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You know for being a history board we don't talk about the big killers, diseases, that often.
Like for example smallpox which killed approximately 200 million+ people just the last century and may have killed one third of the Roman empire's population in the third century (if not the measles)
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The last outbreak of smallpox in Europe was in Yugoslavia in 1972.
The deadly disease was viewed as eradicated in the first and second worlds, and the W.H.O. had been fighting it in the third world.
Patient zero, an Albanian Muslim from Kosovo by the name of Ibrahim Hoti, was infected in Saudi Arabia as he was making the Hajj, he recovered because he was vaccinated.
People who were in contact with him were infected, that's true.
However none of his 11 children were infected (let's not talk about the demographics of Kosovo Albanians, that's another topic, and i'm tired of it), which lead some epidemiologists to believe it was a case of biological warfare, but that's in the realm of conspiracy theory, and there doesn't seem to be a clear culprit (neither USA nor USSR).

He infected Latif Mumdžić, who sought medical help, but the local doctors couldn't diagnose him and sent him to Belgrade (but to Novi Pazar and Cacak before that).
At first the doctors misdiagnosed him with an allergic reaction to penicillin, soon other symptoms appeared.
35 people at the hospital were infected, 9 of whom were doctors (8 of whom died).
Simultaneously ~140 cases of smallpox were reported in Kosovo.
Strict quarantines were established and mass vaccinations ensued. People were getting vaccinated in hospitals, in schools, in factories, in the streets and in the fields (my mom told me specifically that she was vaccinated at school).

The W.H.O praised the Yugoslav regime for quick and decisive (read, brutal and panicked) action, which quickly contained the disease.

There is a great movie from 1982 based on this event (of course, it's not a documentary, it's an epidemic movie and it takes creative liberties). The writer/director obviously knew a lot about the danger of evolving diseases, and he masterfully critiqued communism (and the Yugoslav government), not only through the actions of the government in the movie, but comparing it to the very disease.
Variola Vera
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>>2537569
Variola Vera is available on the pirate bay (can't miss it it's the only one). The English subtitles are not that great, but they're usable.
Here's the intro
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4ZkhnDEpYc
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ww3 is going to be terrifying
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>>2537311
The 1918 flu pandemic that killed more people than were killed during World War 1; but we go on & on about such wars when our real enemies are the little 'bugs' that we can't see or fight with Religion & Bombs..........
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>>2537577
Oh, i forgot to mention

18 million people were vaccinated within a month, and some people even died from the vaccine.

At this moment there are only two samples of Smallpox left in the world, in Russia and in America.
Cue the creepy Arabic flute leitmotif
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>>2537598
>Cue the creepy Arabic flute leitmotif

Please post link.

>>2537596
The next mutant monster flu, if we get one, is what scares me more than almost any other mega disaster.

By the way, your point would have been identical without the fedora tip.
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>>2537596
Are we sure the Spanish flu would have anything near the consequences it actually had if it hadn't been for the war setting a strain on resources and overall health?
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There's a pair of good videos on Ebola and Cholera made for developing countres on how to treat the two diseases.
As a note of interest Cholera with some rather simple treatment, correctly done re-hydration, got a fatality rate below 1% while untreated it starts to climb above 50%.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jG1VNSCsP5Q
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCrOde-JYs0

>>2537569
what's with people from former Yugoslavia making high quality posts?
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>>2538171
Pretty sure the scientific consensus is that the carnage wrought on the environment and the mass movement of people directly caused the severity of the outbreak.
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man, variola was insanity

i wonder what it was like as a doctor to treat these patients, what did they even feel
i also wonder how such a doctor felt after the disease was eradicated
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What techniques did romans use to prevent and cure diseases back in their days? They must have been exposed to a multitude of them considering how expansive they were.
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>>2538443
Probably inhuman amounts of fear. Seeing their patients in such states knowing fully well that they were exposing themselves to that same disease more than anyone else. More dangerous of a job than being cannon fodder imo.

The worst of it must have been the mystery of it all back in those days. Nobody knew what the fuck it was, what was causing it or how to cure it. They just took random shots in the dark hoping something would work.

Pretty sure most doctors just thought the world was ending.
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>The British used smallpox as a biological warfare agent at the Siege of Fort Pitt during the French and Indian Wars (1754–1763) against France and its Native American allies.[92][93] The actual use of smallpox had official sanction. British officers, including the top British commanding generals, ordered, sanctioned, paid for and conducted the use of smallpox against the Native Americans. As described by historians, "there is no doubt that British military authorities approved of attempts to spread smallpox among the enemy", and "it was deliberate British policy to infect the indians with smallpox".[94] On June 24, 1763, William Trent, a local trader and commander of the Fort Pitt militia, wrote, "Out of our regard for them, we gave them two Blankets and an Handkerchief out of the Small Pox Hospital. I hope it will have the desired effect."[95][96] The effectiveness of this effort to broadcast the disease is unknown. There are also accounts that smallpox was used as a weapon during the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783).

what the fuck man
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>>2537569
>(read, brutal and panicked)
I don't understand, apart from the obvious risks of an immunity developing how was vaccinating the country brutal? Panicked sure, rash? no doubt, but i fail to see the brutality in bone headed yet effective treatment.
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>>2538489
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plague_of_Justinian
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonine_Plague

not very effective techniques since disease killed millions
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with the rise of the anti-vaccination craze i can totally see diseases like smallpox making a big return in a few years.
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>>2538681
>13%-26% of the world's population wiped one plague

These earlier plagues don't get enough credit for what they're worth.
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>>2538739
it bothers me that it gives a flawed image of things
ask people about the medieval age and they think of plague, ask them about the ancient era or just Rome in general and they think of no plagues or disease
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>>2538739
>1/3 of your country dies in a plague
>but muh Justinian THE GREAT
not that it's 100% sure it was his military campaigns and the sudden movements of people that were the cause, but come on

history's a scary fucking place
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>>2538786
maybe it was god's way of warning justinian not to remake the roman empire....really makes me think
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>>2538786
feels bad to blame someone who thought diseases were sent by god/gods for spreading a plague
he literally didn't know anything
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>>2538171
Can't be sure of anything but WW1 was actually more Eurpean & Middle East Regional than global perse' as in the case of WW2 and the 1918 flu pandemic was global infecting an estimated 500,000 persons which at that time literaly 1 out of 4 people - 25% of the entire Human population with 25 to 50 million dead.
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>>2538827
Correction:
500,000 to 500,000,000
thanx
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>>2537311
Smallpox killed 3 of my kings in 10 years, 2 of whom had 25+ martial. Gavelkind did the rest. Lost 2/3 of my realm.

Reaper's due best DLC
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>>2538739
>Blaming an ancient ruler for a plague

What you're saying is something that a writer of those times would say. Justinian should not be THE GREAT for many reasons, but blaming him for the plague is ridiculous, specially since we now know that it was most likely bubonic plague spread through trading ships from the east. Justinian was not smitten from heaven with a plague, it just happened due to geographic, climate, trade and so many other factors, as has happened so many times in human history.
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>>2538848
do they still lack famines in the game?
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>>2538654
You cant vebe shocked to hear this coming from the perfidious ones.
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>>2538856
Yeah sadly. They really should've added it with Reaper's due.

Although they added a depopulation factor, it's effect on the game is negligent.
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>>2538367
All me, i don't post often (mostly because i got tired of the state of the board months ago)
>>2537623
It's in the intro>>2537577
Also, here's the theme in the TV trailer
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r4RSU82f8QA
>>2538678
The quarantines were enforced by the military.
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>>2539897
>The quarantines were enforced by the military.
was it out of proportion though?
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>>2539897
>Also, here's the theme in the TV trailer

LOL it's the same melody as the Angel of Death scenes in "The Ten Commandments."
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>>2537311




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