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File: Sequoyah.jpg (41 KB, 390x480)
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This Cherokee dude was illiterate and created his own writing system. Amazing.

>At first he sought to create a character for each word in the language. He realized that this approach was impractical because it would require too many pictures to be remembered.
>Sequoyah decided to develop a symbol for each syllable in the language. After approximately a month, he had a system of 86 characters, some of which were Latin letters he obtained from a spelling book.
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>>2829278
>This Cherokee dude was illiterate and created his own writing system. Amazing.
um sweetie no
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>>2829314
How is it not?
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>>2829278

>At first he sought to create a character for each word in the language. He realized that this approach was impractical because it would require too many pictures to be remembered.
why did none in eastern Asia ever think like this?
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>>2829330
He was not white, and non-whites are incapable of doing anything amazing. Are you unaware of this, you SJW cuck?
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>>2829332
ikr he realized it in 1 year.
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>>2829278
>one Indian single handily beat the entire subsaharan African continent
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>>2829332
because Qing wanted a uniform language for the clusterfuck that was early China.
Basically, you'd know what the symbol for a pig is when looking over a text, even though it'd be spoken in a gazillion ways across the realm.
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>>2829332
"China" is still written by a fusion of 3-4 characters.
The same is true of a lot of other words.
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>>2829364
fun fact.

>In recent years evidence has emerged suggesting that the Cherokee syllabary provided a model for the design of the Vai syllabary in Liberia, Africa. The Vai syllabary emerged about 1832/33. The link appears to have been Cherokee who emigrated to Liberia after the invention of the Cherokee syllabary (which in its early years spread rapidly among the Cherokee) but before the invention of the Vai syllabary. One such man, Cherokee Austin Curtis, married into a prominent Vai family and became an important Vai chief himself. It is perhaps not coincidence that the "inscription on a house" that drew the world's attention to the existence of the Vai script was in fact on the home of Curtis, a Cherokee.[27] There also appears to be a connection between an early form of written Bassa and the earlier Cherokee syllabary.

Red man's burden.
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>>2829330
well if he is illiterate and he created a writing system it doesn't really matter if he was initially illiterate now does it
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>>2829367
I can understand that. What I can't understand is Japanese people staying with that shitty system. They should imitate the Koreans.
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The Cherokee even started their own newspaper with this script.

Damn.
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>>2829364
top kek
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>>2829504
Japanese have an alphabet of sorts
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>This was one of the very few times in recorded history that a member of a pre-literate people created an original, effective writing system[1][4] (another example being Shong Lue Yang).
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>>2829278
Peace Be Upon Him.
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>>2829364
Because he was in extensive contact with people who had writing. Writing has only been INDEPENDENTLY invented (that is, by people with no contact with anyone with writing) three or maybe four times in the entire history of the world (Mayans, China, Sumer, and maybe Egypt, but maybe they were influenced by Sumer)
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>Cherokee
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>>2829349
This
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>>2829278
Fuck off, he was a white Aryan
All these niggers/spics trying to claim our history, lmao
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>>2829504
The power of tradition cannot be understated.

Besides that, the Japanese writing system is actually somewhat efficient once you already made the effort of learning it. Japanese people can breeze through books because their speed reading beats the hell out of almost any other speed reading in any other writing system.
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>>2829278
>illiterate
>some of which were Latin letters he obtained from a spelling book
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>>2829504
Brainlet gaijin detected. Be a good boy and beg and maybe I'll translate some doujins for you.
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>>2832245
He didn't know what they meant he just took the design of the letter. Look at >>2830685
'd' has an 'a' sound and 't' has an 'i' sound.
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>>2829504
>>2829900
The Japanese have a syllabary. And their use of kanji, while highly confusing, is nothing like the Chinese.
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>>2829349
>>2830912
wtf!
/pol/ sure is cRiNgY. You two are obviously /pol/. How about fuck off, buckos. There's no way I could possibly be racist after reading these posts from obviously non-leftist individuals
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>>2829332
>what is Hangul
>what is Hiragana
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>>2832583
No, if anything it's worse, because in Chinese most characters have just one reading (sometimes more, but it's not much more common than words in English with more than one pronunciation, like "wind") whereas in Japanese several dissimilar pronunciations per character is the rule.
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>every writing system was made by illiterate people
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>>2834912
But this one is recorded.
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>>2834912
Not really. Most were designed by someone who was already literate in another writing system but needed one that was more suited to their own language.
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>>2829330
Because upon creating a writing system he was no longer illiterate.
Duh.
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>>2829278
>>>/pol/
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>>2829278
American natives had a written form of language anon, just because you see no paper doesnt mean there is no written language. The fact Native Americans inscribed messages on rocks indicates they found a way to connect pictures with sounds they make hence a written language.
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writing is only really useful to a society that needs it.
If you aren't growing enough crops and populating big enough cities then writing wont be of much use to you, symbolism however could be very useful, but a fixed system of meaning or sound symbols isn't necesarry for most stuff.

http://www.worldpath.net/~minstrel/hobosign.htm
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>>2834902
Pretty much this. Chinese is hard because it requires memorizing more characters, but Japanese is much more confusing.
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>>2835498
The Mayans had writing, I know that, but I didn't think that the North Americans had anything that had been identified as writing.
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>>2835498
>As a silversmith, Sequoyah dealt regularly with whites who had settled in the area. He was impressed by their writing, referring to their correspondence as "talking leaves". He knew that they represented a way to transmit information to other people in distant places. However, a majority of the Cherokees believed that writing was either sorcery, a special gift, or a pretense. Sequoyah accepted none of these explanations. He said that he could invent a way for Cherokees to talk on paper, even though his friends and family thought the idea was ridiculous.
>>2835489
This is history
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>>2832255
ok can i request now ?
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>>2837995
Dude, just learn Japanese. I agree that the writing system is incredibly backwards and convoluted, but it is learnable. I've learned it. I would advise that to help learn kanji, you should read materials written with furigana. That way you'll repeatedly see the reading written right next to the character. There's also a website that will add furigana to any website:
http://www.hiragana.jp/
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>>2829349
fake /pol/ack
>>2834094
>taking the b8




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