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Ok guys, I need some advice.

I'm naturally talented for math and STEM topics were my highest grades in school and humanities were my lowest.
The point is that I can't decide between following my passion and my natural talents.
What do I mean?
I dream of making games but I am unsure if to become an artist or a programmer, likewise I'm trying to decide if to study graphic design or computer science.

I don't necesarelly hate math, but I just find it fucking boring and just don't like it, it puts me to sleep while I watch the videos, but I'm good for it, since I understand it easily, is just boring.
Math seems like my natural talent, but I don't like it.
My passion is to draw, but I know I do it as a hobby, and I'm average at best, but I know it will require a lot more dedication to be good at art than being a good programmer.
Art is my passion, but is so hard to become good at it, it will require years of good practice and I don't think I'm capable of mastering art.

So I was thinking of doing computer science versus graphic design and even then jobs are simply better for a programmer than for an artist.

A graphic designer would make 600 bucks or less in my cunt, while a programmer could make easily 1k doing some BS that would be retarded as fuck.

I'm still unsure which to follow, I know I need to follow my natural talents, but I am really unsure, because I really don't like math.
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>>3515787
Easy. Practice your passion in your spare time while actively studying for a formal degree in comp sci or whatever course of action youre planning to take to become a programmer. Any IT related profession will is garanteed to land you a job, and software devs especially are in high demand and earn a fuck load of money, which is almost impossible to achieve with a digital art (being the most desired art medium right now) profession. Good fucking luck even finding a job in digital art, let alone one which pays well
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>money money money
If you guys were rich like me you would know how worthless that shit is at the end of the day, I only have regrets.
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do your easy 9-5 and do your passion in your spare time. you wont get your soul crushed when you find out you aren't good enough to make it AND you get paid more

plus you can always return to art. you can go back to it in the future. the only thing art school has over youtube videos and online guides and shit is personalized critique + structure. which is very useful, but if youre diligent you can make up for it. your resume doesn't matter for art, your portfolio does.
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I followed the money, but now at 26 I wish I could go back, so that I could instead pursue my passion. Hindsight is truly 20/20. I'll never get those years back.
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>>3515787
programming isn't exactly math, but there are more jobs and they pay better of course. you'll have to excel at something in order to do well in it. if you have doubts about art or don't feel like you can compete, then the safest way is to go for programming and learn art on the side - you can transition careers later if possible. in order to compete in art you'll have to be very motivated and driven. being merely ok at art is fine as long as you're willing to work very hard. I wasn't exactly a natural either. it really all depends on how hard you want to work.
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Not sure if you're still around but...
I went and followed my passion into film school, got a bunch of debt and now work in LA in shit low wage assistant jobs as I try to make it as a screenwriter. To be able to afford rent I do web dev on the side cause I know WordPress and took one HTML class in college. I've been here four years already and can't really break into the industry. I wrote an original animated TV script that got me accepted to a fully funded MFA program but I don't think it'll help to earn more money or with my career cause no one in the industry cares. So now I'm saving up to hopefully make a short film or find someone to collaborate as I have no drawing/animation skills at all.

The struggle is a pain, but I learned if it's truly your passion you'll continue to do it even if you do something else or can't afford to do it, that's why they call it a passion.

If I were you I'd do the thing that earns you money faster so you can afford to take time off to work on your passion.
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>>3515817
How true is this
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>>3515799
This is bullshit right? Obviously if there’s high demand, you’ll need to be super good to beat the competition. Aka, if you haven’t already been dwelling into software since the age of seven, you’re NGMI.
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>>3516097
>make it as a screenwriter
that's harsh. writers, musicians and fine artists are really the biggest starving artists these days. Commercial visual arts are fairly lucrative in comparison, especially since it's easier to showcase your skill, since the nature of the art has a lower time investment for the viewer.
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>>3515787
Go STEM, anon. It will support you financially while doing art as a hobby (or a passive side-line if you want)
Also this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOS7bB050Bs
t. IT fag
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>>3515787
DON'T FOLLOW YOUR PASSION.
Bring your passion wherever you go, man. I am naturally talented for learning and teaching languages, although I've always dreamed of illustrating. I teach for a living, I got a nice job with paid vacations three times a year and I use that time to illustrate and I'm having an expo soon. Students and fellow teachers look aghast when they see the workbooks I design for each one of my courses. It's pretty crafty and the signature of my job. Do what you need to eat but bring that spirit with you and let it grow, maybe one day it will become something.
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>>3516100
not true. The lowest/entry level position of a programmer related job still has an above average salary and this is coming from someone in a shitty 3rd world country
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>>3515787
I agree with some of the other anons here. Don't follow your passion, a lot of people do that and it's a mistake. That will always be there on the side, and perhaps in the future once you're set you can focus on it more fully. Make a living on your natural talents while you can.

t.33 year old boomer
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I'm not reading all that. If you understand physics and mathematical concepts quickly and easily, get an engineering degree. Ideally computer eng, software eng, elec eng, aero eng, and maybe chem eng or mech eng.

"Pursuing your dreams" is retarded and you'll regret it by your late 20s. I know so many late 20 somethings that went to trade school after spending their 20s working shitty minimum wage jobs with their humanities degrees.

If you want to be a homeowner in your 30s, get an engineering degree. The boomers fucked up the economy and it's nearly impossible to get a middle class life without being extremely careful with how you spend your 20s.
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>>3516133
a more correct statement is to only follow your passion if you've determined that
a) It's viable commercially
and
(b) You've figured out the time commitment it will take, and know that you can put in the work.

You need to be able to judge how good you are honestly and be able to identify areas you need to improve and then work on those issues in an effective way. Then repeat many times for years until you're skilled enough to make it. Not everyone can do that, it can only happen if you really enjoy what you're doing and make sacrifices for other things that aren't as important.
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>>3515787
Art is more transcendental and fulfilling
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>>3516152
Art can be done in your free time, after you get off work where you pull a six digit figure.

I would argue if art is your passion, you should stay away from pursuing it as a career lest it become drudgery.
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>>3516160
In a pragmatic way that works. But some of us derive a strong sense of purpose and want to pursue our vision to the limits of what is possible.

I just got fired from my 10 years old IT job and don’t plan to go back to that soul crushing experience despite the lower income prospect of art
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>>3516172
>I just got fired from my 10 years old IT job
just curious anon, why did you get fired?
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>>3516175
US hugely reduced the budget for the refugee project that sustained most of my office.

Thanks Trump
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>>3516175
Probably because of an H1B worker. Which is why you should always try to get a job that requires security clearance. That way a non-citizen can't cuck you out of employment.
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>>3516140
But how would you know if you want to be a homeowner in your 30s? The only reason for doing so is if you're planning on having a family and you can't even plan on that unless you already are in a relationship in the present time.
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>>3515787
hey i'm you
1. one of those degrees is useful. if you wanna do art work on your portfolio instead
2. art and programming are very similar to me, self-directed learning, making projects, designing solutions and building things from your ideas. programming isn't math (cs is though)
3. both require years of practice to get good but the bar for a programming job is way way fucking lower.
4. you can do both, it's good to have constructive hobbies instead of whatever normies do
5. if you're just seriously starting art now, grinding to pro level is an immense amount of pressure. you're staring down thousands of hours of work
if you seriously like graphic design....which is typesetting and boxes or whatever you can do html/css, it's the same thing.
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>>3515787
go STEM since it's a field that constantly needs new members, while art is extremely competitive.
Honestly I envy you OP, I'm the opposite. I wanted to join medical research to do some good for the world but I'm too dumb for science and I'm doing design and illustration instead.
I wish you good luck whatever you choose
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You know buddy, you can find a middle ground.
Maths may bore you to death but also be your talent, doesn't mean you have to sit at a desk and answers questions as a job.

Heard of Robotic/Civil Engineering? Graphics programming? Html? ...chemist??

Maths science jobs can be sweet asf if you find your niche.
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>>3516222
>But how would you know if you want to be a homeowner in your 30s?
So you don't perpetually pay rent on an apartment? So you can actually own property and build wealth and invest your earnings instead of pissing away money on a rent check every month?
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>>3516243
Math is unironically objectively easier than learning how to draw
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>>3516254
>owning property

What are property taxes?

>pissing away money on a rent check

What is pissing away money on a mortgage bill only to be paying rent in the form of property tax forever?
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>>3516278
>What are property taxes?

Something completely affordable unless you're living in Beverly Hills. Try moving out of whatever downtown shitlib coastal population center you currently live in and move to somewhere that isn't a commie shithole with stupidly high tax rates.
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your passion definitely
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>>3516271
This is only true in the current educational system. If there were just as much focus put into teaching how to draw, it would be the same as math.
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>>3516286
what if i like being able to move around, live somewhere convenient and relocate anywhere for work?
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>>3515787
easy, not everyone can be an artist. It's not something you can learn. Artist think through visual perception in space.

Science guys think through algorithmic perception, and want to explain everything through stagnant formula and numbers that never change.

stick to boring math, it's your thing and you can probably make some money with it. Also graphic design is not art, but designing business cards and normie flyers.
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>>3516100
What? Nº dude I started programming at university at 18 and I landed a 25k job where I do fuck all.
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If you can, try doing both. Try getting a degree in stem as a sort of backup, so if you can't find a job in art or its not paying the bills alone, you always will have a job to fall back on.
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>>3516299
Buy a house and then rent it out while you live your degenerate beatnik life. You dirty hippie.
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>>3515787
>I'm naturally talented for math and STEM topics
lol no wait until you get to university in that then you can talk
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>>3517237
Multivariable calc and ODEs aren't even hard as long as you actually pay attention in class.
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>>3517649
the point is that there is a huge difference from high school math




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