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How familiar /lit/ is with the works of the greatest Latin American writer?
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>looking at pictures of authors instead of reading their work
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brazilians need to stop pushing this irrelevant meme author no one's ever heard of
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>>10487159
Wat?

>>10487206
>irrelevant meme author no one's ever heard of

He can't be a meme author if no one has ever heard about him. You are contradicting yourself here, anon. What's the best Latin American in your opinion btw?
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>>10487120
I've read Ficciones and Labyrinths
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Muito afrancesado pro meu gosto.
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>>10487297
You are mistaking him for the Argentine writer Borges, the second greatest Latin American writer.
>>10487309
Voice your opinion. Who's the best one then?
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>>10487339
Eu aprecio Euclides da Cunha, mas por motivos mais pessoais.
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>>10487120
I found his social criticism and wit quite interesting, but not much else.
Are there more facets to his work besides politics and irony? I'm currently quite interested in Brazilian literature, and would like to get deeper into it
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Gabriel García Márquez is the greatest Latin American writer. Machado is great, but nothing he ever wrote compares to One Hundred Years of Solitude.
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>>10487418
Literally pleb incarnate
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>>10487428
Não, meu amigo. Você não sabe do que esta falando. Patriotismo cego é apenas mais uma forma de ignorância. E não chame de pleb alguém que te votaria no chinelo qualquer dia e qualquer hora. Se você ao menos tivesse uma mínima ideia.
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>>10487445
Haha. >Te BOTARIA no chinelo. Maldito corretor ortográfico querendo lapidar as expressões coloquiais.
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>>10487445
Não sou aquele anão, mas acha mesmo que García Márquez é melhor do que Machado? São bem diferentes, o valor da escrita deles está em lugares diferentes. Não falo por patriotismo, mas acho Machado muito mais interessante. Acho Rosa também tão bom, se não melhor do que os dois, mas nem vale a pena citar ele aqui pros gringo porque traduzido não tem graça alguma. E Borges? Outro gigante impossível de ignorar.
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>>10487283
he doesn't care about any latin american writer because they don't write in his native language, and his head is too far stuck up his ass to actually learn a new language and open his mind to new ideas

>>10487309
>>10487357
Kind of agree. Plus, romance and realism are two thing I'm not very fond of. And I, too, had a much better time reading Os Sertões than Dom Casmurro or Quincas Borba. The one work of Machado I really liked was Posthumous memoirs, bu then again, I have only read 3 of his novels and can't say much about him in general.

>>10487418
My vote goes to Guimarães Rosa. In my opinion, the greatest modernist in latin america. His prose in Grande Sertão is masterful, impecable. It was chosen by an international organization as one of the 100 very best books ever written.
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>>10487407
>Are there more facets to his work besides politics and irony?

He is indeed very ironic, it gets even tiresome if you don't take a rest from his work. However, politics is never a major theme in his novels, it just so happens that some characters have political ambitions.

One of the major themes of his work is deception. His characters are often lying to themselves, to others and to the readers.

He is also a master of the short story having written over 50 contos. I recommend Midnight Mass, one of the most sensuous story without being a little bit explicit. His stories often leave you wondering what happaned of if anything has happenend at all.
Another story that I recommend is the Secret Cause, my personal favourite.
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>>10487120
But I think Borges, Guimarães Rosa, GGM, Vergas Llosa and Rulfo are miles better than him.

Also, Os sertoes is the best piece of Brazilian literature.
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>>10487521
>My vote goes to Guimarães Rosa
I've read a few stories from Sagarana and I can't say I enjoyed much, mostly fue to my lack of familiarity with the language variation employed by the characters and the narrator.How does Grande Serão compares to his short stories?
I will eventually read, but his work is intimidating.
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>>10487603
>Rulfo
He only has one novel and a dozen short stories. I haven't read his novel, but Assis' short stories are much better than Rulfo's. Rulfo only has 3 or 4 short stories that are worth rereading while Machado has more than 10.
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that dosent look like robeto bolaño
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>>10487611
Not the anon you were replying to, but Grande Serão is amazing. People call it the Brazilian Ulysses, which I find silly, since the thing has more in common with the Oulipo (mostly Perec and Queneau) than it does with Joyce. That being said, it does share certain traits with Ulysses. Both books are epic and both celebrate literature.

It's one of the most human books I've ever read, and it has some really heartbreaking passages that are beautifully written. Reading it is like running a marathon, but you should really read the thing.
>>10487625
His short stories weren't his forte, though I do find them good at worst. Pedro Páramo is the one thing that makes Rulfo such an amazing author. The atmosphere in that thing is insane.
>>10487637
He's good, but c'mon. He's not even better than Cortázar.
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>>10487647
Thanks for the explanation about Grande Sertão.

My only experience with Rulfo were from his short stories. Having said that, your comment made me curious about his novel. Have you read it in Spanish?

Agree with you on Cortázar, but he has some excellent stories like baba do diabo. I'm also curious about his novel, but people often say it is not nearly as good as the short stories.
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>>10487603
I partially agree on os sertões, because of the cultural value it has, it is a geographic, political, historical, sociological book with extremely high literary value not only about the conflict itself, but about brazil in general.
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>>10487120
I have read most of his stories and some of his poetry (criminally overlooked on this board btw). My favourite ones are Borges y yo, La casa de Asterión and Pierre Menard, Autor del Quijote
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>>10487673
Yeah, I read Pedro Páramo in Spanish. I have no idea of the translations are any good, though. One of the things I liked the most about the book was how amazing and vivid the imagery and atmosphere were despite the prose being incredibly unpretentious. The writing is very tight.

I do think that Cortázar, as a whole, is a better short story writer than he is a novelist. Books like 62 are just too inconsistent in terms of quality. That being said, Rayuela is the best thing he ever wrote as far as I'm concerned.
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>>10487418
He's not even the best Colombian writer. Read Asunción Silva and León de Greiff pleb
t. Colombian

>>10487696
That's not Borges anon. My favourite are Deutsches Requiem, Funes el memorioso, el inmortal and la lotería en Babilonia
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>>10487815
Cmon now, Anon, you are just trying to sound more original.
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>>10487120
You got the wrong picture kiddo
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I thought it was borges and that it wasn't even up to debate
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>>10487815
>la lotería en Babilonia
Good shit, that's also one of my favourites

What about Cortázar? For me
>Un lugar llamado Kindberg
>Carta a una Señorita en Paris
>El Perseguidor
>Las Babas del Diablo
>Autopista Sur
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>>10488011
Maybe the most beautiful. She would not be on a top 20 list of best Larin American writers though.

>>10488036
>Carta a una Señorita en Paris
>El Perseguidor
>Las Babas del Diablo

These three are very good, especially the last one. I also enjoy Circe from the book Bestiary.
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>>10487521
>It was chosen by an international organization as one of the 100 very best books ever written.
kkkkkkkk
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Arlt > the rest
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Im brazilian, but Gabo was better.
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>>10488484
num gosto pega eu otario
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>>10488515
Overrated hack.
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>>10487120
I've read all of Sabato's novels, so pretty familiar actually!
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>>10487120
>It's another Brazilians think their culture is superior to everything in the world thread

I have a shit load of BR friends and this is their mindset. Not one of them is the least bit humble or open to criticism of their country.
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>>10490405
>open to criticism of their country.
how can you people criticize what you have not read? taking criticism from a guy that have read and knows what he is talking about is one thing, taking shit from retarded americans (mostly. but also had that happen with a french) that have never read 1 brazilian or latin american writer is a completely different scenario, which is 98% of the cases I see on this board.
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>>10490427
stop trying to speak for latin americans in general when it's brazilians who are singled out for being constantly obnoxious
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Call me a pleb but I prefer Lima Barreto
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>>10490466
I stated a fact, little friend, and it will remain a fact regardless if its a brazilian, a russian or a canadian stating it, like you or not. The vast majority of the people in this board outside of latin america have not read any works from the countries here, with exceptions of major names like borges, bolaño, márquez and very rarely machado de assis.

and its fine, no one is or should be forced to read anything, but you if you don't and you start talking shit about it, don't expect us "close-minded and extremely proud and nationalist brazilians" to just submit to it. If you knew how little % of brazilians are actually proud and nationalist, you would be surprised, specially in this website.
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Overrated nigger
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>>10490596
lmfao, "little friend"

is there a single brazilian without a massive inferiority complex and a desperate need to compensate?
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>>10490692
I think "little friend" means girlfriend in some languages.
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>>10490692
He was right. People here on 4chan and all around the world make bold statements every single day based on nothing but their own opinions, scraps of information, prejudices and egocentrism. It’s naive to take such affirmations as valuable information. Most people here don’t know anything about Egyptian letters, or Vietnamese letters, or Polish letters, and throw their own ignorance and arrogance upon those nations back, as if they were to blame for being “cultural wastelands”. The fact is that there are much more talented people around the world that we have time to acknowledge; masterpieces as beautiful as those of european fiction have been produced in several countries but might never enter the mainstream media. French and English languages are lucky for becoming dominant in the world at the same time that globalization was starting and consolidating itself, but make no mistake: you will find writers that are as talented as those in France and England in many other lands if you have the will and curiosity to do so. If you were to research the literature of Malasia over the next year I’m sure you would be impressed by que gems you would find.
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>>10487120
>greatest Latin American writer

That's Borges

/thread
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>>10490761
Nope. He was too intelligent, extremely well read, devoted to books and literature as few people have ever been. However, he was too distant from people, too distant from real life, too shy near women, to the point of almost living as a celibatary for most of his life. His work is cerebral, it is beautiful, but more a work of ideas and elaborate allegories. We don’t feel in him the same kowledge of life and human beings that Shakespeare and Tolstoy emanated from every pour. Borges is not the creator of other human beings. I honestly think that García Márquez, even with all his flaws, was superior to Borges. Borges was a sublime writer, but he seems more like a teacher for the truly great poets of humanity and sages of human relations.
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He was writing about poland's fight for independence in19th century so I consider him ok and I respect him.
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>>10490815
T. Polack ofc
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>>10490810
García Márquez was a journalist. He certainly was better at the depiction of human relations than Borges. However, his themes are pretty recurrent (magic realism: yellow butterflies, melancholy, loneliness, unexplicable things, latin american life). The creative power of Borges is superior, he can write about many different things: philosophical paradoxes, teology, gauchos and gunmens on Río de la Plata.

Both are great, it's matter of personal taste at this point. Gabo is a journalist (he understand real human beings), Borges is a world creator and an erudict (not very connected to real world but with an immense creative power).
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>>10490810
>Borges was a sublime writer, but he seems more like a teacher for the truly great poets of humanity and sages of human relations.

I love Borges, but that's exactly what I feel about his work. There is very little human relationship there. Most of the characters are one-dimensional, often in a dream-like state with no room for development. Regardless of that, his work is unique and deserving of every praise it receives.
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>>10490866
>gauchos and gunmens on Río de la Plata.

Agree with you on philosophy, but almost every Latin American writer has written about this, it is a recurring theme, even more "urban" writers have one or two short stories on that.
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>ITT: Butthurt BR's

DELICIA
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>>10487120
Who the hell is this guy anyway?

As for Latin American authors, I've only read "la hojarasca" by Gabriel García Márquez for an assignment for literature class during high school but I didn't like the images of the dusty small town it "painted" in my mind (considering how unpleasant is the part of Colombia that inspired the book in real life) and the nostalgic(?) feeling the place where the story takes place produced in me.
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>>10490896
>>10490810
His poetry, especially by the end, becomes really humane and depressing at times. And frankly, the cerebral and elegant nature of his fiction is perfect and very intimate. Qlon, Uqbar and Orbis Tertius is the perfect introduction to Ficciones, because it works as an invitation to explore his universe, his motifs, his fiction, and simply what he finds fascinating. We're essentially travelling across his mind.

But even leaving that aside, I find short stories like The Circular Ruins, Funes el memorioso, and The Library of Babel, just to give some examples, to be deeply emotional. Not in a overt and acute way like Arlt or Guimarães Rosa, mind you, but emotional and human nonetheless.
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Why are brazilian posters so fucking stupid on 4chan? I have met brazilians irl and they are nothing like the people here.

>7-1
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>>10491974
I am on 4chan for more than 8 years. One of the most gifted poets and readers I have ever encountered here is Brazilian. You must be new here. Ask for the Rimbaud, the Tolstoy and the Shakespeare copy-pastas.
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>>10492052
Machado?

Great poet, but to consider a brazilian the greatest writer in latin america is laughable when garcia marquez, borges, rulfo, bolaños, cortazar, onetti, uslar pietri exist.

Hell, he is not even the best poet.
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>>10492232
a guy like borges, ok, but holding bolaño so high up, you are memeing. The amount of high quality works assis has produced by itself already disqualifies bolaño. Something close to 50 works, including novels, plays, poetry and short stories. That not even mentioning his posthumous works.
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Childhood is when you idolize Borges. Adulthood is when you realize Saer's prose beats anything.
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>>10492232
Rulfo has only written one great novel, his short stories are only good.
Bolaño? Lol
Cortázar has a few good short stories, but not nearly as good as Machado's.
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>>10492232
I was talking about a /lit/ poster
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>>10492052
>Ask for the Rimbaud, the Tolstoy and the Shakespeare copy-pastas.

I've been here for a while and I n3ver heard about them
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>>10487120
I agree with OP, but not in poetry. My favorite poet is Augusto dos Anjos, Ferreira Gullar is nice too. Actually, I was reading a little bit of contemporany poetry and there is alot of trash. God, blog-poets whom think they know how to write poetry and then they go and publish a book.
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>>10487206
He's not DFW to be a meme.
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>>10492232
Machado is a novelist far more than a poet.
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>>10492667
That just goes to show how much the guy know about him.
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>>10492657
There are many meme writers other than DFW
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>>10487603
>Vergas Llosa
see what you did there
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>>10487206
Woody Fucking Allen heard of him and considers his book one of the best he ever read.
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Jorge Amado, anyone ?
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>>10492667
>>10492681
Well, to be completely i rarely give a fuck about hue authors.

Honestly, only hues seem to rate their authors.
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>>10497382
Jorge Amado was the biggest hack of the portuguese language since Gil Vicente.
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>>10498355
why do you still feel the need to post retarded shit like you are an authority on the matter?
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>>10497330
>woody allen likes him, that means he's great!!
do you get your book recommendations from oprah?
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Paul Rabbit is the greatest american writer.
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>>10498355
>Doesn't care about brazilian literature.
>Post in thread about one of the greatest brazilian writers, without knowing anything about him.

Well, good bait anon. Autism everywhere.
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>>10499564
>one of the greatest brazilian writers
the tallest dwarf
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>it's the fucking "macacos think the rest of the world is obligated to know some Hue Huenos Huenada because reasons" episode again
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>>10499578
>Nope. I think it's that episode about "Literature doen'st rotate around Europe and USA"

but, b--, but I have Garcias Marquez, Bolaño, Borges. Am I brainlet?

C'mon, give me a break.
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>>10499569
Seriously, don’t talk about what you don’t know, it’s embarrassing. We are not discussing an exact science here, but at least try to act with a little professionalism. Arrogance itself is bad enough, but combined with ignorance...it’s just painfully pathetic. If you don’t know a particular author, if you haven’t read a particular book abstain yourself from commenting, for your words don’t have any value. It’s like a big man-child trying to scream his way into getting what he wants. Be more professional.
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>>10499847
lmao
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>>10497382
No, he's good and develops his characters like few have, but lacks in actual prose. I haven't read many LatAm authors but I really wouldn't but this guy on a top 20 list, let alone number one
>>10499476
ebin
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>>10492419
Any recommended books?




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