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Historians who studied slavery in Spain concluded that Spain may have had the largest African population in Europe after the XV century

We know that in the fifteenth century slaves arrived in the peninsula through the slave markets of Barcelona, Valencia, and Baleares and that in the sixteenth century Lisbon became the major slave provider. The custom house (alfândega) of Mourão, a Portuguese settlement on the border between Portugal and Spain, testified to this trade, registering the massive entry of African slaves to Extremadura from Portugal
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Furthermore, slaves were not necessarily luxury items, and people belonging to very different social groups and of radically different economic means could be slaveholders.
Indeed, in some places slavery was so widely present (or rather omnipresent) that contemporaries complained about it. In both the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries the authorities of Seville thus remarked that the number of African slaves was so great that they outnumbered the regular citizens. Because of their presence, Seville looked like a chessboard, alternating between white and black (“se parecían a los trebejos del ajedrez tanto prietos como blancos, por los muchos esclavos que hay en la ciudad”).
Recent research suggests that slavery and the presence of Africans continued to be important factors in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries and even into the early nineteenth century.
Why in the seventeenth and eighteenth century people living in Spain (and witnessing the large African population there) still considered slavery a colonial affair. Were all these people blind?
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The literature offers a single answer: the disappearance of Africans was contemporary to their omnipresence because the existence of things does not necessarily make them visible. That is, visibility, or even protagonism, is one thing, and existence is another. Africans, we are told, were habitually depicted in Spanish American art and in early-modern European paintings in general. Nevertheless, they were mostly absent from Spanish Golden Age paintings, in which if they appeared at all, they were normally depicted as Christians and by extension also as whites. This happened because these Golden Age paintings were pedagogically oriented. They were meant to convey the message that conversion was important. Of course, conversion did not change the external color of Africans, but it sufficiently affected their interior constitution to lead artists (at least) to depict them as ordinary Spaniards, not Spaniards of African descent. Artists of African descent seemed to have followed the same interpretation, depicting themselves as fairly white-skinned individuals who were dressed as Europeans. Among other things, this self-presentation was useful to demarcate the distance between libertos (freed slaves) and slaves; while libertos were white, slaves continued to be African not only in culture and faith but also in color.
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>>90944442
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>>90944442
salsa?
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>>90944442
>>90944456
>>90944489
>t. Meme from /his/
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Southern Europe got blacked, we all know that.
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>>90944442
>>90944456
>>90944489
autism
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Portugal was 10% black and mixing was allowed
All Portugese people are quadroons and it shows, dunno why you try to imply its Spain the ones who mixed in mass with blacks
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>>90946505
sure sure and then wake up from our dream




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