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/bqg/ - Bicycle Questions General

Previous thread: >>1057842

Resources:
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
https://www.ebicycles.com/bicycle-tools/frame-sizer
>>
I only have enough room for a 2" wide tire in back but enough room for 2.5 or maybe 2.75 in front on my rigid MTB. Would this be an unusual setup? Do people do this?
>>
>>1063609
It's normal to have a wider tire in front, but people generally don't do as much difference as you suggest. Something like 2.25" or 2.3" front with 2" rear would be pretty normal. More than that wouldn't necessarily be bad, but not really normal.
>>
I fell off my bike the other day and now the front wheel points the wrong way, as in I have to point the handlebars ~20 degrees to the left to ride straight. Is this easily fixable? It's a little annoying but not really that big of a deal so if I have to take the whole thing apart I don't think I'll bother.
>>
>>1063621
Sounds like your stem got knocked out of alignment. On threadless I know that's easy to fix, dunno about threaded.
>>
>>1063621
Just loosen those bold between the fork and the stem and fix it. But if you wheel or whatever is bent you should go to a bicycle store.
>>
>>1063623
>Just loosen those bold between the fork and the stem and fix it.
Thanks, that did it.
>>
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I got myselfe a new project.
I got a semi decent modern hardtail frame.
the company recommends a 120mm fork. the previous owner said he used a 140mm fork and felt the bike handled fine.
the geometry charts look like the bike could handle the slackend angles of a bigger fork (68,5 -> 67,5 ha with the bigger fork)

should I put a bigger fork on it ?
do I need a bigger fork ?
I want to get deeper into trail riding with this thing.
>>
Guys I'm feeling serious pain in my right hand thumb, it's not even so much when I ride though I do get numb palms and fingers, but this is getting pretty annoying it's been waking me up in the last 2-3 days.
Strangely it's not a problem later during the day, so maybe I'm also sleeping on my hand, who knows. I'll go to the doctor and so on, but what can I do on the bike to improve my hand comfort?
>>
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Had this bike since I was like 15, but hardly ever rode it.
Anyone can tell what kind of bike this is (mountain, road or whatever).
Also do you think it's too ugly/bright?
How can I improve its looks?
>>
>>1063703
Looks like a hybrid designed for both road and light offroad use.
Put some slicks on it and a less casual saddle, but I wouldn't invest too much into it.
>>
>>1063703
That's not a bicycle, it's a bicycle-shaped object. The only way to improve it is to throw it into a river.
>>
>>1063692

What triggers does the pain have? You say its been waking you up, when else does it come on? Is it related to biking only or other activities? What sort of pain is it, like shooting/tingly/dull ache? Can you still move the hand normally?

Do you have flats or drops on your bike- drops give a greater variety of positioning, maybe try bar ends if you've currently got flats. Also check your bike fit- it should be roughly a third of your weight on the pedals, bars, and saddle respectively, make sure you're not putting way too much weight on your hands.
>>
slightly autistic question.

is it okay to wear protective gloves while trailriding ?

what protectors are acceptable what are overkill ?


I mostly ride gravel and used to ride some xc and I sometimes take things too far and eat dirt.

I want to get into more serious trail stuff.
I know I will take it a bit to far from time to time , so what should I use ?
>>
>>1063703
that's a pretty shitty bso
its at least rigid so its probably ridable
don't waste money on it
>>
>>1063716
>is it okay to wear protective gloves while trailriding ?
yeah, i never ride my mtb without gloves
crashing on rough gravel without gloves = pain
>>
>>1063706
>>1063727
>don't waste money on it
Yeah, I wasn't going too
I just have this sudden urge to ride
Also the roads are trash here, so I don't think slicks are a good choice.
>>
>>1063729
You could get a set of semi-slicks with treaded shoulders for a good balance of traction & speed - good tires will make even a crappy bike ride better, and can be swapped over when you get a decent bike (same goes for saddles).
Do your wheels have steel rims or alu?
>>
>>1063710
The pain is worst in the morning which makes me think I might be putting pressure on my hand when sleeping, but riding puts pressure on the hand which makes it worse.
It's a sharp pain in the muscle that pulls the thumb towards the palm, It's not numbness, there is still sensation and I can control the thumb which is probably good news.
I get numbness when riding, some nerve is put under pressure and the thumb, index and middle fingers get tingling and numb, but I just switch up my grip or rest my hands for a bit.
I ride a flat handle bar hybrid bike, so far what I've discovered is my seat has tilted forwards probably pushing more of my weight onto the bar.

Are ergonomic grips any good, do they actually help with comfort?
>>
>>1063765

It's hard to make a decent guess without examining and talking to your face to face, as there's lots of questions to ask, but you're seeing a doc anyway which is the right thing to do.

If the pain gets worse when riding, maybe try bar ends, as the different hand position may help. Also definitely sort the saddle out, and make sure your bike fits properly, you might have to raise the stem as well, or the bike may be too small.

Do you only get pain in that muscle, or other fingers as well? When did it start, and can you think of a particular trigger? Have you noticed any change in sensation of the hand? Have you noticed any change in strength of the muscles/grip in the hand (fingers or thumb?

It's a little odd, as that muscle is often innervated by two nerves- the median and the ulnar, and they take a slightly different route. The median causes carpal tunnel, but the ulnar doesn't run exactly the same way. But yeah, check with your doctor
>>
>>1063625
Make sure you put it back together properly and tight enough, because if not, your bars and fork/front wheel will fall off while you are riding. Look up 'headset adjustment' on Sheldon Brown or Park Tool (both links in OP post). If you are unsure, stop by a bike shop and ask them whether or not your headset needs adjustment.
>>
>>1063703
It's a sidewalk bike. Supposed to look like a mountain bike but only really good for riding down the sidewalk. If you enjoy riding it, great, but it's not worth putting money into.
>>1063716
Yes. Giro Xen.
>>1063734
>and can be swapped over when you get a decent bike
Not if his new bike doesn't have the same size wheels.
>>1063765
>Are ergonomic grips any good, do they actually help with comfort?
Yeah they're nice, as long as they're positioned at the proper angle. Gloves are helpful too.
>>
>>1063588
what is the correct saddle to stem lenght for a 6'2 guy?

I've been searching top tube lenght but it seems they only consider the frame size

I think I need a shorter stem
>>
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>>1063809
forgot pic
I want to know red and not yellow
>>
>>1063809

Depends on your proportions- bear in mind you can move the saddle forwards/backwards at the same height, and lenghten/shorten the stem, as well as adjust its angle.

What makes saddle to stem length so important to you?
>>
>>1063829
I already moved my saddle foward and I feel like the bar still is too far away

I just wanted to know if I should just get used to the bike (since I've aways ridden bikes that were too small for my height before) or if it really is too long for me

Also you should never say that bike sizing is "perssonal" or that it "depends on your proportions" becouse that's obvious. When people ask about sizes they are looking for a starting point from where they can adjust to their body type and not for the perfect size that they will use for the rest of their lifes
>>
>>1063860

Take it to a fitter if you're particularly concerned, if you want to look it up there are angles and shit that some of your joints should be at but I can't remember it off the top of my head. If the frame is the right size for you, and you don't have some weirdly abnormal proportions then just play around with different saddle/stem configurations till you get one where you're comfy and can go as fast as you want- easy
>>
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>high ano rims

what are these for anyway?

they seem pretty strong but braking in them is quite horrible in the wet and it was even more horrible before I put Koolstop Salmons. Now they are starting loosing the ano covering.

Now braking is pretty solid but as soon as a drop of water is there I loose the bite pretty dramatically. Calipers are single pivot shimano 600 tri (series 6400)
>>
>>1063809
Can you not add? It's the top tube length plus roughly 20-30cm.

Your saddle fore/aft position should ideal be used to position your hips for power and comfortable knee alignment. Not for reach purposes.

To properly adjust reach, get a properly fitting frame. Micro adjust with stems.

You can go pay hundreds for a pro fit, or just realize for casual riding, your own body signals and comfort levels should tell you everything you need to know.
>>
>>1063911
Hard anodized, not high. It was some kind of heat treatment that was supposed to make rims stiffer and stronger. Also looks good. It's a terrible braking surface. It's also no longer used. Old technology that was flawed but also cool in some ways. They seem to be long lasting rims.
>>
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>>1063916
>Hard anodized, not high.

my lapsus. yeah, after putting based salmons on it braking came from catastrophic to dramatic in wet conditions, and modulation isnt that good it tends to break, break and then BITE.
on back I have the famous ambrosio Durex rims where the anodised surface is worn out.

Ill probably switch the MA40 to the back and put a basic box alu rim on the front. Shame, they look fantastic when the coating isnt worn out and are pretty strong.
>>
Are cheap chinese motorcycle helmets suitable for bike speeds? They look like they're just bike helmet foam inside a larger shell. Totally unsuitable for motorcycles of course, but would they be protective on a bike? Normally motorcycle helmets are horrible for biking because of their rigidity at low speeds, but if the chink motorcycle helmets work out to be made just like bike helmets that would make them a cheap option for getting a full-face helmet right?

Or are they unsuitable for anything at all?
>>
>>1063942
I don't know, but I wouldn't trust a chink helmet. If you want a full face helmet, get a bicycle full face helmet.
>>
>>1063942
>Are cheap chinese motorcycle helmets suitable for bike speeds?
anyting is going to be better than no helmet at all
that being said, they probably won't be quite as effective in low speed collisions as a proper bike helmet
one of the main drawbacks would be lack of ventilation
>cheap option for getting a full-face helmet
i wouldn't recommend full face unless you're doing really intense downhill mtb riding
in most cases there won't be much advantage to a full face helmet, and it'll make your head sweat really really bad
>>
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>>1063945
>not commuting in a fullface
>>
>>1063944
But those are out of my budget and look shitty.

>>1063945
I don't mind my head sweating. I do mind getting my face scraped up by the pavement. I'm willing to deal with a little heat if it means I can keep my teeth and lips in a crash.
>>
>>1063679
Bear in mind that just because the fork has 20mm more travel it doesn't mean the fork is exactly 20mm longer (and if it was it'd only be 14mm longer with the same amount of sag).

What you instead want to look at is the axle to crown length, the distance from the axle of the wheel to where the crown race sits on the steerer tube. There will be 120mm forks out there longer than some 140mm ones and there could be say 60mm difference between others.

Chances are it will be perfectly fine for you to put a longer fork on there.
>>
>>1063946
>commuting
>having a job
>not riding all day everyday
its like you don't even cycle
>>
>>1063974
>implying a job is the only place a person can commute to/from
faggotfuck downtuber
>>
Is there a basic cadence sensor I can buy instead of buying a whole new cyclocomputer? I like my velo 9 and wouldn't have much use for it if I simply upgraded to a higher end model with a sensor.

Maybe something that's bluetooth and uses my phone as a readout? Just got a phone mount today.
>>
Does /bqg/ know of any good 80s–90s literature which details the popular/relevant steel frame tubing of that era and their metallurgical properties?
>>
>>1064000
Does this help?
http://www.63xc.com/scotn/metal.htm
>>
>>1064006
I've already got some good reading material about general bicycle metallurgy I'm more looking for a consumer reference of sorts to what tubing to look out for, as I am in the market for an ~80s steel frame.
>>
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>>1063716
>is it okay to wear protective gloves while trailriding ?
ALWAYS wear gloves, good shoes, a helmet and knee guards while riding off-road. you're gonna fall. that's part of the sport, you know?

>what protectors are acceptable what are overkill ?
nothing is overkill. you can go right into a TLD D3 with a neck brace, fox bombers and launch pro knee-to-shin guards if you want. you can wear fuckin' straight up moto bodyarmor if thats where you're at. your personal safety and well-being are your responsibility and none but the most arrogant dickhead is going to grief you over using personal-protective-equipment (PPE).

i personally wear fox digits, launch pro kneeguards, 5.10 freeriders and a giro feature mips lid.
>>
>>1064023
>always wear knee guards when riding off-road
Seriously?

I've been mountain biking since 8-speed cassettes were new and fancy; I've never worn knee guards. Gloves and helmet, sure.

(caveat: I do XC and singletrack, not gnarly downhill with lots of air)
>>
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>>1064036
>>always wear knee guards when riding off-road
>Seriously?
i like to go fast and huck shit! plus i work on my feet all day. no knees, no money, you know?

i do have a general question for the thread though:

my singlespeed daily driver has an insufficient chainring. are there viable options to go bigger using the stock crankset (fsa mega exo comet 386 36t), or will i be needing something else altogether? far as i know that specific set has a 38t available but i'd much rather something in the 46-48 range. 16t cog in the back if anyone was curious.
>>
>>1064055
Most likely anon. To find replacement rings for those cracks, you will need to determine the bolt circle diameter, bcd. There are usually lots of tooth counts. Just Google how to measure bcd. You will need a longer chain of course.
>>
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My dad acquired a few tools from the closing sale of a bike shop for me. Does anyone know what this tool is good for? Pretty heavy ~3 lb.
>>
>>1064094
That looks like a bearing press anon
>>
Hey where can a europoor find some cheap bikes online. I need a cyclocross/roadie to commute and ride around aimlesly onroad and offroad during the weekends. I tried looking on local listings and such but all i found are some shitty hibryds. Buying new cyclocross is about 800 euros and my budget is only about 400-600. Any suggestions?
>>
Anyone have opinions?
I currently ride entirely on road, and race occasionally.
I'm looking for a second bike that will allow me to go a bit off-road and explore local canal paths, trails and woods. I also want to be able to bikepack on it, so it will need to be at least reasonably efficient on the roads for long distance.
I'm looking at gravel/adventure road bikes mainly, but as I have little experience off road I wanted to ask here...
How 'off-road' can an adventure bike go?

I'm looking at these two bikes:
http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/adventure/adventure/croix-de-fer/croix-de-fer-10

A steel 'adventure' bike, specced out with the new Sora, typical adventure geometry.

http://www.genesisbikes.co.uk/bikes/adventure/adventure/vagabond/vagabond

A monstercross bike, with drops and bigger tyre clearance.

I guess what I'm asking is, what can the Vagabond do that the CdF can't? And how much slower will the Vagabond be on roads?

Cheer /n/!
>>
>>1064107
Cyclocross hasn't been popular enough in Europe for cheap used bikes.
Get an old road bike and mount 28mm trekking tires.
>>
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>>1064182
A pic of the vagabond - weird looking bike but I imagine it's bloody versatile.
>>
>>1064182
The Vagabond has much lower gearing and combined with larger grippier tyres it's going to climb and handle slow technical stuff better. On flat ground your cruising speed might be 2mph slower if that, although going downhill you might end up spinning out with the lower top gear. Other than that you've got slightly longer chainstays so it'll be a bit more stable off road (especially combined with the larger tyres) and a much shorter seat tube so you have more room to move about or lower the seat to get it out of the way.

That said they are both severely limited off road due to the drop bars, steep geometry, large wheels, rigid fork, and poor brakes. I'd at least consider going with flat bars and hydraulic brakes unless you're sticking to smooth trail paths, once you start getting into roots, ruts, and other little bumps you're going to want more control.
>>
>>1064191
Thanks!

I've ridden forest tracks on my race bike, and I actually prefer drops for control over the technical stuff (although as I said, I have little real experience) The ability to ride over technical terrain is more important than going quickly for me.
How much more off road can the Vagabond go in your opinion?
As in, would the CdF be ok on bumpy bridle ways and forest tracks?
Also, they are both basic Shimano (Sora and Deore) but should I be leaning towards the road groupset or the MTB?

Thanks again!
>>
>>1064195
>How much more off road can the Vagabond go in your opinion?
Just based off the gearing, quite a lot. Whilst both can ride over rough stuff, albeit slowly due to the limitations I've mentioned, I wouldn't be surprised if you ran into stuff on the CdF that you simply couldn't pedal through or up.

If it was me and I was forced to choose between those two I'd take the Vagabond for what you want to use it for. As for any changes I'd make, 1x with a wider range cassette and if I got on fine with the bar end shifter (never tried one before) then I'd swap the brakes out for hydraulics, they can be had for reasonable prices and only get stupidly expensive when you need brifters.
>>
>>1064204
I would think I could pedal most stuff with the 1:1 on the CdF but I don't know how rough 'rough' is if that makes sense. Would fire roads, gravel, and bridleways be doable on both? What would be too much for the CdF with 40mm tires?
>>
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>>1064206
The CdF for those interested.
>>
>>1064206
>Would fire roads, gravel, and bridleways be doable on both? What would be too much for the CdF with 40mm tires?
Both would be fine for that sort of stuff. It's the techncial and short but really steep stuff where you'll be wanting the lower gearing. For example near where I live there are quite a few dried up stream beds that I cross and to climb out it might only be a couple feet but it's at like a 45 degree angle.

It's hard to describe what a bike can or can't do off road, it's no where near as simple as road riding where you only really have long sustained climbs that are nowhere near as steep and no obstacles to get over or around.
>>
>>1064213
It's good to know that the CdF can handle bumpy bridleways. On my outings ridleways and forest trails are about as rough as it will get. The CdF also seems more road capable, and most of my riding will be on road. For touring I could take slicks and cover lots of distance on road in comfort relative to my race bike.

The Vagabond seems really cool though, and I like that it could do rougher stuff if ever the fancy took me on travels.
>>
>>1064220
The only thing that makes the CdF more suited to road is the gearing. Looking at the specs again it may only even be the top end where it wins out, the CdF is 9 speed versus 10 speed on the Vagabond so although the cassette has less range the jumps between gears might still be as large (chainring jumps are close to equal). Even on the top end it's not like the Vagabond is inadequate, you'll never spin out on flat ground and even down hill you'll be able to give an extra push up to 27-35mph depending on how fast you can spin (90-120rpm respectively).

I'm seeing little reason someone would prefer the CdF, just if they preferred brifters over barcons really or they absolutely had to top 40mph bombing down hills.
>>
I have a fixie right now and I am looking to upgrade it into something nicer. It's not a nice bike. It's rather uncomfortable and it doesn't ride well.

I ride a lot of different terrains... good roads, unbelievably border line third world roads (I live in Dallas), and some dirt paths.

I have a few questions about upgrading.

I found a little local, small bike shop that I trust. They seem to sell exclusively Kona bikes. Is this a good brand?

After speaking to the owner of the shop, I can away with two options. Either a hybrid bike or a mountain bike. I had a second friend recommend getting a dirt bike but also getting a second pair of street tires for it. Given my riding habits described above, what sub-$600 bike style would fit my needs best?
>>
Getting back into cycling because I became a lazy fuck after getting his license years ago. There are tons of bike trails close to my work and summer is coming quickly in Chicago. Already bought a nice bike rack for the car but need a bike.

Will be on pavement probably all the time. When I used to cycle everywhere I could easily do 30-40 miles a day and I'm hoping to get back up to that, or at least close. Should I be looking at road bikes or other types?
>>
>>1064182
SALSA FARGO

Whatever you go with, just have two wheelsets, a bikepacking wheelset with 2"+ knobbies and a road/touring/fuckaround wheelset with like 32-35mm semislicks.
>>
>>1064249
>I found a little local, small bike shop that I trust. They seem to sell exclusively Kona bikes. Is this a good brand?
Yes. Definitely good quality and good company. The few Konas I've test ridden haven't been the most fun-to-ride bikes in my opinion, but that's purely a matter of personal opinion. They are a good and respected company and they make high quality bikes, so if you test ride one and like it, you're certainly not going wrong.
>Given my riding habits described above, what sub-$600 bike style would fit my needs best?
The only option from Kona in your price range that would suit your needs is the Dew. It's pavement oriented, it will handle rough roads and gravel very nicely as well. It won't be ideal for singletrack/mountain bike trails, but it will be able to handle the mellow ones, you'll just have to work a bit harder and go a bit slower than if you had a mountain bike.
It sounds like you'll be doing roads a lot more than dirt, so it's better to go with the Dew than a mountain bike.
If you had a bit more money to spend, I would also look at the Jake, Rove, Big Rove, and Sutra. The Dew is a nice bike for its price though, about the best you can do at that price point.
>>
>>1064271
>Should I be looking at road bikes or other types?
Depends on your priorities. If you'll be riding for sport/recreation, only on smooth well maintained pavement, like going fast, and aren't a 250 pound fat fuck, then a road bike would be a good option. Not so much a race-oriented road bike though. Something with rack mounts would be nice, racks are convenient for longer rides and commuting.
If you want the option to do a little off road, you could get a cyclocross bike (the commuter/adventure type, not one designed for racing) and put road tires on it. It would perform almost as well as a road bike on pavement, but would also perform nicely on gravel/dirt/etc if you put the original tires back on. Only downside to this is you have to buy a second set of tires (and possibly also wheels, depending on the width of the stock wheels, and how skinny of road tires you want).
Some hybrids would be reasonable options for you as well, but I would lean towards road or cyclocross based on what you described. Road if you will definitely be 100% on pavement, cyclocross if you will potentially want to venture into other stuff on occasion.
>>
Does anyone know the velominati rules or have pic/text of them?

Feeling down and need a kek.
>>
>>1064286
>>1064286
delet this
>>
>>1064094
That's a headset cup press
>>
>>1064289
ok
>>
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>>1064249
SAVE UP MORE MONEY

BUY A KONA JAKE

JAKE FUCKIN RULES
>>
I have a Schwinn Le tour II but I hate the drop bars. What size/type of stem do I need to buy to replace them with something that will let me sit upright?
>>
>>1064365
You don't need a new stem, just new bars. The replacement bars will need to match the stems clamp diameter, probably 25.4mm. Risers or flats will be slightly up right, north roads will be even more up right. In both scenarios, you will need new brake levers without hoods.
>>
If I go cycling for too long, my dick and balls start to fall asleep. Is there a way to prevent this from happening?
>>
>>1064376
Avoid pressure on the perenium. You can do that by changing saddle tilt. Firmer saddle. Channel saddle. Just trying different saddles. Riding lighter, more weight on the pedals. Taking standing breaks every 10 minutes or so out of the saddle. Try cycling shorts. Avoid taking bumps with lots of weight on the saddle. Gonna have to experiment.
>>
>>1064383
Cool, thanks.
>>
I'm building up a hartail with 140mm travel up front and want to get into more agressive trail riding.

35mm or 50mm stem ?

I'm thinking 35mm

handlebars will be ~ 740mm
>>
>>1064454
It's quite a small difference and either will likely be fine, it's just going to come down to personal preference. You'd be better off making the choice based on other stuff like weight, price, design, colour, etc.
>>
>>1064371
Stupid question, how do I get the bars out? I loosened the nut holding the bars, but the gap it opens is too small and the drop bars too bent to just pull them out.
>>
>>1064462
Might need to angle a bladed screwdriver in the gap to keep it open.
>>
>>1064462
Slide it out, it's a bit tricky but you'll get it
>>
>>1064455

cool thanks
>>
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>>1064454
i've got a 50mm on my transiiton scout (760x20mm bars) and it feels fine. i was thinking about trying out a 35 stem with an 800x35mm riser just to see whats up with the different position. i'll let you know.
>>
>>1064208
oh that looks nice
>>
so i haven't lubed my chain on a new bike i got a couple months ago. should i add lube to self clean, or do I need to actually clean it?
>>
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Hey /n/. Total bike newbie here. Got some problem with my Trek's shifters. When shifting speeds sometimes it feels like it doesn't fully engage the crank or something, and sometimes it CLANKs a bit after a few dozen cycles, as if seating properly finally. Then yesterday the chain didn't change from one sprocket to the other mid-shift and I couldn't pedal. And tonight, the chain completely shifted off the smallest sprocket and onto the frame of the bike. Had to reseat it back to get it to work, which is easy, but I feel my bike shouldn't be doing that. Then, while checking what happened, I shined a light, and there's all these nasty scratches on the frame. I got the bike used so ot already had some wear on it, but I swear it didn't have all these before. Kinda worried I'll get hurt, or worse, damage the bike any further.

Any ideas on what's going on? Also, is that normal wear? Should I try fixing it/cover it/touch it up? I know it's just cosmetic, but I'm autistic about those things.
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>>1064611
>"I know it's just cosmetic, but I'm autistic about those things."
>Doesn't seem to care about his rusty-ass chain

CLEAN AND LUBE YOUR FUCKING CHAIN
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>>1064614
I got the bike literally a week ago. I'll get around to it, and I already cleaned up some of the surface rust on the fork things. The frame scratches are a bit of a different kind of beast though
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>>1064611
Sounds like you need to adjust your front derailleur anon. Look up some videos. If the chain is shifting off the small front ring, you need to tighten the low limit screw on the front derailleur.

If the shifting is slow to engage when you use your left hand shifter, that's a front derailleur adjustment. If it is slow to engage when you use your right hand shifter, that's a rear derailleur adjustment.

The paint damage is what you would expect from the chain smashing into the stay while stuck between the small ring and the frame, so you may indeed have caused that damage. It is only paint damage, and it's common to have scratched paint on the chain stay. There is no danger. Repaint if you really care.
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>>1064621
thanks a lot for the help! I'm curious, since I assume the adjustment will be done with a screw and also because I've had to adjust the front brake pads after they were rubbing on the wheel, but how recommendable would blue loctite be for bike screws and parts? Shouldn't that help mitigate the issue in the future?
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>>1064598
So the chain is a month old? It depends on what kind of lube the chain came with from the factory. Some chains with really high viscous lube, like sram, are best left to do their thing for a few thousand miles, then begin a normal maintenance cycle. Most fresh chains should not need new lube for a while unless weather is bad. If the lube you apply is also a degreaser, just apply that. If not, degreaser, then lube.
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>>1064623
thanks homie. i'm plannign a trip to lbs for parts and a free "tune up" so I'll see what they have to say. was just wondering if riding it would be bad until then.
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>>1064622
It shouldn't be necessary. I never use it and I work on lot of bikes. It can be difficult to apply because of all the grease and oil that tends to be on bike components. But use it if you like. Some people like to wax threads too.

It is likely that your front derailleur was never adjusted properly and has maintained its improper adjustment. Once properly adjusted, it should maintain that adjustment. You will also learn how simple a task this adjustment is during your repair. By carrying a Phillips head screw driver among your road tools, you can always address limiter issues you notice while riding.
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>>1064626
Alright, thanks. I stuffed a bike multitool thing into the wedge pack I have on it and carry a leatherman on my person anyways so I think I should be good. Just need to look up how to do the adjustments
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looking to upgrade my sus fork.

I could get this magura ts8 fairly cheap.
it's a good fork right ?

I initially planned on getting a manitou mattoc.

also the steerer is cut to 174mm , thats plenty right ?
I don't have my frame on hand to messure it.
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>>1064674
>also the steerer is cut to 174mm , thats plenty right ?
You're asking us an impossible question, we don't even know what frame you have. Do not buy it until you have the frame to measure and don't forget to include the stack height of the headset, stem height, and any spacers you may want to run under it.

As you're asking such a dumb question I should probably remind you to check other things to make sure the fork will fit. Do you have a front hub that can take a 20mm through axle? Can the frame take a tapered steerer? Are you aware that the fork has to run at least a 180mm brake rotor, and if you want to run 200mm you'll need an adapter?
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>>1064623
>>1064624
>few thousand miles
lolno, few hundred. After a few thousand the chain has to be replaced.
As a VERY general guideline:
>when you get a new chain, wait 300km until you lube it
>after the first 300km, start lubing it every 150-200km
>lube it more frequently if it seems to be dry or dirty
>after applying lube, let it sit 10 minutes to sink in, then wipe it off; you don't want lube left on the outside of the chain
>replace when it surpasses 0.75% stretch which will be like 1500-5000 km depending on many factors
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>>1064704
the 174mm part was more of a guesstimation thing. it was a stupid question anyway.
I just looked it up online and it's enough steerer.

the rest dose fit.

I was more asking about magura or the model in generel , I have no experience with those.
the reviews look good though
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What's the best fairly cheap, fairly fashionable 3m jacket? anything under $100?
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Had to swap out a tube and when I tried to pump it up it started to bulge near the valve. I realized the washer wasn't screwed all the way down and it seemed to inflate okay after that.

Is that normal or did I fuck something up?
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>>1064730
>300km
For some of us, that is one long ride.
>150km
So I'm supposed to lube my chain mid ride?

Your hyper vigilance is not necessary, but if it makes you feel good, by all means continue. In good weather, I can easily ride chains for thousands of miles with no lube and no measurable stretch. Factory lube is far more viscous than penetrating lubes and out performs them. As soon as you start using penetrating lubes you have to begin a regular lube cycle. For me every few rides. But personally I milk that factory lube, and it works.
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>>1064480

I'd be really interested.
I read some numbers regarding 50mm to 35mm stems and eventhough it seems a small step the handling efficenty seems to go up drastically
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>>1064814
The side wall bulged? That would be unrelated to the valve stem nut being fastened, whose purpose is to strengthen the valve for pump attachment. Side wall bulge is a defect in the tire.
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>>1064818
The tube was pushing the tire out of the rim, but after deflating and re-inflating it a couple times (and locking down the washer) it seemed to inflate normally.
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>bike has sat in the garage for a couple of months
>time to reinflate tires
>inflate rear tire
>front tire looks low on pressure but has some air in it
>take cap off and open valve
>accidentally release all air
>spend an hour with the hand pump but it won't inflate at all

I realize that this is a lot of words to communicate "how i aired tires???" but I just wanted to make it clear that my pump works and the tube held air in it just fine a minute ago. Hopefully I am dumb and it's something easily fixable.
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>>1064839
>front tire looks low on pressure but has some air in it
So it was only flat on one side?
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>>1064841
Before I started, I put my weight on the bike and both tires squished more than the ideal amount, but they bounced back. I inflated the rear tire without any trouble. Once I opened the valve on the front tire it completely deflated and no amount of pumping did anything.
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>>1064842
What kind of valve does it have?
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>>1064843
Presta.
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>>1064844
So how do you "accidentally release all air"? With presta valves you have to keep pushing down the little head thingie for the air to come out
In any case, just take the tube out and inflate it to see where the air is coming out from
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>>1064846
>open valve
>put pump on valve
>FSHSHSHSHHSHSSSSSHSSSHSSSSHHHHH
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>>1064852
Ahh, I see.
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What's the standard bb axle length for mid-90s 5 bolt shimano STX, Acera and similar cranks? I'm pretty sure it's 113 for most (if not all) 00s 104mm BCD shimano cranks, but how about these?

Pic isn't mine, but the cranks I need a bb for are either exactly like these or some tier lower, acera or something perhaps.
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Lads, I needed more tension on me brake levers and I adjusted the barrel. Is it alright to leave it like this or should I bring the cable in?
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>>1064815
why not just buy some factory lube?
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>>1064868
This is fine. Just don't screw it all the way out. Also, check your brakepads when they need replacing (probably not desperately soon, judging by how much you've adjusted the barrel) and do it timely.
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>>1064865

113mm sounds about right, but it can depend on the frame. I seem to recall 118 being a thing as well, but I could be mistaken.
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>>1064865
I may be wrong but doesn't the axle length depend on a few things such as the frame (it needs to be long enough so the arms clear the chainstays and depending on the width of the shell) and the rear wheel (width and speeds, to get the correct chainline)? This is one of the reasons why square taper is so shit, consider upgrading to a two piece system.

>>1064868
That's fine, the adjuster has plenty of adjustment left.
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>>1064868

It's perfect, but you may have to bring the cable in later in the season.
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>>1064871
>>1064873
>>1064874

Thanks, guys. i've looking at so many youtube videos on the brake adjust and none them specify.
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>>1064208
>kenda
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>>1064823
Good job anon. The valve lock nut is unrelated to that issue. Your issue was the wire bead not seating. In the future, pump the tire to very low pressure, then seat the bead, the finish pumping.

>>1064839
My best guess anon is that you need to further unscrew your valve, or further smoosh it into the pump head which can be difficult when the tube is flat.

>>1064865
You are correct, most 104 bcd four bolt cranks were low profile and used 113mm spindles.

That crank is probably not low profile. Is the small ring in line with the square trapper hole or is out further Inboard? If it is not in line with the square taper hole, it will need a longer spindle. 117mm is a common spindle length.

Your best bet however is to simply Google the model number and/or consult Sheldons data base https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html

>>1064869
Thick lubes cannot penetrate to the surfaces they need to lubricate. Those lubes can only be applied during production.
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>>1064231
Stop being such a retrogrouch
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Why is my bike louder when I'm on the big gear in front compared to the little one?
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>>1064936
this is a stupid question
because you didn't say what noise it makes
maybe your front derailleur is misadjusted
maybe your big chainring is damaged (i.e. bent teeth)
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>>1064938
hmm, just the normal whirring noise of pedaling sounds louder, but it doesn't sound like cross chaining or anything. it's hard to explain.
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>>1064929
Did you reply to the wrong person?
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>>1064936
unless you're crosschaining, you're probably just noticing that the pitch the drivetrain produces varies depending on how much tension the chain and RD are under.

>>1064852
>>1064841
Could be that when you unscrewed the presta valve head, you accidentially unscrewed the entire valve core.
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>>1064921
>>1064958
Thanks, turns out that a gigantic hole appeared in the tire right underneath the valve at the exact moment that I started fucking around (because it held air fine before I started). Mystery solved!
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Should I buy a trainer are they worth the money? Will it eventually damage my bike in anyway?

Any recommendations, I'm pretty much a poor college kid, but it rains all the time and I want to get my ride on and stay dry.
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How do you prevent the saddle bag from shaking around?
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My rear derailleur hits the spokes of the rear wheel if I change to the inmost gear. What do? Particularly the screws that holds the little cogs seem to stick out a fair bit. Should I just file them down?
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>>1064987
Why trip? This could be a simple task of tightening the low limit screw on your rear derailleur. You twist it in quarter turns until it no longer over shifts into the spokes, but still shifts into the lowest gear (largest cog). It could also however be a bent derailleur cage or hanger. Look to see if the line that intersects the top and bottom jockey wheels is parallel to the horizontal alignment of the cogs by looking from behind the rear derailleur. If the derailleur cage appears to be angled, you can attempt to bend it, or take it to a shop
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>>1064969
Trainers are hard on your rear tire other than that I don't see how you can really hurt anything. My only recommendation is get a fluid trainer. Either get a used one off a facebook group or whatever or watch Nashbar and the like for a sale. I got a basic one for $80 shipped out of Nashbar's return section.

Are they worth the money? That just really depends on how much you will use it. I bought mine last year during winter and used it once or twice a week till spring. This winter has been rather mild though and I've only used it twice period. I use a couple different 30 min interval training vids on youtube. They do seem to help but god damn they suck while doing them.
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>>1064991
It's not the limiting screws, if I adjust it so it doesn't hit the spokes it will not shift into lowest gear, and if I adjust it to shift properly, it hits the spokes. I think it might be bent, I'll try fixing it myself.
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>>1064987
Probably a bent derailleur hanger
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>>1063588
i got a new bike, but there is limited crotch clearance when i stand over the top tube. the guys at the store said thats not a big deal, and that it is a more important factor for mountain biking that has become a meme for all bicycle sizing. is it true or are they just trying to shill me a bike? the bike is a 53cm paddy wagon
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>>1065035
It's true but they might also be trying to clear stock you never know. Other parts of the fit are more important.
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>>1065035
The latter
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>>1065038
so crotch clearance is not a meme?
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>>1065035
Just sit the bike at an angle when you're standing around. As long as you can get on and get off it easily it doesn't really matter.
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>>1065036
ok awesome, i hate returning shit
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>>1065039
As long as you have crotch clearance it's fine. Be more worried about reach, handling and overall fit than if your clearance is an half an inch or two full. On the other hand, if you don't have clearance that's a big no-no and you're being taken for a ride.
>cue all the retards on craigslisted bike boom boat anchors four sizes to large going reeeeee
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>>1064462
sorry, but you did unwrap the tape off the bar first, right? 'cause that's step one. well, and taking off the brake and shifter levers but there's no way you didn't get that.

otherwise >>1064465 maybe this, and you need to twist the bars dramatically thru the bends while you're pulling them just gently.
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Can I use nailpolish to cover scratches in the paint on a steel bike?
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>>1065101
Yes, nailpolish works well for touch ups, and is relatively easy to match to colors, but after it dries and is exposed to UV light it won't be as glossy as the surrounding paint, so people looking at bike up close will be able to see where the paint was touched up.
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>>1065105
That's fine, my bike is 40 years old and no one is going to look at it close up, so I might just use it to touch up some of the minor nicks and scratches it's got. Cheers.
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>>1065106
I was able to get an exact match by walking my bike into the AutoZone and over to the touch-up paint aisle, holding the various bottles right up to my frame. the little tiny iridescent flakes are the same size and everything. It probably cost a little more than nailpolish but not enough that it really mattered.

I've used nailpolish, too, though. it's totally fine. people say you can use Testors or other brands of hobbyist model paint, too. prob some good, cheap matches.
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>>1065101
Use Pacifica nail polish. It works great, will hold up better on a bike frame than other brands.
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I ordered 700c 25 tires+tubes for my old road bike before realizing the old tires are 27x1". Will the new tires fit, or do am I shit out of luck?
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>>1065184
Nah you fucked up, 27x... tyres have a bead seat diameter of 630mm, 700c tyres fit on 622mm rims.
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Ok so I'm >>1064611. I tried dicking around with the limiter screws and watched some videos and I STILL can't figure it out and now my shifting is worse. Considering just taking it to a shop because I'm too retarded to understand how any of this works. But in the case that any kind soul is willing to help this bike know-nothing, the situation is as follows.

When using the left hand shifter to move from the smaller cog to the bigger ones, it will not engage even after the "click." Instead I have to keep pressing on the shifter for the derailleur to move the chain from the small cog to the bigger one. And when shifting from a bigger cog to the smaller ones, if I pull the shift trigger it'll make some sort of rattling noise before it fully engages. shifting down seems to be a lot easier overall than shifting up. After dicking with the limiter screws I noticed depending on their tightness, shifting either gets harder in the sense that I have to press on the shifter much harder and hold it there for the chain to shift up, or gets slightly more tolerable. And while I know nothing about bikes, I get the impression that it should be a lot smoother. I don't know if this is a cable/chain/derailleur issue and don't know where to start on reading about this all.
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>>1064958
oh, that makes sense, like a guitar string
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>>1065188
1. The limit screws control how far left/right the derailer can move, once you have them set so that the chain can't accidentally fall off of the gears then they're set and you don't do anything else with them.
2. How smooth the shifting is depends on the condition of the cable/housing, shifters, chain, what type of cassette and chainrings you're using, and whether or not the derailer hanger is bent. It's entirely possible that you can't adjust your shifting because something is broken and you can't recognize where the problem is. In this case, it's definitely a good idea to have somebody who knows look at your bike in person and show you exactly what's causing the issue(s).
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What's the best bang for the buck road bike out there?

I don't want tourney components nor do I want dura ace. Is there a website where I can search bikes based on groupsets?
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>>1065188
my guess is the cable tension is too loose.

>don't know where to start on reading about this all.

the links in the OP is where.
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>>1065197
The best deal is going to depend how much time and effort you're willing to put into sourcing cheap parts and assembling a finished bike: If you're not in a hurry, and are okay with doing some parts hunting, assembling everything from scratch, and doing your own fitting, you can build yourself something really nice in the 500-1k range. If you're okay with doing assembly but don't want to search around for all the necessary parts, Bikes Direct has decent good options in the neighborhood of 1k. If you're a total newb, then expect to pay a little extra for your first decent bike, not to be a shill, but the Specialized Allez and Trek 1.2 are fine if you're looking for a solid entry-level road bike.
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>>1065188
Ok, look at your front derailleur. There is a long cage that the chain runs through that is parallel with the chain rings (or it should be parallel). That cage moving inward our outward is what derails/shifts the chain. The low limit screw (sometimes marked with an "L") limits how close to the frame the cage can be to the frame. You want the inward part of cage to be limited to a couple mm past the small chain ring. The high limit screw limits how far away from the frame the cage can get. You want the outward edge of the cage to be a couple mm beyond the large chainring. Cable tension adjusts the indexed positions of the cage. There is some times a barrel adjuster on the shifter pod that you twist out for more tension, or in for less. Without that, cable has to be pulled through the cable fastener on the derailleur. If you are under shifting (which you currently are) add more tension. Overshifting, less tension. It is best to first adjust properly the limit screws, then set/adjust cable tension.
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Want to get a bike for riding to school, nothing too expensive. It seems like a pretty well known acceptable opinion that a used rigid mountain bike with city tires is the best option. I found a couple on Craigslist . How's this Trek Mountain 820 for $120 look?
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>>1065208
Looks terrible.
But for 120$ I'd ride it like I stole it til it broke into pieces and buy another one and ride it just as hard.
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>>1065224

Now that you mention it, it really does look awful, huh?

I'd get rid and add some stuff on it and and maybe even paint the frame. But other than that its a decent deal, no?
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>>1065208
seems like a fair deal as long as she's mechanically sound, but it's a very small frame. if you're a manlet, go for it. looks like the current owner has maxed out the stem height to compensate already, but that will only help so much.
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>>1065233
It's a decent deal it just looks like garbage like I said, I'd ride it til it fell to pieces and it might not even do that but why not have fun with it at that price, if I could find a cheap ass bike for what it was I would ride it to ruin and if I could find another one why not go just as hard and enjoy it?
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>>1065208
In addition to what other anon said about small frame, look how far back the guy has the seat lol

But yeah if it's in your size and the parts are in decent shape, go for it
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>>1065229
lol don't paint the frame
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>>1065233
>>1065249
>>1065250


I'm a 5'7 manlet. So i'm not exactly sure what frame size I should be getting since people have their own opinions on what size they prefer. So far I have 16" - 18" frame size seems to be the range for me.

After doing a little more research I found these other bikes within my price range. 1st is a Trek 8500 that's in "excellent condition" for $140, 2nd is a Trek Antelope that is also in "excellent condition and was professionally tuned up" for $120. 3rd is a Specialized Hardrock in "very nice cond." for $150

Or should I go with the previous trek 820? Which do you think is the best bang for your buck?
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Can I put flat bar brake levers on a drop bars?
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>>1065269
I'm 5'10" and I ride 18" 90s mtbs. I would recommend the smaller size, 16". I just barely feel comfy on 18" frames. 90s mtbs are well known for their long top tubes which make for very long reach. So you don't want too big. Too small is better as you can raise the seat post and length the stem if needed.

$100 is a fair price for any operational 90s mtb. You can get them for cheaper, but $100 is fair and such functional bikes are well worth that. Plus out minus $50 is still on value.

Personally, I like the first bike you linked. It's not ugly, but rather aesthetic. It comes with a rack. It's the right size. Price is fine, and it's craigslist, so you can always haggle. I don't know what the other anons are thinking. Test ride it, and if it feels good go for it.

I'm glad you're getting a solid bike anon. 90s mtbs are great. Welcome to the world if cycling.
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>>1065270
No. The clamps are to wide to get around the c of the drops. Drops and flats have different clamp diameters so fastening the levers would be problematic. There are flat style levers compatible with most drop bars known as interrupter levers.
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Just some quick queries.
How long should I leave my chain sitting in hot soapy (dish liquid) water before rinsing it off? Would something like methylated spirits/turps help as a secondary washing? I do not have any proper degreasers at the moment.

What should I do to store a bike in a garage without it getting fucked up? I live on a cold and wet mountain that often gets a lot of mist, especially going into winter. It will be in a garage when not riding it but the garage has a lot of airflow, so it would be in a fairly humid environment.
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>>1065291
>I live on a cold and wet mountain that often gets a lot of mist, especially going into winter.

if the frame is steel, I'd spray some framesaver into the tubes. its cheap and a good idea anyhow. i guess there's different brands, I got something from Velo Orange's site. I saw someone here say there's a generic product that's equivalent from the hardware store but I forget, maybe someone else knows.

keep your chain and the cables and their housings oiled/greased like you should normally. if you're garaging the bike say for the winter and it's going to sit in humidity for a stretch, that would be time to definitely service those items. Squirt some oil into the housings, pinch a glob of grease in your fingers and run them over exposed cables, and oil the chain when it comes time for the bike to sit unridden for a stretch.
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>>1065291
Leaving your chain to soak isn't going to do much, you'll have to scrub it to remove the crud. And when you take it out, rinse it thoroughly and then let it dry _completely_ before adding oil to it. In this case, because you've already soaked the chain in water, it's not going to help much to soak/rinse it with denatured alcohol.
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I need a new tail light. Waterproof with a simple toggle switch is preferred Any recommendations that are not from cateye?
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>>1065291
>How long should I leave my chain sitting in hot soapy (dish liquid) water before rinsing it off?
Thick oils do not dissolve in water and washing up liquid helps only marginally. Like solves like. Soak the chain in a slightly more volatile (or hot) oil or petroleum product if you really must degrease it. Gasoline, thinner, a deep fryer full of hot old canola...

Usually though, especially with a chain that isn't close to worn out anyway, the gaps are tight enough that there shouldn't be much grit _in_ the chain. You more often have a black slurry of suspended microscopic metal particles in oil that washes out perfectly fine when putting the new oil on. So, unless the chain is nearly dead anyway, just oil liberally, spin and wipe.
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A LBS I recently bought a frame from keeps insisting the standard for rear road hubs is 135mm even though Sheldon says it's 130mm and both my 10spd road hubs (tiagra and some noname one) are also 130mm. Are they just trying to jew me into buying a 135mm frame? It doesn't even have disc or canti bosses
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>>1065332
Knog
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I can't remove the cranks on the my unicycle. The crank puller bottoms out but the cranks stay on. Could it be that the crank puller is too short for the thicc unicycle cranks, or am I being retarded?
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>>1065380
So the centre pin is threaded in all the way without making contact with the axle? If so that's very surprising as the pin usually sticks out quite a way so the crank arm would have to be pretty damn thick. You could try putting something between the pin and the axle, a small ball bearing perhaps.
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>>1065306
Housing with a plastic sleeve (most modern) is not meant to be lubricated. On a bike not being used, those oils just harden and collect dirt and dust. Housing that have been oiled become unusable before housings that have not.
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I was test riding some bikes at my LBS today. Is a bike too big for me if I am constantly sliding forward in the saddle as I pedal?
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>>1065404
It means you aren't going fast enough. Your speed should push you back on your bike.
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I ride bmx frequently and am trying to replace my bottom bracket, but I don't know the size. If you can help me out, it would be greatly appreciated.
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you wanna go from A to B, B is higher than A so you will be climbing.
if you have 2 routes to choose, both have constant inclination, lets call em X and Y.
X is 20km and Y is 40km, so obviously X has a bigger inclination. both have same climatic conditions.

same rider on same bike (with gears and stuff), X should be quicker to complete the route than Y due to lower speed wich means lower fight with the wind right?

in other words.. wind would be the only factor?

what happens when you go downhill? the longer route Y should be quicker cause youre going slower? than on X?

just random thinking i do sometimes
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I've only owned cheap mountain bikes and was thinking of getting a hybrid bike. Yay/nay?

https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/nishiki-adult-anasazi-hybrid-bike-16nisanshknsz15xxdsb/16nisanshknsz15xxdsb?&color=White
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>>1065406
That's an American bottom bracket, also called Pro size. It will probably be hard to replace the bearings unless you want to get some loose ones and stick them in the old cages.

>>1065410
You need to clarify some things. You say they have a constant incline and the shorter route has a larger incline, so do they both have the same vertical climb? If so then they would technically require the same total amount of power, at the same constant power output they would take the same amount of time but the steeper route would have half the velocity. So, in a vacuum they would both be equal which means that air resistance can be the only differentiating factor.

This is assuming that things such as bearing efficiency and rolling resistance don't change with speed which I have no idea if they do, in which way if they do, and whether it is by a meaningful amount.

>what happens when you go downhill? the longer route Y should be quicker cause youre going slower? than on X?
You mean taking the same route backwards? In a vacuum the shorter steeper route would be faster because it's a shorter distance and at a higher speed. With air resistance it would have a greater negative effect, I suppose whether it's enough to slow you down so the longer route is quicker depends on how aero you are.

An interesting question, I'll gladly be corrected if I'm wrong about any of this.
>>
>>1065406
other anon is correct; that's an "American" (a.k.a. one-piece crank) bottom bracket. Dan's Comp and PorkchopBMX can hook you up with new bearings
>>
>>1064921
>consult Sheldons data base https://www.sheldonbrown.com/bbsize.html

Thanks!
Why didn't I instantly realize to look this shit up at sheldon's, the immense knowledge base of pre-00s bikes?
So it's 110-113 for whichever 90s 5-bolt Acera/Alivio/STX. Perfect.
>>
I know there's not really an answer, but anybody live uphill and have any tips for getting your bike back up there? It's like a 40 minute steep walk for me, shit kills. Fun to go down though.
>>
>>1065404
not necessarily, might as well be because the seat is misadjusted - set to far back or at wrong angle
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ycA1tpSWeqA


>>1065355
>a 135mm frame? It doesn't even have disc or canti bosses
You sure it's a road frame? Pic?
If it where a hybrid frame meant for either disc or canti/v-brakes, it should be 135, but yours sounds truly confusing. Wouldn't have thought such frames even exist.

>>1065359
>Knog
Knogs are pretty waterproof and solid, but the rubber loops that hold them on seatposts/bars don't quite last forever.


>>1065412
/n/ approves non-suspension hybrids.
Also >>/bbg/

>dickssportinggoods
kek
>>
>>1065269
too bad can't see shit in the latter lo-res pics, and they all are shot from the non-drive side.
they look somewhat similar tier, the antelopes have plastic pedals and plastic (not sure as for the black one) levers, which might impky for an overall lower spec. The black antelope clearly has single wall rims, can't tell shit about rims on the others. the 8500 looks older than the rest (see shifters), yet might be the highest tier among all, but again, we don't see the drivetrain.
Can't you find something a little newer that has v-brakes not cantis and double wall rims?

Sizewise, I'd say certainly not 16". 18"ish.
The black antelope looks like a 16" to me, way smaller than the rest.

>>1065277
>90s mtbs are well known for their long top tubes
are they? afaik they had longer stems and shorter top tubes compared to 00s-current xc bikes
>>
>>1065439
>You sure it's a road frame? Pic?
>If it where a hybrid frame meant for either disc or canti/v-brakes, it should be 135, but yours sounds truly confusing. Wouldn't have thought such frames even exist.
Exactly my thoughts, but no, not a hybrid frame, no disc or canti mounts, yet the LBS guy insists 135mm is the road standard, he even claims they sent it back to their wholesaler and they fitted some Shimano road wheelset on it with no problem. Which I think is bullshit.
I'd post a picture but my internet is acting up and won't let me post the picture, here's a link
http://www.rockandbike.cl/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/linus-700.jpg
>>
>>1065443

I scaled the photos to a smaller size, that's why they look a bit jaggy.

The 8500 has already been sold.
And im currently looking for something newer with V brakes, that is also the size I need. Of course, the newer it is, generally the more expensive it gets.

Im leaning towards the Trek black antelope 820 because its 16.5" frame and that might be perfect for me.
>>
>>1065438
The more you try to actually ride it, the stronger you'll get until one day you can do it without having to stop.

If your bike doesn't have a low enough gear, change something in your drivetrain to make it lower.
>>
this might be a stupid question.

a mate from work has a 26" fox ctd 160mm fork that he would give me for basically free.

I run 27,5" but the fork would be a definitive upgrade over mine.

the difference between 26 and 27,5 is something like 25mm.

is this doable ?
>>
>>1065504
The radius is what matters so the difference is 12.5mm. You should be able to run 27.5 in any 26 fork depending on how large a tyre you use, just bear in mind that you won't have as much clearance for mud and might not be able to run a mudguard under the arch. Why not just put your wheel on the fork and try it? It will only take a few minutes, don't forget to let out all the air/remove the spring so you can check that the tyre doesn't hit the crown under full compression.
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I want to replace my rear 8speed cassette, what steps do I go about making sure that I will have enough space to fit a cassette with more sprockets?
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>>1065559
Any hub that fits an 8spd cassette will fit a 9 and 10 spd one.
>>
Is there any way to balance side pull road brakes? On my front wheel, one of the brake pads keep on touching the rim, while the other is about half a cm away.
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Not actually a question, but I'm coming to the realization that I may have invested too much money in parts and repairs for a bicycle that's not really worth it.
Shit keeps breaking down constantly and I feel like at some point I'll have replaced everything but the frame. But I've had it since I was a kid, for over 20 years and I'm sentimental about it.
>>
>>1065572
The spacer that sits against the frame should have flat sides, use a flat wrench to grab it and adjust the caliper position
>>
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How do I make my saddle more comfortable?

Should my sit bones be at the very front or the wider part of the saddle closer to the back?

Is putting the seat at a downward angle in the front worth trying at all?
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>>1065567

cool, I think I'll make the jump from 8 speed to 10 speed so, thanks!
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>>1065577
>Is putting the seat at a downward angle in the front worth trying at all?

Seat should always be parallel to the ground and never angled.
>>
>>1065581
SAY THAT TO MY FACE FAGGOT
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>>1065586
Seat should always be parallel to the ground and never angled.
>>
>>1065572
They can be kinda tricky/annoying, but sometimes literally just pushing them will work. Sometimes it's helpful to open the brake quick release (so the pads are further from rim, giving more wiggle room), loosen the bolt that attaches the caliper to the frame, then push it as far as it will go in the direction you want to move it (as in, push the pad that's farther away all the way until it contacts the rim; you should be overcompensating here) then tighten back down the bolt (not TOO tight though), close the quick release, let go of the calliper. If it goes back to how it was before you did this, then um try again I guess. If it goes to center, perfect. If it stays where you pushed it to, so now off center in the opposite direction as it was initially, you can likely just push it back to center this time without loosening the bolt or anything.
Credentials: Mechanic at a LBS but they didn't really teach me how to center caliper brakes, this is just a method that usually works for me. Idk if it is the 'correct' method.
>>
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Has anyone ever tried out the cheap Chinese carbon fiber saddles from ebay? I'm thinking of giving one a shot, they're only $16.
>>
I'm looking for a couple of cheap bikes for me and my boyfriend. I'm not "into" bikes nor do I know anything about them. My budget is around $250 per bike. I want something I can ride on the sidewalk and maybe the occasional dirt trail, I believe I'm looking for a hybrid bike? I'm 6' and my boyfriend is 5' 7" Any recommendations?
>>
Do brakes have standard mount going back a long time? I have an old Bianchi bike from the 70s with some weird brake set ("Universal" brand) and they're really stiff and don't work well. Can I pick up a set of Shimano Sora brakes and mount them easily, or will I run into trouble?

It has (old) Shimano 105 brake levers currently.
>>
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>>1065599
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>>1065589
Thanks, I'll give this a try in about 30 minutes.
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>>1065599
>my boyfriend
>I want something I can ride on the sidewalk
>I'm 6' and my boyfriend is 5' 7"
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>>1065604
Thanks for your helpful post friend
>>
I am 6'1" 220lb and want to cycle to lose weight. Mix of city (commuting) and hopefully light trails on the weekend. Are there any types of bike I want to avoid? do I need to have 36 spoke wheels? Does anyone have experience/opinions about mtb vs cx type bike?
>>
I just read that you need hooked flanges on your bike wheel to fit folding tyres - is this true? Will I not be able to fit folding tyres on my old bike?
>>
>>1063588
Should I buy this bike for commuting to class in a pretentious college town?
>>
>>1065606
Honestly get something you won't feel too bad about breaking, either new or some used 90s MTB.
I'm 230 (used to be 170, but life got to me) and the excess weight is seriously harmful to bikes, it's no joke.
You'll also feel a lot more pressure on your taint and on your wrists than if you were a normal weight.
>>
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>>1065605
I consider kindness its own reward.
>>
>>1065608
Yes, if you try to inflate a folding-bead tire on a straight-side rim it will just blow off when the pressure gets too high. The same thing can happen with wire bead tires too, that's why you should never inflate tires above 75 psi on a straight-side rim. And this is why you see tubular wheels on essentially all racing bicycles made through the mid 1970's before lightweight hooked-bead clincher rims became available.

>>1065610
Sure why not? It's a little pricey but not horrible assuming that price includes assembly at an actual bike shop.

>>1065600
The location of brake mounts hasn't changed, but most modern brakes use recessed nuts instead of the traditional nuts you see on your brakes - this isn't a big problem in practice, because you can get modern (Tektro) dual pivot brake calipers that are designed for nutted mounting, alternatively it's a very simple modification if you want your old Bianchi to accept modern recessed bolts.

But before changing the brake calipers, it would be cheaper and easier to make your current Universal centerpulls work properly. Replace the brake pads, brake cable and housing, and put a little oil into the pivots on the brake calipers and brake levers and you'll have a powerful braking setup.
>>
>>1065618
The problem with the Universal brakes is that they're extremely stiff, I think it might be the spring that's old and shitty? I've added oil to the pivots to no avail.
>>
>>1065619
Unless the calipers are somehow damaged or you overtorqued the bolts that hold the arms on, It's more likely to be the brake cable and housing that are making the brakes feel stiff.
>>
>>1065620
The brakes are sidepull, btw.

I've tried loosening the bolts (a lot), but that doesn't seem to help. I'm pretty sure it's not the cables and housing, since they're super stiff to push together with your hands, even without using the brake levers. They're so stiff I can't actually break without putting my hands down on the drops.
>>
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>>1065621
Oops, my bad for assuming you meant the pic-related centerpulls. Sounds like you need to adjust the tension on the pivot bolt, read this:
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/sidepull-brake-service#article-section-9
>>
>>1065623
From that article
>With much use the spring may become fatigued and a good setting is not possible. Replace spring if necessary.
I'm thinking this is what happened? I've tried adjusting the two bolts on the front of the brakes, but it doesn't seem to help. Even if I remove them entirely, the brakes are too stiff to push together.
>>
>>1065592
It will probably be the most uncomfortable thing you've ever sat on. I bought one expecting it to have some flex (like those plastic Tioga Spyder saddles, which are pretty comfortable btw and you can get cheap fakes) but it's rock hard. It looks cool at least and is pretty light, if the edges weren't so sharp it'd be good for something like a BMX.

>>1065599
Something like in that photo would be good. Be wary when using the hybrid term, it can refer to a quite broad selection of bike types.
>>
>>1065601
>>1065604
Tall girls exist too.
>>
I bought a bike online and it arrives tomorrow. Is there any good guide on everything to check to see if it's assembled properly? I'm a novice
>>
>>1065638
Google "bicycle m check"
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>>1065643
That's exactly what i needed. Thank you
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>>1065618
I doesn't include assembly.

It is 80% assembled when shipped I just have to do front tire, handle bars, and brakes.
>>
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Can I build a quality bike wheel without specialized tools? I already trued a wobbly wheel (using the techniques in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4g11lhs5l4k ), so I have some experience.

Before asking why I don't just hire someone: Everything is expensive as shit here and I'm trying to save up money as I'm going on a tour. Besides, my dad delivered in a bike with a wobbly wheel for repair, and all they did was to clean the bike, change brake pads and replace 2 missing spokes. All of this cost 80$ and the wheel got broken instantly and I had to fix it myself.
>>
>>1065768
Yes, of course you can
>>
I have a creak that seems to be coming from the bottom bracket area that I cant figure out. The creak only happens when I am out of the saddle putting a lot of energy through the pedals, also it only happens on the drive side when pushing down on the right pedal. Does not happen putting power throgh the left pedal. I have changed various things to try and eliminate the noise including..chain,bottom bracket,pedals, tightened the chainring bolts, cleaned all the bottom bracket area out. However this noise still persists. Anyone have any suggestions? Thanks
>>
>>1065768
i did it once with a spoke wrench and a bike frame.
i inserted a screw into a hole the frame had so it was facing the inside of the rim and worked from there. took me a few hours to get it. dont forget to move the spokes in between to let them settle.
since my family has multiple bikes and i have too fix wheels here and there again i'm gonna get a cheap trueing stand soon. should really be worth it.
>>
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How do I remove the sand in the chain of my CX bike? I feel like only the pressure manages to really clean it but that ruins my bearings so I'd rather try something else.
>>
>>1065781
Put it inside a plastic jug with some mineral spirits and shake it around for a while, then remove and wipe down
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>>1065776
Tighten seatpost and saddle rails clamp
Apply some grease on the stem/bars clamp and retighten
Inspect for loose spokes on both wheels
Inspect whole frame for little cracks
You may think the creak is definitely coming from the BB, but it may not. I had the same issue, turned out to be a crack at the downtube/headtube joint weld.
>>
>>1065776

>>1065795

also, clean your spokes. drive-side spokes will flex enough to cause noise when putting power down
>>
>>1065781
You can't, chains are hermetically sealed and if you try to remove the sand you will UTTERLY RUIN the special internal lube which is different from the external lube. Just never lube your chain, once the factory lube wears out it's time to replace it (or, preferably, the entire bike)

I got 190 miles out of my S-Works bike last year before I had to throw it out due to eroded factory lube, which is fine because my special matching S-Works gloves were already UTTERLY RUINED by some accidental sweat. Obviously you could get more miles out of your bikes if you just use them indoors on those roller things, which is what I usually do but I needed some outdoor pictures of my bike for facebook bragging and one thing led to another and now I have to buy a new bike
>>
>>1065795
>>1065799
Thanks, it was the front wheel! Tightened all the spokes and cleaned out the hub. Really did sound like it was coming from the bottom bracket. Been annoying me for a couple of weeks this.
>>
how do i take off pedals 'n shit?
they seem to be both threaded ans pressure fit onto a square
also i fucked up a rear wheel, can they be remounted?
>>
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>>1065821
pic of pedal assembly
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>>1065821
wheel with fucky bearing& carrier
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>>1065781

Applying a drip lube to the rollers from the top down should provide a natural flushing motion as the oil works it's way through the chain and out the sides.


>>1065801
>chains are hermetically sealed

wut.
>>
>>1065825

That plastic ring at the back is just a spacer, right?
>>
>>1065842
some sort of guard
i feel like something's missing
the clean side is ok, but the chain side seems to want to wander out of torque
>>
>>1065842
No, it's a dork disk. It's so that if the rear derailleur is adjusted improperly and the chain shifts past the biggest cog, it won't get stuck in the spokes.
>>1065821
To remove pedals from crankarms, you need a pedal wrench. Left pedal is reverse threaded, right pedal is standard threaded.
To remove crankarms from bottom bracket, you need a crank puller. There are different types of crank pullers for different types of bottom brackets. The one you need is the Park Tool CP-22 or the equivilent from another company.
Regarding the wheel, depends what's wrong with it.
>>
Which one is better?
>>
Is BMC a reptuable brand? I'm interested in getting one of these for my next bike but am torn between this and a cannondale synapse 105 carbon
>>
>>1065864
BMC supplies pro tour teams. I dunno what their budget stuff is like but if you're in a 105 price bracket they'll be legit.
>>
>>1065866
Tasty.
My only worry with this is the shifters, since it's hydraulic disk but low/mid range bike, they're the lowest version that would work with it
>>
>>1065869
I hate those shifters... they look like dicks. I also think that road disc is stupid... Do they not make a bike with 105 and rim brakes?
>>
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bike cleaning question:
its raining here and im on a rest day so i just cleaned the drivechain of my mtb and road bike. (degreased, washed, rinsed).

now i only have to apply lube on them. i am not gonna ride today.

whats better? to aply lubricant right now? or wait till tomorrow or just before a ride to apply it?
im thinking its best to wait so that way the chain and parts will be completly dry and lube will attach better. but maybe im wrong and i should lube the things right now. (yes i did dry the parts with a dry cloth).

what do you guys say? sorry for my crap english btw. thanks!
>>
>>1065870
I'm set on disks for the next bike. One before last was disk, current is rim. Miss them so much.

Suppose i could swap out the shifters futher down the road is all goes wrong
>>
I need tips for eating cheaply on long rides. (150+ miles)
>>
>>1065872
Missed them in what way?
>>
>>1065876
power, ease to work with, ease to clean
>>
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I got a bike last week and have since put on around 50 miles on the thing. It's fun as fuck so far.
I've only been wearing a t shirt and basketball jeans, though my ass fucking hurts and i've tried fiddling with the saddle. Should I invest in a cheap jersey + bib combo? Those buttpads on the shorts/bib sound awfully nice.
>>
>>1065871
It doesn't make much of a difference. Just make sure to wipe down the excess lube after.
>>
>>1065886
Padded bibs are a bliss for your ass, plus it's nice to have a tight fit so you're not flapping around like crazy
Jerseys are nice mostly because of the back pockets, so you can carry your tools and phone/wallet/whatever without the need for a bag.

In any case if you just started riding it's normal to have a little butt pain, it takes some getting used to. The pain should be on your sitbone area though, not your taint or balls or asscrack. If that's the case, get a proper fit. A good rule of thumb is to have the saddle level relative to the ground, or tilted back a little bit. A good tool for this is... you guessed it, a level.
>>
Is there such thing as crankset bolt spacers? I want to run a single chainring on a double crankset
Also, are crankset bashguards as thick as a chainring? I'd actually prefer that over nothing
>>
>>1065864
I wouldn't worry about it. Hydraulic brifters are ridiculously expensive so even the cheapest set ain't gonna be that cheap, and for that sort of money it wouldn't make sense for them to be junk. It's Shimano too, I don't think they ever made a shitty hydraulic brake.

>>1065889
Yes, they're called chainring bolt spacers (the crank bolt typically refers to the bolt that holds the crank arms onto the axle). If you're gonna order spacers you may as well just order shorter bolts instead, spacers are intended for moving the chainring further from the crank spider.

>are crankset bashguards as thick as a chainring?
Usually, most will be like twice as thick as a typical stamped steel chainring.
>>
>>1065889
If it's square taper you should get a BB cartridge with a narrower (for single on the outer ring) or wider axle (for inner). Outer is preferable as it lowers the Q-factor. Mountainbike hollow chainsets often have spacers on either side that you could experiment with removing or shifting. If it's any other type of chainset you'd have to go with chainring bolt spacers or various other hacky solutions. Or accept that the chainline will not be perfect and mount it wherever it's the least bad. It not of that great importance anyway. You do lose one of the main advantages of singles though: Q-factor.
Bash guards are generally thicker than chainrings but recessed to fit the same bolts.
>>
>>1065890
>just order shorter bolts instead
How the fuck did I not think of this, thanks
>>
>>1065887
thom thonks bro
>>
For the casual/commuter, are noseless saddles a meme?
>>
Where to store sunglasses on a road bike?
>>
>>1065921
Your helmet, your head, your face, a strip of velcro, jersey pocket, or your stupid head
>>
>>1065913
Unless you're commuting on a TT bike, yes
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>>1065921
>>1065924
you might also niggerrig something like this onto something
>>
Is fork upgrade from rockshox 28tk to manitou m30 for 220€ reasonable? There are no decent used bikes for 6'6 rider and im too poor to spend 1700€+ on a new carbon mtb
>>
is chinkshit carbon usable?
>>
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I'm looking for the best value Hybrid to get me to work and back every day (4 miles each way, flat but I'm not very healthy).
I just want the ride to be as easy as possible.
Possible options:
Cannondale Contro 2 (Alfine 8 hub)
Trek FX 7.7 (Carbon Frame)
Charge Grater (includes mudguards)
BMR Alpenchallenge AC02 (love the look of this brand).

Please halp!
>>
>>1066041
I should've said, budget is £900 and I want the bike to last a while.
>>
>>1066041
Contro looks pretty cool.
The trek is a flat bar road bike, not a hybrid. At least on my local website the price is appalling for the level of spec. No allowance for fenders, or rack.
Grater looks good.
The BMC also seems decent and it does look nice doesn't it.

That said for a 4 mile commute any of these are probably overkill, but if you have a bike that's actually nice to ride then you'll want to ride it more of your own accord, perhaps.

If you're not able to bring your bike inside, make sure to also get a good lock combo (u-lock and cable lock for the front wheel).
>>
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>>1066047
Thanks for your input. The Trek components suffer due to the carbon frame I guess. I'll rule the Trek out and it's not really as hard wearing as I like. I will be doing other leisurely rides along tow paths and cyclepaths and the option for a bit of off-road would be nice.

Just found a Saracen Hank FB as well which is basically a flat bar version of a Cycloecross which sounds perfect.
>>
>>1066026
Yes, that's a much better fork. It's up to 800g lighter, has an air spring (so it's easily adjustable), has adjustable compression damping, and will probably be stiffer.
>>
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QUESTION

are spokes on the drive side of the rear wheel the same lenght as those on the nondrive side?
>>
>>1066129
Almost certainly not. There are some cases where they are, such as with an Alfine 8 or 11 and maybe some single speed disc hubs, but usually they will be shorter as the flange is closer to the centre of the hub.
>>
>>1066130
>Almost certainly not.

that is why my rear wheel is so radially messud up right now. I change a few spokes on the drive side and as ref took the nondrive side (becuase of exp with disc wheels). thanks!
>>
If i have a chainring that says it is for 8,9, and 10 speed chains, is it even possible to run an 11 speed road bike chain on it? it is for a compact road bike groupset

also, if i have a 56 tooth big ring up front...what is a good small ring size so that it would be good for climbing but would not be a huge drop from the big ring?
>>
>>1066130
I'd think the spokes WOULD be the same length, just tightened different amounts in order to keep the wheel true.

They just look like they are different sizes because of the dish of the wheel
>>
>>1066129
Effectively and theoretically no, but in practice usually yes. You just screw the nipple down a bit further instead. The drive side spokes will stick slightly higher up through the nipple than the non drive side spokes. The spokes sticking up through the nipple isn't a problem with double wall rims so unless the difference is to large to be reasonably absorbed in the build I'd say most wheel builders prefer the same spokes all around - for both wheels.

What may differ, if your wheel builder takes great pride or the build is particularly delicate, is the spoke thickness. The drive side rear spokes should be thicker than the non drive side to make the wheel both stiffer and more hard wearing.
>>
>>1066137
>If i have a chainring that says it is for 8,9, and 10 speed chains, is it even possible to run an 11 speed road bike chain on it?
Yes. It may make upshifts a bit more hesitant but not cause any real problem. The other way around can cause ghost shifts and jumping, but a thinner chain doesn't matter.
>>1066135
No, that's just because you didn't rebuilt it properly. Make it round first. Make it straight later. The other way around will invariably lead to flat spots or tops.
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>>1066141
>What may differ, if your wheel builder takes great pride or the build is particularly delicate, is the spoke thickness.

they seem to be identical and I had a problem with the spokes braking while workinf on the radial centring - rim is slightly radially skewed from impact so I forced the spokes to eork on it (it doesnt affect the braking and pads) but its there.

Rim is vintage box style Ambrosio 19 Super Elite Durex.

>>1066143
>No, that's just because you didn't rebuilt it properly.

It came that way, its a 90s road bike, talked to the people from the shop, they said its from impact and cant be retrued.
>>
>>1065931
>Unless you're commuting on a TT bike
If he's commuting on a TT bike, then HE is the meme, not the saddle.
>>
at what point is it worth it to get a hybrid bike over a road bike? I plan on using the bike mostly to get around at college and going for hour long so I could take it onrides on the road. Would it hurt the bikes preformance that much if I got a hybrid instead some trails as well?
>>
>>1066208
>at what point is it worth it to get a hybrid bike over a road bike?
It's really the other way round (at which point should you get a road bike over a "hybrid"?) but judging by the rest of your post you get that.

Assuming it's a decent "hybrid" that other than having flat bars and the associated controls is identical to a drop bar bike then the advantages of the drop bar bike will be the more aerodynamic position and the multiple hands positions, which I shall address below

Aero - Going from flat bars to drops will save you about 5-10 watts, depending on if you're actually in the drops (which isn't the primary position, it shouldn't be comfortable for extended use) or using the hoods (where you'll be most of the time). This amounts to an extra 1-2mph for the same amount of energy or fuck all if you're not in a huge rush or racing.

Hand positions - Whether this matters depends on how long you're riding but an hour should be fine. You can also fit bar ends or wacky "flat" bars to give you more hand positions, I run the former on the inside of my brake levers and the position is similar to the hoods on drop bars.

The advantages of flat bars are price (either cheaper or better specced for the same price) and for a lot of people they will give you greater control.
>>
>>1066214
I think I understand, but I need to lurk moar definitely
have any brand or bike recommendations?
budget preferably under 500
>>
>>1066216
Most of the major brands sell flat bar road bikes (decent hybrids). Cannondale, Trek, Giant, Cube, Commencal, Kona, Surly, Canyon, etc.

Don't focus on brands, just find all the bikes you can as close to 500 whatevers as you can and compare the specs to weed out the worst ones (e.g. exclude the 8 speeds if there are ones with 9 or 10, go for hydraulic discs over cable or rim brakes). Once you've done that it's probably just going to come down to whatever you like the look of most.
>>
>>1066041
>>1066057

Don't get a carbon bike for commuting, eventually you can make your ride to work even easier by attaching panniers on the back to stop yourself wearing a backpack or for keeping your stuff properly waterproof. Carbon is overkill for a commuting bike.
>>
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>>1066145
>they seem to be identical and I had a problem with the spokes braking while workinf on the radial centring - rim is slightly radially skewed from impact so I forced the spokes to eork on it (it doesnt affect the braking and pads) but its there.
Ok, spokes breaking means you're letting them twist. Lube the threads/nipples and pay attention. Don't overtighten, but loosen the opposite side instead. It is impossible to snap a spoke in otherwise good condition from over tightening alone. The soft rim or nipple gives way long before the 1000++ kg spoke does. Either the spokes are dead, of you're twisting them, and possibly both.
If the rim is deformed you tear the wheel down and straighten it first. There are specific tools to pull out flat spots in rims (pic related) but you can always make a redneck rig out of shit at home. The principle is straight forward enough - controlled brutality.
>It came that way, its a 90s road bike, talked to the people from the shop, they said its from impact and cant be retrued.
Nonsense but possibly a cover story for 'not worth the effort/expense'. What's said still apply though. Make the wheel round first. If that means make the rim round before even making the wheel, then do that, but make the wheel round before you try to true it - whatever effort that may require.
>>
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>>1066296
>Nonsense but possibly a cover story for 'not worth the effort/expense'.

thanks for the in depth explanation, I tought it was smth like you said from a few shop guys. have a pic of a cool meme jersey as a sign of appreatiation!
>>
Reposting here as /bbg/ has reached it's limit- Is this a decent deal for a 2011 CAADX 105?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/cannondale-road-bike-/172629664067?hash=item283187a143:g:lBsAAOSw5UZY9LGS
>>
>>1066313
How the fuck can you possible expect anyone to answer that question? It's an auction, it has over a day left, it could go for £200 or it could go for £800.
>>
>>1063588
what's a good and cheap degreaser and lube for my chain and drive train? diesel and wd40?
>>
Any flat-bar road bike or hybrid recommendations for under £900?
Disc brakes preferred.
>>
>>1066400
Mineral spirits and sewing machine oil
>>
Are carbon forks effective on commuters to reduce the bumpiness of the ride?
>>
>>1066419
>Pounds

Just go walk around until someone on the street offers to sell you a stolen bike at the local thieve's market.

>>1066429

No.
If you are a new commuter, don't worry about it. It takes a little while for you to HTFU, and for your body to learn and build the appropriate muscles for absorbing shocks.

You should also learn about basic bike handling skills. The best way to soak hits is to ride in the mountain-bikers "attack" position with relaxed hands, arms, and upper body.

A carbon fork won't change anything, especially on a cheap commuter frameset. Drop your tires 2psi instead.
>>
>>1066433
I'm not new, I'm just changing bikes to switch from drop bars to flats. My current bike has a carbon fork but the bike I'm considering doesn't and was wondering if it would make a difference.
>>
Why is it that its always my front wheel that gets punctures, nothing has ever happened to the rear

I thought all the weight is on the rear?
>>
>>1066419
Commencal FCB - really light with 1x for £850
Ghost Square Cross 5 - looks pretty neat imo £830
Cube SL Road (Pro) - decent bikes if you're okay with 2x8(9) £570 (£700)
Vitus Mach 3 Urban - pretty damn light 1x11

All on Chain Reaction Cycles
>>
>>1066441
How is it getting punctured? If it's from rolling over shit like thorns and they're sticking in the tyre then that's exactly why, the front wheel rolls over it first and doesn't leave it for the rear tyre to pick up.
>>
>know barely anything about bikes
>eat shit making tight turn on gravel and end up with my bike flat on the ground on the right side
>now bike makes clicking sound each rotation of the right pedal
What parts should I look at? Chain isn't off and shifting works, that's as much as I know.
>>
>>1066455
identify exactly where noise is coming from
lift bike or turn upside down
for each spin, spin forwards and backwards
spin front wheel, check for noise
spin back wheel, check for noise
spin pedal, check for noise
is the noise specifically coming from the right pedal?
>>
>>1066439

None.
>>
>>1066455
Is the noise regular? Does it happen on EVERY rotation of the pedal?

Does it happen when it's coasting? or only when you're pedaling?


If it only happens when you're pedaling, and it's EVERY rotation, it's most likely the bottom bracket
>>
>>1066429
Bumpiness? As in when you hit a bump? No, it's not suspension. Carbon forks absolutely help take the edge off the road buzz/road noise, however,

>>1066419
cannondale quick, if you want something that has that road bike agility and sportyness
whatever you do, test ride a few, see what you like the most. also you can post in /bbg/

>>1066400
if you use WD40, post here so we can laugh at you for fucking up your bike. Use chain lube. Wipe the chain down after you lube the chain as well.

>>1066455
jerk around the crank and see if it has any play, indicating if it's loose. See if the right pedal is loose. Grab a wrench and try tightening it.

If it's neither of those, probably bottom bracket. Take it to a shop, see what they say.
>>
Why does my bike click obnoxiously when I'm coasting? I've never owned a bike that does it so loudly.
>>
whats the best store to buy bikes at?
>>
>>1066507
local bike shop, or local bike coop

>>1066484
Different freewheels/freehubs make different noises, it all depends on the size, shape, and number of the pawls and ratchets inside the mechanism. If it really bothers you, the noise a freewheel makes can be reduced by packing a little more grease into the bearings inside the mechanism BUT this is one of those things where, if you have to ask the question, you're probably not mechanically competent enough to do this without creating more problems for yourself in the process, so you really should just learn to deal with the noise.
>>
--THREAD IS PAST BUMP LIMIT--

start a new BQG thread if you want questions answered, this thread won't be seen anymore by people who just browse page 1 and don't look at the catalog
>>
I'm looking at buying a used full suspension mtb. If I'm lucky I'll meet the guy tuesday or so when I get home from a trip I'd it's still available. It's a 2015 Giant Anthem 27.5 and I'm going to try and get it down to 1k from 1250. Pics look good, but I'm clueless largely about bikes.

How do I make sure I don't get fucked? I have no mtb knowledgeable local friends.
>>
guys,
can I run sram nx shifter and deraileur on a 10 speed shimano casette ?
could I just set the limit screw acordingly ?

building a new bike and trying to use as much stuff I have lying around.
>>
How tight is 40Nm? I don't have a torque wrench, so how I can get to that amount of tight?

Also, what's the biggest frame size for 80s/90s mtb? The biggest I can manage to find is 50cm. Will that fit me without looking too small? (185cm tall)
>>
>>1066447
Thanks bro. I love that Cube. Might have to try and find one to test ride locally.
>>
>>1066548
40 Nm is TIGHT. My little wrench only goes to the teens.

Is that for a cassette lockring? You should just be able to wrench it nice and firmly. Haven't had a problem doing that myself.

Keep in mind mtb sizing is different to road. Looking at a size chart they reckon 50cm is in the L range, which suits riders up to 185 cm tall. You might be perched up high though.
>>
>>1066543
All cassettes of the same speed are equally spaced so the brand of the cassette doesn't matter. The only difference is the mounting of the cassette, a Shimano one won't fit on a wheel designed to take a SRAM one and vice versa.

>>1066520
If that photo is the actual bike then it's an Anthem 3, the lowest model, in which case the price is a little high. Ideally you'd want to pay something more like $800 but if they guy's advertising it at $1250 he's unlikely to drop it that much. For $1k it better be in really good condition.

Things to look out for are worn bearings and wear to the suspension. For the bearings you can grab stuff and try and move it in a way that it's not supposed to move and see if there's an excessive amount of play. Grab the front brake and try and push the bike forward to see if there's any movement in the headset, push the wheels side to side and see if they move relative to the frame, see if the swingarm moves side to side relative to the front triangle and if there's any knocking noises or looseness when you lift the rear end by the saddle.

As for the suspension check that there's no discoloration or scratches to the stanchions on both the fork and rear shock, see if the dust seals are cracked or damaged (they can be replaced but it'll cost you for parts and labour). Ideally you'd also want to check that they hold air but that would mean measuring it and then waiting around for ages to see if it drops. They should be okay in that regard though.
>>
>>1066579
>The only difference is the mounting of the cassette, a Shimano one won't fit on a wheel designed to take a SRAM one and vice versa.
Fairly sure sram/shinamo use the same freehub
You need a different one for campy though.
>>
>>1064891
are they bad? Only ever used Shwalbe and Conti's.
>>
>>1066581
>Fairly sure sram/shinamo use the same freehub
For 10 speed yes, for 11 speed they're not interchangeable.

I was actually talking about the mounting in general and just used Shimano and SRAM as an example, I should've really said that the mount type CAN change but doesn't always do so. Sorry for not being clear.
>>
Do I need to grease a carbon seatpost if the frame is alloy?
>>
>>1066587
>>1066581
>>1066579


I think I have to further explain.

the cassette that I have here is a shimano 10 speed + a 10 speed chain.

I could get a nx shifter and deraileur for real cheap and have a gx crank lying around.

now nx is srams cheapest 11speed drivetrain but as far as I know it is special in that the nx cassette doese not use the sram xd driver that other sram 11 speed cassettes are using.

the dream scenario would be that I could buy the nx shifter+ deraileur and use my shimano 10 speed cassette+ chain for a while , with an adjusted nx deraileur tuned to 10 speeds.

then later upgrade to a nx 11 speed casette and chain.

but I think the stepps the deraileur dose are smaller than the cassette steps on a 10speed cassette.

so what do you guys think ?
>>
>>1066602
Sorry, I assumed the NX stuff was 10 speed. If they're 11 speed they won't work as 11 speed cassettes are more tightly spaced, so the derailer won't move as far for each click. In practice it may be close enough to actually work but it won't be ideal, and any inaccuracies in cable tension or the alignment of the derailer hanger will only throw things further out of wack and make shifting more unreliable.

A 10 speed shifter and derailer aren't super expensive, just save up a bit more cash and get stuff that's designed to work together.
>>
>>1066616

yeah that's what I thought.

thanks
>>
>>1066552
Yes, I have a bent cog and was told to remove it and straighten it with a hammer.

I have a habit of tightening things nice and snug so they're not likely to come apart, but this is the first thing I've encountered on a bike that asks for a specific amount of torque. I don't want to under-tighten it and gouge the freehub, or over-tighten it and fuck up the threads or lockring.
>>
Why would my derailluer lose the 4 biggest cogs...i adjusted it perfect the night before, then on a ride i lost 4 biggest cogs....

New cable...im gonna adjust it tomorrow, do you /n/egros think it might be a bad derailleur letting the cable lose or a bad sti shifter?
>>
>>1066741
What do you mean "lose"? What happens exactly?
>>
>>1066601
No
>>
>>1066750
I dialed in the rear derailleur, then next day went on ride.. i could not get to my big cogs...i am going to readjust soon. ..i dont know how this happened. ..maybe the deraileur is wonky...
>>
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>>1066296
Hi, Ive just found this video and am planning on doing the same process...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1Ks4wMhoXk

the thing is that my rim has a wobble outside of the radious, not to the inside. Is it safe to do the same process in reverse? I assume all spoked have to be loosen when doing this (and those on the wobble removed)?
>>
I asked a bit up about replacement brakes for my old road bike.

I measured the distance from nut to rim, and it's almost 60mm, so I guess I need some brakes with longer reach. Will these work, provided I get two front brakes and drill out the back of the front mount to accomodate the sunken nut? Or does
>Comes with 10.5/12.5/18 and 27mm sunken nut
mean something else?

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-br-r451-dual-pivot-57mm-drop-brake-caliper/
>>
>>1066944
Alternatively, I'm looking at these, which are also 57mm reach. But I don't really feel like I want to try to drill out the back mount as well, since it's more difficult to reach and I don't have an angle drill.

They're cheaper, and silver like I would really prefer, but they're also some funky brand I've never heard of and again, I'd need to drill out the back mount.
http://www.wiggle.co.uk/miche-performance-57mm-drop-brake-caliper-set/
>>
>>1066616
>A 10 speed shifter and derailer aren't super expensive, just save up a bit more cash and get stuff that's designed to work together.

Why would he need a 10 speed 'derailleur'? The derailleur does not see the shifters and all the shifters need to do is pull the cable a correct distance to match the cassettes speed. The only thing to look out for on a derailleur is how many teeth it's rated to take up the slack from.
>>
>>1066996
The cable pull ratio also matters, I think SRAM have kept it the same for quite a few generations now but Shimano has fucked about with it and caused incompatibility problems. As I understand it he hasn't bought the NX derailer yet, if it's a really good deal then he could buy it and then get a 10 speed shifter but he may want to go Shimano instead.
>>
>>1067004

The cable pull ratio only matters for compatibility between the cassette and the shifters though, again nothing to do with the derailleur.
>>
>>1067007
No, it matter for compatibility between the derailer and shifter. You could have two ten speed shifters but one pulls 1.5x the amount of cable with each gear change, a derailer designed for the 1x shifter isn't going to work with the 1.5x as the derailer would move 1.5x as far with each click. This is why you can't use a Shimano shifter with a SRAM derailer or vice versa, or a Shimano 11 derailer shifter with their 11 speed Alfine hubs (which also has a varying cable pull, it's not the same amount for each gear).
>>
>>1067011

Excellent, this is news to me, I did not know this.

So the magic number to look out for here when choosing a shifter/rear derailleur is the 'actuation ratio'?
>>
>>1067014
I think that's what some companies call it, I seem to remember SRAM saying something about a 1:1 actuation ratio which I would take to mean that for every 1mm of cable pulled the derailer would move 1mm laterally. That's why you can mix and match stuff with them, if a 11 speed cassette is 1.2x closer spaced than 10 speed (just random numbers) then you just need the shifter to pull 1.2x the amount of cable per shift.

Shimano on the other hand has changed the ratio depending on the amount of speeds and they've also changed it depending on whether it's road or MTB with 10 or 11 speed, thus you can't use a 10/11 speed MTB derailer with road shifters or vice versa even if the speeds match.
>>
Anybody have any bike light recommendations? Both front and rear, preferrably USB rechargable. Something that fits onto a mount rather than being one of those "goo"-like flexible attachers too, I always had bad luck breaking those.

I want to move on from relying on a shitty 4,99 front-light that consumes batteries on the front and my sole rear light being just on the back of my helmet.
>>
>>1067022
I've heard nothing but good about lezyne lights
>>
>>1067027

I'll take another gamble so. It was lezyne lights I broke.
>>
Is the Look 566 good? It sounds good on paper but reviews seem to be all "it's really good but not a race bike" or "Don't listen it's a fine race bike if you aren't a pro".
>>
Does chamois cream really make a difference?

Also, how dangerous is it to slide my saddle forward past the stop mark? It feels like I'm sitting too far on the front of it and it's destroying my balls.
>>
>>1067059
It's good, but there's better imo. cannondale synapse comes to mind

>>1067099
It can for the few who have any chafing problems. Getting good shorts/a saddle that works for your shape always comes first.

>>1067022
the planet bike superflash ones are pretty good. bontrager flare r if you wanna get fancy and spend more ($60)
and the litmo urban line is pretty trusted for front lights, good warranty on them, esp if you get em at a lbs
>>
Does anyone know if a canyon CF SL disk 9.0 would support 28c, maybe even bigger, tyres? It comes stock with 25c and there's no info out there that i can find of any help
>>
>>1067207
Which model, ultimate/aeroad/endurace?

Almost certain Si from GCN put 28 mm whatevers on his aeroad, so that shouldn't be a problem on that or the ultimate, I'd imagine.

Seem to recall reading on the store page the endurace supports up to 32 or 35 mm, can't remember which but it seems to be gone now. Wouldn't expect the other two to fit anything above 28, though. Maybe a 30 that runs true to size but I don't think many tyres come in that width.
>>
>>1067211
It'd be the ultimate

Super stuff, thanks.
Think that just sealed the deal on me buying one
>>
>>1066585
opinions?
they come with the flintridge sport but I can only find the flintridge pro online. should I switch them out for some g-ones?
>>
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See this, what do?
>>
>>1067309
Return to manufacturer as faulty
>>
>>1067310
The manufacturer is craigslist. Rest of the bike is fine. What's the backup plan?
>>
>>1067392
buy a new tyre
>>
>>1067392
Panic
>>
help me /n/!
How do i get this off, so i can service my headset?
I cant figure out if the bolt should be screwed upwards on the thread, or downwards?
>>
>>1067610
That looks like you've got a quill stem in the steerer tube, try removing that first before you have at the heatset
>>
>>1067619
thanks. You were right.
>>
How long does it take to get a respectable cycling tan? I rarely go outside during the day and am very pale.
>>
>>1067022
Biologic Revue was inexpensive, USB, bright (15lu). Has silicone band tho
>>
>>1067022
For front I found a niterider Lumina 400 for 29.99. That was a steal.
>>
>>1067788
Depends where you live, what time of year, what time of day, how you use suncscreen, what your skin is like. There are too many variables to say, but please, trust me on the sunscreen.
>>
>>1067788
Takes me just a few days once the sun kicks in after winter, but i've heard it's a bit more of a slower process for others
>>
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>>1067022

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01HR7RYHK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

just got this yesterday, it's worth the price and then some. of course make sure you're not using a fast charger, use a 1 amp charger for shit like this.
>>
>>1068062
>of course make sure you're not using a fast charger, use a 1 amp charger for shit like this.

why's that
>>
>>1068088

some things just aren't designed to take that much juice that fast. not an electrician but that's how it be yo.




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