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/diy/ - Do It Yourself



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My mother completely destroyed hey last garden hose sprayer, presumably by leaving it out in freezing temps last winter. I decided not to mess around and ordered her a really nice spray wand as well as a couple of quick connect fittings so that she can swap it out between the front and back yards (and bring the damn thing inside for storage). I went with quality brass for the quick connects since I've read and understand that other metals will eventually corrode and I wasn't going with plastic garbage. After ordering though, I realized that the cheap hoses my parents get aren't going to have brass fittings, and I'm not even sure what material the fitting on the spray wand is. From what I understand, unlike metals can corrode and eventually fuse together, even if one of them is brass, correct? I would rather prevent that from happening.

Tldr: is there a way to protect garden hose fittings from each other? Would something like silicone spray or grease work or would that lubricate too much and keep the fittings from staying snug?
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>>1424543
If she hasn't learned how to not fuck up in below freezing temperatures despite living there for evidently decades, there's no saving her. Just let her blow up her hoses.
Galvanic corrosion will occur with unlike metals, but if your idea works the way you say it will, the hose is never attached long enough for it to matter.
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>>1424556
No you misunderstand. The quick connect fittings connect to the existing fittings.
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>>1424543
do they even make garden fittings in anything else than brass or plastic?
stainless maybe but it wont react with brass much, check the galvanic series.
>>1424575
if she disconnects it and stores it inside it wont be connecting or reacting?
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>>1424580
Nowadays they make them aluminum, stainless, sometimes other garbage.

The quick connect fittings fit over the existing fittings. You're disconnecting e.g. the sprayer from the hose but the quick connect fittings stay attached.
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>>1424543
so get them a $10-15 hose with brass ends
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>>1424543
You are over complicating this to no end. Every fall when temperatures start dropping to freezing at night go over to Mom's house and get her house setup for winter, put the hose and it's attachments away, check the weather stripping around the windows and doors, replace and calk as needed, window film where needed, etc. Every spring go by and get her ready for summer. It is just an afternoon's work and you will likely get a meal out of it, and she will be so proud. Stop trying to buy your way out and just go be that son she tried to raise you to be.
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>>1424685
I'm asking how to keep hose fittings from fusing.
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>>1424689
With fresh water there is not a great risk with the common hose/fitting types as long as the connection is tight and it is occasionally disconnected, such as in the fall. Stainless, brass, bronze and steel all can experience galvanic corrosion when in contact with each other in wet environments for prolonged periods or when, both salt and electrical current will make this worse. Your pipes should not be live and your water should be fresh, so not a major risk here. Use hose with a rubber washer in the ends and that will keep water away from the threads, when not used turn the water off with any fitting on the end open so water can drain and coil it up so it hangs off the ground. Disconnect it every fall and all should be fine. Only sure way is not to mix metals and even then you can not be sure wine you will be unlikely to know the exact alloy composition. I suppose you can also put Teflon tape on the threads of you feel like being anal.

And help your mother get ready for winter every year.
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>>1424755
Thank you for the thoughtful response.
>I suppose you can also put Teflon tape on the threads of you feel like being anal.
Well with this sort of thing being neither expensive nor difficult I figure it's probably worth doing. This is probably what I will try.
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>I wasn't going with plastic garbage.

Shame, it's the best choice to avoid this exact problem.

Decent (e.g. Hoselock, Gardena) plastic ends and attachments will last ~ 20 years.




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