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File: bqg.png (2.6 MB, 1709x1000)
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/bqg/ - Bike Questions General

Last thread: >>1043950

Resources:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
>>
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BB30 question:
Does anyone know if I fugged up my bearings or can it be fixed with a press?

I was replacing my crankset and when pulling it out and I slightly made the bearing piece stick out/crooked (see pic) Is the bearing part supposed to be flush with the housing or is it supposed to be recessed? (The non-drive side is recessed)
>>
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If you have actually used Assos Cream before, I'd like to hear your opinion on it. Is it as good as I hear it is, or is it just hype?

I don't get saddle sores except very seldom anymore, but I do get patches of what looks like heat rash. If this stuff is good I might try it to see if it'll prevent that from happening.

Before anyone says it:
>I have good, quality kit (2 sets in fact, new every year)
>I have a properly sized, shaped, and adjusted saddle, and a properly fitted bike
>>
>>1047501
Just whack it back in again
>>
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Is there any value in moving from an Ultegra 6700 rear mech to a Dura-ace 7800, other than weight and bling factor?
>>
How much should I spend on a decent saddle? (in CAD)
>>
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>>1047586
On a related note, I recently bought a used CAAD9 at a LBS that came with a Selle San Marco saddle that costs as much as I paid for the bike.
Question: Isn't that nifty?
>>
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>>1047586
anything that fits your ass is the correct answer- i use an $80 tri saddle for mtb cause it fits my ass and taint. You could spend $20 to $200 but fit matters most.
>>
>>1047598
I was hoping to spend about $80. It's for a roadie.
>>1047595
Yes. Very nifty.
>>
are there differnent qr skewer thicknesses ?
I have some non series shimano hubs and I just put in some qr skewers I had lying around.
I feel like my wheels wiggle and I had trouble really fastening them.
>>
>>1047605
skewers are standardized, I would look very close at the skewer to make sure it's not broken or missing any parts, and check that the hub cones are adjusted properly too
>>
>>1047605
Thickness or width? Because there's different qt skewer widths
>>
>>1047605
Thickness, I don't think so. Width, absolutely. Maybe the skewer is bent? Or maybe the washer things that go on it are backwards or in the wrong order or one is missing? Or it's an old skewer with a worn out hinge?
>>
have a bike like pic related, but i hate the logos. (in green circles in pic related). any trick or tip to make em disapear or to mod the bike without having it to be a specialized paint job? something i can do on my own
>>
>>1047626
also, another serious question, am i beeing retarded?
>>
>>1047605
qr skewers compress the hub slightly, pressing on the bearings. the cones usually adjusted so that they have some play without the skewer but fit right when its there. if your new skewer doesn't have as much leverage on the bit you tighten it with and isn't as tight then you could have play in the hubs because of that even if nothing's wrong with the skewer
>>
>>1047626
>>1047627
Nail polish remover and yes
>>
>>1047626
what's wrong with the logos?
>>
>>1047555

7800 was a great group, but there's no reason to go backwards unless you're doing some period correct piece. I'd find a 7900 derailleur. That group is dirt cheap these days because it's 10 speed.
>>
>>1047633
just dont freggin like it :(
kinda looks like some femenine product.
>>
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The plastic washer(?) on my headset is pushing out on the right side. What, if anything, do I need to do? Completely new to bike mechanics
>>
>>1047626
My little pony stickers.
>>
>>1047678
Maybe its old and needs to be changed?
>>
>>1047678
It's not a structural piece, just a dust seal. You can try pushing it back in but if it won't go you'll have to remove the stem so you can slide the fork out of the frame a bit and that'll make it easier. If the seal is actually deformed and won't go back into place then you can either leave it as is or remove it.
>>
>>1047680
>>1047681
Thanks. So I suppose any washer or gasket I can find at a hardware store will do to replace it?
>>
>>1047678
you dont need to do anything about the plastic seal. it has deformed and now does not seat well. they often dont seat well brand new. they are a cheap way to add a water and dirt barrier to cheaper headsets whose metal parts dont mate well.

do make sure your headset is adjusted properly. firmly hold the front brake lever and engage the front brake. rock the bike forward and backward. is the fork solid or does it jiggle? jiggle indicates maladjustment.

upgrade your headset if you want actual water and dirt protection and/or run fenders.

but basically youre fine
>>
>>1047683
it isnt a washer or a gasket. it is a proprietary bearing seal. you might find a matching one in a parts bin at a bicycle coop.

to repalace it, you will need to remove the fork so determine if you want to delve into a large-ish undertaking.

a trick for sealing bearings that is somewhat effective and is universal is adding some silicone.

cut away the old seal. clean the exposed surfaces of the race and cup. add a line of silicone all around. cut a slit all the way around after the silicone has cured.

the seal deformation is not anything you need to address. water and dirt are getting into your bearings regardless because its a cheap headset. it will probably become pitted at some point. when that happens, replace it.
>>
>>1047540
is this name a pun?
>>
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I recently got an older Shogun steel frame road baiku. Most of it has stock parts, it's gear levers are in a retarded place (tip of handlebars), the pedals are absolute dogshit (not weighted, uncomfortable), and the brakes have an annoying setup from the previous owner(cables far too long).
It isn't retarded to pour in a bunch of love (money) and replace mostly everything with new parts over time and really make it my own, is it?
>>
>>1047703
>it's gear levers are in a retarded place (tip of handlebars)
>>
>>1047703
>It isn't retarded to pour in a bunch of love (money) and replace mostly everything with new parts over time and really make it my own, is it?
Depends on the quality of the frame; if it's a lower-quality frame from the 70s Japanese Bike Boom it's probably not worth it. If it's a nicer frame made of decent steel, maybe. If you post a picture of the rear dropouts, it will provide an idea of what kind of quality you're working with.
>>
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What's the proper way to remove some rust on a chain ring?
>>
>>1047724
Soak it in WD40 and use a shop rag to polish it off.
>>
/n/ewfriend here.
I'd like to buy a bike for commuting (2*15 km/day) in one of the largest european cities, but I'd also like to use the same bike for a 600km long trip this summer (I expect it to be mostly roads).
What kind of bike should I look into?
>>
>>1047752
What kind of trip, camping or "CC touring"?
I'd say a steel or aluminium touring or adventure bike would suit the bill well.
>>
>>1047753
Camping trip. Thanks for the recommendation Anon.
Also, what should I pay attention to in order to make sure the bike is comfortable?
>>
>>1047754
Frame size, saddle (this is personal) stack height (of the handlebars), tyre size and construction.
>>
I have a bmx bike and i have been trying to replace the back tire that is 20 x 2.125 with a tire that is 20 x 3.5 would this fit for my bike? Would i have to get a different rim?
>>
>>1047763
You wouldn't need a new rim, but you might have some significant clearance issues. I doubt your brakes (if you have them) or frame would be wide enough to accommodate such a large tire.

Also why the hell do you want a 3.5 on the back of a bmx bike?
>>
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>>1047764
because everyone knows wider tires are faster
>>
>>1047724
spray some wd-40 on some 000 or 0000 steel wool and rub off. if it is particularly bad you can use a brass or steel brush instead of the steel wool.
>>
Shimomo says I should use a 1X. Kinda interesting drivetrain advisor:
http://drivetrainadvice.shimano.com/global/en/drivetrain-advisor
>>
>>1047771
What do those different rider types even mean?
I know enduro is focussed on technical DH with "just survive" climbs, and XC is up and down with relatively less technical focus, but what about "marathon" and "trail"?
>>
>>1047773
http://www.ibikeride.com/beginners-mtb/1505-the-different-mountain-biking-disciplines-and-bikes-explained
>>
>>1047773
>XC is up and down
No, XC is 'Cross(="X") Country". Flatish, mostly not very technical, high average speed races with the occasional obstacle.
>"marathon"
Longish rides on gravel, fire roads and prepared woodland paths. Think XC/audax hybrid.
>"trail"
Woodland trails. Single track. Natural trails. Mud, roots and goofing off.
>>
>>1047775
>>1047776
Thanks m8s.
>>
>>1047775
That articles feels like it was written by a 12 year old - awkward phrasing abounds; spelling and punctuation errors in nearly every sentence.
>>
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i cant get the cranks out. its my first time doing it.
>>
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>>1047810
this is the extraction tool i got.
i already took off the bolts
when i start using the extraction tool, while inserting the extractor bolt, it gets really hard and i just cant keep turning it. tried a couple of times on both cranks. what im i missing here? thanks!
>>
>>1047811
You must first "unscrew" the extractor all the way. You can then screw the black bit, by hand, onto the chainset until it bottoms out. Lube the gang with some fat if you have it. Then, start turning the handle.

It will be easy until the extractor makes contact with the axle. After that you use force. Grab the crank arm with one hand for leverage and the puller hand with the other and use both your arms.

If this doesn't work you should double check that the puller is for square taper and not Octalink. They look confusingly similar.
>>
>>1047811
Screw the black part into the crank arms with the silver part wound out all the way.
Now screw the silver part in until your crank comes off.
>>
>>1047813
thanks, how can i check if the puller is square or octalink? been googlin no one tells it clearlly.
>>1047815
thats what im doing. just that the silver thing gets stuck and my crank doesnt go off
>>
>>1047811
Cover that shit in penetrating fluid and use a longer spanner, whack it with a hammer if you have to (not only will that apply more force but the shock can also help to break any corrosive bond between the crank arm and spindle).

>>1047819
That's square taper, because it's a square hole. If it was Octalink it would be a splined hole and the hole that the bolt goes into would be larger and your extraction tool wouldn't work (you'd need a plug to fill in the hole).
>>
>>1047819
>thanks, how can i check if the puller is square or octalink?
Square taper pullers will have a very small tip. Pic related is for square.
>>
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>>1047819
This is for Octalink.
>>
>>1047824
>>1047822
You can use a few dimes to give the small tip something to push against. This will kill the dimes, but no one has to know.
>>
>>1047854
Yes, but you can't do the reverse. GP has a square taper. If he's using a puller designed for ISIS/OL it will not work and might even damage the chainset, the tool or both.
>>
Anybody have some experience buying pro cycling kits?

I've narrowed it down to Rapha, Pearl Izumi, Assos and Castelli.

I'm mostly interested in Castelli's Team Sky kit

Is it a good investment for 170$?
>>
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Opinions on pic related?
>>
>>1047888
it's a surly therefore it's shit
t./n/
>>
>>1047888
beyond overpriced, esp considering that looks like a rolhoff hub in back
but a ok bike for touring
>>
>>1047889
surly makes some good bikes, its just that they're very expensive for what they are, and they really aren't anything special despite all the hype
>>
>>1047889
>>1047891
I don't know shit about bikes and I need a good all-rounder with terrain for touring. The guy that inspired me uses it and after minimal research I was led right back to it.

Is there a better option you have in mind?
>>
>>1047893
>good all-rounder with terrain for touring
that surly is a decent all-rounder and will work on a decent variety of terrain, there's no doubt about that. the main issue is that it costs way more than it really should for what it is

>touring/adventure rigs for decent amounts of money
my number 1 rec is always going to be the fuji touring, it's be the cheapest capable touring bike you can get new, and if you aren't doing anything crazy it'll be more than enough bike for you. you can get 1 brand new for $750, or lightly used for ~ $600.

stuff like the kona sutra or the specialized AWOL are pretty fantastic touring machines, but they are going to cost significantly more

> better option
you need to figure out exactly what you want and name a price point to make a good decision here

do you need disc brakes? you'll have better stopping but harder to source replacement parts, can't be fixed on the side of the road, and much more expensive

do you care more about speed or ability to handle gravel and singletrack?

do you know how to work on a bike and have tools to do roadside repairs?
>>
>>1047893
also, i always recommend getting something used and rebuilding it yourself as a touring rig, since you need to know the bike very well and be comfortable working on it if anything breaks

i have done several very light tours (4 - 5 days) and a lot of weekend trips on a 90s rigid mtb with a shitty 3x7 drivetrain, cantilever brakes, cheap, shitty panniers and a tent from walmart, and that setup has worked perfectly fine for me

you just gotta get out there and do it
>>
>>1047903
In a couple years I'll be biking around the U.S. And after that, seeing what I'm getting myself into, I'll be flying down to Patagonia and making my way around the world.

>cost
I say this now because it's just the beginning, but cost isn't that important. The reason I'm leaving after a couple years is so I can save up now, and I feel like $1,800 or whatever it might cost is worth it for how it'll serve me.

>components
I'm obviously going to be facing very limited options for fixing my bike, so I'm not too sure if I want discs but I'd really like them.

>speed or ability
Ability

>knowledge on fixing bikes
Nope. That's another thing I have to work on. Humble beginnings.

>>1047905
Yes that's my plan. Either that or dissembling it and rebuilding it until I get a grasp on it.
>>
>>1047908
>biking around the U.S.
good for you, that's a great goal to have. I'd recommend starting to plan your route and all details as soon as possible, because that's the most important part of this, and that's what'll make the tour actually happen

also, that's going to be a long and difficult tour for someone new, I would 100% recommend doing as many small tours as you can fit into your schedule first

do you have a nice state park or national forest near(-ish) your home? go ride there on a saturday, camp for the night, ride back in the morning. if you have some time off or a 3 day weekend, go a bit further, get used to touring and get used to camping soon, and you'll see how much fun it can be, and get a better understanding of what your limits are and how to improve them.

>cost isn't that important
fair enough, if you've saved up for a while and are planning to take quite a bit of time off this becomes less of a factor. however, I would still recommend not spending too much money on a bike. the point of this is what you can do more than what the machine can do, so don't skimp on the bike, but know that you don't have to buy the absolute greatest touring machine in the world

also, one issue that you're going to have to think about is theft when your in cities or near them. a bike over $2000 is going to be painting a giant bullseye on your back no matter what

your overall comfort and the amount of weather you can withstand is going to depend on your clothes and tent more than your bike, the difference in price between a tiagra and a 105 groupo is the difference between a shitty tent and a nice lightweight tent that'll stand up to anything

cont.
>>
>>1047908
>components
I wouldn't disqualify discs over the increased difficulty of repairs if you want them, because discs tend to very reliable and are not susceptible to bad weather the same way rim brakes are

The increased difficulty of repair is just something to keep in mind. One important factor here is that your first big tour is going to be in the USA. That means there are bike shops in a lot of places, and you can easily get transportation if you're stranded and get parts shipped to you anywhere.

Requirements for repairability are going to be different in the middle of nowhere in a third world country where nobody has ever heard of hydraulics. In the US, I really wouldn't be too concerned about discs as long as they're good quality from a good manufacturer.

You're also going to want to consider your drivetrain carefully. That's possibly a place where cheaper may be better. Higher end drivetrains have more cogs, thinner chains, more delicate shifters and require more maintnance. I would rather have claris (8 speed, pretty cheap) than ultegra (11 speed, very expensive) for touring.

You're also going to want a triple chainring. Some people may give you bullshit about triples being for casuals, but if you're going up a hill after a long day with tons of shit on your bike, that little chainring is going to be your best friend.

>knowledge
I would recommend starting with something either new or only a few years old if you aren't already comfortable working on bikes, because ideally you want to get riding regularly and taking daytrips as soon as possible, and if you have an old bike that requires lots of work to get it going well you aren't gonna be able to do that.

Find a bike coop near you, there's one in pretty much every city. Go there and ask if they can teach you how to work on bikes in exchange for voulenteering with them. That's probably the best way to learn
>>
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>>1047920
I'm going to improvise a lot of the route, but I'll definitely be using parts of pic related. I currently live in South Carolina so I might give the Palmetto a go during the summer prior to setting off (with incremental buildups like you mentioned).

>robbed
I think about this everyday. I'm very skeptical of my wishes right now because I *want* to do this forever, so I can't be completely reliant on something so fragile. I really want to incorporate the ability to pack up and hike when it gets too rough, and if I do in fact get robbed then I'll have a back up plan.

>comfort
My clothes (and tent relatively so) will be shit to start off all up until I've worked the Patagonia back up to the U.S. Then I'll work however I can for money to stock up on winter supplies for the beautiful cancer of cold that is Canada, Alaska, and eventually Russia.

>components
I'm lost for most of that but I can tell it's very useful, thanks.

>knowledge
I have a department store mountain bike that I got a few years back that I never ever ride (mostly because I have school and nowhere to go that isn't miles off). I'll be tinkering with that for a while; learning the basics and dissembling certain parts. When I move in about a month I'll be really close to an amazing bike shop (what people say) so I'll definitely be spending time down there and learning what I can.

Thanks for all this help, by the way
>>
>>1047925
>improvise route
I'd still recommend planning overall area->area map, but yeah, improvising what road to use for each place can be good

always keep an eye out for fire roads and rail service roads, they're really fun, take you through some nice places, and aren't that much slower to ride than asphalt. they're all over the place too if you look carefully.

>robbed
this is going to vary a lot from region to region. if you're out in the country in the US, there's very little chance of anyone messing with your stuff. that mainly is an issue if you're passing through cities. country people tend to be chill af, don't be suprised to see people offer you food or water as you pass through small towns.

this becomes a much bigger concern when you're in south america or central america, depending on the region. again, in the countryside you'll be much safer than in cities, but keep a lookout always. if worst comes to worst, hiking is always an option.

also, its hard to do, but don't get too attached to your bike. all bikes go on to bicycle heaven someday, it isn't the end of the world when something happens to your bike as long as you keep riding.

>comfort
>clothes and tent shit to start off with
DON'T DO THIS. buy good, reliable camping gear, and if you have to buy a slightly cheaper bike, then do it. a good pair of cycling shorts, a jersy, and a good tent, mat and sleeping bag will make much more difference than spending an extra $500 on the bike.

also, bring a tarp with you at all times. it took me a while to figure that out, but even a $5 blue construction tarp from home depot is incredibly useful as it'll allow you to keep your bike dry at night, your bags dry, and can be used as a second tent footprint on rough ground

>components
you'll get the hang of it over time. don't worry too much about most of it, modern bicycles are incredibly capable and pretty much anything can work. There's some great resources online to learn about this.

cont.
>>
>>1047925
>online resources
check out sheldon brown for 90% of your bike knowledge needs. he's the late, great god of bicycle maintance and is generally right about most things. also check out rj the bike guy on youtube, he does detailed videos of common repairs and maintance tasks on bikes

>knowledge
the best way to learn is to ride, its good you're moving somewhere bicycle friendly. a good bike shop can be a great place, some guys i've met in bike shops are pretty chill

i'd say for now, the #1 thing is to ride as much as you can and have fun, knowledge and leg strength and endurance will just kinda fall into place as long as you're riding

>thanks
no problem man, its always good to get another cyclist on the road and see someone planning an adventure. it'll only take a couple weekend trips to realize how incredibly fun and liberating a bicycle can be

have fun :)
>>
>>1047764
Its the only type i can afford that comes in pairs thank you by the way
>>
>>1047764
Oh and fuck i meant 2.35 on 3.5 kill me
>>
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How would you compare the level of use between these tires?
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>>1047905
>you just gotta get out there and do it

This is the number one problem I see with people planning stuff like this: Spending forever planning and re-planning, never actually going out and doing it.

Buy a cheap bike. Go and ride it a lot. Break it, fix it, figure out what you don't like about it, modify it as needed. Once you feel like you have a solid handle on bikes in general, THEN you can think about laying out a few thousand on the dream mondo adventure touring rig.

>>1047921
>brakes
I'm of the opinion that cable-pull discs are a good compromise between "repairable in the field" and "modern/better braking power". A few spare pads are light to pack if you're really worried about wearing out the pads in the middle of nowhere. And for the truly paranoid, there are frames with both disc tabs *and* canti/v-brake mounts.

>I would rather have claris (8 speed, pretty cheap) than ultegra (11 speed, very expensive) for touring.
Fact. My old 8-speed MTB gear is going strong over 20 years later.

>You're also going to want a triple chainring. Some people may give you bullshit about triples being for casuals...
Anyone who tells you triples are for casuals in the context of touring bikes should be shot out of a cannon into the sun.
>>
do i need a special pump to inflate presta valves? im confused at how to do it
>>
>>1048017
Nearly every pump that isn't a total piece of shit should be able to do both presta and shrader.

After taking off the cap you need to unscrew the valve, and to make sure it's gonna take, push it in briefly to loosen it up.
>>
>>1048017
yes. you need a pump that is designed to work with presta valves. a ball pump wont work, a gas station pump wont work.

you can buy an adapter to make your presta valve work with a schrader(normal american) pump.

you can use a trick to pump a presta valve with a shrader pump. see video
https://youtu.be/76AQ8RFvCX4
>>
>>1047950
the way we compared tire usage levels (TUL) at the bike shop i work at, is to fill a large vessel with water. fully submerge each tire individually in the water. calculate the volume displacement for each tire. then calculate the wear proportional to a brand new tire. then we would plug the numbers in to sheldon browns tire usage calculator and from there we could determine if the tire is indeed used......pretty simple desu
>>
>>1048037
>>1048032
lucky my hand pump was double sided, my foot pump must be absolutely shit then. still rolling with 80psi beats 0...
>>
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Hi guis, first time postan here. I'm looking for a cheap bike to buy and I've thought of just getting a cheap decathlon one to move around the city so mostly asking to europoors if they are any good or if someone has experience with this bikes
>>
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Is that Green Oil stuff any good? Reviews seem to say it's about on par with other chain oil but with eco credentials as long as your arm.
>>
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>>1048047
I tried some of this eco shit and its pretty bad. I think its just vegetable oil.
>>
>>1048048
http://www.green-oil.net/

Hmmm.
>>
>>1047940
oh, well a 2.35 should be no issue. go for it. we're talking about less than a quarter inch of extra space. you should be good
>>
>>1048046
you should check out this thread. >>1043316
it's better suited for you question.
>>
>>1048059
oh, thanks anon
>>
How do i determine the appropriate tire pressure for my fatbike, given a type of riding and terrain?

I'm not necessarily looking for a numerical value.
>>
>>1048076
Fat bikes are not appropriate for anything
>>
>>1048076
sadly there's no real trick or answer to this other than just trial and error. you don't want it to feel bouncy, but conversely you don't want rim strikes. ideally you would find the perfect medium between those.
I don't ride a fat bike, but a lot of my teammates do. they run about 4psi in the snow, and about 5-10 in any other off-road terrains.
>>
>>1048081
it's worth adding that for gravel or road rides they all ride at max pressure.
>>
>>1048076
80 psi
>>
>>1048081
>>1048082
This is helpful.
I find it interesting that you're talking about a balance between bouncy and rimstrikes. I could increase the pressure from what i have now and that would make it feel less bouncy.

>>1048079
Then assume the same question for mtb in general.
>>
what's that net called ?
a bungee net ?
are there good one or will anyone do ?
>>
>>1048115
>bungee net
That sounds right to me. The $8 Sunlite one I have has been going strong for over a year now.
>>
>>1048120

nice, do you have a size recomendation ?
smaller than my platform or bigger ?
>>
>>1048076
>I'm not necessarily looking for a numerical value.
That really only leaves the option of going by feel; pick a starting PSI and go for a ride. If you find yourself bouncing around too much, let some air out little by little until it feels right.
>>
>>1048121
Mine stretches to be nearly twice the area of the rack platform, that seems to be working out pretty well.
>>
I'm trying to live my life as close to 4chan meme standards as I can, what is /n/s meme bike, it's thinkpad, it's starting strength?
>>
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hi there! i need some bottom bracket experience.
its the first time im changing it myself so be gentle :)
so this is my beater, '98 trek 6000. bottom bracket died so i removed it. its a 68x122.5 (VP is the brand btw). heres the thing.. when i went into a shop a guy by looking at the bike told me the one i needed is a 73x122.5. so now when i removed the one it had installed.. i measure the width of the bottom bracket cage. and its 73-74mm. so i supose the bikeshop dude was right and i had installed a shorter bottom bracket.

is this right or is there another way to choose the correct width of the bottom bracket shell?
also if i swap from a 68 to a 73mm width, will the position of the cranks be different? (slightly wider or something?) or do they remain the same as long its still a 122.5 ?
any prob if i go again with a 68mm? could i fugg something up?

thanks and sorry for my crap english! anything else i should know about bottom brackets before i go and buy the replacement is great, thanks!
>>
>>1048145
rigid 90s mtb , maybe with a pizza rack
>>
>>1048148
>>1048148
The 73mm measurement is the width of the frame where the bottom bracket is installed (the bottom bracket shell). You wont be able to install a 68mm into a frame with a 73mm shell.

The 122.5mm measurement is the spindle width, and installing a BB with a different width will alter the position of the crankset on your bike, which will alter your stance and potentially effect your front-end shifting.

If you had a 73x122.5 before, replace it with the same.
>>
>>1048152
>You wont be able to install a 68mm into a frame with a 73mm shell.
Rather, you wont be able to install it properly, and will have problems in the future.
>>
>>1048145
90s rigid MTB with slicks
>>
>>1048152
>>1048153
thanks! the frame shell is 73mm. but for some reason it had installed a 68mm BB ( i supose it was done cause they did not have the correct replacement at the time).

so, just confirm me this please: i should get a 73mm BB and position of my cranks will be slightly different right? (and ill need to adjust the front deraullieur)

if i stick with 68mm ill fugg things up right? (walayws talkig about 122.5 spindle lenght).

(sorry for repeating myslef, i just want to do this right!).
>>
>>1048158
>so, just confirm me this please: i should get a 73mm BB and position of my cranks will be slightly different right? (and ill need to adjust the front deraullieur)
It shouldn't effect the drive-side crank arm position, no. If anything it might move your non-drive-side arm out about 4mm, but that wont effect your shifting.
>>
>>1048158
>>1048164
If the spindle length is the same the crank arms will end up in the exact same place, if the 68mm BB had a lip on the right side cup that stops it screwing in too far (in which case the left side would've been screwed in further than normal).

If it didn't have the lip then either of the cups could've been screwed in too far and so the arms might not be in the same place with a 73mm BB and so you'd need to adjust the front derailer slightly.
>>
>>1048120
where did you get the "witness me" decal
>>
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>>1048174
>>
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>>1048145
90s rigid mtb with slicks
also, get a rack and fenders
>>
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How do I use a trainer? I got my bike back from LBS yesterday and my shit is all fucked up again. Here's the story:
>Be me
>Get in bad accident when quick release fails, ambulance, hospital and all
>fuckthatshit.jpg, I'm not doing my own work anymore
>Find respectable LBS, full accident check over, fork replacement, new front tire, brake caliper, and quick release for $130 (discount because poor college student)
>assume everything is done right, I worked in a bike shop and this place looked pretty legit, guys new what they were doing when I talked to them
>get bike back, start riding on rollers
>measure wheelbase length with new fork, set rollers to closest measurement
>after 5 minutes, smell burning rubber and suspect I feel a bump in the back tire
>Harder to pedal than it used to be
>Get off bike
>5 seconds later back tire explodes like a gunshot and bead is off the rim

What did I do wrong? On closer inspection the wheels weren't centered quite right in the dropouts, but not quite rubbing. When I worked in a bike shop I would have gotten canned if I gave a bike back to a customer like that. Should I take it back and ask for a new tube or is it not their fault?
>>
>>1048190
imo yes it is their fault if they fucked up like that
in reality it may be hard to get them to own it though

also, always look over your bike completely after getting any work done, whether you did it or a shop did
>>
>>1048122
I guess the question was more about how to decide what 'right' is supposed to feel like.
>>
>>1048145

>>1048150
>>1048155
>>1048184
This.

But has OTS gone out of style?
>>
>>1048201
OTS hasn't gone out of style, but they take a bit more skill and knowledge to keep in good working order and ride well

thin tires and tight clearances everywhere = more maintance
also, dt shifters take a while to get the hang of

anybody who knows how to ride a bike can hop on a 90s rigid and go
>>
>>1048190
>runs road tyres with road butyl tubes on his trainer
>wonders why he gets blow-off
>cant even operate a quick release
>claims to have worked in LBS
wew lad
>>
>>1048058
Thanks man i appreciate it
>>
>>1048105
>I find it interesting that you're talking about a balance between bouncy and rimstrikes. I could increase the pressure from what i have now and that would make it feel less bouncy.

Well too much pressure and you negate the purpose of fat tires. Why bother with them if you don't get extra traction and rolling ability?
>>
>>1048251
Exactly. Which is why i asked in the first place.
>>
What tension gauge of you guys recommend? Is the Park TM-1 worth the money or can I get away with something cheaper?
>>
Is there a 26" tubeless rim with 36 spoke holes?

My mtb is as modern as a 26er can get besides the wheels. I would like to upgrade the wheels to a tubeless version and I would rather use my current hubs to build a new pair of wheels. I have a pair of Hope hubs so it would be lot cheaper to just buy the rims and spokes than a new wheelset.

I've tried ghetto tubeles but the rims arent tubeless ready and I have to run pretty high pressures if I want to prevent the setup from burping the air.
>>
>>1048327
Velocity Blunt 35: http://www.velocityusa.com/product/rims/blunt-35-559

Or their Cliffhanger: http://www.velocityusa.com/product/rims/cliff-hanger-559

I'm not aware of any other rims that are tubeless + 36-spoke + 26"

Honestly not a lot of folks out there making 36-spoke rims anymore; they're basically relegated to touring bikes now.

If you're willing to get new 32-spoke hubs, I'm a huge fan of DT Swiss rims. I have a set of XM401 rims on my trail bike and I love them.
>>
>>1048306
There's a cheaper one than the park?
>>
>>1048337
Well I guess not, figured xtools or Cyclo might've made one.

For something as precise as a tension gauge I guess I'd better go for Park anyway even if a cheaper one existed
>>
>>1048350
The Park one is known for being the cheap imprecise tension meter out of all the available functions. It's good enough, but it's not a pro tool. Well it's not a pro tool for the wheel builder. It's a pro tool for the mechanic who rarely has to respoke a wheel or retention all the spokes.
>>
The chain at the back makes a sort of cracky ice breaking noise when I wheel the bike backwards. It also feels clunky in general and not very smooth when I spin the pedals

What am I doing wrong? Yes I do ride when its raining and on muddy trails sometimes but it seems mostly clean
>>
>>1048368
could be bad freehub bearings, a worn cassette, poorly adjusted rear mech or just a frozen link in chain. i'd start with cleaning the drivetrain and adjusting the mech.
>>
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>>1048371
How close of a pass is this lads? I know you probably don't like him, but this made the news because he lost the plot over this pass.
Keep in mind, this road is about 6.6 M wide in total.
Tried to scope it with parallel lines and such, but no dice.
>>
Can you suggest me a nice semislick tire?
I've been using a maxxis larsen oriflamme, but it needs to be replaced by now.
>>
I'm a skinny couch potato who took the old rusty mountain bike out of the garage and tried to ride it but I couldn't even ride for 2 minutes up a moderate slope before having to stop and go home with significant chest pain. Is the problem in me or the bike? I geared down.
>>
>>1048386
you wont like this but maybe both
remove the rust from the chains+cogwheels and oil it
make sure the tires have enough pressure
>>
>>1048386
I'm normal and I hate uphill climbs

I'll go to the lowest gear and be the slowest fuck possible before getting off halfway and walking it
>>
>>1048388
I suspect you're right, I'll give my bike a touch up before trying again.

>>1048390
Where I live it is impossible to cycle on anything but hills. Is there any hope for me as a beginner?
>>
>>1048392
of course, you'll just have to work harder
try to find easier routes
>>
>>1048374
if you watch the video there was a cyclist coming along the other side so the driver couldn't use the entire lane, but yeah it was a bit close and he should have waited for the other guy to pass before overtaking. Hardly worth losing your fucking shit over
https://www.fb.com/ttadelaide/videos/1361291177225828/ for anyone interested
>>
>>1048386
what kind of chest pain are we talking. Is it a stitch or something more serious than that?
>>
>>1048386
You are the engine.
I mean it in the most encouraging way when i say "Keep riding and HTFU".
>>
>>1048400
Not a stitch, it was a pain near my right breast whenever I breathed in.
>>
>>1047626
Use a hacksaw and just saw out little chunks of the frame and fork in those areas. It shouldn't damage the structural integrity of the frameset too much. Hopefully.
>>
>>1047752
Salsa Vaya. You're welcome.
>>
>>1047773
Mountain bikes are kinda in a spectrum, ranging from cross country to freeride:
Cross country: Little front suspension, little to no rear suspension, designed for long non-technical rides, and ofen used for racing
Trail: Little more suspension than xc, almost always full suspension (front and rear), for all-around use; while there are high-end trail bikes, trail bikes are often the best option for someone who wants a single mountain bike to do it all
Enduro aka all-mountain: More suspension (150-160mm front and rear), wider tires than xc and trail, often 26" or 650b (whereas xc and trail are more likely to be 29"), slacker geometry; good at technical descents but still capable to climb, just not as fast or efficient as a trail/xc bike on climbs; used in enduro racing
Downhill: Lots of suspension, lack of really low gearing, used for lift-accessed downhill, terrible for climbing or anything else
Freeride: Even more suspension than a regular downhill bike, freeride bikes are for realy gnarly downhill, like riding off 30 foot cliffs

Outside of that spectrum are dirt jumpers which are hardtails designed for dirt jumps, not mtb trails
>>
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hello! im the guy thats changing the BB of a 98 trek 6000 mtb.
one quick question.
pic related is the BB i removed. im not totally sure if it was the correct BB for my bike.
so i measured the bike's frame BB cage /shell (dont know its correct name), and it is 73mm. width.

so i guess i need a 73mm width BB right?

and heres the real question, pic related bottom braket says "68 x 122.5" (green arrow). but on the code name it says "73" (red arrow). with the cups on it measures 73mm (can be seen in pic, camera nagle makes it look a little different though but it is 73mm)

. so is this a 73 or 68mm BB?
i should go get another one that is the same right?just ask 73x122.5 right?
this discrepance in whats pointed in the green arrow is confusing me, thanks!
>>
>>1047822
>>1047824
>first for square, second for octalink
Usually true, but there's exceptions. It depends on the bolt size, not the spindle interface. Bolt size usually correlates to spindle interface but not always.
Basically on the park tool ones, the rubber circle thing should correspond to the bolt size.
>>
>>1047888
Replace the shit tier saddle and it's great for third world touring. For touring in the US, Canada, or Europe, ride a Vaya instead.
>>
>>1048404
Femanon? Post pics
>>1048440
Measure your frame's bottom bracket shell. Tape measure isn't accurate enough, use a calliper.
>>
>>1048440
Green arrow is what you have to ask for.
I assume 73mm is the outer width of the BB shell. 68mm is the actual BB cup width
>>
>>1048444
I am male, and I don't have tits.
>>
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>>1048444
measured, it is 73mm, pic related.
>>1048445
so i have to go ask for a 68mm BB? and it should be 73 with the cup?
sorry i just wanna dont fug it up when buying
>>
>>1048450
it looks like you're including the fixed cup in your measurement, be careful

i'd guess its a 68, but yeah, use calipers not a tape measure
>>
>>1048450
Yes, a 68mm BB. In fact, just take the old BB to your LBS and go "hi, I want one of these"
>>
>>1048449
I am male, and I have tits.
>>
>>1048438
Pretty much everything you said is correct except for freeride, that's in between AM and DH. FR is perhaps one of the most broad disciplines as it could encompass shorter travel bikes that could be called AM/Enduro (my 160mm frame is branded as FR) or as long travel as DH bikes but with greater gearing range.

Beyond DH tier suspension travel you're talking about huck bikes (although you can certainly huck with a DH bike). Not something that really exists anymore, at least new, now that the Super Monster is so rare and few frames have much more than 200mm.
>>
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>>1048453
with fixed cup do you mean the cup thats part of the BB?
heres the thing, when i remove it, the BB measures 65mm.. wich maked me more confused, i dont know where the 68 (green arrow here >>1048440 is from ??)

>>1048454
theres no LBS where i live. only shit places where they wanna ripp you off.. thats why im not sure the last BB is the correct one. .. cause as they are here.. they will just install you anything...

so in short.. BB in pic is a 68. my frame shell is 73. i should ask for a 68 thatwith cup measures 73. am i correct here?

pic related is BB without cup mesuring 65mm
>>
>>1048461
In the last photo you posted it looks like there's still a cup in the frame on the left side, although there obviously isn't as you've removed the BB so I don't know what that line is.

If that's not a separate part from the frame (some sort of spacer perhaps) then you have a 73mm frame and need a 73mm BB. The 68mm BB that was in there previously would have had the left cup (the one you've removed in that photo) screwed too far into the frame.
>>
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Would switching to a SRAM Red 22 crankset be possible on a bike otherwise running Ultegra 6800. The Sram is BB30, while I'm currently using the Shimano Pressfit bottom bracket in 86,5 X 41MM.
>>
>>1048450
>>1048461
You are getting inaccurate results because you're using a fucking tape measure and tape measures are not accurate, as we said already, use a calliper
>>
>>1048461
No you need a 73mm 122.5mm BB.
>>
>>1048467
A tape measure is more than accurate to tell the difference between 68mm and 73mm.
>>
>>1048460
Depends on definitions then, but as far as I'm concerned, freeride refers to what you're referring to as "huck bikes" (200mm+) and I think that's what many/most people take freeride to mean
>>1048464
If you were running, say, 8-speed, then sure. With 11-speed, however, drive train components from different brands are not cross-compatible.
>>
>>1048464
No. BB86 is wide and skinny. BB30 is narrow and fat. Even trying to fit a EVO386 type 30mm crank requires the use of specialized and inferior small bearings.
>>
>>1048470
>>1048471
Guess I'll just buy a stages power meter then :^)
>>
>>1048470
Perhaps back when huck bikes were more common, but these days a freeride bike is very different. Just do a Google image search for it and you'll see that very few huck bikes show up, most of the results are in the 150-180mm range.
>>
>>1048461
just take it to a bike shop and ask for a replacement that's the same size, stop fucking around with a tape measure
>>
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hello! im the bottom bracket dude again.
quick question: the BB installed @ pic related is not the correct one right? should be longer
(please confirm this. i know it may be obvious, but im new so i want to be 100% sure).

to the ones that posted before.. i do not have a calliper available, else i would have used it. the BB that was previously installed confused me as it was broken thus a bit wider than it should.

the one installed right now is 68 so im pretty sure i need a 73, gonna go to the shop to change it tomorrow if you guys confirm this.

Thanks.
>>
>>1048587
Yes that bottom bracket is the incorrect size, the cup should be pretty much level with the shell.
>>
>>1048590
thanks. errythings clear as water now.
>>
>>1048587

Damn that bike looks like it's been through the zombie apocalypse and killed some folk, rad.
>>
>>1047880

Kind of a fred move desu. If you're not on the team, why wear the stuff?
>>
>>1048125

mirin those levers
>>
>>1048587

don't forget to grease those threads during install
>>
>>1048614

I agree with what you say about team kit, but it puts a certain type of person in the mood to ride. More riders on the road make it safer for all cyclists.
>>
>>1048470
>With 11-speed, however, drive train components from different brands are not cross-compatible.

Shimano and SRAM use the same tech for cassettes and chains, so those at least are very much interchangable. Not sure about up front though.
>>
>>1047880
Only fat casuals wear Team Sky kits
>>
>>1048617
thanks you, i will do it now, already got the proper BB, cheers!

>>1048609
i fuggin love that bike, have 2 or 3 car crashes on it, plus some broken bones... but a lot lot lot of love also. usually put 1000km on it a month! cheers
>>
>>1048641
For lower speed drive trains (5-10 speed) yes, they use the same. For 11 speed, nope.
>Shimano and SRAM 11-speed chains are not cross-compatible
https://www.biketiresdirect.com/chain-compatibility-article
>>
>>1048706
Bullshit. They're just repeating what the manufacturers say and the manufacturers only say that because they want you to buy their stuff. Just take a look at third party chains, compatible with SRAM, Shimano, and Campy.
>>
Out for a ride earlier, I had my first ever blowout (clincher). Was riding along about 32km/h on flat surface, nothing special. Suddenly BANG and instant rear tire flat.

There was a tiny hole in the inner tube, so I replaced it with a new inner tube and put it in and started inflating it. As I inflated it, I noticed the inner tube was sticking out from under the tire. Appearantly there was a tear in the tire, so it was useless.

The tire is a 700x23c, I had inflated it to about 7 psi, I weight 85kg. Did I goof? Was this just bad luck?
I also checked that the rear brake wasn't making contact with the tire, but it was cleanly on the rim so no real problem there either.


Can fetch some pics later if necessary
>>
>>1048715
>Just take a look at third party chains, compatible with SRAM, Shimano, and Campy.
For lower speeds yes, but 11 speed?
>>
>>1048720
Yes, for 11 speeds.
>>
>>1048719
>7 psi
Obviously a typo but what did you actually inflate it to?

How long ago had you installed your tire?

There's two possibilities I can think of. Either the tire was already damaged (the tear was there, just perhaps smaller) which could have been due to the tire being worn and just starting to separate, or due to being sliced or punctured by something, and when this happened, it allowed the tube to poke through which cause the blowout. The force of the blowout then made the tear bigger which is why you only noticed it after. To prevent that issue, replace your tires when they get old, and pay attention to catch any wear/damage before it causes harm.

The second possibility is the tire was fine before the blowout (the blowout caused the tear entirely) and the tube was improperly positioned. This can happen when the tube is pinched under the tire bead. It can also happen if the tube is stretched thin in one spot and bunched up in another, or twisted in a spot. This can be due to improper installation, though if you hadn't replaced your tube/tire recently, then I wouldn't expect it to take that long for it to blowout. Otherwise it could be that the tube just got pulled/stretched over time. Perhaps if you had the tire at very low pressure even just in storage it allowed the tube to slide around inside a bit; I wouldn't expect that to happen but it's possible I guess.

Or you didn't actually get a blowout, you got a puncture, and the slice is because something hit your tire and damaged it, puncturing the tube.
>>
>>1048723
7 bar sorry. The equivalent is 100 psi. I checked the tire before leaving and it was at about 87 psi so I bumped it up to 100

>>1048723
(1) That would be disappointing as it was a fairly new tire. Couldn't have had more than 500km on it I think
(2) I recently got new rims from the LBS and they installed my tires, so while I usually put new tires on myself this time I didn't see how they were installed. I haven't put more than 100km on my new rims, though, so I wouldn't rule out that something was wrong there.


I think I'm going to carry a spare tire with me in the future along with my inner tubes to be sure. Never something I expected to happen, I've had punctures before but never tears in the tire.

Thank you
>>
>>1048727
Sounds like maybe the LBS installed it just a little bit wrong. Not way off or it would have blown out sooner, but maybe stretched a bit or twisted slightly in a spot, or maybe the valve stem wasn't perfectly aligned and was forced into the valve stem hole (did you notice if the valve stem was crooked?)
Or it could have been a defective tire, who knows
Spare tire is great for really long rides but otherwise you can carry tire boots. They aren't a permanent fix but they can usually get you home in an emergency. I do fairly long rides (up to 300km) and I am really particular about bringing all the tools and supplies I could possibly need (multiple tubes, rim strips, masterlinks, various tools, zip ties, extra lights and batteries, etc) and I keep a few tire boots in my kit but not a tire.
Not that carrying a tire is a bad idea. Boots are just an alternative to consider because they're small, light, and usually sufficient in emergencies.
I'd still carry a full tire (or two) on a tour or multi-day ride though.
>>
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>>1048729
>tire boots

Didn't know those existed, but that's a great idea for something to add my tool belt. Such a tiny thing but christ if you don't have it.

Here's a picture of the tear, for the archive
>>
>>1048747
Yea that looks like a typical blowout tear, still hard to say if there was a minor tear first or if the tear happened only because of the blowout. If I had to guess I'd say the mechanic that installed your tube fucked up

And yeah boots are great, bring a few. Once when I had a blowout, since one blowout makes the tear worse, I went through like 3-4 tubes and 2-3 boots just to make it home (which was only like 20 miles or a little over) and even that was barely enough, I had to ride at like 10 or 20 psi just to prevet the pressure from causing more blowouts.
Point being, boots are great but not perfect, and make sure to bring SEVERAL.
>>
How do I know if I need an new inner tube? I filled my tire with air. ride it maybe 15 miles over the course of a month, put it away for like 6 months, and when I pulled it out the tire was completely flat. I need a new inner tube then right?
>>
>>1048756
I think any inner tube will lose its pressure over such a long period. Pump it up and see what it says, or just replace it with a new one straight away. Personally I always use my inner tubes until they puncture and then replace them
>>
I want to buy a modern wheelset for a 90s rigid mtb that I'm building up right now because I'm weird like that.

are there any good 26" wheelsets that use qr (or something convertible) for around 100 - 150 € ?
>>
>>1048747
That happened from often riding under pressure. You guys ever see how tires appear to be "cracked" along the side wall, especially road tires that dont seem that old? That is from under inflating. Pump your tires up faggots.
>>
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Is the Escape 3 (2016) a good starting bike for someone really wanting to get into bicycle commuting?
>>
>>1048771
Yeah, that's a good option. If you want more options, you can also consider:
Kona Dew Plus
Trek FX
Specialized Sirrus
Cannondale Bad Boy
Salsa Vaya
Surly Straggler
All-City Macho Man
Kona Jake
Used old ten speed road bike (Craigslist)
Used 90s mountain bike (Craigslist) with semislicks
>>1048756
No, it doesn't mean you need a new tube, it means you're stupid enough to think that an innertube is completely air-tight and will not leak any air over time. Any tube will go flat after 6 months. A tube will lose a lot of air after just a week. You should be checking your tire pressure, and filling as necessary, before every single ride. If you ride every day, yes, this means you should be checking your tire pressure EVERY FUCKING DAY.
>>
>>1048747

Send it to the manufacturer, or just contact them. They might give you a refund/new tire, or tell you to fuck off. Worth a shot.

Also, at least in the US, dollar bills make great emergency boots. They're pretty strong, and it's a good idea to have a couple bucks on you anyways.
>>
>>1048771
I bought the Escape 3 a few weeks ago
>>
My tyre is 700x32, what size mudguard should I be getting? thanks
>>
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>>1048812
forgot size list
>>
>>1048706
>>1048720
My bike shop as far as I know only even stock SRAM chains, and they work just fine on my 11 speed bikes.
>>
>>1048756
>...put it away for like 6 months, and when I pulled it out the tire was completely flat. I need a new inner tube then right?
This is a troll, right? Pump it up and ride it, it's probably just fine.
>>1048777
>You should be checking your tire pressure, and filling as necessary, before every single ride. If you ride every day, yes, this means you should be checking your tire pressure EVERY FUCKING DAY.
This is also a troll, right? I commute with my bike every day, and check the tire pressure maaaaybe every other week.

(That said, I'm on 50psi +40mm wide tires, so a way lower leak rate than someone on 110psi 23mm tires)
>>
>>1048813
https://janheine.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/fenders-for-different-tire-sizes/

45 mm should be good.
>>
Couple fueling questions:

Is filling my bidons with coconut water an absolutely stupid idea?

If I want a reusable gel container style thing that I can put nut butter in (think like those single-serving squeeze packs you can buy, but that can be washed out and reused), what kinds of things can I use?
>>
>>1048825
>This is also a troll, right? I commute with my bike every day, and check the tire pressure maaaaybe every other week.
Yeah and how much pressure have they lost by then? 20psi? 30? Tires will lose a few psi in a day. If you don't give a fuck about riding at 20psi below optimal go ahead and wait a few weeks, then enjoy your pinch flats
>>
>>1048921
Wider tyres have multiple times the air volume of skinnier ones, so air losses are proportionally much smaller.

Unless I have an actual slow leak once a week on my commuter is plenty. Race bike is every ride or every other.
>>
>>1048921
>Yeah and how much pressure have they lost by then?
Usually down less than 10psi; low-40psi rides just as good as 50psi on these tires.
>go ahead and wait a few weeks, then enjoy your pinch flats
lol no. 40psi ain't causing pinch flats on 45mm tires.

Remember:
A) Flow rate through a membrane is proportional to the pressure differential. For a given, constant surface area, a tire with 50psi gauge pressure leaks air at half the rate of one at 100psi.
B) Having more air volume doesn't matter, but critically, recall the cube-square law of scaling: Bigger tires have a higher volume/surface area ratio, so there's *proportionally* less surface area for air to leak from.
>>
>Is filling my bidons with coconut water an absolutely stupid idea?
Probably. Most bottles (and their valves in particular) are irregularly shaped so it's not easy to get them perfectly clean. If you put any kind of sugar into a bottle, you must clean it thoroughly after use, otherwise you're inviting bacteria to a party inside your bidon.

>If I want a reusable gel container style thing that I can put nut butter in (think like those single-serving squeeze packs you can buy, but that can be washed out and reused), what kinds of things can I use?
My reusable nut-butter squeeze pack responds best to gentle repetitive stroking...

I haven't seen such a product commercially available, but If you wanted a DIY solution, I'd start by looking at cake icing products for inspiration. I can't imagine it would be especially hard to rig a conveniently sized, washable pouch with a nozzle (with a cap to prevent premature discharge inside a jersey pocket) to a small packet filled with homemade gel.
>>
Is this chain length OK for the big cog on a 1X or should i take out some links? this is like my old chain plus about 6 links after adding the 42t.
>>
>>1048986
Doesn't look too long, would be easier to tell in the smallest cog. When I do mine I like to get it as short as possible for a bit better chain retention, I let all the air out my shock and get my ma to compress it whilst I size the chain.
>>
>>1048988
here it is in smallest- i just took out 4 links from other pic- this seems to be OK I think.
>>
>>1048986
>>1048991
looks perfect to me
>>
>>1048991
Make sure you do what I said, last thing you want is to bottom the suspension and end up ripping the derailer off.
>>
>>1048935
But don't a lot of people use sugary electrolyte powders in their bottles?

As for reusable gel packets, it seems like baby formula reusable packs might be a reasonable alternative.
>>
>>1048998
Yeah I let the air out and did a twister pose to compress and check. Shifts OK, not as smooth as before but does not skip so its fine. Sent fork in for service now it makes a honking noise and my front brake is a bit squishy but ima ride it till something breaks. Shaved at least a pound but most of that was prob from the sram spider I took off. Went tubeless too but I cant tell any diff- front wheel may be a tad lighter.
>>
I might be buying a new crankset, do i get the 110 or the 130 bcd version?
>>
>>1049038
depends on the size chainrings you'll want to use - the smallest chainring for 130bcd is 38t, which is fine for road use but you might want smaller for touring/cx or if you need lower gears for hill climbing.
>>
>>1049040
It's a Rotor crankset for racing, and Rotor makes 53/39 for both options
>>
>>1048920
you used to be able to get something like that from REI in the US. I assume if they're still made then any camping supply place would carry them. No idea what they're called, but my family had some, I've used them on hiking trips
>>
>>1049062
110 if you're going to use Q rings.
>>
My dad's bike came with awful mechanical disc brakes and I want to replace them. Only the brake calipers, levers are OK. What should I have in consideration when looking for new brake calipers to make sure they're compatible? Also any recommendations for decent quality, reasonable price mechanical disc brake calipers?
>>
>>1049207
Unless the calipers are specifically advertised as being compatible with drop bar levers they'll work with your levers (I'm assuming it has a flat bar). That said you should just get hydraulics.
>>
>>1049209
What about disc size? Don't those vary?
And hydraulics would be too much of an investment on such a low tier bike. It's not like my dad is downhilling.
>>
>>1049211
If you're keeping the current discs then that doesn't matter.

>hydraulics would be too much of an investment on such a low tier bike. It's not like my dad is downhilling.
They can be had just as cheap as the cable calipers that are actually worth buying. You also don't need to be riding hard to notice that they feel a shit ton better (less hand fatigue and better modulation = faster and safer braking), are easier to set up, and require less maintenance.
>>
>>1049212
Wouldn't hydros require new brake levers though?
>>
>>1049213
Sure, you buy them as a full set already bled.
>>
>>1049214
See that's the problem, the bike currently has one of those shifter+brake lever combos, so I would also have to buy new separate shifters. It's just not worth it.
>>
>>1049217
Upgrading to better cable calipers isn't worth it. The cheapest ones worth getting are Spyres at around $80 a piece. Shifters are cheap at anywhere from $15 to $30 and decent hydraulic discs can be had from about $75 (down to like $50-60 if you're willing to get some off Ebay).
>>
>>1049218
I don't live in the US or yurop, buying things through Ebay or any other online shop is a painful, 2 month ordeal, and my dad is already quite frustrated with not being able to ride. LBS' around here don't have too big of a collection, my best bet is probably mechanical Deore or something to that effect.
It's not like he wants to switch out his current brakes for better ones, it's simply that the current ones are giving him a lot of issues.
>>
>>1049219
Well if that's the case and you're fine with any old shit that at least works then by all means go for those Deore ones. Just bear in mind that they won't last as long before they need replacing again (there are quite a few moving parts that are exposed to the elements and wear, where as it's not unusual for hydraulics to last a decade or more).
>>
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Took my first short ride on the tubeless today. pressure was nearly what I ride tubed and the front felt a bit squirrely. The bead is seated and no leaks. Is the ride supposed to feel different?
>>
>>1049230

Your pressures are probably too high.
>>
>>1049263
i like high pressure-did i just fall for a meme cause they arent any lighter than tubes
>>
>>1049265
High pressures aren't faster in terms of rolling resistance. Lower pressures will give you a more comfortable ride, which should, all else being equal, also be a faster ride.
>>
>>1049230
>>1049265

The main reasons to go tubeless are flat protection, lower PSI for more traction, and less rolling resistance. Reduction in weight can happen, but I've found it's typically a wash.

http://www bicyclerollingresistance com/specials/tubeless-latex-butyl-tubes

The front may need more air if it feels sketchy. I know when I ride my tubeless mtn bike on pavement, it feels a bit goofy because I use such a low PSI. Don't go above recommended (on your sidewall) though, high pressures are a meme.
>>
>>1049268
Then why do people go faster at higher pressure?
>>
Any recommendations for a chink garbon frameset with a threaded BB and straight top tube? Non-tapered headtube would be nice too but I'm not sure it exists
>>
>>1049348
They don't. Look at Jan heine and his research into tire size and pressure.
>>
>>1049268
They are on the track
>>
>>1049400
>"research"

Listen, I don't want to bag on Jan. Dude rides a bike more than all of /n/ combined. There's a specific kind of riding he likes the most and a specific bike he likes for that kind of riding. And when mainstream manufacturers weren't making components for those kinds of bikes, he paid folks to manufacture them and started his own bicycle company to distribute them. He runs a successful *print magazine* in [CURRENT YEAR], for christ's sake. He's worked his way into a self-employed job that involves traveling the globe and having sweet bike adventures; literally living the dream. Respect.

And I think he's on to something. I'm loving my fat Compass tires. I feel faster, they *certainly* roll smoother, and they're champion descenders down the local twisty mountain roads. They're simply better tires for spending all day in the saddle.

But despite my appreciation and respect, I can't claim that Jan's "science" is anything but utter garbage. There's always too much noise in his data and not enough datapoints to draw any meaningful conclusions, and as far as I know, he's never published one of his "science" things that has a negative result; they always "confirm" that he's right.

Like everything else out there, you have to read Jan's work in the context of his known biases, and do critical thinking of your own.
>>
>>1049414
For a race weight rider, there is very little difference in speed on smooth pavement between 23mm and 25mm. It's been known forever fatter tires are better on cobbles, which is why the pro peloton has used fatter tires in the classics since forever. 20-23 was basically settled on because they kept trying to make tires lighter.

On the other hand, there is basically no speed penalty for 25mm tires, the increase comfort, and perform better on rougher pavement, so they're now favored, especially among heavier people.

On extreme rough surfaces, such as rumblestrips of off road, there's a reason why MTBs have big wide tires and not skinny road tires.

Jan likes to pretend he has much bigger insights than he actually does. It's true that he does bust some myths, but it's like that episode of mythbusters where you already know the myth is false, but you watch it anyways.
>>
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Can anyone help me?
Why does my GP4sII crack in the tyrewall?
im running at 95psi, which is within the recommended.
They are around 2 years old, and used on my commuter bike.
>>
>>1049438
Have you run over something?
Have you been storing your bike outside in freezing cold temperatures?
Do you have any idea how many kilometres you've done in those two years?
>>
>>1049439
its all around the wheels. on both of them. so i doubt its because i ran over something.

It has been standing outside this winther, so it has been exposed to minus degrees.

probably around 1500km but they dont look very worn, on the tyre markers
>>
>>1049439
The cracks are all around both tires, it looks like it's from exposure to the elements (sun, wild temperature swings) for years and years

The rest of the bike is probably in similar condition
>>
>>1049445
i switched them to my commuter from another bike, and bought them from new, 2½ years ago.
I do accept that its probably the weather, and driving on them in water, snow and salt, that has taken a wear on them.
Thanks anons
>>
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>>1049450
>2½ years ago.
Should've started with that
>>
>>1049450
Weather is fine if your bike is indoors when you're not riding it
The issue is it wasn't
Treat your bike like garbage and it will become garbage
>>
>>1049462
thanks. its my beater, as i cant fit it inside my apartment. my girlfriend is allready complaining about my 2 expensive bikes, so I think ill just have to live with it.
>>
How do you determine proper chain length on a 1x drivetrain?
>>
>>1049495
It has to be long enough to go around the largest cog. If you have suspension then it has to be long enough to allow full suspension travel in the largest cog.
>>
how much of an asshole am I if I strap a bluetooth speaker to my bike and listen while I ride?
>>
>>1048386
Same here. Repeat until it gets easier, then go further. You just need conditioning and practice.
>>
>>1049502
It depends on the situation really, but It'd make you look like an asshole most of the time.
>>
>>1049502
you could get some bone conducting headphones so you can listen to music without losing situational awareness
>>
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Found this bike being sold on craigslist locally for $280.

It's a GT XCR-3000, made in 1999-2000. It's like new. The guy says he's ridden it a few times since he's owned it.

Apparently, this bike was a big deal back in the day. I've never done downhill or anything. I'm used to riding hardtails for fun/exercise but had to stop after an accident a few years ago.

tl;dr, getting back into riding, not going to be using this bike for its intended purposes, mostly just store runs and cruising around. It was a $1500 bike a decade ago.

Any reasons why I shouldn't get it? Anyone familiar with this bike?
>>
>>1049556
do not buy old fs bikes or cheap fs bikes
the suspension will be complete and utter shit, and it'll weigh so much that you won't be able to go up hill without legs of steel

also, bike suspension doesn't work well on roads because the suspended/unsuspended mass ratio is fucked, so suspension won't make riding on a road any more comfortable, and may actually make it worse

in short, buy a 90s rigid mtb
>>
>>1049556
That's like $200 too much and it's a piece of shit.
>>
>>1049558
>>1049559

Okay, thanks.
>>
>>1049561

Older mtbs are typically fine, but just look at that rear suspension. You really don't want to be servicing that or trying to find small parts. Hard tail is the way to go for your use.
>>
Is 105 overkill for a commuter?
>>
What is the big deal about making breakable belt drives? Is it really that hard to come up with such thing?
>>
>>1049574
Yes, as long as you also have another nice road bike with 105 or superior components. Otherwise, once you inevitably start upgrading your only bike, you'll regret not shelling out a couple more bucks on the best bang for your buck groupo.
>>
>>1049584
Yes.
>>
>>1049574
Yes. And Shimano is shit. SRAM is better.
>>
>>1049495
Same as on a non-1x drivetrain obviously.
>>
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How much do you guys think i can get for this on the street/ what do you guys think of my build im almost finished
>>
>>1049624
SRAM cannot even into front derailleurs or comfy,proper working brifters.
Lmao-ing at their sales figures
>>
can I run a wheelset that useses 9mm QR with standart dropouts on a 90s rigid ?
>>
>>1048443
what is so bad about that saddle?
>>
Bought myself a Kryptonite mini lock and it doesn't fit the frame and the back wheel, its too small

Should I buy the full size lock or just lock it differently?
>>
>>1049647

This thing make no sense, some high end bits mixed with aweful end bits. Should go ok i suppose it just seems off. Half of the bike stolen?
>>
>>1049748
Doesn't fit at all? Not even the frame and wheel by themselves?
>>
This may seem like a very stupid question:

I'm interested in getting a bike that has very particular hubs.

What should one consider when buying a wheelset? Are there particular things I need to know about the hub before I make a purchase like this, assuming I want to keep the factory hubs?
>>
>>1049756
It needs to have the right width and axle type (although some are convertible) and the right hub for the speed of your drivetrain.

If you were less crytic we could probably help you more. Are you talking about boost, or dymamo, or igh or something?
>>
>>1049758
Sorry for being cryptic.
The bike in question has a dynamo in the front hub and an igh in the rear.
>>
>>1049763
So you want to keep the hubs that come stock, and rebuild the rest of the wheels keeping those?

I'd suggest buying rim and spokes instead of buying an actual wheelset and taking that to pieces (?).

You need to make sure the rim has the matching number of spoke holes, and the spokes are both the right length and type (standard or straight pull). There are spoke calculators online.

Sorry if I'm barking up the wrong tree with regards to your intent.
>>
>>1049753
Yes it is
>>
>>1049765
That's my intention entirely. I used the term wheelset incorrectly.

So it's just a case of identifying spoke count (easy enough),
calculating the length and type and making a purchase accordingly. Thanks for your support!
>>
>>1049647
Give it back Jamal
>>
What companies make decent lug-welded bikes nowadays?

I'm done going fast. I want to ride classy. Most of my riding will be gravel bike trails in Virginia (like the New River trail).

I know about Rivendell but there must be other manufactures.
>>
>>1049775
Soma, All-city
>>
Will a 9 speed shimano deore derailleur work with a 10 speed microshift BS-A10 bar end shifters?

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/mobile/fi/en/shimano-deore-m592-shadow-9-speed-rear-mech/rp-prod40542

My commuter bike that I bought second hand about a year ago needs a new derailleur since the current one (some old 8 speed shimano that hasn't even a mark of what model it is in it) doesn't shift correctly no matter how much I adjust it.

I believe that I can use 7/8/9/10 speed derailleur with the shifter as long the derailleur isn't a dyna sys one. Am I correct? If the derailleur linked earlier won't work with the bar end shifter, what will?
>>
>>1049771
No. And I'm not a nigger either lol
>>
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>>1049779
>takes pics of stolen bike in a chop shop
>knows jack shit about components or mtbs in general
ur a beaner
>>
>>1049778
Yes
>>
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>>1049755
I can fit and lock it through the frame and rear wheel however I won't be able to lock it to any object. Basically I can't put it on like in the picture
>>
>>1049783
Try the wheel and seat stays instead.
>>
>>1049784
can't do that either, think I should just buy a normal sized lock. this mini one is probably just for people who don't trust cable locks to save their front wheel

don't want to use the sheldon method either
>>
>>1049787
I have a mini one and can get it through the wheel and frame on most bike parks. Does take some wrangling to get the angle lined up right, though.
>>
>>1049783
If you can fit it through the frame and rear wheel, you can fit it through rear wheel and whatever pole you're locking the bike to. There's no need for the lock to actually go through the frame as long as it's inside the rear triangle.
>>
>>1049775
Velo Orange (they're practically local to you too), Black Mountain Cycles
>>
>>1049769
Well atleast it make sense now
>>
Bought a cheap bike a few years ago, recently started using it for daily commuting. The front wheel has been going noticeably out of true. Got a spoke wrench and had a go, but I don't think it's much better. (It did get worse, but I fixed that.)

Do I need a truing stand? They seem kind of expensive relative to what I paid for the bike.
>>
>>1049800
Hard to say without seeing it in person - the problem could be specific to that wheel (rim itself bent, making a good true impossible), or it could just be that you're doin' it wrong. Keep in mind that when truing a wheel you want the rim to end up straight, but you also need the spoke tension on each side of the wheel to be even, otherwise the wheel will tend to quickly go out of true in the future - this means making adjustments by tightening AND loosening spokes, and checking spokes to see if they feel noticeable tight/loose.

A truing stand isn't absolutely necessary to true a wheel, but it is much more convenient than working with the wheel on a bike.
>>
>>1049803
>tightening AND loosening spokes
Yeah, I'm doing that. I'm not sure how reliably given that I'm just going on instructions I've read off the Internet.

> checking spokes to see if they feel noticeable tight/loose
I don't think I'd know what to check for other than "so loose it's not actually in tension".

It feels like I could probably true a wheel on the bike if I knew how, but will struggle to learn without a stand.
>>
>>1049790
You mean like this? >>1049783
>>
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Am I retarded or my fucking brifters are crooked? They look asimetric and it bothers my autism.
>>
>>1049854
ur hub is crooked 2 m8
>>
>>1049854
It's not the brifters.
>>
>>1049864
>>1049856
Please do elaborate, fine ge/n/tlemen.
>>
My new dropper post is just slightly too long, I need a new saddle anyway so I was thinking of getting something slimmer (distance from the rails to the top). Anyone got any recommendations? Current saddle is just under 60mm thick, I don't think this is a measurement given in saddle specs but perhaps some of you guys could measure yours.
>>
>>1049878
no clue but cc has selle italias for $22- not shilling just seems like a deal.
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/selle-italia-nekkar-plus-saddle?skid=SEL001O-BK-S2&CMP_SKU=SEL001O&MER=0406&CMP_ID=PLA_GOc014&mv_pc=r101&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=PLA&CSPID=0914&mr:trackingCode=B03BBD07-F44D-E511-80F8-0050569475F3&mr:referralID=NA&mr:device=c&mr:adType=plaonline&mr:ad=81822233821&mr:keyword=&mr:match=&mr:tid=pla-469155664992&mr:ploc=9014241&mr:iloc=&mr:store=&mr:filter=469155664992&gclid=CNu1rsrBmtICFQi1wAodcCAMxA&gclsrc=aw.ds
>>
>>1049882
That looks a bit thick. I've found the WTB SL8 which is 44mm high so a fairly decent reduction, don't think I'm going to get much low than that especially without interfering with the seatpost guts.
>>
>>1049731

most likely, yes. 9mm QR was the standard for many years.
>>
>>1049775

crust, rawland, boulder. bruce gordon, moth attack, or build your own at yamaguchi
>>
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>>1049806

This has worked for me.
>>
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>>1049775
What do you mean by "lug-welded"? Lugged frames are usually brazed, right?

>>1049776
>>1049792
Soma, All-City, Velo Orange, and Black Mountain Cycles all only make tig-welded frames without lugs. But if the person we're replying to doesn't care about the precise method of tube joining and just wants a classy, comfy steel bike, all of those are great choices. I absolutely love my Black Mountain Monstercross.
>>1049963
Boulder and Bruce Gordon both make fine lugged steel frames, but if we're going into framebuilder territory, the list would be very long. Thanks for reminding about Crust... the Romanceür; a bike with both a 1" threaded steerer and disc brakes. What a world we live in.
>>
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guys,
I'm looking for a fork thats around 400 - 420 a-c disc only 1 1/8 straight steerer and preferably has mid mounts. budget is around 100€ cheaper is cheaper.

also, what's your opinion on alu forks ?
I plan on using 2.2 tires at least so the harsh ness shouldnt be a problem , right ?
>>
>>1050007

also, the obvious answer seems to be surly , but are there any good and maybe cheaper (and maybe not as branded) alternatives ?
>>
Hey I have an old (late 70s?) Schwinn le tour that was converted to singlespeed. I've been doing cycling commuting with this for a while and am finally looking to upgrade.

I'm fairly broke right now, but was thinking I could slowly upgrade parts on the old schwinn with the intention of eventually buying a new frame and swapping everything over.

Is this a stupid idea? I'm guessing it would end up costing more in the long run, not to mention I'm guessing there could be comparability issues between an old schwinn and a new frame.


I'm interested in commuting, short (~200-300 mile) touring and am hoping to eventually get into racing etc. (If relevant)
>>
>>1050018

rid that schwinn untill you have about 200 € (or whatever currency you are using) start looking around for complete bikes, preferably something with stis.
by the time you found something worthwhile you'll have accumulated around 300 €/$
get it and enjoy it
eventually upgrade stuff on the "new" bike.
>>
>>1049586
Thanks.
>>
>>1050018
Bear in mind that if you eventually want to switch to a nicer frame, many of your components won't be compatible.
>>
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How am I supposed to bleed this older shimano saint brake? I don't see the bleed port where the funnel is supposed to be installed.

I bled the brake by removing the cover but I don't think that it's the way it should be done.
>>
>>1050058
Pretty sure that model is from before the one way bleed thing with the funnel.

Level the lever and remove the lid from the reservoir and fill it to the top with oil. Put a tube on the bleed nipple at the caliper and put a bowl under it. Squeeze the lever and hold it in whilst opening the bleed nipple to force out some oil and air. Close the nipple and then release the lever, top up with fluid before doing so if needed. Repeat the pump and bleed process until there's no more air coming out.
>>
>>1050058
Previous anon already answered the question, I just want to say that those are my favorite style of brakes to bleed:
evacuate air from both ends, top off oil in the reservoir, close it up and clean up any that spilled out at the lever - done!
>>
>>1050065
Have you tried the new style? They're much simpler and easier to do, the old style would ideally need two people.
>>
>>1050058
The correct way to do these is to take the cover off. You dun gud.

>>1050067
I do mine by myself, no problem.
>>
>>1050083
If you do it the correct way then it's quite a stretch to the rear brake and difficult to keep an eye on the fluid level whilst pumping.
>>
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Does anyone know where i can order studded fat tyres in Europe?
The grip level under the snow was practically zero today.
>>
What is a good bike to buy for under $150 for use in a suburban cycling-friendly college town with mostly warm weather?
>>
>>1050162
don't buy new in that price range, look on craigslist or in a bike coop
look for:
>90s rigid mtb
good for commuting, extremely reliable, work well on bad roads, heavy, slow
>OTS (old ten speed)
slightly less reliable, but still good, not great on bad roads, reasonably light, fast
>>
>>1050165
What price range would you recommend for buying new?
>>
>>1050174
+$1000
>>
>>1050174
i wouldn't fully listen to >>1050208
you can get good new bikes in the $500 range that are functional but very basic, and in the $600-$800 range there are some pretty decent general purpose commuting bikes and entry level road bikes

however, used will always be a much better deal, even in the >$1000 range

imo, there's really no reason to buy a new bike unless you want the absolute latest technology or there's a specific model you really have to have. if you buy a used bike from a decent lbs or a good coop it'll be ready to ride and reliable right out of the shop, and a lbs will often offer free service on a bike for a few months. there are so many used bikes out there that buying new is just burning money
>>
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is it possible to mount mtb hydraulic discs to a 700c fork?
>>
>>1050241
If the fork is not designed to be compatible with disc brakes, then it's generally not advisable to modify it to accept discs. Disc brakes put unique forces on frame/fork, and the frame/fork may not do well with those forces if its not designed to withstand them.

If the fork is designed for disc brakes then yea you should be able to swap from mechanical to hydraulic if that's what you're asking. Not all disc rotors are the same size (common sizes are 160mm and 180mm) so make sure to get the right size

Sorry if I misunderstood the question
>>
>>1050174
If you want to buy new and want to go as cheap as possible, get the Kona Dew or Kona Dew Plus. Ignore anyone who disagrees, that is the cheapest bike that's not pure shit.
Used bikes are a great option too though. I have 5 bikes and I ride my 80s steel ten speed road bike (which I paid $175 for) more than I ride my carbon road bike (worth $5,000). More expensive doesn't mean better, depends on your uses
>>
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>>1049854
Shameless self bump within a thread. I'd really appreciate if any of you anons has any experience with this. My handle bars are not bent and I'm beggining to worry that something will snap in the worst possible moment.
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>>1050275

>They look asimetric and it bothers my autism.

I dunno about your brifters, but if out-of-place things trigger your autism, you should really learn how to spell "asymmetric." Because it's triggering mine.

No, Ralph. I will not be your valentine. Learn to spell.
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I need your help again /bqg/

Greentext to keep long story short:
>bike old, wasn't serviced for over 5 years, experiences breakdowns far too often
>get it fixed by a serviceman. Replaced: cassette, chain, and couple things unrelated to drivetrain (tubes and tires)
>since then links get stiff at a very very fast rate - you can get 1-3 stiff links during a 30 min ride (this is not an exaggerration)
>ever-present "jumps" that accompany stiff links suck all the pleasure from riding
>getting rid of stiffness is easy, re-lubricating is easy, none however fix the underlying issue and links keep getting stuck, stiff and whole drivetrain keeps jumping
>been to the serviceman twice since, he only fixed the stiff links, outright refused to fix the underlying cause
>fed up, gave up on him, ask /bgq/ for advice
>following your advice end up replacing entire crankset and chain
>only parts of drivetrain left from before the servicing are deraileurs
>only part of drivetrain left from the servicing (the evil one, the one that broke the bike) is cassette
>issue still persists

Spring is on the way and I'd like to be able to get back to riding again.
How do I get it fixed?

I've just been to LBS. They pointed out a mass of other issues with bike I don't want fixed - cashgrab bastards.
All I want is the drivetrain issue causing link stiffness to be fixed.

Personally I only have one idea - the chain length, since both new chains are same length and both cause stiffness (old one didn't, but I don't have it anymore to check length).
But even here I used Sheldon Brown's guide for getting proper chain length, I seriously doubt I did it incorrectly.
Is it possible the guide is old or wrong through other means? How do I get correct chain length?

Thanks.
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>>1050323
I don't see how chain length would cause stiff links. In my experience that happens when the chain gets rusty, do you leave your bike out in the rain a lot? Either that or the chain is just cheap shit.
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why are there so many cyclists who insist on standing to pedal when taking off?

I overtake all of them in comfort and ease just by using my gears
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>>1050325
It's always stored indoors and I don't ride during wet weather.
Both chains are brand new, first one is cheap chink shit, the second is a solid connex one.
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>>1050275
your wheel is not properly trued, its not your bars
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>>1050322
No need to be an asshole, buddy. I was typing in a hurry and it just so happens that English is not my first language. So fuck you, asshole.
>>1050347
The front wheel is radially laced and pretty much fine, but thanks for the tip. The thing the bothers me is that my brake levers seems to be pointing slightly in different directions. Notice how the right brifter seems to be pointing a little bit the side more so than the other one? I've already inspected them from up close and nothing seems to be bent or cracked.
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>>1050386
It's hard to tell when you can't even take a straight photo.
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>>1050386
>no need to be an asshole
where do you think you are.jpg
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best way to paint a carbon frame?
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>>1050499
don't
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When I was a child, I had a bicycle with just 5 gears, and only a gear shifter on the right side of the handle.
After googling a little, it is my understanding that this means I had 1 gear in the front, and 5 in the rear.
I have a new bicycle now, and it has several gears in the front and the back.
To be honest, i still don't understand how to shift correctly. I read that in order to "shift down", i have to either shift the front into a smaller gear, or the back into a bigger gear. But isn't that the exact opposite of what im supposed to do? on my old bike, i had to shift down by shifting into a lower gear.
I'm honestly pretty confused on how to shift up and down now.
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>>1050561
The best way to describe it to a novice is using the terms easy as in less pressure to pedal and hard as in more pressure pedal

For easier gears, select large cogs in the rear and small rings in the front. For harder gears do the opposite.
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>>1050563
i think i understand. i'll try it out. thanks!
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>>1050564
also, pay attention to your chain angle
don't make it go too far sideways, that's called crosschaining and its bad for your drivetrain

see:
http://sheldonbrown.com/gears.html
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>>1050561
>>1050563

another way to think about it is:

for both sets of gears, easier (downshifting) is moving the chain closer to the frame of the bike. harder (upshifting) is moving the chain outward, away from the bike.

you can also think of shifting the front gears (or "chainrings" or just "rings") as the "main" shift: going uphill? downshift. Going downhill or settling into fast cruising? upshift.

the rear gears can be thought of as "fine tuning" to spin the most efficient or just "natural-feeling" cadence within the gear you've selected up front.

Once you're used to it, it will be more intuitive, you'll predict your next shifts without considering what I wrote. but until then it will help in understanding and deciding how to shift.
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You guys know if this tire is good for a mtb?
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>>1050692
Bump please help
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>>1050692
Shameless bump
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Why are people asking 200-600 EUR for 20-40 year old bikes?
I understand that some are worth it for collectors but they can't all be asking for that much.

I would like a cheap road bike to run errands but that's too fucking expensive.
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what does n think of flat bars with bar ends?
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Does a 10 speed non dynasys mtb rear shifter exist? I have a 8 speed shimano derailleur and I was wondering if I upgraded my second bike to 10 speed. I have the cassette already so the upgrade should be pretty cheap and easy to do. Only thing is that I haven't found a 10 speed shifter that isn't a dynasys one.




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