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>Be me
>19, in college near Chicago, want to pursue computer networking
>Have good job testing fire alarms. Lots of sitting around on phone. Make $16/hr
>Know subnetting and how to setup and maintain basic IPV4 and IPV6 networks along with other misc computer stuff
>Decide it might be a good idea to focus on my certs instead of a degree
>Start looking for a job more related to networking so I can learn on site
>Get contacted by a company in Chicago called "Impact".
>Hard to tell what they actually do through all the corporate buzzword crap but it looks more like SQL than networking.
>They want me as a fucking printer technician

Honestly I'd rather have my current job than work with printers but if I worked there I would be at a place where I might be able to eventually learn stuff related to what I want to do. Any advice? Thanks.
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>>68024957
don't search for advice on 4chan
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>>68024957
Getting your foot in the door as a self-learned programmer is easier than Sys. Admin, believe it or not. If you're really serious, you should a technical course on Network Administration or take up some certifications.
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>>68025127
Really? I figured programming wouldn't really be something I should focus on seeing as it's a seperate field. What language should I learn since I'm not really as interested in programming in the long run?
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Most network automation is python, you should get ahead of the field and learn Ruby.
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>>68025185
Thanks!
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>>68025168
>I figured programming wouldn't really be something I should focus on seeing as it's a separate field. What language should I learn since I'm not really as interested in programming in the long run?
You misread what I said. What I say is that getting a job in programming, in comparison to Sys. Admin., without any certification or degrees is easier. BUT, if you're really into Network Admin., consider getting certifications in it as it will help you land a job.
Also, even though Sys. Admin. has little to do with programming, there's a common mistake that Network Administrators need to know no programming languages. I don't know how's the market in the U.S., but here even as a Sys. Admin. you MUST know or have basic knowledge of programming. Also, learning Perl/Bash, C and Python will give you a MASSIVE legs up above the competition in Network Administration.
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>>68025250
Huh. Thanks a ton man. What are your thoughts and learning Ruby to get ahead like the other guy suggested?
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>>68025250
by certifications are you referring to the CompTIA/Cisco certs?
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>>68025332
It's very useful. And don't worry about seeming too much: ruby and perl are HEAVILY based on C, python is simple and Bash can be learnt in a day if you know the aforementioned ones.
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>>68025343
Yes. Although that depends where you plan to work/live. Where I'm from Cisco certs are king. Having a CCNP means getting a job easily in the Networking/Switching/Routing-type category. CompTIA is also useful, but it's of an American thing?? A great Cert. is the Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) since it'll give you SOLID Linux knowledge and other things very useful in the field.
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>>68025388
where are you from? I am currently studying (in the UK) for the Net+ as a prequisite to CCENT/CCNA. My budget should cover A+, Net+, CCNA, but RHCE seems expensive. Also looking to get into networking
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>>68025413
Same timezone, same continent.
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>>68025413
To be quite fair RHCE is quite expensive and can be substituted if you find and solve a couple (not just one) of the manual books they use. The advantage of getting a RHCE cert. is the paper one, being able to put it on the curriculum.
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>>68025359
So I should learn C and then that should allow me to learn ruby and Perl easily? Then python?
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>>68025442
Yep, pretty much. C is the mother of many languages, despite what the "based /g/ unix c++ neet" programmers say. Having STRONG knowledge of C is almost a guarantee to be good in 90% of programming languages (please keep in mind my field is not programming).
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>>68025463
Cool. So right now the wise move would be to keep my current job and study C and Linux while shooting for a CCNA cert?
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>>68025441
calm. looks like I need to sift through that big ass linux bible on me shelf. cheers lad _
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>>68024957
Congratz on being replaceable
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>>68025477
not the guy your talking to but yeah thats a solid idea. Look up Cisco packet tracer and GSN3 for network simulation on your local PC :)
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Work on getting your CCENT/CCNA, then your CCNP. Most places won't even consider you if you don't have those.

If you can, grab an IT job so you can start getting experience in the field so you can start building your resume.

Also if you're pursuing strictly networking, I wouldn't bother with anything but Python. I'm a network engineer and I haven't needed to use anything else. Most neteng guys prefer Python 2.7 because of all the libraries already available and that's the cool thing to use in our field right now.

That being said, if you don't know how to program at all (basic loop structures and stuff) taking a class in any programming language will help since it's all mostly similar and you just need to learn the syntax. I wouldn't stress the programming side too much though. I've literally written a handful of scripts myself. It's usually considered a plus and not as much of a must have as your basic networking skills.
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>>68025477
You should ALWAYS have a income source, whatever it might be. Study C and Linux in your lunch hours, practice at home, and see if you find any technical night courses on Cisco, IT, etc. Whenever you feel comfortable, shoot for the CCNA - which isn't that hard, by the way (what makes it famously difficult is the structure, the stupid details you must remember, and the fact that's entirely on Cisco IOS specifics).
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>>68025481
Good luck, mate. But remember that having a paper that says you're "certified" (disregarding if it's somewhat true) is ALWAYS better than none at all since most IT recruiters, at least here, are blonde HR roasties that know little to nothing and only look at your "qualifications". Good luck!
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>>68025477
>>68025503
GSN3 is the next step above Packet Tracer. You should use it if you really want to learn the hard way - it'll make you more knowledgeable, though.
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>>68025518
>CCENT
It's a joke, CCNA is considered - implicitly - to be the minimum.
>If you can, grab an IT job so you can start getting experience in the field so you can start building your resume.
This, nothing beats experience.
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>>68025571
Yeah, but it's not like he has to go out of his way to get it. It's literally what you get for passing the first test if you decide to break the CCNA into two tests, which is easier than taking one longer test that covers both ICND1 and ICND2.
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>>68024957
Hey man, I'm a software engineer now but I actually started out as a copier technician. You may very well learn networking there it depends what your role is, you will have to configure all of the printers for the particular clients networks before you install them so this includes things like subnetting. You will also have to fix hardware most of the time, but occasionally there were network problems I had to troubleshoot too. You won't get a ton of networking experience, but like you say it could be enough to get your foot in the door.
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>>68024957
>>Decide it might be a good idea to focus on my certs instead of a degree
No, no, no.
NO.
JUST NO.


Certs are worthless without a degree.
You absolutely need a degree, even in fucking philosophy (blah blah transferrable skills, problem solving, analytical thinking, etc. etc.) if you want people to even look at your CV.

It's just how HR and recruitment works: risk mitigation. Having a degree, ANY degree, tells them that you've been assessed in a formal setting, and had your learning and working skills tested. So you're less risky as a hire, since the uni is already "vouching" for you.

You might have a superstar github and conferences under your belt, but nobody will take the risk. A safe, "good enough" hire is *always* preferable to a risky "high potential" hire, when it comes to business.

Focus on your degree, get good grades and get an internship.
Or/and do a summer research internship with a good professor and network through them.

It's the only way to get your application fast-tracked to an in-person interview. Anyone telling you otherwise is fooling you or just wishful thinking.
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>>68025726
this

you still have time anon, I started my degree at 23.
don't fuck it up
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>>68024957
>Decide it might be a good idea to focus on my certs instead of a degree
>I think I'm better off being among 90%-ers cert-pajeets rather than 10%-er degree holders

With a mental process like that I wonder what kind of shit college even let you in.
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>>68025626
Fair enough, my point was that having CCENT only and by itself is useless.
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>>68025503
>>68025554
I already use packet tracer to simulate and Putty to actually set stuff up but I'll check this out.

>>68025726
Dang. Was hoping to bypass taking classes I suck at like Algebra and Chemistry.

>>68025796
My ex-Network Architect cert holder teacher told me I could focus more on certs than degrees ;_;
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By the way, can I just give a big thanks to everyone who is taking the time to help me with this? Really, it means a ton and I appreicate it.
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>>68025849
But as much as I hate to admit it, he's right. Having a degree is much more better than a certifications. Having both is the ideal.
>Was hoping to bypass taking classes I suck at like Algebra and Chemistry
Then study math. Also, >Chemistry in IT
What the fuck is wrong with your country's IT degrees?
>My ex-Network Architect cert holder teacher told me I could focus more on certs than degrees ;_;
If you have the ones I listed and get some job experience in the field, having a degree becomes a joke.
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>>68025881
Yeah I need to pass gen eds like chemistry at my college to get a fancy network security degree. Alright. Guess I'm gonna have to buckle down and take some algebra classes, keep working my current job and taking more networking classes, and study C in my spare time.
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>>68025922
But like I said, certs. are the same - if not better than degrees - if you manage to land a gig at the field.
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>>68025922
make sure to write a clear list on your desk to learn x by doing y before a set deadline of z. and work a little every day, no matter how small the step is.

wouldn't hurt to keep a log of your progress along the way and make a blog.
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>>68025944
Wait so should I be focusing on college classes or should I focus on trying to get a job where I can get in house training and get certs quicker?
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>>68026139
If you can go for the second one, do it; if not, first one always. But remember that income is more important, so don't quit your job or do something stupid.





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