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Why has this book been virtually suppressed by economic and financial academia. Whilst the work of Marx is frequently discussed, this much more practical solution is never mentioned today, and yet it was one of the greatest selling books in American history.
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>>11314919
People like landlords and mine owners stopped being so relevant. The share of wealth that is converted to rent for landlords and the share of the economy that is made up of the primary sector both shrunk. Capital liquidity increased. The economy became dominated by the secondary and then the terciary sector.

I would think the housing crisis would've brought atention back to Georgism tho. But I guess to get atention these days you would have to have some regime expousing your ideas. Georgism was pretty popular with Christian solidarity proponents (mostly Catholic, some Orthodox like Tolstoy) but these guys lost power as public intellectuals. Evangelicals are doing great for themselves, but they don't really have equivalent social teachings.
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>>11314954
>people like landlords and mine owners lost significance
But it’s all the same today, just under different rulers. Developers own massive amounts of land.

And the value capture the single land tax could capture would mean that ridiculous rents and housing shortages would be unheard of
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>>11314977
If you mean the factory owners and stockholders and tech moghuls and most of the uberwealthy people today - the land they own just isn't worth that much. For the industrialists it is the developments made on that land that have value (they tend to put their factories in low value plots anyway), for the stockholders they might not own any land themselves, and the tech moghuls make their money from advertisement and IPs.

Real-estate developers, even the richest, don't derive most of the value from land itself anyway, their assets have value because of the developments made in that land and that land's location in relation to other valuable developments.

Only companies that extract wealth straight from the ground prize the land they own most of all, and countries all over already nationalize those rendering taxation of these companies useless, and the ones that let that ground wealth be exploited privately only get those companies to drill for them because costs to those companies are kept low. Which is why companies like Exxon hold governments by their balls - society relies on that mineral wealth (oil, gas, coal, metals) being avaiable on the cheap.
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>>11315001
But you’re still neglecting the fact that the Uber wealthy you talk about snap up all the land they can and own properties all over and charge people rent on it. If land was taxed than you would at least give people an incentive not to snap up all the land and you could fund infrastructure using the captured value instead of having the rich block development to keep prices high.
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>>11315123
https://www.forbes.com/sites/erincarlyle/2016/03/14/the-20-richest-real-estate-barons-in-the-world-2016/#218368116540
The wealthies real estate tycoon isn't even on the top 10.

https://www.bizjournals.com/seattle/blog/techflash/2011/10/amazons-bezos-among-largest-landholders.html
The richest guy in the world buys land for his vanity projects - he gets pretty much all his money from retail (and his shop is virtual, it is simultaneously the world's largest retailer and the retailer that takes up the least land relative to the volume of it's trade). You could tax him for it (as you do) but shifting from a tax on income and capital gains (of which he has a ton) to a tax on land (which he spends more money on for fun that takes from) would actually lighten his tax load, meaning less revenues for the state.

This is part of a larger trend. Gates, Buffett, Soros, all those guys, they don't need land to make money. Their most valuable assets don't take up physical space at all.
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bum
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>>11314919
fuck off to /litpat/ leftycuck

We don't take kindly to socialists around here.
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>>11315206
But this is a marxist board lol
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>>11315235
No it isn't you communist
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>>11314954
>(mostly Catholic, some Orthodox like Tolstoy)
Tolstoy was not part of the Orthodox church by the time he read P&P.
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Landlords and property developers aren't a problem.
t. Landlord and property developer
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>>11314919
Marx’s main contribution was showing how economic categories such as “capital”, “commodity” and “labour” are not “natutal” or transhistorical and should not be taken as a given. Henry George’s main contribution was inventing a new tax. Which of these two was a deeper and more original thinker?
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>>11315206
"we"
wew, he thinks he's part of a community
wew, he's trying to gatekeep 4chan of all places
>>>/pol/
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>>11314919
>much more practical solution
bull fucking shit
georgism is just another expression of the petty-bourgeois pipe dream of perpetual small-scale, original, "good" capitalism. marx preemptively btfo'd him in the poverty of philosophy, his polemic against proudhon, whose utopism amounts to the same as george's.
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>>11315243
Yes it is you monkey, are you new here?
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>>11315365
economic calculation problem
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>>11315307
Marx's historography was factually wrong.

We can apply all those concepts accurately to all market systems all the way to the ancient city of Ur and even gift economies are not at all like Marx described them (Maus, 1925).
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>>11315419
propaganda
>spouting le planning never works meme in 2018
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>>11315442
why posts graphs of state capitalism if we are debating socialism?
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>>11315235
hahaha lmao lol
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>>11315442
Read your graph:
>economy plummets with war communism
>jumps back up to pre-communist levels with the NEP (ecoomic liberalization)
>with stalinism imperialistic expansion is initiated, with plundering of eastern europe
>western (capitalistic) allies invest in the USSR
>industrial capacity of central europe destroyed, a boon to soviet exports
>industrialization reaches new heights with demand for oil ballooning, while the USSR happens to be sitting on top of massive oil reserves
>inefficient state apparatus propped up by oil revenues, becoming ultra-dependent on that one commodity, which causes the whole thing to come crashing down when oil prices start dropping in 1981
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>>11315463
in case you're serious >>>/gulag/
besides, we're debating planning vs free market, not capitalism vs communism. capitalism makes various uses of economic planning, which makes the "economic calculation problem" even bigger bullshit.
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>>11315177
Ok point taken, what then would be the equivalent of “capturing the value” taken up by these rich tech moguls? If a government attempted to tax their capital gains, they can just wash them through a tax haven, or stop allowing their service in your area. How can they be taxed if their business is digital and their profits can be transferred anywhere around the world in half a second.

What would be the Georgism/Marxian solution to this? The means of production can’t even be seized anymore because it’s all digital.
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>>11315206
more georgists are libertarians desu

>>11315347
le epic owned him with the wew meme and told that CHUD to go back to pol which u have never visisted becuz ur scared of fascists
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>>11315476
>the "economic calculation problem" even bigger bullshit.
oh my god youre so fucking dumb
read the actual text that described the ecp
you
fucking
dipshit
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>>11315476
The economic planning in market economies isn't determined by a single agent, like centrally planned economies are. That is the difference. In the market, individual businesses fail and are taken over by more efficient businesses. In a way, it is the same with centrally planned economis: the regime fails and is replaced with a less micromanaging regime.
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>>11315476
im serious. i thought you were an actual socialist. no fun debating you guys

>trust me guys the class above us that controls our life and surplus value are not the bourgeoisie.
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>>11315442
haha do you actually believe the ussr's self reported statistics
you deserve to get your teeth punched out fucking dweeb. holy shit pick up a book instead of browsing leftypol memes and charts
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>>11315475
>imperialistic expansion is initiated, with plundering of eastern europe
>industrial capacity of central europe destroyed, a boon to soviet exports
where did communism touch you, stanisław?

>>11315489
>The economic planning in market economies isn't determined by a single agent, like centrally planned economies are.
Do you believe in the USSR they just produced whatever comrade Stalin felt like?

>>11315493
>LIES! IT'S ALL PROPAGANDA!
>*goes back to reading the black book of communism and solzhenitsyn*
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>>11315480
Of course they can be seized. People need physical devices to access the internet. We can monitor and tax facebook, amazon, netflix, etc - there has just been a lack of political will until recently. You probably have been seeing a lot of notices about privacy policies being updated. The EU has enough leverage to affect change in those companies because it controls access to a market that is so large that those companies don't want to let it slip. I suppose a lot of businesses can go on the dark web, like they do already, but those have necessarily less reach sense their practicality is contingent on staying low-key.

We can also weaken the stranglehold of hardholders of IPs. For most of the developed world pharmaceuticals are pretty affordable since pharmaceutical companies can't have distribution monopolies and/or set prices all by themselves. The US is an exception to this and they are pretty much the only 1st world country where life expectancy actually dropped in the last decade. As informatic piracy becomes common, some companies will fail (unless they lobby governments to repress these changes) while others will smart up and offer new goodies instead of focusing on hardholding rights (like Valve's Steam, which maintains an ongoing relation with the consumer rather than just standing between the consumer and the products he could easily pirate anyway).

We have to stay aware of the economic winds, but the answers on how to deal with these are probably not in books from the 19th century. Technological solutions bring new technological problems, which require new solutions, and so on.
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>>11315517
The USSR exported grain while people starved on the country.

The production quotas and resource allotments were decided by a central authority. Not one man, but a bureaucratic apparatus who set all the prices, stocks and wages. Rather than there being several producers and distributers adjusting their behavior to the evolving economic combinations they were set to follow previously laid out instructions by distant agents. For instance, many people went hungry because agricultural yields didn't meet production quotas set according to previous yields; rather than having the farmers or the retailers adjusting the exchange rates for the reduced supply of foodstuffs, these were redistributed as if the quotas were met because the local admnistrators were rewarded for meeting quotas. This depleted the food stores in the country side, with little to no compensation, and even if the rural population had something to barter for more food they wouldn't be allowed on account of the state's restrictions on trade... at most, if they were lucky, they could buy back their own products from the thugs that took those from them.
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>>11315541
>People need physical devices
So what are you proposing to spy on them or confiscate them, I don’t get it?

Also how could you monitor them when they are the ones who store the data, especially when it’s their product aka Facebook
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>>11315206
>We
You don't speak for me /pol/fag
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>>11315422
>we can apply market concepts to all market systems guys!
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>>11315476
The USSR failed at economic planning, despite the great breakthroughs of Nobel prize winning economist Leonid Kantorovich, because they didn't have sufficient computation and communication technology to make it practical. This is no longer a problem, and the only remaining obstacles to a planned economy are political.




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