up to one of those for a table, depends on the table though.

>>1327339
Most likely you bought some of those silly quick grip style clamps, the faces of the clamp are likely not making even contact with the surfaces so they are just baring down on the edge of the pad, the second you put any shear force into the piece clamped or bump the bar it shifts and is no longer clamps. Also bar clamps are not the best clamp for such a job, they are really made for clamping up panels, I like hand screws for that job.
>>
>>1327348
well i dont have any FUCKING MONEY so how the FUCK am i supposed to fix all this scrap wood i have to my big heavy table so i can attack it with a chisel or whatever
>>
>get sandpaper
>try to sand something
>surface is still uneven, even kinda dirty
>floor is covered in sand
woodworking is easy, they said
hobbies are fun, they said
just start doing stuff and it'll come eventually, they said
>>
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>>1327350
With a vice. Or better clamps. Decent tools don't have to be expensive, I can get pic related for cheap, and that's in dollarydoos. I cant see a usable G clamp being more than $5 USD, and if you can't afford $20 for a decent set of 4, then you might have bigger priorities to worry about than a hobby.

>>1326973
I have been wiping down with mineral spirits (turpentine) once I have finished with the 320 grit to get all the dust off. Shit looks glorious. Will be varnishing this weekend.

>>1327352
Sanding is for surface finishing, planes are for smoothing. And if you're getting sand on the floor you're likely using shit paper that has terrible adhesion to the sand. What are you working on?
>>
>>1327355
>What are you working on?
A sandcastle.
>>
>>1327355
yeah poor people arent allowed to have fun or make their own things or even fix their own things
>>
>>1327326
Look up "Restoring the Bench Plane" by everyone's favourite not-grandpa Paul Sellers
>>
>>1327355
Harbor freight clamps are half that price and work very well
>>
>>1327357
Welcome to America, you commie fuck.
>>
>>1327359
>harbor freight
poorfags like (you) should just kill yourselves
>>
>>1327361
Not him, but I'm not entirely sure cheaping out on clamps is a turrible idea.

That's the only tool I've bought chinkshit for, simply due to how many I need (apart from a couple of proper cast iron G clamps) - can't say I regret it. One has failed, 11 are still fine.
>>
>>1327361
Why wouldnt you shop at harbor freight?
Unless you are buying a high end expensive version of a tool, most tools you buy on amazon or at a hardware store are identical

Its private labeling, hardware stores do it, and its surprisingly easy for an individual to do it and sell on Amazon or Ebay too.
You are just literally paying twice the price because its on amazon and some fag put his made up company logo on it.
>>
>>1327362
The clamps are one of their better deals in the store
>>
>>1327363
>Unless you are buying a high end expensive version of a tool,
Why are you not?
>>
>>1327366
Point of diminishing returns when there is only so much disposable money.
>>
>>1327367
Maybe you should try getting more money, poorfag.
>>
>>1327352
git gud
>>
>>1327370
Being responsible with your money is universal across the board.
The only people very loose with their money are the very upper and very lower echelon of people.

Spending every cent that comes in on drugs, or tools, or their car, or video games, or whatever hobby they may have is what "poorfags" do anon.

Suddenly getting a nice pay raise by moving to a new job doesnt suddenly mean responsible spending habits go out the window.
>>
>>1327373
t. poorfag
kill yourself commie
>>
>>1327373
You are right to some extent. I however subscribe to the approach "the miser pays twice", learning from experience cheap crap either doesn't do what you got it for, or breaks.

No one honours warranty, not easily at least, where I am, so that makes a bog difference. On a personal note, I like the idea of heirloom tools.
>>
>>1327375
I agree, I think being informed about your purchases are pretty much the most important thing.

I spend big on things I deem important to spend big on.
I was just trying to help this anon who says his bar clamps dont work, and he accuses me of being poor. Right after he exclaims how he has no money
Baffling.
>>
>>1327377
lmaoing @ all of your lives if you cant afford real clamps and real tools in general

he was right poorfags dont deserve to do woodworking. guilds existed for a reason you fucking commies
>>
>>1327378
>i dont understand communism
>i dont understand budgeting
>i dont understand guilds
>i dont understand proper grammar

At it seems like you dont understand trolling either. Why are you up so late anyways anon?
>>
>>1327380
lol. keep crying about your clamps, poorfag.
>>
Additional question. A side project of mine is simple sanding down a painted closet and repainting it. Should I sand it until the wood shows or like my dad said "until the shiny layer is off" ?

>>1326968
Thanks!

>>1327348
Thank you. I got myself a cheap router, will that do the job just as well?

>>1327339
I got some 9EU/10$ F-clamps and they do the job perfectly well. I'd say ignore the fancy modern looking stuff and test it out in the store.

>>1326976
Good tip, thanks. I got a cheap one for now and it does a bad job, but it gets me far enough to sand it down to something more acceptable looking. I'll invest in an actual usable plane somewhere down the line.
>>
>>1327370
Dumbass.

I own a handyman business. It's job is to make money. If I spend all my money on blingy tools, I don't make any money. The key is to buy the cheapest tool that still gets the job done. Sometimes that means Harbor Freight. Sometimes it doesn't.
>>
>>1327394
Sharpen your plane, and I'm willing to bet it will do it's job just fine.
>>
>>1327601
those are the kids who end up in private equity. don't feed their egos
>>
>>1327359
Realistically they are one of the few tools you can cheap out on, theres fuck all that can go wrong with them. Im ausfag btw, no HF here, but from what I see on the chons Bunnings is on par quality wise.

>>1327632
Filtered
>>
I'm looking for a good way to make a tabletop, but I'm also interested in historical aspects. Anybody have some reading recommendations regarding 17th-19th century carpentry? I'd really like to know what sort of glues and fasteners used to be used
>>
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I'm looking at tables like pic related and I'm thinking of building one because I like the construction of it, but I'd like to know if there's anyway to "frame" the table, so to speak. Like have the ends mitered at 45° angles, but still not have to worry about expansion and contraction. Or is there at least something I can do to give the illusion of a frame around the center boards
>>
>>1327849
dont bother. you dont have the tools to join the planks for the surface. generally they're done with a jointer and biscuit joined together.
>>
>>1328088
>you dont have the tools to join the planks for the surface
My guy all you need is some planes and some saws and chisels for M&Ts
>>
>>1327378
>Gearfags
>>
>>1328088
why not bother? And biscuits are fine if you are in productions and looking to shave pennies, but they are a waste of time and money for one offs.

>>1327849
Just make sure the outer two boards are contrasting to main wood in grain or species and slap some breadboard ends on it. Tops like these are not really framed in, they are just made to look like they are. To do the mitered corners on such a thing would be a trick though, you would need good wood that is well seasoned or accept the occasional gaps between the field and the frame.
>>
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>>1327849
>>
>>1328088
>Using biscuits
>Ever
>When there's worlds of mechanical jointery
Fucking new age plebians. I scoff at you
>>
>>1328244
Yes I understand how it's made, but I was looking for a response like >>1328236 which basically just confirmed what I had initially thought. I was hoping I'd be able to make something like pic related in that regard, but it seems that a flexible filler is necessary if that's the route I choose
>>
>>1325614

I picked up a Stanley Sweetheart #4 last week to learn how to handplane.

It’s really satisfying. I know dem feels.
>>
>>1328169
Where is your wood shop? Faggot. Get off of my thread.
>>
>>1328249
avoiding the gaps in the miters is fairly simple, it is around the center panel that is a trick. Plywood or laminate is the best bet, using a good ply with sawn outer veneers keeps it from looking like ply, or do your own with a solid wood core and a fairly thick veneer applied top and bottom, a four way book match of some sort would be traditional here.

If you want to do it without veneer/ply then this is one of those areas were flat sawn wood best, but it needs to be flat and straight grained. The grain needs to be flat and parallel to the edge on both the quartered edge and the end, this pretty much means you have to glue up a lot of 1 or 2" wide boards for the top to get the grain right. This is also the way to do the solid core for a veneered panel, expansion is through the thickness instead of across the width.

Old bar tops were often made this way, as were any veneered panels, good use for all those narrow rippings, rotate them so the grain is right, glue them up tell the apprentice to make it flat.
>>
>>1328502
>Plywood
>Laminate
>Veneer
What's the point of woodworking then?
>>
>>1328932
Unless you're building high dollar commissioned furniture, building down to a price point is always a concern.
>>
>>1328932
Plywood is a perfectly good option at times, sometimes it is the best option. To use solid wood for the sake of using it is just wasteful.

Lamination allows the creation of many forms which can not normally be executed in wood, and allows the creation of very stable panels so things such as a large panel inside a mitered frame become possible along with many sculptural shapes and tight radius bends.

Sometimes you want to be able to use a nice burl or a particular bit of wood for a table top and there is not enough for a top, so you slice it into veneer.

Veneer historically has been the realm of high end cabinetry and furniture, and is still a big part of it, it was expensive to produce and adds a considerable amount of labor. Rotary cut veneer has made it common for cheap furniture, but rotary cut is a sorry excuse for veneer, a nice bit of flitch sawn veneer in a four piece book match is still a sign of quality furniture. Matching up that book match is not a simple task. trimming those large pieces of veneer so the grain aligns perfectly is quite time consuming and can take hours, one slip can ruin the whole thing. If the wood for the veneer is well chosen and the time was taken to match the grain perfectly the seam disappears and you end up with a quite wonderful bit of impossible grain.
>>
>>1329057
>>1329015
Lol you stupid fucking poorfags. Are you the same nigger who was crying about clamps earlier? Maybe you should try getting a job. Woodworking isn't for the faint of heart. If you're not willing to use proper slabs of old growth hard wood and high grade joinery with no glues, nails, pins, or screws, just fuck off out of this hobby right now. You are not wanted here.
>>
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>>1329015
>building down to a price point is always a concern.
>>
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>>1329959
Excerpt scratched into a recent restoration of a solid jarrah table from an australian primary school. About sums up what I think of you, if you have trouble reading it, thats ok I'll write it here.

Suck my shit cunt dick head.
>>
>>1329973
>defacing antique furniture
>is a phoneposter
>isn't even American
Lol. This is an American website on American servers for American audiences only. Why are you even here? Listed.
>>
>>1329973
>The Australian is the one advocating for fake woodworking
Of fucking course
>>
>>1325682
>This will be my first project. I'd like some general advise on the basics.
Honest advice: start with something simpler and less visible.
I started with cutting landscape timbers to make planters and part of a backyard walkway project.
I made lots of simple stuff, but more importantly, I made stuff that really didn't need to be perfect.
A cat "tree-house", nick-knack shelves, a bookshelf, etc.
>>
>>1327350
>how the FUCK am i supposed to fix all this scrap wood i have to my big heavy table so i can attack it with a chisel or whatever
Sorry, I didn't read the whole thread, so this might not help, but I do a lot of layout, clamping, glueups, etc just by screwing stuff directly to my wooden workbench,
>>
>>1330031
I don't have a drill for pilot holes nor do I have a proper workbench, just a heavy built desk
>>
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>>1330033
>being THIS MUCH of a FUCKING shitter POORFAG
>>
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>>1329959

I don't think so, but I am pretty low on clamps.
>>
>>1330054
>not slab
Lol. Just Lol. Fucking kill yourself poverty nigger. Take >>1330033 with you. :)
>>
>>1325531
If it's solid, I would sand all the way down to fresh wood.

It seems like a lot of work but between a belt sander with 120 paper and palm sander with 22, it'll only take an hour or so to get to something brand new.

Then you can pick your stain and finish with no bs
>>
That look is cool but the top would be impossible to clean.

But some cheap boards that look similar tone, some clamps wide enough to clamp across the table, and a guide for your saw (a clamp that makes your saw cut straight.

Clamp the boards together width-wise on the ground and then put 1x straps across them that don't quite go to the edges and drill them together.

The straps around the edges are just 1x2s cut at a 45 degrees on the ends attached with screws to the top.

Sand the top with a belt sander coarse-fine grit and then finish with a palm sander 220. Do this to lessen the effect of the rounded corners on pre-fab studs.

Use #8 screws or larger, keep the length 1/4"-1/2" short.

Build a simple set of legs like the picture without the curved pieces.

A 45 degree support and the top and bottom wouldn't be a bad idea though- a pocket hole jig and caps would make easy work of this.

Measure the bottom of the legs exactly and then center it on the top and fasten securely.

The only problem with this type of construction is that the wood screws can loosen over time-so use a lot of wood glue.

By then, though, you'll need a new table.
>>
>>1330092
Who are you quoting?
>>
>>1330092
https://www.lowes.com/creative-ideas/kitchen-and-dining/diy-dining-set/project

Borrow some ideas from this.

Lowe's blows but this is useful.
>>
>>1330095
>>1330092
>>1330097

Are for this guy
>>1325682
>>1325682
>>1325682
>>1325682
>>1325682
>>
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>>1330026
>>1330026
Too late, desu.
>>
>>1330199
>butt joints
Get the fuck out of my thread you fucking savage. Don't let me see you here ever again or I'm getting your ass banned.
>>
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>>1330201
But anon-kun, there are rabbets and dowels in there.
>>
>>1330217
Not high grade joinery. Fuck off.
>>
>>1330219
This is the first time I've ever used tools like a circular saw, a router, etc. I didn't even know what half of them did until last week. I would appreciate constructive criticism and advice, though.
>>
>>1330226
> I would appreciate constructive criticism and advice, though.

Realize that most woodworkers are a bunch of pretentious faggots, which is funny because of the inherent low tolerance of woodworking in general.

My best advice? Ignore anyone who whines about joinery
>>
Is there such a thing as a clamp that I can clamp vertically, to my desk, that will prevent work from moving side to side or back or forth so that I can use tools on it safely and effectively instead of having stuff just slide forward as I try to plane or chisel it, or rotate around the clamps or disengage from them entirely as I try to saw into things?? does such a product exist????
>>
>>1330227
I didn't expect a board like /diy/ to be as salty and elitist to newcomers as other boards. Why people have to be opposed to people with similar interests wanting to learn is beyond me.
>>
>>1330230
The board isnt, just certain sects of it
Lord help you if you start a Welding thread
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>>1330228
I believe you mean a (portable) vise.

Protip: place some scrap wood between the grip and the surface.

>>1330230
>>1330199
Ignore those arseholes. There's a fair chance they've never made anything in their life, doesn't take a master craftsman to google "complex joinery" and bitch on a Uighur horsemilk fermentation newsletter.

I tried to mortise&tenon the apron to the legs on my first attempt, with dubious results. It was fun, I learned a lot (such as "number your fucking parts" and "I hate pine"), but I'd probably have acquired a sturdier table with simpler methods (luckily I applied generous amounts of D3 woodglue, so it's probably fine?).

You made a thing - if it's sturdy, it will serve it's purpose, if not - you still make a thing, unlike most people nowadays, and I'm guessing you learned a shitton by doing, and not just theorizing about it - so the next time you make a thing, it'll be even better.

At any rate it's an achievement, have a beer and celebrate.

How's the table top coming along?
>>
>>1330228
no
>>
>>1330228
You haven't killed yourself yet? Lol. Poorfag nigger. Do it already. On cam, preferably. :)
>>
>>1330230
how about you fuck off scrub
>>
>>1330228
kys
y
s
>>
>>1330242
>vise is not above mounting point
won't it torque and spin around when I try to plane or chisel stuff or do literally anything that involves any amount of force along the piece of work clamped in the vise?
>>
>>1330254
If you cannot drill into the surface, that's your best option.

If you can drill, obviously just get a regular vise.
>>
>>1330254
Yes. Don't listen to that shitter. You have to screw pieces directly to your workbench at at least three points.
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>>1330258
>not using proper joinery to secure your work
?
??
?????
>>
>>1330258
>>1330259
Ya'll best be trolling, clearly pockets screws are best to attach workpiece to the workbench.
>>
>>1330261
>pocket screws
>ever
k i l l y o u r e s e l f
>>
>>1330257
this but without the vise. drill into your work surface, through the thing youre working on.

you should be able to design around this. it's not hard. if woodworkers in the middle ages could do it, so can you.
>>
>>1330266
Exactly, you can safely attach the workpiece to the surface with several drill bits, of various sizes - just leave them in.

>Fun fact: that's why they give you several of those with any good drill!
>>
>>1330267
drill bits are shaped like that so they dont come out. its why theyre twisty. its a design from before you could easily 3d print strong enough screws like we use today
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>>1330228
Nope. Deal with it, faggot. Maybe you should lift a little so you can hold stuff in place with your hands instead of being a pansy faggot.
>>
>>1330271
>>>/fit/

>>1330269
This guy gets it. I've read that pallet wood dowels also work, and you can make them really easily by fitting a saw blade to an angle grinder (remove the guard first, lol), and just going to town.
>>
>>1330272
2bh if you can't make a perfectly round dowel with hand tools only, you shouldn't be in this thread.
>>
>>1330242
>Uighur horsemilk fermentation newsletter
lel, never heard that one before

You're right, though. Since a table is a pretty big piece of furniture to make the sheer experience I'm getting from doing specific types of drilling/sawing/jointing/etc a dozen times in a row is valuable to me. I've discovered a few ways of doing certain things better that I'll apply for my next project.

>How's the table top coming along?
Haven't gotten the boards yet, but I've went to some wood suppliers and already decided on which I'll get. Now I learned to keep an eye on the cut orientation, so I can pay attention to that, too. I'm pretty exited to work on making the boards feel and look as smooth as a single slab of wood, or at least close enough.
>>
>>1330242
thats not going to hold wood to a table.
>>
>>1330280
>I'm pretty exited to work on making the boards feel and look as smooth as a single slab of wood, or at least close enough.

That is a neat thing to do. What I did for mine is use wood putty (sanding sawdust + D3 glue) to hide any visible gaps, as lord knows it did not glue as perfectly as I had hoped.

Just make sure to not work it until the putty has set.
>>
>>1330280
>>1330292
>glue instead of joinery
Kill yourselves.
>>
>>1330293
Already on it, gradually and via the liver.
>>
>>1330294
>reddit response
You have to go back.
>>
>>1330307
Never been. Been on this godforsaken site since 2006, though.
>>
>>1330293
>joinery on a tabletop
enjoy your warped scrap wood
>>
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OP pic very related. I can't tell if this is walnut or mahogany.. Or something else completely.

Top of pic is raw sanded, bottom is wiped down with turpentine. Halp?
>>
>>1330455
Sorry, no size/scale reference, those pics represent about 200mm width.
>>
>>1330456
Pores, grain and color suggest cherry, suspect the odd dark coloring when wiped with turps could be filler/sealer/finish still in the wood.

Definitely not walnut or mahogany though.
>>
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>>1330459
Interesting.
> suspect the odd dark coloring when wiped with turps could be filler/sealer/finish still in the wood.
That's the thing though, I don't believe this has been finished. Pic related for context, this is the top of a cabinet, behind the cornice. I looked unfinished to me but to confirm/deny your suspicions I hit a spot with some stripper, which came off clean after two minutes. Circled area is the spot I hit, which is basically invisible unless it's highlighted (a little darker at the moment as it has not completely dried. Perhaps its American Cherry? The internet is telling be this can run onto the deep browns/reds..

Thanks anon!
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>>1330465
To add further context, I am cleaning up pic related. It had shitty, sagging MDF shelves which had been horribly stained to "match" the rest. I would like to ID the timber so I can buy the correct wood to shelve it with.
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>>1325528
I'm turning this into a table, but does anyone know what type of wood this is?
>>
>>1330470
Give us a face on shot of the cut end. It kind of looks like a slice of eucalyptus to this ausfag.
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>>1330473
Here's another piece from the same tree
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>>1330473
Second for eucalypt
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>>1330578
>>1330473
Any idea what the little bean shaped marks on there are? It doesnt show up on any other eucalyptus tree pictures
>>
>>1330607
Tiny boomerangs.
>>
>>1330607
Insects eating the tree.
>>
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>>1325528
hey /wwg/ i've got a question for you

i need to build pic related out of wood. It's a 4 foot by 7 foot rectangular frame with a 6-8 inch deep curve in it, to put canvas on.

what's the best way to go about building this out of 1x4s or 2x4s?

or if you have any other ideas how it could be done, please let me know.
>>
>>1330750
Plane some wood to about a quarter inch thick, steam it and bend it. Pine should work just fine.
>>
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>>1330850
what if i don't have great access to those kinds of tools?

i was thinking of cutting 3-4 pieces like this and then running a 2x4 in the recess area on the edges
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>>1330854
Well sure if you wanna be a weenie about it
>>
i picked up an electronically hight adjustable table for like 50 dollerinos in mint condition only problem is the wooden top on it looks super bland, any idea what to do? like should i paint it white/black, stain it or what?

picture is very close to how it looks
>>
>>1330946
>picture is very close to how it looks
> not posting the actual desk

Either way, veneer over MDF ≠ wood. Do what ever the fuck you want with it, you know your tastes, not us.
>>
>>1325528
I'm sick of my wardrobe and I want one custom made or at least find one that looks like what I have in mind.

What tool do you guys recommend for furniture design?

Consider that I'm a complete newbie to CAD stuff.
>>
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>>1331058
Sketchup is an easy option. Model parts based on real world timber dimensions and learn to group individual parts so you can explode your designs and work out total material requirements when it comes to build time.
>>
>>1330946
I'm so happy these will be repurposed for all kindsa stuff soon.

I just picked up a hand crank one to use as a multipurpose outfeed for the planer and table saw! It's nice and stable.
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>>1331122
Damn, that's a mighty fine idea. I was just planning on how to build that as a complex - I had arrived at "outfeed table on wheels, same height as planer and table saw surface", but that was just a theory.

I'll be keeping an eye out.
>>
>>1330288
will anything? how is woodworking done safely? how do you secure a piece of wood for working?
>>
>>1331196
With your hands you fucking manlet. When will you learn?
>>
>>1331132
Totally, same here. I found mine at a goodwill for 5 bucks. It's designed to be light and stout so it really doesn't need wheels at all. These things will be all over the place because of the sit/stand officeworker desk craze.
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>>1331198
>the sit/stand officeworker desk craze.
What?
I work in an office and we have desks and chairs. We sit so much we have to periodically order new chairs because the old ones wear out. some people who are not using computers sit directly on the desks. But I don't live in America.


Is America such a dystopian hell now that sitting at work is banned? Does it make it ambiguous whether you're giving 100% of your energy to The Company when you sit down, so offices no longer have chairs to sit at while you work?
>>
>>1331200
Nah, m8, the sit/stand desks are making their way across the pond as well. The missus has one as work, so does a friend of mine.
>>
>>1331201
>across the pond
the UK may not be america-lite (yet) but is just as retarded when it comes to work environments, architecture, and product design
>>
>>1331213
>all modern leading architects have been American
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>>1331231
yeah those "leading architects" make such pretty and functional buildings
>>
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>be one of the GREATEST AMERICAN ARCHITECTS of ALL TIME

>live in an oversized scrap metal shack
>>
>>1327355
Got some new clamps today, I swear you always need more clamps
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>>1332557
Lol you fucking fraud. Clamps are for faggots who don't /fit/
>>
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>>1325682
If you don't have a table saw or a jointer, get a fuck long level to clamp on the work piece and run your circular saw along to get the straightest cut possible.

I made this table not too long ago with:
Table saw for table top board edges and a dado stack for the breadboard mortise
circular saw + 5' level for the cross cuts
Hammer and chisel for all the through tenons.

I used a biscuit jointer for attaching the top to the frame with "table top fasteners" off Amazon.

If it's your first big project, I wouldn't worry too much about the wood used. I made this using nothing but doug fir found at home depot. This was kind of a prototype, a practice run before I made a bigger one for a friend. I made the stain out of vinegar and steel wool then put 5 coats of poly on the top and 3 coats on the frame. For like $150 in materials I feel it's a pretty good table. The 10* legs I think added a lot.
>>
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The front to a "book" I'm making for the girlfriend.

Still need to drill the binding holes, round off the corners, and maybe inlay an eye, but I'm still on the fence about that.
>>
Is it safe to hold a portable belt sander in a vice to use it as an improvised stationary sander?

If it helps the sander is an older craftsman 315-117151 with enough flat, perpendicular parts to lie flat and for the vice jaws to get a secure grip.

Pic related, mine is similar.
>>
>>1333722

Strictly speaking...not really.

That being said, I did it all the time before buying a proper belt/disc sander. My biggest concern was more one of clamping it too hard and cracking the body of the sander, rather than it getting loose and wreaking havoc. Zero flat parts the handle to get a grip on with relatively light pressure, so I just wrapped it in some rags to try and spread out the clamping force a little.
>>
>>1333722
>>1333731
we unironically did it in high school, if it's safe enough for high schools to do without getting sued, it's safe enough for you

probably the most dangerous part is securing it to your work surface without damaging the sander too much. i recommend using wood screws right through the housing of the sander right into your workbench.
>>
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>>1332805
>hummingbird
Good choice anon
>>
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How were these letters etched into this wooden telegraph pole? Most poles are marked with these serials. Is it burnt in, or cut in, or what? What instrument was used?
>>
I want to make a dowel plate, but I don't have any power tools whatsoever. Can I drill the holes by hand or is it an exercise in futility?
>>
>>1334119
router
>>
>>1334213
Either punch the holes like a blacksmith or just make your dowels by hand, it's not that hard at all.,
>>
How do I hold work down to my desk for safely chiseling/planing/sawing it? I don't have a vise and my clamps just slide around.
>>
>>1334443
You could try this.

https://blog.lostartpress.com/2018/01/12/chinese-roman-workbench-router-table-and-a-palm/
>>
>>1334452
I thought of bolting a sacrificial tabletop to my desk unit and installing dogs, which is similar, but that too requires clamps to hold the parts in place i intend to work into shape to install to my desk
>>
>>1334443
homemade bench dogs. or even screw down blocks of wood to hold your work in place, assuming this isn't your mom's sewing desk.
or make a wooden board with a stop above on one end, and a stop below on the opposite end, so that it can hang off the edge of your bench like so (ascii art)
|______
~~~~~~|
then you can butt your work up against that back fence.

get better clamps
>>
>>1334454
>assuming this isn't your mom's sewing desk.
it is my dad's old L unit

it's my property but it's also a nice desk
>>
>>1334454
also
>ascii
i wanted to do this for my whetsone so that too stops sliding around when im trying to sharpen things and can actually use both hands on whatever i'm trying to grind back into usability, but it too proved impossible since trying to chisel out a notch to join some pieces of wood proved INCREDIBLY UNSAFE because i couldnt get the piece of wood to hold still without holding it with my off hand, and who the fuck chisels one handed
>>
>>1334470
>who the fuck chisels one handed
People with upper body strength.

>>>/fit/
>>
>>1327350
Observe this australian who moved to the middle of shithole colombia build a foot powered scroll saw (and other things, including a tiny lathe) using just very basic crap and scrap: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LmEHuTgtcvw
>>
>>1334213
>>1334292
You can punch them or drill them by hand. You need a cold punch to do that (NOT a pin punch) and it has to be through a mild steel plate or softer.

Drilling is just the same as with wood but you need twist bits and a massive amount of feed pressure to not be basically grinding the metal and ruining your bits. If you insist on using hand tools you can pick up a chain drill (make sure it's functional and not missing parts) for a brace, otherwise you need HSS bits and/or a mate to force downwards onto the top of your drill while you turn it.
>>
My nigger table what you guys think
>>
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>>1335637
>>1335637
>>
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Got a tv table I build back in first year highschool shop out of cherry, can't say I was particularly good then, machine sanders were used, varnish isn't great, corners got some gap, topp is a bit loose.
Took some 320 laying around and a shelf out of it and did some hand work on it, lot smoother now without the old shitty finish.
Thinking of taking the whole thing apart and trimming a hair off each part and reassemble so it's got better fitment, rigidity and refinishing it.

Not too sure on what I should refinish it with, I am thinking a rub in oil since it'll be easy and less hassle. Should I go boiled linseed or tung?
>>
>>1335637
>butt joints
>pocket holes
Kill Yourself.
>>
>>1335758
Why do cats roll over and invite me to tickle their belly like that, then ALWAYS bite me after doing it for a while?
>>
>>1335778
The crossbeams in the frame under the top are rabbets and the legs use dowels.
>>
>>1335404
this has nothing to do with anything that was posted and the man clearly has vises and clamps to work with
>>
>>1335637
You made a thing, buddy. You can now eat a meal off said thing.

The top could have used being a bit thicker, that would look nicer.

Other than that - as I said before - it's perfectly fine for the first go (I'd say you did a decent job at making the surface as well) - and your second project will make this look like crap.

Have a beer, you made a thing and learned some skills.
>>
>>1335785
Just lift, bro. Or use screws right into your hardwood floor and then work on the floor like an animal you piece of shit
>>
>>1335779
cats rolling on their back isnt an invitation, it's a defensive posture

they arent exposing their soft underbelly, they're getting into prime position to use their front paws to grab, their rear legs to kick, all while probably biting as well
>>
>>1335789
>You can now eat a meal off said thing.
Not really. It'll fall apart as soon as anything touches it.

>pocket holes and screws instead of high grade joinery
>butt jointed garbage wood planks instead of slab hardwood
>is so much of a poorfag he has to use flattened cardboard boxes instead of a proper rug
>>
>>1335783
That's low grade joinery, and therefore, trash.

Kill Yourself.
>>
>>1335803
>>1335805
I'd always appreciate being told what type of joints would be better for me to learn and why they are better. This is my babbys first project and I know where and how I messed up or can improve on at least a dozen counts, but if you're just going to cry about it and not offer anything worthwhile, at least post a picture of your own projects. Preferably some of your exotic quadruple sunrise dovetail joints in your exclusive 4000 year old Japanese cherry brossom wood blessed with ancient geisha cuntjuice. At least then your insults would hold some weight.
>>
>>1335808
Ignore those cunts, buddy. You did fine for the first attempt (and being told literally here how to even do it).

As I said before, using fancy-ish joints nearly killed my first table.
>>
>>1335813
>As I said before, using fancy-ish joints nearly killed my first table.
Are you retarded? Are you a retarded person?
>>
>>1335801
bullshit, why would it be all cuddly and then the next moment feel threatened? If you piss off a cat and it deems itself unable to kick your ass it will fuck off, not flop over on its back like a retard. It's like you've never even seen a cat ready to fight or flee.
>>
>>1335829
>bullshit, why would it be all cuddly and then the next moment feel threatened?
Because it's a fucking cat, they're stupid.

>If you piss off a cat and it deems itself unable to kick your ass it will fuck off, not flop over on its back like a retard.
like I said, it's a defensive posture, it's something they do to attack things larger than them they think they can win against, or to defend themselves when they can't flee
>>
>>1335785
Kneel on it you dunce. Japanese woodworking doesn't use clamps either if you want a more refined example. They just sit on the floor and hold part of it down with the ankle of a foot.
>>
>>1335893
the japanese also make swords out of sand and literally only one of their nation's castles is still standing and not a reproduction, they are NOT authorities on pre-modern construction and fabrication
>>
>>1335841
Don't think that's so. Showing belly is a sign of weakness when it comes down to it, because it's their most vulnerable part. Showing belly can be a sign of submission or trust. Submission can translate into asking forgiveness (when they did something wrong and punish them, they "accept your dominance"/"Do as you wish to me") or "I am no threat, see!". Alternatively, domesticated cats don't line up perfectly with natural behavior, and can learn to show their belly when they are completely relaxed.
>>
>>1335841
>like I said, it's a defensive posture, it's something they do to attack things larger than them they think they can win against
Like I said, it's like you've never even been around a cat. Even then, you should realize how retarded your explanation is.
>>
>>1336118
http://www.catbehaviorassociates.com/why-cats-do-the-bunny-kick/

you dont know cats youve never owned a cat you dont even know what cats are you piece of shit and you're trying to school me now? shut the fuck up faggot i bet you still think wolves have "alphas" too you dumbass yankee

death to america
>>
>>1335637
How long did this take to build?
I'm a newbie lookin to make my first table
>>
>>1336518
About 6 minutes.
>>
>>1330455

It's the rare walhogany. When a walnut tree gets lost in the 'hood, sometimes it falls in with a bad crowd and gets fucked by a mahogany tree. The resultant offspring is walhogany.

Sadly, the walhogany tree is rejected by both walnut trees and mahogany trees. Frequently walhogany trees are found alone, on the ground, having committed tree suicide.
>>
>>1335758
bump
>>
>>1336518
Depends on your free time. I have the luxury of occasionally giving it from morning to early evening, so working days only I'd say a week. That's counting the time you need to let glue and varnish dry.
>>
>>1325653
My father. Didnt even notice it until a year or so ago
>>
>>1336492

I second the anti-american sentiment, radical deglobalisation now!
>>
>>1337044
God I hate America.




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