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Hi All,

Looking to get into bows, namely recurve bow shooting.

What technique (3 finger, thumb, pinch?) draw is gud?

Which side should the arrow rest be on? I hear conflicting views (right/left for right handed?)

What's a good beginner bow? What kinda draw weight am I looking for?

I really don't know much about the sport and am just looking for a way to practice in my backyard.
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First for Samick Sage.
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>>36795975
>Beginner
Start with ~25# for target shooting and switch out to heavier limbs once you have your technique down.
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>>36796063

What poundage is usually used for hunting durr?
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>>36796110
Hunting regs change from place to place. In general, 40# is usually the minimum. Most people will tell you to use 60#.
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>>36796063

How about draw length? I'm about 6', what draw length should I look for?
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>>36796412
Got a tape-measure handy? Because you can measure your draw length using one (just google "draw length tape measure").
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>>36796439

I guess I'm about 29-30," thanks
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>Which side should the arrow rest be on? I hear conflicting views (right/left for right handed?)
You go by dominant eye, not dominant hand. You can find your dominant eye with a five second test, look on YouTube. If it's your right eye, the bow is held in your left hand and drawn with your right, and the arrow rest is on the left.
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>>36796500

I always imagined it was the other way around, if I were right handed and left eye dominant wouldn't putting the arrow rest on the right place it extremely far from my left eye?
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>>36796535
You aim by looking down the shaft, so it has to be in line with your eye.
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>>36795975

Would advise against pinch grip shooting, your only real practical choices are between split finger (one finger above the arrow, two below) and a three under variant.

If you are right-handed, the shelf should be cut out of the left side of the bow and opposite if you are left-handed. If you are using an arrow rest, it gets attached on the side with the shelf/sight window.

Any bow from a reasonably reputable company will do really. Ragim, Samick and PSE all make cheaper recurves. You might want a takedown bow so you can buy new limbs to move up in draw weight. On draw weight, get measured in an archery shop rather than just doing it yourself ideally, because it will effect draw weight. I'm also 6' and I draw 28" shooting three under with a high anchor point. If you have crazy long arms and actually are drawing 30" you could be drawing 6 more pounds than marked weight, for instance. 25-30# is a reasonable weight for a beginner. For hunting, 45# is acceptable and 50# and up is the norm.

It's worth mentioning that arrows aren't anywhere near "one size fits all" - arrow choice will be guided by how deep the shelf on your bow is cut, your draw length, the length of your arrows, your draw weight and the total point weight up front (also arrow diameter, but you're probably not buying micro-diameter as a beginner). Seek advice, preferably at pro-shop while getting set up with the bow and read up on spine and arrow tuning yourself to get familiar with it.

On backyard shooting, beginners miss high, sometimes very high. Have a backstop and start fairly close.
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>>36797407

Thanks for the info.

I have a 1/2 acre backyard which is basically a huge hillside so I feel like it would be perfect.

Is it bad for the bow if you end up drawing more than its advertised draw length?
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>>36795975
>What technique (3 finger, thumb, pinch?) draw is gud?

3 finger is the generally accepted way for boring modern recurve shooting.

>Which side should the arrow rest be on? I hear conflicting views (right/left for right handed?)
If you are drawing with your right hand you will need the rest on the left side of the bow assuming you are purchasing a bow with a shelf cutout. Reason being the twist of the string will pull the arrow to the right when drawn with fingers. In styles of archery using thumb rings it is the opposite.

>What's a good beginner bow? What kinda draw weight am I looking for?
Samick sage or similar is decent. Start at a low weight and work up to avoid injury. 25# is good. Make sure you are using proper form and drawing with the back muscles. Find an anchor point and stick to it every shot. Follow through should be the same every time as well.

>>36796655
>he consciously aims his bow

no thanks

>>36796135
No need for more than 45# but my state for example requires 55#. Shouldn't go lower than 35#.
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>>36797478
>Is it bad for the bow if you end up drawing more than its advertised draw length?

Mass production fiberglass recurves are generally built to be drawn a couple inches past the advertised length but I would highly advise against it. It will also depending on the design start to stack and may if it is a shorter bow begin to pinch your fingers with the string.
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>>36797478

All good. Industry convention is to measure draw weight at 28", so 28" will be the "advertised" draw length on all bows (unless you get one made to draw a given weight at a given draw length, in which case they'll mark it with that). How far you can draw a bow varies between bows and is mostly a function of how long they are and how they're made. A modern recurve with fibreglass-laminated limbs that's 62" + long should go out to 30" draw relatively easily whereas that's potentially a much more questionable idea for a 58" recurve or shorter. You will likely experience stacking before you get to the point of breaking a bow though - this is when draw weight increases very quickly and disproportionately at the end of the draw, and it generally indicates you're drawing the bow too far.

If you find out your draw length is really 30", basically just get a 62"-64" recurve and you'll likely be fine. If you're 28"-29", the vast majority of bows on the market will work for you.
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>>36797502
>If you are drawing with your right hand you will need the rest on the left side of the bow assuming you are purchasing a bow with a shelf cutout. Reason being the twist of the string will pull the arrow to the right when drawn with fingers. In styles of archery using thumb rings it is the opposite.

So if you're using a thumb ring and shooting right handed the arrow would rest on the right side of the bow?

That's interesting.
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>>36797708
Yep! You'll see the same effect in Japanese Kyūdō with their gloves.
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>>36796135
Whatever is above your legal limit that you can shoot accurately 100% of the time. American indian hunting bows seem to have been around 30 - 45 lbs, but flint arrowheads are actually sharper than steel broadheads. Still, a double bladed broadhead will shoot clear through a whitetail deer from a 35 lb bow. A 4-bladed broadhead needs a 40 - 45 lb bow to do this. More power will shoot flatter, gives you more margin for error and more flexibility on quartering shots. But none of this matters if you can't put the arrow where you want it.
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>>36797502
>he consciously aims his bow
>no thanks
Your brain still uses the arrow for aiming.
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>>36798080
Speaking of low-tech arrow heads, have you seen this?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsjON0YBkp0

Surprisingly effective.
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>>36798165

that's not how it works....
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>>36796495
At 6ft i dought its that long for correct form with a recurve. Go to archery shop and have it checked.
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>>36796655
No really. Its more instinctive. No real aiming
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The best advice you will ever get but no one ever follows is to get low poundage limbs to start. I'm not fucking around. Don't act like you're all tough and buy some 50# limbs. Anyone over 16 can draw those back but a beginner will learn the worst fucking habits imaginable and will destroy any real possibility at learning how to shoot a bow correctly and accurately. Spent an extra 75 dollars, get another set of limbs, and don't be a jew.

Getting into archery costs money if you actually want to be successful with it.
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>>36797407
I agree with all. This guy gets it
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>>36797407
>Would advise against pinch grip shooting, your only real practical choices are between split finger (one finger above the arrow, two below) and a three under variant.

What about thumb?

It seems like nobody ever mentions that even though historically it's still pretty significant
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>>36798197
I haven't seen that particular video, but american indians would use trade or discarded glassware to make arrowheads. Esp if chert or obsidian wasnt native to their area.
Knapped stone can be extremely sharp, flint and obsidian get an edge that is a single atom across, with no jaggedness - its perfectly smooth even under an electron microscope. You can cut a cell cleanly in two with one, a steel scalpel can't come close. It's occasionally used in surgery even today.
https://www.cnn.com/2015/04/02/health/surgery-scalpels-obsidian/index.html
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>>36798414
>What about thumb?
Its pretty necessary for shooting from horseback, but has significant disadvantages when shooting from foot. Its hell on your thumb, it requires an awkward twist on your bow arm, pulling even moderate draw weights will cause arthritis in both your drawing thumb and bow arm elbow. And its very difficult to get a consistent release. But its the only way to shoot from a horse, which is why it was developed and why it persists.
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>>36798319
Not to mention the potentially severe injuries you expose yourself to by starting with too high a draw weight
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>>36798319
>Reply
don't listen to this fucker. I bought a 50lb bow on craigslist for $40 3 years ago. it came with 32 aluminum arrows. Ive successfully killed 2 deer with it and im probably a better shot than the guy im replying to.

Archery is cheap as fuck. even the hunting. My city has like 6 free archery ranges and they are never busy.
Get a bow off craigslist (+arrows if possible) for ~$50ish. Watch a couple videos on youtube and buy a couple cheap melons and go to a free outdoor range.
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>3 finger, either 1 above 2 below or all 3 below.

>Left side for right handed person

>25-50 pounds depending on how big you are and your goals. Don't be macho, start light. 25 for the range, 50 for hunting.

I mostly shoot compound for competition and hunting but I have a recurve for my "plinking" bow.

Get a 3 piece. They tend to be more consistent because it's easier to build a bow in 3 pieces than one 5 foot long stick. Also you can get multiple limb sets.

I have a no-name 3 piece that I picked up in my local archerey shop for like a hundred bucks. It came with two sets of limbs, 25 and 45 pounds. It's nothing at all special but it's plenty of fun to shoot. I just have a cheapie stick on plastic rest and a single pin sight off one of those kids bows they sell at big box sporting goods stores. Just enough of a sight to take quick shots at gophers.
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>>36798414

Thumb shooting comes up a lot in Eastern archery, and it fixes a lot of the problems of shooting very short bows at longer draw lengths. You can do it and it obviously works, but as a Westerner shooting a hunting style recurve, there's not a lot of use in doing it. Your bow isn't so short that any string pinch can't be fixed by shooting three under and there doesn't seem to be a particularly compelling reason to draw to the ear rather than the corner of the mouth or eye tooth when drawing to eye tooth/corner of mouth produces perfectly adequate power and provides better alignment of arrow with eye. All modern archery equipment (excluding compounds) has been built with finger shooting in mind into the bargain and finger shooting is what the sporting community and the coaches know. It just overall winds up being the practical choice in terms of gear, effectiveness and available expertise. Still, no reason not to get into Korean archery or the like if that's what you're really interested in.
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I bought a cheap 50lbs Chinese traditional recurve horsebow a year ago and damn, shit is smooth as fuck and fun to shoot.

But one problem I have is kinda finding the right spine and weight for the arrows. If I want to have them fly where I want them and not peer off to the right or left, I really needed the heavy aluminum ones, but then, they impact range and I already see how slow they fly and how badly wind will impact them. Still didnt find the perfect arrows yet.

Now, I really get the feeling that right arrows are hundred times more important than the bow itself. Damn, how did the people of old deal with that? I thought they could literally grab any enemy arrow from the ground or make one themselves and achieve the performance they are used to.
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>>36798813
Also consistency is the key. Find a good place to anchor your hand on your face. I have a way that I sort of hook my index finger around my cheekbone and place the tip just at the corner of my nose. It's hard to explain but I'm sure you'll figure out your own way.

Also when you release the string, don't burst your fingers, slowly slide them backwards and let the string slip off. Again, consistency is key.
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Carbon shaft arrows... Isnt there anything worse in the world?
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>>36798941
>Carbon shaft arrows... Isnt there anything worse in the world?

No, carbon is de way. They either flex and return to straight or they shatter. Aluminum arrows bend and never quit shoot right again.
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>>36798970
It takes quite some retardation to break aluminum arrow shafts (such as shooting against stone walls or pulling them out of a target like ass), but carbon shafts break so easily and splinter at a micro-level. And then, one day, you carelessly pull them out of a target and cut open your entire hand at razor-sharp splinters, or they fuck up your whole hand because they broke during shooting since they were damaged and you didnt see it since the breaks were so small.
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>>36799018
I've been shooting weekly and competing monthly for nearly two decades and literally never had that happen. They only break when you miss and hit a rock or wood with a nail in it or whatever.
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>>36798615
>Its hell on your thumb, it requires an awkward twist on your bow arm, pulling even moderate draw weights will cause arthritis in both your drawing thumb and bow arm elbow.

Curious about this, I always heard it was actually easier on your fingers and arms than 3 finger draws?
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>>36797846
That scene was sick as hell man, made me try some trick shots as well, bit harder with a Longbow over a Horned bow.
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>>36798738
Enjoy the rotator cuff injury. 3 years isn't enough time for the problem to manifest.
Nobody listen to this idiot. I don't give a shit if you hurt yourself but don't give out stupid advice to beginners who don't know better.

>>36799433
I don't know what he means by that. It feels the same if not a little more comfortable to me. I also tried it using intentionally poor form drawing with my arm muscles and keeping my elbow down like most people I see and it was less comfortable. Don't know about long term effects like arthritis though.
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>>36798615
>Its hell on your thumb,
Not really?
Your thumb isn't supposed to be strained at all just held in place by your index finger.

>it requires an awkward twist on your bow arm
What?

>pulling even moderate draw weights will cause arthritis in both your drawing thumb and bow arm elbow.
You're doing something seriously fucked up if that happens.

>And its very difficult to get a consistent release.
A lot easier than 3 finger draw, I don't get what you mean. All you're doing is literally letting go of your thumb. 1 point of contact compared to 3.

>But its the only way to shoot from a horse
Objectively wrong.
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>>36799018

how the fuck does that even happen
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>>36801970
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7zewtuUM_0
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Samick Sage okay for a 31 inch draw? Or should I go up to a 66" bow?
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>>36795975
Get a compound you fucking neck beard muh lady piece of shit
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>>36797502

There's definitely a need, deer far more likely to jump the string on with a bow that slow.

Stay in your lane.
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>>36798738

This is terrible advice, particularly when it comes to the arrows:

Let's see if you're smart enough to identify why this is poor advice, and you know next to nothing about archery.
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>>36803119
There is literally nothing wrong with recurves.
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>>36798235
It does you dingus, at the end of the day, the main diference about "instinctive shooting"(that has nothing about being instinctive) and GAP shooting is that one you are doing it coinciously and the other is just pure muscle memory, but the fact that the arrow is pointing at the target in the same way is pretty much the same.
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>>36803584
'Need' referring to pass through of the arrow. You are right that many recurves are very loud. I have selfbows that are very quiet when properly set up with correct nocking point and brace height which can alleviate that.
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>>36804395
Do you aim a baseball as you throw it? What a nitpick, tell me is a man shooting from a galloping horse with a thumb ring spending time looking at his arrow to aim?
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>>36805463
I get your point anon, but the thing is that you are doing the same motion shooting "instinctive"(unconcious) than shooting by "gapping" (concious), either way you are aligning the arrow to your target, no other way around it, that just the nature of shooting with a bow.

Either way, you have to train your muscle memory to be able to shoot straight without putting much concious thought into it.
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cwzv4Q2KUkM
>00:21
>tfw no archery gf
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>>36795975
mediterranean draw (three finger) is what most equipmemt is made for, partly because the arrow and arrow rest should be on the opposite side from your dominant hand
for a starting bow you mostly just want something light so you can work on your form without fighting the draw weight too much, 20 lbs. is a good place to start, but you can try out a bow before you buy it at a sporting goods store-- but you should be aware that drawing a bow once is very different from drawing it 100 times in a short period
beyond that, it's a good idea to get a takedown bow with multiple limb options so you can save money movung up in draw weight
for a target you can buy one for like $30 or, for low draw weights, you can just use a hay bale
I recommend looking up NuSensei on YouTube, he has tons of videos on every aspect of archery, I wish I'd found them when I was just starting
good luck
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>>36803104

66" is pretty huge
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>>36795975
>What technique (3 finger, thumb, pinch?) draw is gud?
Three finger is the norm for western bows, like the recurve.

Thumb is used for horse archery, especially Mongolian style, where you keep the arrow on the opposite side of the bow from your body.

Pinch is pretty much exclusive to Japanese style, which is mainly a horse-archery technique anyways.

Generally speaking, the way the string rolls off the release is the side the arrow should be nocked, because that ensures on release the arrow's flexing doesn't touch the riser.

Also, if you get a bow with a sight mount hole, like Martin's Takedown models (which are all interchangeable, so you can buy the three different bows with different weights and change the limbs between, or buy one you like and can buy different limbs) I recommend this as a fantastic cheap arrow rest:
https://www.amazon.com/New-Archery-Products-Center-Flipper/dp/B0009TRQT0
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>>36799018
>Doesn't flex-test his arrows to be sure they aren't fucked
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>>36807131

Thumb is not exclusively a horse archery technique. I don't get where this meme comes from
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>>36803119

What's wrong with recurves?
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>>36807190

Legit question how do you do this?




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