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Questions That Don't Deserve Their Own Thread

Which version of "Complete Works" of Plato is the best?
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The one you posted
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the one which is complete
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A Thousand Platos
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winchester or caxton
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>>9764656
The Jowett version includes the controversal scene where Socrates meets two young philosophers William and Theodore. It's sometimes dismissed as an forgery by medieval monks (similar to the Epistle to Seneca the Younger), but Jowett addresses that fairly well
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>>9764681
The Winchester manuscript is superior, but honestly either is fine. I'd worry more about getting a good edition than which manuscript its based on.
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>>9764708

I thought this was going to turn into a gay fantasy. I never heard of this before, what's it about?
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>>9764714
William and Theodore claim to be from a distant land (sometimes translated as 'the future', but that's a whole different topic). They bring Socrates with them to their land, where no one listens to him speak, and then he returns.
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Which book accurately portrays >tfw no gf? I've read Oblomov, Sorrows of Young Werther and Houellebecq but i'm in need of more.
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>>9764733
Knut Hamsun, Hunger.

>tfw no gf
>tfw no food
>tfw no heat
>tfw no sanity
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What is this Bullshit?!
I just picked up Turgenev's "Fathers and Sons", read his short biography and then started reading the introduction and the translator is spoiling parts of the plot.
He is describing how Turgenev saw his characters before the idea of the novel so he knew each character's specific behaviors, mannerisms, thoughts, etc. beforehand and especially since he based certain characters on real people which makes the kiss between X and Y so much more impactful and btw Z dies.
Why can't they put the translator's comments ( which they really just are) at the goddamn end of the book?
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>>9764759
We all learn this the hard way when we first start reading on our own but NEVER read the intro if we want to keep the suspense of the novel.
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Bookzz has been down forever. Was an alternative ever created or discovered? Bookzz was the best.
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>>9764656
whats the best book learn to write an argumentative essay. Im a stem fag so assume my english is 1st year english undergrad level.
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I started reading the Brother Karamazov over a year ago and stopped when I got to the public prosecutors speech because I just couldn't stand out for some reason. Now a year later I want to finish the book but I don't know if I should just pick up where I left off or start over again. I know I'm near the end, but I'm worried I've forgetten important points that will make me miss out on a lot of stuff. I did enjoy what I had read, so I was thinking just finish the book and in a year or two, just read it again.

>>9765432
If you're okay with not torrenting, libgen is really good.
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>>9765432
The just moved to a new site

http://b-ok.org/
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Anyone have recommendations for interesting/edgy active blogs?
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>>9766026
K a n t b o t
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What book has the best prose? I mean it does deserve a thread, but I make too many and don't contribute enough. I decided I'm going to focus on responding to threads that I can.
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What's the word to describe (negatively) something with too many appendages? For example, to describe a tree with too many branches or a centipede with too many legs
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>>9766263
excessive
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I plan on reading the 4 Chinese classics, doing a small amount of research these are the translation choices I'm thinking of going with. Are any of these choices particularly bad?
>Anthony Yu for Journey to the West
>David Hawkes for the Story of the Stone/Dream of the Red Chamber
>Moss Roberts for Romance of the Three Kingdoms
>Sidney Shapiro for Water Margin/Outlaws of the Marsh
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How does Light in August and Absalom, Absalom stack up to The Sound and the Fury and As I Lay Dying? The sound and the fury is 10/10 for me and As I Lay Dying was like 8/10 just for perspective
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What the fuck is the "my diary desu" meme and where did it come from
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>>9766263
>>9766263
polymelia? hyperphalangy?
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>>9764656
That Cooper one right there for sure. Better translations then the other one.
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>>9766260
Don't tell me the Great Gatsby
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>>9766363
nor 1984
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>>9764681
Winchester is widely considered to be more faithful/complete
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What's the literary device (not sure if I'm even using this term right) where you attribute all sorts of inexplicable nonsense to a certain thing called? For example, sci fi that explains away everything by referencing some sort of new element or power system in the technobabble, or the classic "it's magic I ain't gotta explain shit". Basically a rug under which one tucks all the loose ends with a lack of realistic explanation. I thought it was Deus Ex Machina but appearently that's totally different.
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Is this any good? I've heard it isn't much like The Prince or Discourses on Livy, but I like Machiavelli's style nonetheless. Has anyone here read it?
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Don't know if this is the right place to ask, but how would I go about learning Latin, and is it possible to become fluent in two years while working?
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>>9766661
Wheelock's latin and yes
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>>9766721
Have you read it? I've heard bad things about it, that it's old fashioned and hard to digest.
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>>9766736
I have, I enjoyed it
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>>9766748
Thanks, I'll look into it then. What sort of level of latin does it go up to?
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>>9766585
But that is Deus Ex Machina.
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>>9766313
Desu is "t-b-h", but autocorrected.

>What the the most profound book you have ever read?
>My diary "to be honest" (desu)

That's literally all the meme is.
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>>9766661
I'm also planning to learn latin soon and I've seen plenty of other posts on the board from people learning/wanting to learn. I wonder if there is an appetite for a /learning latin general/ where we pool resources, make guides, and generally shitpost in and about latin. I'm planning on using the Cambridge latin course books, does anyone know if they're any good?
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I wish to read the greeks as a basis for subsequent literary reading, as opposed to philosophical. What works do I begin with?
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>>9766287
>Are any of these choices particularly bad?
The order. Start with:
Water Margin
ROTK
Journey to the West
Dream of the Red Chamber

>>9766868
Read the same chart(s) as everyone else, which I'm not reposting again
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Does a degree in Classics sufficiently count for "starting with the greeks"?
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>>9766800
same desu
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>>9766758
From the aptly named literary-devices.com,
>Deus ex Machina is a rather debatable and often criticized form of literary device. It refers to the incidence where an implausible concept or character is brought into the story in order to make the conflict in the story resolve and to bring about a pleasing solution.
I can't find any definition that disagrees, even though I thought it was totally different.
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>>9764759
>learning that the intro often spoils the plot and should be read last

I hope you enjoy reading your first ever novel, anon
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>>9766985
>What's the literary device (not sure if I'm even using this term right) where you attribute all sorts of inexplicable nonsense to a certain thing called? For example, sci fi that explains away everything by referencing some sort of new element or power system in the technobabble, or the classic "it's magic I ain't gotta explain shit".
I call it hand waving, to lack a better term.
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>>9766758
Deus Ex Machina is about the plot, not the setting.
And hence it's more about general plausibility than scientific realism.
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Anyone own pic related?
I've read it a bit from a gen lib copy but I'm looking to get a physical one for better reading but I just want to get the standard paper back version.
Is it decent quality or will I wish I spent extra for the hardback?
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How much should I read a day?
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>>9765520
lel, i just stopped brothers K at the beginning-ish of chapter 10. i haven't picked it up in two weeks. there's really not a lot of plot detail that you would need to remember; it's just the forward thrust of the emotional impact that's important. for me, the book slogged after zosima died.

which translation did you read? i highly recommend ignat avsey's.
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>>9766661
wheelock's is shit if you want to learn latin for the aesthetics of the language. the key to learning any language, dead or not, is to deny the conscious method of translation whenever possible. that is to say, when reading a text, you should strive to immediately apprehend the meaning.

in this, wheelock's does a shit job; you will run through the charts over and over in your head. i learned latin in high school using the cambridge latin books and won summa cum laude on the NLE (which was written for texts like wheelock's). to put it another way, when i tutored a fellow student learning from wheelock's, she was so overawed by my recitation of catullus that she gave me the first blowjob of her life—and swallowed.

>>9766852
i learned latin well enough to produce competent translations in three (school) years, going up to the end of unit 4. i was a lazy, shithead stoner for two of those years. it seems a little gimmicky or childish (like rosetta stone) at first, but it does result in an intimate understanding.

supplement with a slim rulebook called "essentials of latin grammar" (i think) once you get past the first, red book
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>>9767348
do you have a kindle, a kobo, or are you reading it off your computer? reading it on my kobo aura one is the best for me, since i can choose to ignore the footnotes when i want. the kindle and the pc would be torture, however. the cover is pretty resilient and has a good, matte feel to it; the papers are bible-thin. it's a small beast of a book and best if you plan to sit at a desk when you read it.
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>>9766898
If you live in a Romance language country, do go ahead. But the Oxford program only mentioned two works by name: the Iliad and Aeneid.

I suspect what might pass for a degree in Classics among Anglos might require you to read all the works between them on your own, which I'm afraid means no.

>>9767348
The thing about digital copies, besides costing less in terms of cash and trees, is that you don't have to worry whether your eyes are getting too old for the font size, you can always enlarge things.
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>>9767406
Can you read it on a desk without holding the pages down? Cause that's my main concern.
Would you say that it's similar to nortons books?
I've got the norton shakespeare and I'd want to get the bible if it's similar to that.
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Which translation of Crime and Punishment?

/lit/ keeps saying P and V is shit but won't mention a better alternative.
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>>9767400
Can you self-teach from the Cambridge latin textbooks then?
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>>9766260
Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul. Lo-lee-ta: the tip of the tongue taking a trip of three steps down the palate to tap, at three, on the teeth. Lo. Lee. Ta. She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock. She was Lola in slacks. She was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always Lolita.
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Are there any philosophers that make arguments against Cartesian methods of philosophizing?
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>>9767536
This.
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>>9764759
>reading for the plot
sad!
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how can i read when it's too fucking cold?
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>>9767581
Heidegger, the Structuralists (not the post-Structuralists)
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>>9767581
Also what Ricoeur called the masters of suspicion: Marx, Freud and Nietzsche, obvious influences on the Structuralists
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is it necessary to read st. augustine & thomas aquinas before descartes?
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>>9767692
Descartes breaks with previous Scholastic (although Augustine isn't really a Scholastic) methods of philosophy and does something completely different. You don't have to read them to understand Descartes, but it would give you an idea of what methods he is breaking from (again, he's breaking more from Scholasticism than anything).
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>>9767692
Most skip them, Scholastic philosophy would be what Descartes criticizes. He's creating a new philosophy, a modern philosophy.

Did you read Aristotle at least?
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>>9767707
not yet, still reading plato. i'm just looking ahead a bit to stay motivated, and was curious. i plan on studying aristotle thoroughly once i feel ready to move on from plato.
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>>9767707
>Most skip them

That's a fucking tragedy..
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Which copy/version of Ulysses is the best?
I know that there are a bunch of different ones but I want to get the best or most accurate one.
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>>9767508
i've not had a softcover norton's, but the pages are similar. with a little required breaking-in of the spine, it can be read without too much fuss.

>>9767532
yes, you can. it's very user-friendly, especially with the workbooks.

>>9767523
for crime and punishment—david mcduff (i think he's penguin)
for brothers k—ignat avsey (oxford)
for war and peace—the oxford update of the maudes' (amy something), or just the maudes' original
for fathers and sons—surprisingly, constance garnett is the best i've read
>source: blyaaaaaaaaaaat
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There are a lot of reading lists floating around here, but most seem quite broad in scope.

What does one need to read, with little prior philosophical background, to read and engage with the existentialists? Particularly Nietzsche.
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>>9767348
I own the hardback because it was actually cheaper, but I'd probably recommend it over the softback, especially given that they have bible paper which I find a bit cumbersome in paperbacks. The paperback version also lacks the concordance, if that's something you care about.
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>>9767523
I liked Oliver Ready's translation
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>>9768260
Well I'd say you should basically work your way (mostly) backwards...
Start with Sartre's "Existentialism Is A Humanism" to get your feet wet.
Then move onto de Beauvoir's "Ethics of Ambiguity" and Camus's "The Myth of Sisyphus".
Next up you should check out Heidegger's "What Is Metaphysics" lecture.
Then and only then can you approach Nietzsche. Go with "Genealogy of Morals" first then perhaps "Twilight of the Idols" or "The Antichrist". Don't jump straight in with "Thus Spoke Zarathustra" cause it is one hell of a ride. Save it for later.
THEN you can maybe try Kierkegaard's "The Present Age". "Fear and Trembling" & "Sickness Unto Death" are readable but quite Christian (not such a bad thing but can be annoying at times).

So there you have it. Obviously I have missed key people: Jaspers, Dostoyevsky, Merleau-Ponty, to name a few...
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>>9764656
What is the best order to read Platos complete works?
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>>9768424
There's no real "best" order. You should probably start with Apology or Euthyphro, and then read roughly in the chronology of the "blocks" of his writings people have attempted to work out.

If you get a complete works, you are probably going to be fine reading things in the order presented there.
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>>9766644
no one is replying because lit only reads books that are lit approved and they don't include books of the beaten path, then they are never read, hence they aren't included as lit approved or patrician or whatever the pre approved term is this month

I'm sorry that no one can help you anon
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>>9767370
????? As much as you like obviously ????
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>>9767592
Gloves if your poor
Central heating and radiators if not

Your probably poor though otherwise youd just turn your heaters on
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>>9766644
>>9768527
/lit/ mostly reads classic literature and philosophy. if you ask /his/ they might give a better opinion. no sense bashing this board for not commenting on something that's another board's focus
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>>9766287
I can confirm Hawkes is the best for Story of the Stone.
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Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship or Italian Journey? I found a decent price on the Princeton edition of Wilhelm Meister and it seems like the overall more important book, but on the other hand Italian Journey sounds comfy as hell and it'll help me get a better sense of the diversity of his output rather than just reading another novel.
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Why is Heidegger¨s Being and Time important?
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>>9767370
66 pages at least.
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>>9768824
Because all continental philosophy and post-analytic philosophy was affected by it, and it's the continental contribution to the Linguistic Turn.

Man on a mission to reinvent Western metaphysics contributes to the philosophies of phenomenology, ontology, language, mind, technology, hermeneutics, death, poetry...
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>>9769018
Could you elaborate on the context of B&T?
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>>9769029
It all started when he asked himself: What does the word "to be" mean? A question Western philosophy ignored, for millennia the sorry excuse for "answer" was "a being," a very big one, specifically. Heidegger wasn't particularly impressed.

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/heidegger/
Heidegger's philosophical development began when he read Brentano and Aristotle, plus the latter's medieval scholastic interpreters. Indeed, Aristotle's demand in the Metaphysics to know what it is that unites all possible modes of Being (or ‘is-ness’) is, in many ways, the question that ignites and drives Heidegger's philosophy. From this platform he proceeded to engage deeply with Kant, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and, perhaps most importantly of all for his subsequent thinking in the 1920s, two further figures: Dilthey (whose stress on the role of interpretation and history in the study of human activity profoundly influenced Heidegger) and Husserl (whose understanding of phenomenology as a science of essences he was destined to reject). In 1915 Husserl took up a post at Freiburg and in 1919 Heidegger became his assistant. Heidegger spent a period (of reputedly brilliant) teaching at the University of Marburg (1923–1928), but then returned to Freiburg to take up the chair vacated by Husserl on his retirement. Out of such influences, explorations, and critical engagements, Heidegger's magnum opus, Being and Time (Sein und Zeit) was born. Although Heidegger's academic and intellectual relationship with his Freiburg predecessor was complicated and occasionally strained (see Crowell 2005), Being and Time was dedicated to Husserl, “in friendship and admiration”.

Published in 1927, Being and Time is standardly hailed as one of the most significant texts in the canon of (what has come to be called) contemporary European (or Continental) Philosophy. It catapulted Heidegger to a position of international intellectual visibility and provided the philosophical impetus for a number of later programmes and ideas in the contemporary European tradition, including Sartre's existentialism, Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics, and Derrida's notion of ‘deconstruction’. Moreover, Being and Time, and indeed Heidegger's philosophy in general, has been presented and engaged with by thinkers such as Dreyfus (e.g., 1990) and Rorty (e.g., 1991a, b) who work somewhere near the interface between the contemporary European and the analytic traditions. A cross-section of broadly analytic reactions to Heidegger (positive and negative) may be found alongside other responses in (Murray 1978). Being and Time is discussed in section 2 of this article.
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>>9769065
How did his interpretation change the way one sees earlier phil?
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Does anybody here have the hardcover of the Cooper version of the Complete Works of Plato, and if so, how is it?
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Anyone know where I can find an ebook of Fitzgerald's translation of The Aeneid or Mandelbaum's translation of The Divine Comedy?
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>>9769083
By introducing the ontological difference.

>Heidegger: What does the word "to be" mean?
>Western metaphysics: Bruuuuuh... it's like this huge entity, a being totally like you and I and this chair and baby seals, only bigger and more universal man, you can call it, uuuuuhhh... idea, energeia, substance, monad or will to power and so, yeah.
>Heidegger: 'no'

Read the rest of the article I just linked.
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Is it necessary to start with the greeks?

If yes, which is best for a brainlet, who never read philoshopy?

I wanted to get Meditations first
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>>9769136
No. Start with what you want. Descartes, Hume, Hegel, Kant are all fine enough starts.
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>>9769136
Since you're a self-admitted brainlet, for me it's a definite yes, so go all the way from Mythology and the Iliad as per the chart.

Meditations is not a particularly challenging book but Aurelius as a philosopher is a very late Stoic, and an eclectic one at that.
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>>9769136
Unless you want to read tons of philosophy, not really. I would still advise familiarizing yourself with Greek mythology as it's referenced a lot in all genres of literature.
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>>9769136
It depends on what exactly your goal is.
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So /lit/, I just decided to get drunk and make a mockery of one of your favorite poets. At the very least, I show you the courtesy of not starting a new thread about it. Enjoy!

Two girls emerged from across the bar
And sorry I could not marry both
And be one rambler, long i stood
And looked at one as long as I could
Until the other went out the door;

Then took my chances, as just as fair
And having perhaps the better claim,
Because she was lonesome and wanted wear;
Though as if my drunken smear
Would make her look the other way.

We both that night equally lay
in dreams no mare had trodden black.
Oh, I kept her smile for another day!
Yet, knowing how way leads on to way
I doubt if she would ever come back.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two girls emerged from across the bar, and I -
I took the one still staining by
And that has made all the difference.
>>
How good are the Barnes & Noble classics editions of books? There are a ton I need to get to and they're only $5 but are they any good? Especially with translations I'd be worried, but even stuff like Moby Dick to things with multiple versions, what are the chances the b&n one is the best?
>>
Where to start with Edgar Allan Poe?
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>>9764668
Underrated.
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>>9766026
https://samzdat.com/
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>>9768424
http://plato-dialogues.org/email/950404_1.htm
Although grouping Plato's works into tetralogies is kind of outdated, I think the order shown in that link is a pretty reasonable way to read Plato.
>>
What is the legacy of Gorky today in Russia?
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it's weird i haven't fapped in a week but im not even in the mood i dont know whats wrong with me, although my eyes kept gravitating to boobs all day so i must be sort of horny subconsciously, but i just dont feel motivated to fap at all
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>>9767400
>essentials of latin grammar
by bennet?
>>
My favorite authors are: Pynchon, Gaddis, McElroy, Barth, Wallace, Faulkner, and Alexander Theroux, am I going to enjoy Proust? I'm going to start it soon regardless, but I'm just wondering if others with similar taste have enjoyed it?
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>>9770217
If you want cheap paperbacks that are high quality and look nice, go for Vintage.
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>>9771076
proust is way better than most long and boring shit, actually maybe i should read budding grove now, been looking for something to get into
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>>9771086
Thanks anon. Though I don't think any of the authors I listed are boring.
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>>9771086
holy shit, just grabbed it off my shelf and read the first page, ohhh yes so fucking good, british modernists can't fuck with proust, maybe mann can hang maybe
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>>9771105
I'm hoping to close out the year with Joseph and His Brothers, and your post excites me.
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>>9771086
no i agre i just mean compared to some brit shit like woolf or joyce, ok fine ulysses is dank, but a lot of his other shit goes soft, and woolf come on, but proust is like just kind of comfy with a tinge of boring but just a little twinkle of something to make u smile, but at the same time hit u with some psychological shit that change the way u think about ur life, so fucking good
>>
>>9771116
i'm debating joseph and his brothers or city of god, i know i'm only going to get through one doorstopper this year, wanna make it an impactful one
>>
It hurts so much when someone you care deeply for and love tells you to stop being so "attached." The whole time on the phone with him, he sounded very monotone and uncaring. I guess he doesn't care anymore. Love is duumbb/ / Time to watch de animes and cry :DD fugg

What are some fulfilling works?? Something about love or growing up, the cheesier and more normie the best. Or sad stuff. Or good stuff. I don't know, something just filling in it's nature, ya know? I just need something.
>>
>>9771131
Literally Austen. Her novels more or less follow the trajectory of silly little girls setting their youthful erroneous ways aside and finally settling down with the Good Man who was right there under their nose all along but whom they never saw due to their self-involved myopia.
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>>9769133
I am so sorry, but to me this appears (as Heidegger hates to put it) self-evident that being and beings are two totally different things.

This can't be correct that H was the first to have this idea in this scale.
>>
Don't listen to anyone else itt.

https://www.amazon.com/Collected-Dialogues-Plato-Including-Bollingen/dp/0691097186

Get this; thank me later.
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Putting aside all of his autistic sperging out, what are the main arguments of Schopenhauer's criticism of Hegelian philosophy?
Are they still valid?
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>>9771375

Schopenhauer skewered Hegel's philosophy so badly that most Hegelians prefer to not even acknowledge him.

Marx was Hegel's heir, Nietzsche was Schoppy's. That pretty well sums it up.

Hegel was still less retarded than Fitchte though.
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>>9771375

His main criticism (aside from the obvious one) was that Hegel's Absolute was just the cosmological proof smuggled back into philosophy under a different name.
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>>9771295
Ordered a copy, thanks.
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>>9771375
Schopi's Will isn't sapient, Hegel's Spirit is
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>>9771295
Why? The one you posted doesn't even have all the works of dubious authorship (which are noted as such) that are in the Cooper version.
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>>9771258
>to me
Because you live in the 21st century. Believe it or not, pre-Nietzsche philosophers weren't living in the current year, and the gospel of the Death of God wasn't announced to the vast majority of them.

Do you see why Heidegger is important? The ontological difference is not the conclusion of Sein und Zeit, it's the starting point. Where do we go from here? Enter existentialism as the first response.

Anyway, I should remind you this is a thread for questions that don't deserve their own thread, what we talked about hardly fits that description.
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>>9767406
aren't Kobo and Kindle the same? Been wanting to get one
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Why do I consider the Spanish and Italian languages less valuable than French and German?
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>>9771567
Because they are
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>>9768664
or lit is just a bunch of pseud's that don't know anything but act all intelligent when really they don't have two brain cells to rub together
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>>9771922
Sir, are you a victim of domestic buttblasting?
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>>9771927
No, are you a real doctor?

Don't act like lit isn't some elitist hellhive of unholyiness

lit acts all well read and intelligent but show them a book off the beaten track and they don't know how tor respond
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Does anyone read with a Kindle or similar? I'm interested in getting one, but I'm worried about my reading being too distracted, or I'll have too many things available to read and find it impossible to decide what to read.
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>>9768302
>it has the concordance
isn't that the catholic version of the NRSV, though? it's not the exact same as the ecumenical one; there might be other slight differences as well.
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>>9771933
Well, to be honest you should be reading influential books before trying to go off le beaten path and there are a fuckload of important works.
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>>9772295
I use Kobo.

>reading being too distracted
?

>too many things available
don't put many things to it.

>what to read
pick randomly
>>
>>9771545
i got my wife a kindle voyage in may, then i got myself a kobo aura one. kobo aura one has:
>bigger screen
>more customization
>native support for epubs, which is cool
>is totally waterproof
>an overall better experience
kindle has:
>a better store (if you don't use libgen)
>better support for translation
>on some models, buttons or haptic sensors you can use to turn the page
i much prefer my kobo, desu. every flaw i find with the firmware, the programmers fix without my asking. they are on top of their game, unlike amazon.

>>9771017
no, the one by w. michael wilson. it doesn't really matter, though—any slim volume of grammatical rules will do.
>>
>>9771545
Kindle is Amazon. I don't want to support Amazon.
>>
>>9768050
bump. I wanna know too! Tell us /lit...
>>
>>9766295
light and absolom are his best books imo

>>9770294
just grab any of his short stories collections
>>
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Is there any good "History of the World"? I bought pic related the other day and it's fine but I'm wondering if there's something better. I remember seeing a multi-volume set on here recently that was recommended
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>>9768050
>>9772441
In my Joyce class (taught by Prof. Paul Saint-Amour, good modernist) we read this. I forget the details
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>>9772543
How about this? Anyone read it?
I'm gonna crack it open after I'm done writing my MA thesis... Not enough time right now.
>>
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>>9772565
Thanks man, I appreciate it.
Why not pic attached though?
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>>9772565
Or this one ...?
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>>9764725
kek
>>
>>9764725

I have the Jowett version and literally never came across this...
>>
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I'm looking for a compact, single-volume edition of Shakespeare's works that I can hold (semi-)comfortably in my hand and that doesn't have too many notes. Is this the best edition to get? I think the RSC edition is the only other contender, and it's about an inch larger on both ends/dimensions.
>>
>>9764759
Pro tip: never read the introduction for a work of fiction.
>>
best DFW essays?

can pinecone influence be felt on IJ?
>>
is Simulacra and Simulacrum worth reading formally or is it too dated/ingrained in modern thinking to be worth the effort? (what I read elsewhere)
>>
>>9773303
>I read external judgement on a work I've never read and now doubt about reading the work that was commented upon

may I tell You how silly this is?
>>
>>9773303
Read the SEP article on Baudrillard so you can get a critical yet fair assessment that covers the guy:
https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/baudrillard/
and if you're still curious, carry on with S&S. But my favorite work is The Spirit of Terrorism.
>>
>>9773316
That little terrorism book is pretty wild for sure. I tried Symbolic Exchange and Death and it was quite awful actually. What other ones would you recommend ?
>>
>>9773284
Authority and American Usage (or something) is his best, on my opinion.

Nothing nearly as much as people would have you believe. He's much closer to Barth, Gaddis, and McElroy, if anything. His voice is distinct, though, and the comparisons to Pynchon are mostly about the length and complexity.
>>
>>9773392
For a Critique of the Political Economy of the Sign
Simulacra and Simulation
The Transparency of Evil
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>>9773312
look at the brain on this guy
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>>9773399
thanks a lot. so it would be fine reading it before any pynchon?
>>
>>9773455
I read it before Pynchon and if anything it helped. Pynchon is more difficult, and Infinite Jest is a great intro to the long, dense postmodernist novels.
>>
>>9771086
>maybe i should read budding grove now,
why not start with swanns way
>>
>>9773467
hum, ok. only big postmodernist novel I have read is ulysses.
>>
>>9767348
That's a great edition, lots of great supplementary stuff. I have the paperback version and it holds up just fine, although of course it's printed on bible paper which is annoying but i'm not sure if the hardcover is any different. I would go for the hardcover, since it's worth the money
>>
>>9773566
Ulysses is most definitely a work of Modernism.
>>
>>9773521
already read it
>>
What are the best Hemingway short stories? I've already read Hills Like White Elephants, A Clean, Well Lighted Place, The Snow at Kilimanjaro, Francis Macomber, The Killers, Now I Lay Me, and Homage to Switzerland. Any others worth recommending?
>>
What're the good plays by Tennessee Williams besides the obvious Streetcar and Glass Menagerie? From what I understand he drops off at some point, are his one-act plays worth finding a compilation of?
>>
Pre-reading for T.S. Eliot?
>>
What's a good Spanish publisher?
>>
>>9766585
Macguffin

Suspension of disbelief

Internal consistency
>>
>>9767348
Protip: If this is going to be your main bible, get an el cheapo NRSV as well that you can lug around and re-read and mark up with a pen if you feel like it

Oxford is great to read for your "thorough" read of a bible book (whether you like to do that before or after you read it more casually), but it's hard to sit down and digest ten billion footnotes, and it's hard to resist reading the footnotes to just read it casually. It's nice to have a good ol' personal Bible that doesn't resent you manhandling it, that you can read on the bus and so forth. The Oxfords are made out of tissue paper so thin that turning a page can tear it in half.
>>
>>9767581
The entire transcendental turn of Kant is in a sense a response to Cartesian rationalism

But Kant is of course also in the legacy of Descartes' epistemological foundationalism or "quest for a ground," which is critiqued by Nietzsche (also by Schopenhauer) and by Heidegger, and of course by the "school of suspicion" like the other guy said, notably _Dialectic of Enlightenment_

Check out a summary of Dialect of Enlightenment's argument, and a summary of Heidegger's problem with the Western search for the ultimate ground of rational subjectivity, and see what you think.
>>
>>9767400
>she was so overawed by my recitation of catullus that she gave me the first blowjob of her life—and swallowed.

and I thought I was the only one who got sex from being literary
>>
>>9767348
Does anyone has the leather binding of this, is it good?
>>
Are Lovecraft's works supposed to be read in a specific order or is any fine?




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