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File: 20180212_184708.jpg (3.69 MB, 4032x3024)
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Started stick welding.
Using 6013, wasnt able to do any good with 7018.
Any advice/things you see wrong with this weld?

>Not fast enough, etc..

Thanks!
>>
>>1330786
knock the slag off bruh...keep practicing
I was always fond of 7018
>>
>>1330790
Will do! I like it a lot.
>>
>>1330786
Whats the material thickness in the picture? Seems pretty thin. When I was learning stick we used 6-12mm steel coupons to practice.

The thinner you get the harder its gonna be to weld without blowing through.
>>
>>1330952
It is thin. Will try on thicker metal. Thank you!
>>
>>1330786
Im always fond of 7011
>>
>>1330786
7018 are god tier and can make anybody look like a half decent stick welder
>>
>>1330786
looks like you're going too fast. try on thicker shit for a bit. really when you're learning the thicker the better. you need something you can just go nuts on and focus on getting a good bead then worry about the rest
>>
>>1331025
>>1331210
>>1331229

Thank you for your input. Will get something thicker and try again with 7018.
>>
OP should learn to post his welding machine make, model and the settings he is using for welds which give him problems.

We started students pad welding, and be sure to weld for at least four or five inches each pass because you are building muscle memory in order to perform repetitive motions with precision.

http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/stick-welding.html
>>
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>>1331279
My bad. Sears AC230.
Currently on 65 AMP for 6013 stick. 1/16".
Just did these two pass.
Like other said I am praticing on too thin metal.
>>
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>>1331279
Still have problem with starting the ARC.
Ground is clamped on metal both side on the piece. AMPerage is higher than recommended. Still sticking. I need to work on the "like a match" tehcnique.

I heard you can also "Tap" the rod to make the arc but I havent been able to do it.
>>
For being green you're doing great anon. I like to wire wheel where I ground and make sure the ground clamp is clean and bright. Also clamp your rod at a 45 deg angle instead of 90 deg. That helps to strike the arc. A full rod is always harder to get going than a half of a rod. Concentrate on your side to side c motion on your bead. When you get that down start worrying about penetration. Keep practicing man you're on it. Always beat the slag off after you ran your bead. I even held a full rod with my free hand half way down to steady it
>>
One other thing anon...keep your rod stored in a container as it is hydroscopic and once it draws moisture it's pretty much toast
>>
>>1331283
>1/16"
Those are tricky since they are low amp with tiny arcs. I suggest you get some 3/32" 7018ac and 6011 rods, they will be much more forgiving.
>>
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Built many race cars on similar. We cut all our tubing with just a hacksaw. I can't tell you how many blades I used over the years...yeah Im an old fart
>>
>>1331442
My Dad used one of those. Only ever used the highest settings on it. What were the lower ones even for? Aluminum? Thin sheet metal?
>>
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Looking for welding gloves that I can feel the torch through, around £20 price range. Any suggestions?
>>
>>1330786
7018 3/32" makes the prettiest welds. Good for practice of stacking beads
>>
>>1331484
We used it to make brackets, frames etc...
Not sheet metal of course
>>
OP why are you learning stick with such tiny rods
I'd say 3/32 is the bare minimum, 1/8 would be even better.
>>
Valentine so no welding tonight. Will keep you updated of my progress! Thank you all for the comments.
>>
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>>1331442
>>1331612
Heres a picture of the kind my Dad had. Same model, from google. It's a huge old 220v model and is about 3 feet tall.

What I mean by the 'highest settings' is he only ever plugged the leads into the ports for 200 amps. What are the lower amperage ports for?
>>
>>1331913
OP here. I guess its for smaller diameter stick. If you put too much amperage on your small rods it will cook.
Maybe your dad always went with big sticks.
>>
>>1330786
Show us what it looks like without the slag
>>
>>1331603
Miller blue gloves are around $25-30 on Amazon and I fucking love them
>>
>>1331285
Tapping is my personal favorite method. I feel like you stick way more often whenever you strike. Focus on your right hand and anticipate your arc. Start your puddle, then "Push" your bead in a small, circular motion. Make tiny circled as you go, touching the toe of the weld, back to the top of your puddle. 6013 is a great starter, but 7018 will give you a thicker weld with more room for control.
I recommend using some 1/8" coupons and practice running beads until you cover the front and back.
Find if you like moving when the coupon is horizontal or vertical.
After you've gained confidence, practice some lap welds, butt welds, and T welds.
Don't give up if you fuck up, grinders exist if you really hate it.
Tt: I'm a certified stick,Flux core, Might & Tig welder. Got my certs after 2-3 years of welding practice.
>>
>>1330786
real welder here

before you take any ones suggestions here i suggest you knock off the slag and reveal your weld bead before taking any critiques
>>
Look for Bob Moffet on YouTube. I think their channel is weld.com but he explains what he is doing and looking for quite well.
>>
>>1332216
As a "real welder" you should be at work right now but you should also at least see that he's traveling too far between puddling. Even with the dusting of slag over top. If you can't see through that you probably damaged your eyes from all that "welding" you did. Get some glasses FagMolester.
>>
>>1332226
This, even with slag on it it's obvious he's going too fast and not letting the puddle wet out
I want to see if he's got other problems with it under the slag though.
>>
>>1332226
>what is evening shift
>>
>>1332276
>Sleeping less than 7 hours a night
>>
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Tried 7018 3/32" stick tonight on bigger metal. 135AMP, AC.
Tried the "tap" method, no good but I did manage some good sparka with the match method. I was keeping the rod on the surface before (it was sticking obiviously) but I réalised that you have to lift it just a bit after the match. Now its easier to strike a match.
I was able to do this tonight. Ugly but pretty solid. Still working on my weld lookness. You guys were right its way easier with nigger stick the stick melt slowly and makes it easier to have a good distance.
Thank you all for the good advice.
>>
>>1332539
*bigger.
Kek
>>
>>1332226
>>1332227
wow lmao look at these 2 keyboard welders

its obviously a practise bead and you 2 are saying...

>hurrrr isnt it obvyuss

all im saying is before you can run QC YOU HAVE TO REMOVE THE SLAG you fucking twats lmao like what is so hard to understand about this.

if you cant understand at this point removing the slag to critique tecnique is the most basic of steps towards learning i feel sorry for you lmao
>>
>>1332539
dude dude dude

REMOVE THE FUCKING SLAG
>>
>>1332745
Will do!
I need a wire brush.
>>
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>>1332745
>>
>>1331913
Yea like >>1332162 said, smaller diameter rods like 3/32 or 1/16 6013 on sheetmetal
>>
>>1330786
uhhh

is what you're welding galvanized or something?

make sure you're messing with a hot rolled or cold rolled steel plate then try your hand at it
>>
>>1332539
>7018 3/32" stick
>135AMP
Way, way too hot, that's why your slag looks like explosive diarrhea
You'd use 135 amps for 1/8" rod, 7018 3/32" is like 90-100 amps.
>>
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>needing to remove the slag manually
psh, nothing personnel, kiddo
>>
>>1332744
>wow lmao, lmao. I read in a book somewhere that an important step in welding is removing the slag, lmao.
>>
>>1331285
far too fast in that pic
>>
>>1331603
Hobart Kevlar are the best i've used so far. they are $40 here but everything is more expensive here so likely pretty close to your budget. problem with cheap gloves is that the stitching burns out and depending on your position(over head) that can happen extremely fast
>>
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>>1333301
Just double checked, you are right.
I should follow these guage/Amperage suggestion.
>>
>>1333300
Im not sure about the first material I tested it on but now Im praticing on bigger metal.
>>
>>1333374
Yep, like others said I find it easier to pratice with bigger sticks it melts slower so I am not in a rush.
>>
>>1333423
The charts on most machines are pretty damn good to get you started. Once you’re more comfortable with everything you’ll find yourself ignoring the charts and just doing whatever feels right. I haven’t looked at the chart on my welders for years now
>>
>>1331603
>that I can feel the torch

TIG torch or acetylene torch? If TIG, Tillman make comfy gloves which are fine for TIG, gas welding and brazing.

If you mean holding a stick welding "stinger" and you aren't burning heavy rod at high amps, many welders use a heavy stick glove on their non-dominant hand (closer to the work and gets hotter) and a TIG glove on their dominant hand. I do it that way. I'm not particular about stick gloves since all gloves are consumables.

>>1331283
You may as well use up your thin rods because they force you to develop technique. They are why you are having some trouble.

For thin rods some welders start the arc with their left hand or index finger (presuming operator is right-handed) while holding the stinger with their right hand. That reduces whip with thin rods. The rod will get a bit warm so don't leave your finger against it.

>>1331305
gets it.

>>1331317
true

Just begin with suggested amps for your particular rods. That's a nice machine. The old transformer welders often have very nice arcs. They use taps instead of a switch for reliability. If you ever need more male lead connectors they are readily available and usually standard. Some of the odd tapered sort can be made out of straight connectors by using a flap disc in your angle grinder (if you don't have one, get one. HF can work passably if you don't overload them).

Keep at it. Persistence pays.
>>
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>>1332747
hit the fucking slag with a welders hammer you don't wire brush it
>>
>>1333541
most people wire brush it too
it don't make any difference in the weld but we do it anyways
I guess it does make a little difference if you stop and start because it cleans it better. a little smoke and splatter
>>
>>1333543
Why wire brush it if youre going to grind it anyway because most cant weld for shit
>>
>>1333558
>assuming we grind our welds
I never grind welds
there is no added strength from grinding
grinding removes material so the rust takes more from your weld

I don't see no practical purpose for grinding welds. I hardly ever seen any welds that were grinded. and I see some welds from 30 or more years ago
autists like to see smooth flat shiny welds but as far as im concerned its a waste of time and money
>>
>>1333562
>I hardly ever seen any welds that were grinded.

Stop and think about this really hard for a second.
>>
>>1333562
Weekend warrior detected.
In custom fab you'll have to grind your welds flush like 25% of the time.
>>
>>1333610
im more than a weekend warrior
mechanic and agricultural/farm welding and "weekend warrior" stuff

I have one uncle and one brother that work at a smaller welding and fabrication place. almost all John Deere stuff
>>
this guy hasn't knocked slag of one fucking weld..../shit thread sage
>>
>>1333612
>I have one uncle and one brother that work at a smaller welding and fabrication place. almost all John Deere stuff

So whats your excuse for being a retard about something so basic then?
Do you not talk?
>>
File: inside.png (1.05 MB, 585x589)
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why would you want to grind this?
>>
>>1333610
Ground welds found during pre-race inspection are a failure/ DQ in all race classes.
If you ever make it out of bubbas ghetto shop, you'll discover that.
>>
>>1333610
>>1334205
>>1334206
You dumbasses, obviously that stuff doesn't get ground, but have you ever heard of a clearance?
>>
>>1334215
>hurr durr, now I'll pretend like I'm someone else...
>>

∆ ∆
>>
>>1334206
It's almost as if different welded things weren't exactly the same.
>bubbas ghetto shop
We're aerospace certified, bitchnigga
>>
Not to interrupt the bitchfest, but I have a Montgomery Ward 295 amp stick welder that I need to build a circuit for, and I can't decide how robust I should make it since I can't really find any input ratings for the thing. Anyone have any suggestions before I just overkill it?
>>
>>1334291
Fucking google it retard.
>>
>>1334295
Anyone without permanent brain damage want to contribute?
>>
>>1334302
Kekk
>>
>>1334291
>build a circuit for,
what circuit
>>
>>1334305
Power. Need to run a line for it, but haven't had much experience with how much power welders draw. New ones at the local shops indicate input amperage, but this old heavy bitch does not as far as I can tell.
>>
>>1334313

just run some 6awg/3 conductor to a 50A breaker and NEMA receptacle
>>
>>1334321
Yeah, that's about what I figured I'd do, just the lack of ratings on the machine and lack of info online put the spook on me.
>>
>>1334326
50A.you have the three prong plug?
>>
>>1334431
Yeah, it's 3 prong.
>>
>>1334458
Wanna take a pic of it?
>>
Question for you anons. If you were repairing a crack (non structural) and you couldn't clean the rust form the inside, what would you do? I was just going to crank the heat up a bit and use something with more flux to hopefully float it out.
>>
>>1334480
Depends on how the joint is and how much rust there is.
>>
>>1334291
i don't know that exact model but others in the 300 amp range i can find are calling for 90amp input which would mean you'll need a 100 amp circuit and likely 4 gauge wire but it'll depend on the distance you need to go
>>
>>1334480
Proper way to repair a crack is complete removal of the defect. Depending on the application or code, you may be allowed to weld over the defect, but you are kidding yourself if you think turning up the heat or whatever is going to repair a crack. Typically cracks propagate out further when heat is applied via welding.
My credentials:
AWS certified welding inspector
API-570 piping inspector
API-510 pressure vessel inspector
SNT-TC1A LVL 2 Dye Penetrant examiner
SNT-TC1A LVL 2 Radiographic Film Interpreter
Also 20 years in fabrication.
>>
>>1334460
It's a montgomery ward ac295. The site no longer lets me upload via mobile.

>>1334509
If that's true, I'm gonna need to find a better store, the local hardware store only carries up to 60a.
>>
>>1334460
>>1334622
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRZqgLjiOy920JBtgkiUfhDI4ZmLQsNfNqnVIeznYk9uPLqsGhGLw
This is the same one I have.
>>
>>1334622
They usually rate the input a decent bit higher then it really needs but still 50amp won’t cut it if you want full capacity. On a 50amp circuit you can probably run up to 230-240 amp output but beyond that you’ll start tripping the breaker unless your just doing quick welds. Really comes down to what you want to do with it
>>
>>1334609
>Typically cracks propagate out further when heat is applied via welding

That’s why you grind the ends which you would fucking know if you were even half as educated and experienced as you claim you lying piece of shit
>>
Also for all we know this very well may be a totally inconsequential weld.
No need to apply code autism on every fucking thing.
>>
>>1334649
>t. bubbas ghetto shop
>>
>>1330786
Skimmed through topic, you're longarcing/going too cold.
Won't show you anything mine because it's cold outside and I'm sick. I'll tell you a story though.
Been trying 6013 for years now (when the occasion came) with hand held shield and el cheapo inverter. Could do filet and flat on anything including 2mm (well then you do pulse, you have no choice). Above everything looked like it should, both 6013 and 7018 3/16 and 1/8 - amperage needs to increase for 7018 (iron powder in flux). It worked good enough so that I've made a hitch that holds ~5 tonnes in down force on it for the rear of a front loader - I drag stuff behind it on single axle trailer, then unload). Then got more interested, watched a bunch of instructional vids of this guy - he's likeable persona:
https://www.youtube.com/user/ChuckE2009/videos
Found some old instructional vids like this (one of the best, listen to every word he says):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UP8hh0yQibM
Got brave and tried to weld some vertical and overhead, beads and z weave. After some practice could go semi-consistent overhead especially filet. But vertical - no way. Only pulse would give me some results. Still with hand held shield, I was kind of frustrated and then... I bought self darkening helmet. Maybe you won't believe me, but I could instantly weld 6013 vertical and overhead. 7018 yet to try, but I'm already pretty confident I'll make it. My guess is that I already knew what I needed to do (except seeing the puddle and what that ment) - all the angles of electrodes, approximate amperage, movement of electrode, yet as I said I could not see it properly nor hold it steady enough.
>>
>>1334823
Hend held shield does not cover you entirely and always from external light.
The thing is with helmets, especially autodarkening, you gain massive amounts of stability by freeing up the other hand. Whether you support yourself or use the other hand to help hold the stick you're much more stable. It's also a lot easier to strike ark when you see what you're doing.To counter this in classic helmet you strike the ark somwhere, see where you are and then longarc it to the weld - it's another skill you'd need to develop. Not especially hard, but everything is a challenge when new.
Another point is that it's infinitely adjustable darkening vs changed glaas in classic helmet which I didn't use - seen no point, nobody explained it clearly enough to me. I've set it to 10,5 in bright sunshine, just so that i could barely see the surroundings when welding. And then watch the puddle - if you don't see the puddle and drive it by ark around, you're not welding (I mean you are, you can make stuff, I know - I did, even managed to avoid undercut, but it's a pain in the ass in comparison to zen-like experience it should be) - you're guessing and you have to chip the slag after to actually see what you've done. It's wrong, you should be able to know while welding where the metal was directed. Whether it went well or not. The slag should come off almost by itself or with very little effort.
The helmet I've bought is 70$ stamos with 1/30000 second reation time - nothing fancy but as I've said, like loading kung fu in matrix. Helmet should have 4 sensors, infinately andjustable darkening, adjustable wait time before it turns off (gets bright again) and at least this short reaction time - it's a standard now. Grind function, external controls, and sensitivity settings not necessary - but it's nice an mine has it.
>>
>>1334826
So again, this vid:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UP8hh0yQibM
Very important is to get comfortable, plan the weld (dry try it if necessary), see the puddle, look at it and drag it around with arc - it will follow, until you longarc it or overheat, remember that it's all about the heat, strive to keep the arc rather tight, know your desired angle of electrode and play a bit from approximate designated amperage for the weld and electrode - machines differ, electrodes differ, speed of travel differs, anle of electrode differs - you need most probably different amps then recommended. But "see the puddle, look at it, drag it around with ark you're not looking at!" is the most important thing ever, imho.
ps. you will also hear when the weld is going well, you'll know what I'm talking about in no time, good luck and have fun.
>>
>>1334823
>3/16
3/32 - I'm metric based, wanted to spare you conversion and made a mistake, also misused then/than at the end - second language, also rambled like an imbecile - hurried for a dinner, also made a lot of excuses, kek

Looking at that weld though again you might be one of those people that go way too fast as a beginner. It looks as though you're afraid to stick it, don't be, if you're tense you're never going to gain control over what you're doing, you need to get comfortable with the situation. Wear proper safety gear so that nothing gets in the eyes and you don't burn yourself to crisp - that a decent welding helmet and a pack or 2 burnt sticks under it will give you the peace of mind and relax your muscles. Don't try to learn everything all at once, muscle memory is cumulative. It means the next time you'll try something it will be way easier because you already have some things automated - something I learned in higher physical education gymnastics - I kid you not.

Once arc is established through scratching, hitting whatever it's way more stable - in some circumstances you can actually lay electrode on flux and let it burn itself. Recently did it on lower bucket hinge that had to be raised so that the bucket on front loader (same mentioned earlier) would close up fully, because the way the aftermarket was made it didn't. The weld came out as if it was machined - pottery, slight downhill and the angle was no more than 20 degrees flat fillet. I could have also used the space to simply bend the stick to get the proper angle - didn't thought about that at the time.
Anyways once the arc is established and it's sounding true it's way more stable and it really isn't uncommon to touch the base metal with the electrode. Most of the cases it won't extinguish it right away and stick. Just don't hold it there forever.

Well, if anyone reads it anyways, kek
>>
This thread has made me laugh.
>>
>>1331285
Slow right down and learn to concentrate on the puddle behind the tip of the rod, not the tip of the rod itself.
>>
>>1332216
>real welder here
lol, implying you can't tell he's going far too fast and not laying enough down.
>>
>>1332744
You sound dumb. Please show me some of your 'welding' before trying to imply that you're the be all and end all.
>>
>>1333541
Some places will fuck you for hitting it with the pokey part of a slag hammer, true story.
>>
>>1334206
Depends on the application, you tard. Sometimes you have to grind, others not.
>>
>>1335505
Why?
>>
>>1333541
>>1335969
You're supposed to rake the hammer across your weld, not leave a bunch of little unsightly ping marks. If the slag doesn't come off easy then hammering away isn't gonna make it better.
>>
>>1335969

>>1335990
What he said

Also, some (very very picky) institutions will say it's forbidden as it could damage the weld if you're hitting it with a pointy hammer.

Most would agree it's pretty fucking unlikely, but there are places that would genuinely pull you on it.
>>
>>1336142
>institutions
is that nuclear industry
>>
>>1336151
I would imagine mainly pressure vessels and possibly things like nuclear.
>>
>>1335504
>hey guys just remove the slag before you critique

>you sound dumb

lel ok pussy
>>
>>1336179
that's MIG you fucking faggot. also too cold.
>>
>>1331285
I think maybe a little bit more slow and as consistent speed as you can
>>
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>>1336179
>Post mig in a stick weld thread
>>
i'm the long winded faggot >>1334823 here
Tried 6013 1/8 on some thick enough material (6mm I guess). My father who's done 30+ years of this shite in farming exclaimed: it's just like in the film you showed me, it's fucking great, and it was, a weave on some farming contraption vertical. - slag cam off with a little nudge. Then I tried to weld a space with a stringer which resulted in poor fitting of elements which left me with convex bs to go around when i tried to weld it over - big mistake, should have ground it off or run parallel strings to it. Lack of experience, it all sagged miserably and I saw it while doing it. Still decent from our perspective, but if I knew what it would do I would have went with two stringers beside the first failed attempt ( my first fuckin time trying it with this equipment). Anyways - burn as much as you can afford - it will come to you - provided you've swallowed enough info. I mean the first thing I did with 1/8 came almost perfect - just wathed some vids that I've already linked. . What else can you ask?
Disclaimer - helmet is obligatory, that is if you want to do magic with sticks. It's funny, yes I am a bit of a failed human been and he pushes me over, but the funny part is he barely could cut the stuff I welded together real time. Buy an autodarkening helmet. Watch a bunch of instructional vids, don't skip on what the guys are saying - it's mucho important.
>>
>>1336179
nigger, either that's gr8 b8, or you're the dumbest fucker in this thread.
>>
>>1336997
>convex bs vertical
Should have ignored it and go straight for weave with this size of a stick ( I just run out of 3/32) - just don't have experience with bigger size electrodes, I went with 90 amps 1/8 6013. Flat 7018 1/8 is no stranger to me, then I go as high as 140 amps. It all depends on circumstances. When you're a rookie as myself, you need a little time to ponder what the hell are you doing. It's not as automatic as for the guys the do it for living I guess. But damn is it satisfying when it comes out nice!
Burn electrodes with knowledge that you've acquired previously by the pound (both knowledge and rods) - no other way imo. But you can't go blinded, deprived of basics. Otherwise you're going to end up with hodge-podge of guesses about what went wrong and why I can't do this or that.

This is the vid I showed my father:
https://ruclip.com/video/-ScGeTUWfoQ/how-to-weld-7018-z-weave-vertical-up-stick-welding-technique.html
>>
>>1337001
why, if you're still here?
>>
>>1337001
I know it's a muh ballz of steel place and all but I'm sensitive as fuck and I can run AMA vertical with my recent experience and I'm thrilled about it. What's your point bucko. Want to see the welds? Maybe tomorrow when it's day actually - half past 8 now. Well?
>>
>>1337008
>AMA
What?
>>
>>1330786
Can already see a little bit through the slag that you are going too fast, maybe amperage is up too high to.
Also
>stick welding instead of doing God-tier GTAW
>>
>>1338199
It's almost as if they were better fitted for very different applications
>>
How long from never welded to be a good welder able to work professionally?




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