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The Queen of /gag/... FO Sabrina edition

https://youtu.be/su2pg029awQ


Old thread: >>1088421
>>
>>1095824

I'd have no issue blowing in her stall warning horn.. if you know what I mean
>>
Is she...dare I say it, /our girl/?
>>
>>1095834

she's mine
>>
part 65 or part 141?
>>
>>1095845
You mean 61, not 65.

And you're not giving us any information about you, your situation, or your goals to help make suggestions.

Your post is 0/10

Do your own research before you bother the real people with your waste of time question.
>>
>>1095847

My bad, I'm 25, I wanna be a commercial pilot, currently an A&P line tech. Any more info?

Theres a part 141 school near me that offers a bachelors in aviation and you graduate with a commercial license and instructor ratings.
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>>1095827
>picking the trousers
>>
>>1095827

I'd let her inspect my pitot tube for blockage
>>
If I have a chance to fly on an MD-80 should I do it? I've never flown on one before and I know they're going to be scrapped soon
>>
>>1095869

Why not?
>>
>>1095827
This is a general aviation thread for general aviation, hence the name "GA"G.

Our queen isn't an airline pilot. Should be a GA pilot.
>>
>>1095887

She was GA at some point, Dammit!
>>
>>1095890
You're reaching.
>>
>>1095898

I'm not wrong tho
>>
>>1095887
This is my queen right here
>>
***Reminder***

Aviation > girls
>>
>>1095919
>whynotboth.xvs
>>
>>1095924

can't multitask
>>
>>1095928
No need. She'll handle the stick for you.
>>
>>1095937

Crew Resource Management?
>>
>>1095919

Aviation > everyone who is spending money in the industry and not making any
>>
>>1095848
>I'm 25, I wanna be a commercial pilot, currently an A&P line tech

>Theres a part 141 school near me that offers a bachelors in aviation and you graduate with a commercial license and instructor ratings.


You'll do waaaaaay better as an A&P with the right additional training & experience. Everyone wants to fly airplanes for money - nobody at all really wants to maintain the godamn things.

The result is that pilots are dirt cheap and plentiful and maintenance professionals are rare and highly sought after. It's been getting worse for a long time and the trend is going to accelerate like crazy with the advent of affordable instrumentation upgrades for the ten bajillion fifty-year-old six packs floating around.

How long after everyone's car is self-driving do you think it is going to take for folks to accept self-flying aircraft?
>>
>>1095943
Whos going to make more, pilot with ten years of experience or a mechanic after ten years?
>>
>>1095993

Ten years from now?
The mechanic, definitely.
>>
File deleted.
Can ya'll help me log my flight correctly?

>1. Background
I'm building PIC XC time for my instrument rating. I still need like twelve hours. I followed a magenta line to nowheresville once, and it sucked, and I'm not doing it again.

>2. The Flight
So: enter today. I wanna build some cross-country time so I reserve the only plane that's available: the Widowmaker '38 (pictured). nobody else will reserve this plane, especially not for XC, so that's perfect for me. I decide to go to Galveston, which is exactly 50.1 nm from Bumfucksville, TX. (I'm dead set on going to Galveston because of the Dads song "Get to the Beach," which is about getting to the beach.)

>3. "Unexpected situation"
On my way to Galveston (with flight following) Nico calls me up and asks if I want to go bowling. Nico lives in Palestine, TX, which is only like 33.333 [repeating] nautical miles from Bumfucksville. So I say, sure, let's go bowling. Except we don't go bowling, we actually end up flying an SR-71. It costed me like $350 for one hour, and it's in my logbook and everything. Nico wouldn't even let me use more than 9000" of manifold pressure, that's how cheap he was!

>4. Digression
But i digress. After our bowling sesh, I continue on my way to Galveston, and tire rubber briefly contacts runway pavement. Given my goth complexion, this already exceeds thrice my daily recommended serving of beach. I decide to head for home immediately. Due to the 'ball game, Houston approach routes me the long way around. I fly at 80 mph with my elbow out the window the whole time. This way, I ended up with 2.5 hours on the Hobbs!

>5. tl;dr
So if I flew 30 nm to a flying lesson, then I flew 21 nm to the beach, then I flew 51 nm back to the original point of departure, I can log the whole thing as one XC flight, right? RIGHT? It's still one flight even if I stop to grab lunch, right? (I'm clearly just demanding validation here.)
>>
>>1095997

hold on that was the wrong pic sage
>>
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>>1095997
clarification: I am clearly not logging the SR-71 time as part of the XC flight, just the giant flight surrounding it
>>
>>1095997

The FAA is deeply committed to washing it's hands of responsibility for the aviation community in general. Literally nobody cares what you put in your log.
>>
>>1096000

you're wrong, first of all you spelled 'its' wrong, second of all DPEs are mostly retired 'Nam vets trying to relive the experience of fatherhood and / or projecting their perceived failures in this regard onto new initiates, and since DPEs are like the institution of elders of the FAA, you can see the truth is in fact more nuanced. in any case I hope my DPE will accept a 500 word essay written in crayola about everything I learned about navigation and talking to approach today, sage
>>
>>1096001

>second of all DPEs are mostly retired 'Nam vets trying to relive the experience of fatherhood and / or projecting their perceived failures in this regard onto new initiates

Exactly why the >FAA is deeply committed to washing its hands of responsibility for the aviation community in general

holds true.

Running away from responsibility for your failures is like 90% of fatherhood and 100% of 'Nam vethood.
>>
>>1095919
Yes.
>>
>>1095995

Yea but the quality of life is what I care about, I got friends at delta, united, and american and let me tell you when I Interned at delta I had guys who've been line techs for 30+ years tell me they regret not going to school for something else or not just becoming a pilot.

I'm not doing it for the money, I originally wanted to be a pilot since I was a kid but seeing the cost crushed my dream but now that I make decent money as a line tech i can save up and become a pilot and live my dream, even just a job at a regional makes 60+ a year which is more than enough for me, as long as I can fly and make a decent living I dont care.

There isnt a just a shortage of mechanics also a shortage of pilots, look at horizon cancelling 300 flights for july, republic airlines is getting fucked too. Every airlines is increasing its fleet size as well, then there's ASIA.

Man do you really think I wanna be unclogging toilets on 767's every day or changing tires, cleaning windshields, changing oil filters in sideways rain or working on bleed air cooling ducts in the summer after the engine shuts down? Just the fact that we turn engines on, get to taxi the planes and do full power runs is so unfulfilling, sit there with the feet on the brakes while the engine runs at TOGA for like 2 mins straight, yawn.

Then theres the pilots I talk to, not a single one of them will say they dislike there job.
>>
>>1095943

You will never get people to fly on a fully automated airplane, machines are inherently failure prone because they are built by humans, an airplane WILL ALWAYS need a pilot.

The machine will never be as flexible as a pilot, there are just some things a machine cant do.
>>
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>>1095827
I like how airbus planes call the pilot a retard everytime they land. Also I like how she jiggle.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9svSePWwisQ
>>
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>>1095827
Also, what happens if you sneeze while youre landing? Crash?

Has there been an accident where some physical hiccup caused a crash?

When i was in school they had this girl who was paralyzed give a speech how she crashed when a bee stung her. Also my friend was driving and that happen and he stopped in the middle of the road and people were honking.
>>
>>1095827
Why does she have brown skin?
>>
>>1096033
I like how the quote is wrong
>>
>>1095995
No, both with ten years of experience. If both have worked in the same place for ten years which one makes more money?
>>
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>>1096035

DON'T MENTION THAT
>>
>>1096022.
>I'm not doing it for the money, I originally wanted to be a pilot since I was a kid but seeing the cost crushed my dream

Likewise. I dont even need the money or a paycheck, I make enough to get by from my stock dividends, but I need something to do so that I dont get bored. I never wanted a normal job so flying an airliner is quite fulfilling. Well I dont like the early mornings or minimum rest tours but when I get some seniority it'll get better.

Practically I got my training free partly due to military service and a airline sponsored scheme, nor have I paid for a type rating, but I understand that it can get really expensive. And I've lucked out, I get that. But such is aviation, unfair and ruthless sometimes. It took me 15 years to get here.
>>
>>1096034
You should be able to supress the pain, the sneezing or whatever for those critical seconds necessary to get yourself in a safe position.

I´m not a pilot, but if I had crashed everytime a bee or wasp stung me while cycling I would probably be a cripple too.
>>
>>1096035
>>1096092

Or why is she fat

She'll be losing her medical in five years
>>
>>1096034
Landing an airplane becomes second nature. Do you crash your car every time you sneeze?
>>
>>1096122
>>1096095
Yeah but the stakes are so high it makes me nervous that the co-pilot isnt hovering his stick just in case.
>>
>>1096092
>>1096132
You know that means her pussy lips are brown? I donno how i feel about brown pussies... on one hand pink ones kinda look like ball sacks but on the other hand i have this weird aversion to the color of shit.
>>
>>1096132
It's really not that big of a deal. The landing won't be pretty but you're not gonna die. Airplanes have suspension that absorbs lousy landings. You would have to have a shit approach AND a shit flare to be dangerous and that takes real effort. Loss of control just doesn't happen during landing.

Initial climb out and turn to final are much more dangerous.
>>
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>>1096167
>turn to final
Whats dangerous about this...? Ive never thought of this before, not trolling.
>>
Is a discovery fleet worth it if I'm pursuing a private license when I work in aviation and renting a Cessna 150 + instructor outright is $10 an hour? I hear they are highly recommended before starting but I don't know if that recommendation is based on value or experience
>>
>>1096195
Low speed, low altitude, stall risk is higher and there's not much room to recover.
>>
>>1096195

this >>1096216 and
Add in that you're slowing down, are more likely to add more rudder to make that turn onto final, use opposite aileron to keep the same bank as before, and then you're cross controlled usually leading to a spin.
>>
>>1096208
It's worth it. It gives you a feel for controlling an aircraft, which is a bit different than anything you've probably tried before, so it's good to try it before you drop a bunch of cash on instruction.
>>
>>1096241
>>1096216
That and an increased load factor in the turn presents a higher risk for a stall
>>
>>1096195
>>1096216
>>1096241
>>1096247
The biggest problem is pilots getting "ground shy" and not using enough roll on their base to final turn. They "push the tail around" with the rudder instead of cranking in the aileron and keeping it coordinated. This causes an unrecoverable spin toward the inside of the turn.
It is a major killer and the most common killer for the approach and landing phases of flight. The remedy is to ALWAYS fly coordinated, and ALWAYS maintain your speed on the approach.

You get slow, you get uncoordinated, you get shy with the ailerons close to the ground, you die.
>>
>>1096257
>This causes an unrecoverable spin toward the inside of the turn.
Isnt this more a problem with small GA aircraft not airliners because they have much more stability?
>>
>>1096259
>Small GA craft
>Not stable
Brah
>>
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>>1096262
Well relatively compared to a large airliner. Planes cant turn using the rudder alone without risking a spin?

One of the problems with BWBs is that roll can be uncomfortable for passengers sitting farther away from centerline so my genius ass thought a simple remedy would be to just execute turns using the rudder only and having big rudders. Is that not possible?
>>
>>1096093

I dont plan on quitting any time soon, theres always people trying to tell you you cant do it blah blah blah, fuck em.

I'll be flying a 737/A320 someday.
>>
>>1096245
Thank you anon I don't get discovery flights comp'd like I do normal instruction but you're probably right about it being different and it isnt that much
>>
>>1096269
Short answer; no
>>
>>1096022
>Man do you really think I wanna be unclogging toilets on 767's every day or changing tires, cleaning windshields, changing oil filters in sideways rain or working on bleed air cooling ducts in the summer after the engine shuts down? Just the fact that we turn engines on, get to taxi the planes and do full power runs is so unfulfilling, sit there with the feet on the brakes while the engine runs at TOGA for like 2 mins straight, yawn.
>Then theres the pilots I talk to, not a single one of them will say they dislike there job.

That's not really what I was talking about at all.
Working for the airlines is trash-tier.

Freelance in GA. Shit is SO FUCKING AWESOME. Five years from now every A&P is going to be able to basically name their price.
>>
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What do you think of this?

https://youtu.be/YMONcHY1Jeo
>>
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>>1096291
Join the Navy, pick MPRA, and it'll happen sooner than later. Pic related.
>>
>>1096023

No fucking way.

Machines don't get drunk/bored/sleep on the job/suddenly decide to ablababu akbar.

If you actually worked in aviation or even spent any time talking to people who do, you would know that literally any idiot can fly an airplane and seemingly most of them do.

Driving is FAR more intrinsically challenging and dangerous and we already have self-driving cars that people are ready to accept.
>>
>>1096357

Not him

But there will always be a pilot. Insurance companies control everything. It would be far cheaper to pay for 2 human pilots than to have to pay for the deaths when a computer fails and kills everyone
>>
>>1096359

Insurance companies are absolutely DESPERATE to get human operators out of the loop. And rightfully so.
>>
>>1096357

I'm a Line A&P technician at an International airport. I work on A320, 737, 747, 767's every week and I interact with pilots every day. I'm type rated to work on the A319/320/321 which is what i work on the most.

I've talked to pilots and other technicians that have been in the business longer and I or you have been alive. I've talked to guys who worked on DC4's and 707s when they were in their 20's and pilots that flew them.

I worked on everything from the toilets to the Powerplants.

There is no way in our lifetimes we will every see a fully automated airliner. Too much automation causes accidents (Air France Flight 296), flight control laws get in the way. A computer will follow check lists but sometimes decisions have to be made that circumvent protocol like how sully immediate turned the APU on after the birdstrike, if he followed the check lists he would have been delayed by 40+ seconds and they would have all died, A computer would have delayed APU start until after it completed the double engine thrust failure check lists and other generic system checks, it might have tried landing at the airport which was impossible given the situation. A computer will not make snap decisions.

We will not see fully automated planes. Maybe remotely controlled planes but thats a whole different shit show that probably wont happen.
>>
>>1096354

Do you require an education? (bachelors?)
>>
>>1096350

Good thing if shit gets tough I'll still have my A&P (+connections) to bounce back on.

Although i have no interest in working on GA aircraft.
>>
>>1096385
>A computer will not make snap decisions.

You have absolutely no idea what you are talking about.
>>
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>>1096353

I work on spirit planes all the time, these fucking shitty passengers pay a VERY cheap price compared to every one else to get where they need to be, these fuckers buy tickets on a super low cost airline and they expect Delta/united/american level service and quality?

Go fuck yourself.
>>
>>1096389

and you do?

How will the computer decide instantly that its lost both engines and the best course of action is to either turn around and attempt to return to the airport or ditch in the river?
>>
>>1096391

I do.
You have absolutely no idea how advanced the sciences of heuristics and robotics have become. Children's toys are already more capable at certain tasks than any human pilot in history.
>>
>>1096392

You are basically pulling shit out your ass.
>>
>>1096393

Again, you seem to have no fucking clue.
If you actually care, do some research.

Very few humans are any good at the OODA loop.
>>
>>1096394

Are you some 100 hour Cessna pilot with a fucking psychology degree or some shit?

Research on what? I work on the damn things and know what they do and how they do it down to the check valves and push buttons.

Just keep throwing out random shit.
>>
>>1096395

Nah. We're done here.
You're just an idiot.
>>
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>>1096398

lmao, ok buddy.
>>
>>1096357
Haha nope.
>what is mechanical failure
>what are unprogrammed errors
>what is flight control logic and hard laws

I'll never fly on a commercial aircraft without a pilot, and I'd bet almost everybody would agree with me.
>>
>>1096388
It may be harder to get a decent job again if you haven't been actively working aircraft for a few years though.

Best combo = do 3-5 years at a biz-av MRO then pick up a job at a corporation's/company's own private flight department. Cushiest and generally best paying/benefits in the business short of overseas contracting or getting on the management/MX planning side.

I'm kinda the opposite though, I want a decent livelihood so I'm going with what I think is the best path I can reasonably achieve, yet if money was no object I think I'd much prefer GA over anything I've experienced so far
>>
>>1096440

My current job was right out of AP school making 25/hr and overtime here and there.

Like everyone else I wanna to fly the big planes a320/737> but I have no problem flying regionals, nowadays regionals pay pretty nicely.
>>
>>1096354
Looks cramped
>>
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I have a friend that worked at Boeing and he said workers would try to cover their mistakes any way they could to avoid getting in trouble. Do you think he's full of shit or do you think it's possible for a small manufacturing defect to make it through quality control?
>>
>>1095918
Cedar key?
>>
>>1096488
Anything is possible. I saw firsthand where an aircraft left with an extra slat stop left in the wing from factory, just kinda rattled around in there until it came in with a whole punched through the skin because it got wedged in between the slat track and the skin.

What surprises me is that such a large company seemingly has such a large employee culture of covering things up; usually it's safer (and better for your conscience in general) to be honest, and most times an employer will give you a slap on the wrist for being honest vs. straight-up firing you for lying/brushing something under the rug. Usually larger companies with the budget for employee advancement and research into efficiency would be better about that I'd think
>>
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>>1096530
What kind of plane were you talking about that left the shop like that, if you dont mind me asking?

And yeah I would think that to, but I also heard a story about a guy that cost the company millions and kept fucking up but wasnt fired. I think its a human nature kind of thing and also the chaw-dipping turbo chads in everett are some real shitheads, especially the guys i knew that worked at boeing. Haha desu it makes me partial towards airbus although i also hate fbw, so i just hate flying in general.

I do like the manual reversion mode on the 737 though, but I wonder if it is more vulnerable compared to self contained electric servos on the new jets, because it is a centralized system still.
>>
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I posted this in another thread but anyone know why fuselages arent made with hexagonal ribbing instead of squares?
>>
>>1096534
What year is this
>>
>>1096533
Ehh, most specific I feel comfortable going is that it's a business jet. Probably being paranoid-level hesitant, but I'm still also relatively new at my current workplace.

Never had much chance to work on any of the commercials though; frankly the airlines sound so shitty for maintenance until you put in 20+ years that it just doesn't seem worth it to me, but I guess what I'm saying is I really can't weigh in on those aircraft's systems more than that based on instinct and intuition I would lean more towards a more connected and less automated flight experience as well, but again I've never flown or had firsthand experience with those designs

>>1096534
Looks like it uses a lot more material, which means more weight. Also it may be needlessly stronger when the standard ribs/stringers/longerons designs have enough strength already.
>>
>>1096424
These systems are also certified hinging on the fact that a human is there to make esoteric decisions and cross check what the computer is doing. If the plane is going to be fully robotic it has to be designed as such from the beginning
>>
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>>1096537
>What year is this
wwii

>>1096538
>most specific I feel comfortable going is that it's a business jet
Yeah i understand and thats what i meant, ie. GA vs Commercial.

>I would lean more towards a more connected and less automated flight experience as well
Im not a pilot either but it seems like common sense that a combination of different kinds of systems would be optimal.

>Looks like it uses a lot more material, which means more weight.
Hmm yeah but since a triangle or hexagon are the strongest shapes then couldnt you have thinner ribs so the overall weight is less? I know that some of the composite panels use honeycomb cores for example.
>>
>>1096488
I can't speak for Boeing specifically but mistakes that people notice get addressed, and just about every aspect of the plane is cross checked by 1-3 people or more to catch errors. This still isn't perfevt, but makes failures on the field much less common. The CYA game usually begins if something got through the net, and the quality control quality really depends on the company's internal practice.
>>
>>1096530
You'd be surprised, the big companies can afford to sack you and train your replacement and wash their hands of it, it's the smaller companies who really can't let you go so quickly
>>
>>1096546
That's a bad reputation to start having though IMO. Where my logic is taking me is that once that rep gets around the industry, it'll scare away the good, experienced guys and will mostly leave you with newer or less picky/less attentive workers who will in turn lead to you putting out a worse product over time. Just seems like a bad way to run a business no matter what your size is, especially in this industry
>>
>>1096548
They can try to balance it out by offering a lot more money to applicants, but the reputation for mass firings does stick. I see both approaches used though, it could be entirely dependent on management's attitude
>>
>>1096540
Whether or not a system has been designed to be fully automated or not is irrelevant. They are still subject to failure (electrical failure, logic failure), as are the systems that provide input to the computer for situational assessment and basic control. There are plenty of examples of aircraft suffering significant damage and surviving due to the actions and ingenuity of the humans onboard.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2003_Baghdad_DHL_attempted_shootdown_incident
>>
>>1096592
I agree with you I only meant to say that that anon is overconfident in the robustness of the computers on most planes
>>
>>1096480

Its a 737
>>
I need advice

Right now I'm finishing up my Private at a small local flight school. They have been decent, but it's taken me almost a year to get my Private done (mostly because of my scheduling and weather issues). After I get my private, I'm planning on going to ATP Flight School to do the fast track program. But now my flight school is trying to convince me to stay. They say I can get all of my training done "quickly". But when I asked my CFI later on he said that he estimates 1.5 years until I can be an instructor, and it took him 1.5 years also to get his required hours for the regionals (he just got a job offer with a regional). That just seems long as fuck.

ATP ill have all of that in 2 years..
>>
>>1096762

Don't go to ATP, it sucks according to the pilots I've talked to. None of them have anything good to say about it.
>>
>>1096762
>>1096789

I prob gonna do the Part 141 program at a nearby Part 141 community college that the pilots recommended to me, its located at a very large airport and has a good reputation.

2 years for me to go from 0 hours to CPL and then Restricted ATPL in about 1-2 years.

Yea I could get it done faster at a Part 61 place but I get an associated degree and a Part 141 education which is liked more than the Part 61 route.

of course all of this is word of mouth information i've gotten from various professionals I've talked to.
>>
>>1096789

I've heard that from a few, but I've also heard from others that it's good. The thing is, if it's so shitty, then why would more than a dozen airlines partner and specifically recruit and offer special incentives for ATP graduates?

>>1096790

I have no interest to do the college thing Tbh
>>
>tfw scared of flying
>had to fly 7 or 8 times this year due to work
>Fuck flying on Embraer CRJ 700's and fuck Minnesota

>tfw pilot was landing in h-town
>30 ft from the ground or some shit
>too wobbly, says fuck it and guns the engine and takes back off
>REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
>>
>>1096800


>Embraer
>CRJ 700s

Pick one

>too wobbly, says fuck it and guns the engine and takes back off

He didn't feel safe, so he went around. That's for your safety
>>
>>1096762
ATP programs are shit. I've met a few people that have gone through them and they didn't retain any of the important information after completing the courses. Some things take time, and when you learn how to fly take your goddamn time and do it right.

>that just seems long as fuck
Getting through CS/MEL+instrument takes a long time and a lot of work, let alone CFI/CFII or ATP. You will take more than a year and a half, I fuggen money-back guarantee it.
>>
>>1096812

Well hears a questions nobody answers. If ATP is such a bad program, why do more than a dozen airlines partner and recruit directly from ATP? I've noticed a lot of them even offer special incentives for ATP graduates like tuition assistance and lower hour requirements.
>>
>>1096925
Because they're airline-sponsored programs, and it trains students how they want them to be trained. They are rushed through these ratings and taught in a way that will align with company procedures later on down the road. This isn't necessarily bad but it sacrifices the time pilots need to practice and apply their knowledge to build a foundation.

I went through a part 141 school in addition to getting a degree in Aeronautical Science, so the topics presented in the plane were expounded upon in a classroom later in much more detail and depth, or vice versa depending on your rate of progression. I know you don't need several classes on aerodynamics and aircraft performance, systems, physics, airline dispatch ops, etc. but having done it I feel bad for those who just glaze over these complex topics. I'm not trying to sound "holier than thou" but I think it's important to really understand the concepts and ideas rather than giving it a short once-over and calling it good
>>
>>1096641
Still, looks cramped. My a/c has a lot more space in the cockpit.
>>
>>1097016

> Still, looks cramped.

No shit its a 737.

is the sky blue? YES
Do 737s have cramped cockpits? YES
>>
>>1096999

After my Part 141 schooling is done I might do a Bachelors online from embry riddle or something I really dont wanna spend another 2 years in school. I already have an associated with my AP.

Really wish I didnt have to but a bachelors is preferred from a big airline.
>>
>>1096925

Finishing any part 141 school allows you to get a Restricted ATP not just "ATP school".
>>
>>1096999

I hear what you're saying. I mean, even if I do stay with my current flight school. I feel like the knowledge will be the same, but it'll just take a lot longer. One of the biggest reasons I'm considering ATP is because I'd go to a Florida campus. It gives me an excuse to move to a place where I'll have good flying weather. i live in northern Virginia and the weather is shit in the fall and winter. Everyday 20+kt gusts and low ceilings. I had so many cancelations last fall and winter it pissed me off. I wanted to have my private done by May, but it's August now and I haven't done my checkride yet.

I'm friends with a Jetblue A320 captain, and he keeps saying "you just need to get everything done. Seniority is everything, you need to start getting seniority", so he keeps suggesting ATP Flight School.

>>1097024

Yes I understand the difference. However with going to ATP Flight School, Airlines will do special bonuses and will conducts on campus interviews. Many of the Airlines that partner with them will even give offer letters to students at 300-500 hour, that they will have a job waiting for them once they meet the minimums
>>
>>1097044

Ironically the jetblue pilot I was talking to told me to not even consider ATP. Since I live in Seattle he told me he hears good things about Big Bend College, its located on grant country international airport and has 350+ days a year VFR.

Which is what I'm gonna do, and after I'll instruct for 2+ years and get a online bachelors while I'm at it.
>>
>>1097061

I'm just not going the college route.

So it's either do an accelerated program like ATP, or stay with my local flight school. There is nothing wrong with my current school. Just, the weather sucks and it'll take a lot longer to finish all of my training and build my hours
>>
>>1097064

Do you have a degree?
>>
>>1097067

no
>>
>>1097068

then u are gonna get into a major airlines.

A regional requires a Associates.

Alaska, American, Delta, ETC...

requires at least a Bachelor or prefer it.
>>
>>1097081

NOT GONNA GET***
>>
>>1097081

Regionals don't require an associates.

Plus, if I were to get hired by PSA, Envoy, or Piedmont I'd have a guaranteed job at American.

United doesn't require a bachelors although it is a preference. The same with Jetblue, Spirit, and Virgin America. I'm really hoping my past work experience will be considered
>>
>>1097084

Any job you apply for 1000 other guys will apply for and many of them will have more experience and degrees behind them. Its just good to have something like that behind you.
>>
>>1097086

College isn't a good path for me Tbh.

I'm really hoping that my military and current job experience will carry some weight.
>>
>>1097089

best of luck
>>
>>1097092

You too anon
>>
http://money.cnn.com/2017/07/27/news/companies/pilot-shortage-figures/index.html

Will this mean that getting hired by a major should become a lot easier, even without a college degree?
>>
>>1097163
I honestly don't know anymore. Everyone has conflicting views on on this
>>
>>1097170

Oh :/
>>
>>1097163

maybe in 10 years they will be desperate and let some associates degree holders in.

I'm betting on my 2 associates and A&P license lol.
>>
>>1097163
>PILOT SHORTAGE OH FUCK WE NEED PILOTS SUPER BADLY
>continue to pay them shit and further ramp up hours required
>>
>>1097372

maybe it'll hit them when 2021 hits and all of those forced retirements happen
>>
>>1097372

Blame Congress for the hours required, if they could take lower hour pilots then they would and we wouldn't be hearing much about a pilot shortage.
>>
>>1096269
Hard rudder can still induce spin on an airliner

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Airlines_Flight_585
>>
>>1096394
>>1096395

There's something to be said for a human ability to asses situations in and around the airplane. A potential runway incursion, a weird failure, passenger situations, and general know how. Computers haven't reached sentience and therefore and inferior to human pilots, and as long as that's true humans will have jobs in aviation - or any career or aspect of life for that matter (which is why I believe computer intelligence needs to be legally limited in the near future).
>>
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Just went to KOSH last week. Breddy Epig guys, worth the 8 hour flight in my 172. desu arrival and departure aren't so bad if you show up later in the weak and leave late too. Also Fremont, Nebraska has one of the nicest little FBOs and nicest people I've met in a while. Good place to overnight or stop for gas/food.
>>
>>1096033
I'm surprised no busybody who actually believes it's referring to mental retardation has tried to petition Airbus to change the callout to "differently abled, differently abled, differently abled" yet.
>>
>>1096424
In cases of mechanical failure I trust a machine far more than a human.

For a human it's extremely hard to fly on differential thrust alone if all flight controls are lost, as in United Airlines Flight 232, but for an autopilot it's just a matter of running a different program.

What I won't fly on is a commercial aircraft without a cabin crew. Fine, they can put a vending machine for the drinks, but medical emergencies, evacuations, unruly passengers, etc. require human intervention.
>>
>>1097756
If you design a simple program to fly a plane you factor in pitch, roll, yaw, and power setting. This gives you fundamental control of the aircraft. But what happens when you remove a necessary element? A jammed aileron or yaw damper failure perhaps? Maybe a thrust reverser is malfunctioning but the engine still works, or elevator trim runaway? Something that would affects the flight characteristics significantly and the computer wouldn't then have the basic inputs required to control the aircraft.

The autopilot is only as smart as the engineers who built it. They cannot predict and program every error because of the sheer possibilities. Nobody thought UA232 could lose a triple-redundant hydraulic system and the possibility was so slim they didn't even bother with it.

Also you must remember that an AFCS is a system like any other: subject to failure itself. On some commercial jets you can literally MEL an autopilot, though I'd imagine that would be a long day.
>>
>>1097756

what is the computer going to do during a severe bird strike, or if icing conditions are present?

Will a computer know how to pick a suitable off airport landing site if that kind of emergency arises?
>>
>>1097776
>a severe bird strike
Follow engine out procedures
>or if icing conditions are present
Anti ice systems, same as a human
>Will a computer know how to pick a suitable off airport landing site if that kind of emergency arises?
Why not? If a computer can drive a car in a chaotic urban environment, flying an airplane is baby stuff

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzg5Qe0pTKk
>>
>>1097778
Driving a car on a well defined road =/= flying a plane

LIDAR-based moving map imagery are good but cars essentially only move in two directions, for which these systems work well. But planes fly in three dimensions, quite far from obstacles to use as spatial reference points, and at much higher speeds. Determining an acceptable off-field landing point is not feasible for an automated system. There are way too many variables to program.
>>
>>1097784
>well-defined road
I'm not sure what that means. The system has to work even when there are no visible road markings and there's a mixture of cars, trucks, bicycles, pedestrians, temporary construction signs, and so on, all moving at different speeds and possibly making abrupt changes in direction.

If a human has sense data from which to make a decision, so does a computer.
>>
>>1097785
Yes and when you're several thousand feet in the air how do you program a computer to judge an approximate engine-out approach and landing distance on an ill-defined road or field? How do you program a computer to crash under control instead of lift off at the end of the runway just below Vmc? Driving is relatively predictable, and it's assumed that other cars will follow the rules within reason.

Perhaps the worst part is that a sensory-input based system is inherently reactive, not proactive. When flying any aircraft it is absolutely necessary to stay ahead of the plane. Staying with it or just behind it is a recipe for disaster. It's ok for more basic autopilot to hold altitudes and airspeeds and perhaps an approach, but a fully automated system must be predictive and somehow possess intuition.
>>
>>1097796
>how do you program
>how do you predict
Fuck if I know, I'm not an AI specialist. Some combination of deep learning pattern recognition and conventional "rules", I suppose
> Driving is relatively predictable, and it's assumed that other cars will follow the rules within reason.
Not really. Maybe in Germany?
>a fully automated system must be predictive and somehow possess intuition.
This is first generation technology:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--xITOqlBCM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuIrjRAzNPQ
It's only going to get better
>>
>>1097785
>The system has to work even when there are no visible road markings
Exactly. It doesn't. There is no self-driving car capable of this today, not even close. Not one can even handle heavy rain or snow. When there are no lines, intuition comes in to play, and computers have no intuition. Sorry anon, but you are either horribly mistaken about the capabilities of computers, or deluding yourself.
>>
>>1097801
And you're misinformed about the current level of self driving cars. They already do all of that. They don't need the lines.
>>
>>1097801
You are the one who is horribly mistaken about the capabilities of computers. By your logic a Cat III landing should be a "recipe for disaster", and yet, they're done routinely, using computer technology that would have been considered primitive even in the 1990s.
>>
>>1097800
If the cars in front of the automated vehicle slam on their brakes or it senses an object approaching opposite and at a high rate of speed, those still qualify as reactive measures.

If I am flying and I see a quickly rising oil temperature and a falling oil pressure, I can make the assumption that I'm probably losing oil. The engine won't run long without oil, so I gotta work quick. I can then reduce power and point the aircraft towards either a safe off-airport site or towards a nearby airstrip as a contingency when my engine decides to quit. A computer will understand that an unusual scenario is present, but cannot think proactively and start making preparations for a scenario that does not exist yet. This is why a human is necessary
>>
>>1097808
No, you fucked up your interpretation. CAT III landings rely on very precise ILS signals to stay aligned. It's not flying blind. This fits in perfectly with the previous post, and requires no intuition.

>>1097804
Show proof, please; need to confirm if there have really been such significant improvements in the past year. I doubt it though.
>>
>>1097811
>I can then reduce power and point the aircraft towards either a safe off-airport site or towards a nearby airstrip as a contingency when my engine decides to quit.
So, you mean, respond REACTIVELY to the data on your instruments, kind of like a computer?
>This is why a human is necessary
Yes, a human is necessary: to train the computer to recognize the pattern that you just described.
>>
>>1097815
>It's not flying blind
Where did we come up with this stipulation that a computer has to "fly blind"? You're just making up restrictions because you're afraid of mass unemployment in the airline pilot industry.
>requires no intuition
"Intuition" is just a word describing a heuristic, which can be explicitly programmed or "recognized" via machine learning. It's not 1988 anymore, you can give a machine a simulated human body and tell it to figure out how to walk, and it does.
>>
>>1097816
No, I mean proactively. If the temperature rises and the pressure increase, my engine is overheating. If the temperature rises and the pressure falls, there is a leak. How bad the leak is depends on the rate of change, which will determine how serious the situation is and how fast I'll need to act. The determination that my engine is going to quit is an assumption, but decisions are made off of that assumption that can affect the outcome of the flight.

Consider faulty wiring on the magnetos. My engine will quit, but attempts can be made to restart with enough altitude, but at a low altitude it would be safer to secure it and land off field. That is a decision that depends on how the engine responds to start attempts (faulty versus severed wiring), and what your chances of landing safely off field are. The latter being quite a subjective decision, cannot be programmed. My buddy went through this and after messing with the mixture and repeated start attempts he was able to regain partial power and land safely. Discretion is very difficult, if not impossible, to program.
>>
>>1097822
I understand what you meant. But you are still REACTING to data. You don't seem to grasp that all the stuff you're describing can be part of the program - we're well past the point of computers serving just to solve a simple linear equation. What you're doing in your head can be done by a computer, faster, and without emotions to fuck things up like with AF447

>Discretion is very difficult, if not impossible, to program.

That's what machine learning is for. You model the entire airplane and tell the computer to try out all the possible outcomes. Eliminate the ones that lead to an unwanted outcome, and then consider the rest. Find the one that has the best chance of success, and do that. You can model all this stuff in advance and convert it into a huge pile of IF-THEN rules, or do it in real time. Maybe even have more than one model, and have some controller that takes a "vote" on the outputs, much like how they already do with aerospace computers to rule out sensor faults or a logic failure, but on a more advanced level.

It's difficult, of course. That's why the experts in the field are fought over by all the different companies that see profit in it. But it's certainly not impossible and research is progressing much faster than most people realize:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gn4nRCC9TwQ
>>
>>1097824
No, making decisions off of assumptions is not being reactive. That's using information currently available to predict one or more potential outcomes, selecting the most likely, and making decisions based upon that likely scenario. That is not reactive.

Those complex computers cost a shit load of money too. Those systems work when all parts are functional, but in commercial aviation where repairs cost time and money lots of equipment is deactivated or inoperative on the aircraft that isn't always a possibility. It also depends on ground based radio navaids which may be inoperative too. Pilots must be able to perform their jobs especially when systems or circumstances are abnormal
>>
>>1097848
>look at instrument panel
>see numbers change in such-and-such a way
>perform action
You and the computer are both reacting. The exact details of what happens next are different depending on whether the computer is controlling the plane or a human is controlling the plane. This is because the thought processes that go on in your head are not the same as the computer's processes but both use heuristics - or as you call them, "assumptions" - to figure out which reaction would be best, given the data. You call it "proactive" because you're thinking several steps ahead. You think of this as fundamentally different than reacting, but that is only because you are arbitrarily limiting what counts as "reacting" to suit your argument.

The important thing is not that the computer should use the exact same deductive sequence as you used in your head. The important thing is solving a problem accurately and quickly, it's highly unlikely AI is going to solve it in the same way that you do. But it doesn't matter how the problem is solved, as long as it's solved. What matters more is the political angle - the human may fail in X percent of those scenarios and we may be accustomed to making excuses for that. The computer may fail in Y percent of those scenarios and the failure may be a different kind of failure and we may be indisposed to tolerating that even if it's a lower failure rate, because we can't "sympathize" with a machine.

>Those complex computers cost a shit load of money too

They cost a lot less now than they used to. My mom just got a new Subaru with EyeSight which is basically a rudimentary babby tier form of self driving, that would have seemed like a laughable fantasy only 10 years ago. If I recall correctly it was a $3000 option at the dealer

These technologies have applications across fields as diverse as finance, law enforcement, transport, manufacturing, etc. They're going to get into air travel whether the pilot unions like it or not
>>
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>>1097808
>>1097815

Guy.. guys...

What do you think of this attractive new airplane that's coming to the US?
>>
>>1097858
A computer will react to changing circumstances, and react further to each progression. A human will do so but will prepare for expected changes and think several steps ahead (radio for assistance, select multiple landing sites, predict possible related failures). I'm not bending the definition to fit my argument, I'm arguing that humans are proactive and computers are reactive, which is true. You're cherry picking the absolute latest experiments on machine learning and applying it to a human-based system. A computer may be able to solve a problem quicker, but it can't solve the same problem using an equation it has not developed or without the necessary inputs (see mechanical/electrical failure).

It most certainly does matter how the problem is solved. Consider the miracle on the Hudson: ditching an aircraft like that in the water (more so at that temperature) is a death sentence from a statistics point of view. A decision was made, protocol items were done out of sequence, and everyone lived. A computer would have followed procedure for a single engine failure, then a double engine failure (burning more time), and attempted to fly back to an airport, which would condemn the aircraft and those onboard to a toasty fate short of the runway.

>manufacturing
Inherently automated and computer-based, no lives at stake
>finance
Inherently mathematical, and algorithms have been used and updated for decades

And I'm not even considering the economic impact of automating the whole industry
>>
>>1097896
>A human will do so but will prepare for expected changes and think several steps ahead
Only if it has learned to do so. The same is true of a computer - it will lay out multiple contingency plans if it has been programmed to. I don't know what you're arguing, really.
>>
>>1097881

hope i can fly it some day, they do testing of it at the airport my fight school is at, hopefully when I start training next year il see it.
>>
>>1097898

Trans State Airlines has an order for 50 of them in 2019
>>
>>1097901

Hoping for a future job at eastern airlines or Skywest.
>>
>>1097896
>it can't solve the same problem using an equation it has not developed or without the necessary inputs (see mechanical/electrical failure).
But it can, that is the crux of this disagreement. You believe a computer can only solve a problem by being given a fixed set of if-then rules that it is constrained to follow, blind to the purpose of those rules. The point is that isn't true anymore, you can now give computers a goal, some tools, and (usually) a pile of data, and it can teach itself to solve for that goal in situations it has not been explicitly programmed to "expect".
>A computer would have
You have no idea what a computer would have done because it would have to be developed first, but it's safe to say you would severely underestimate that computer. Multiple tests with HUMAN pilots have found that a safe return to the airport was feasible. A computer can think faster and has more experience to draw on due to massive amounts of simulation time and data collection from real world flights.
> protocol items were done out of sequence
A concession to slow human response times, no doubt. A computer can perform many more things simultaneously than any human. Hence why so many flying tasks are already separated by a layer of computer logic. You command a pitch change and the computer decides exactly what control surface deflections are needed, taking into account airspeed, and so on.
>And I'm not even considering the economic impact of automating the whole industry
I'm pretty sure that is the main thing you're considering, and, of course, it would be a big impact, which we're going to have to deal with in almost every sector of the economy.
>>
>>1097902

>>1097902

My top 3 choices are Envoy, Republic, and Trans State.
>>
>>1097881
I cant wait for fetishists on deviant art to draw one having sex with a CRJ
>>
>>1097923

L-lewd
>>
>>1097910
>I'm pretty sure that is the main thing you're considering
I haven't argued the economic impact at all.

Frankly I think you horribly overestimate the ability of such a system, and have never flown an aircraft with automation. There is no safety net if a system were to have the equivalent of a blue screen at Mach .8 or on short final, and electrical and logic failures are not terribly uncommon. A fleet wide transition for just a single airline would be in the tens or perhaps hundreds of millions of dollars, much less to change a national airspace/air traffic system that is human-based. Machine learning is in its early prototype stages at best, and implementation to such a task as flying a commercial airliner is so far fetched I'll be dead by the time it's phased in. You can call me a nostalgic hairless-ape-in-a-tube lover but I'd sooner walk than step in a fully automated aircraft. Too many variables, too many points of failure, too much reliance on automation.
>>
>>1096386
To be an officer in all branches, yes. But it can be in literally anything. Mine was Computer Science.

Also, YOU DO NOT HAVE TO GO TO THE ACADEMY. Nor do you have to go to ROTC. There is an OCS option for normal humans. (Also BDCP, which is a drug deal of its own)
>>
>>1097022
>>1096480
I came from P-3s, so imagine my shock and horror the first time I walked into the flight deck and saw how ridiculously cramped it was.
>>
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>tfw want to go mil and have run out of money for lessons
How do I not suck at ground reference turns?
>>
>>1097980
use the force niqqa
>>
>>1097995
HOW
>>
>>1097996
think about the wind, look outside the plane, make corrections to end up where you're supposed to be when you're supposed to be there. I dunno man what specifically are you having a problem with?
>>
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>>1098001
The few times I've done them, I could never keep an even distance. I was always either flying away from the point, or towards it. My path felt lumpy if that makes any sense.
>>
>>1098005

Dude just stare at the point you're turning around, and occasionally glance in at your altimeter
>>
>>1098005
If it looks like you're flying away, make your turn steeper. It may "feel" lumpy but if your actual ground track is an even distance away from the point then that's the point of the maneuver
>>
I had this dream the other night where I was taking my GF flying again.

We're taking off Runway 1 in a 172R and we get partial power loss about 500' agl. I'm maintaining altitude, but quickly bleeding off airspeed.

I decide to ditch the airplane for some reason and glide down using my iPad because apparently it has some lifting capabilities that can support the weight of both my GF and me to a safe landing in someone's backyard.

We break into this rather large house only to find the wife and grandma sitting on a couch watching tv.... and they were surprisingly gracious considering we just broke in.

It was all very unsettling for some reason..... maybe it's because it's the first time I ever had a dream so directly related to flying.
>>
>>1098037
Maybe you worry you depend on foreflight too much?
>>
>>1098037
I dream about flying several nights per week. Usually they're realistic dreams that almost feel like exact replays of lessons, and other times they're really surreal where there's torrential rain all around and strange sounds.
>>
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>>1098093

>really surreal where there's torrential rain all around and strange sounds.

JAL 1628 ayyy lmao
>>
>>1097902
>future job at eastern airlines or Skywest
>future job at Skywest
ok sounds promising
>future job at eastern
why? are runway overshoots your cup of tea?
>>
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Just a reminder that if your airport doesn't have an almost constant presence of jumbo jets, you live in an irrelevant city and might as well just off yourself.
>>
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>>1098172

What if N2 shows up at your airport a lot?
>>
>>1097949
The technical challenges aren't insurmountable. It's just that avionics-grade software engineering is terribly expensive, and the more you automate the more you need of it. And why would you when you can pay people a pittance to fly your planes?

I'd be much more concerned that it will give regulators a hard-on for banning VFR altogether. Things are GA-hostile enough as they are already if you ask me.

t. programmer in the transportation sector
>>
>>1098172
FAA plz go.
>>
>>1098182
>Not having at least 6 terminals with 40 gates each
wew its like those planes are just parked there in the middle of a random road surrounded by a forest
>>
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>>1098182
>>
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>>1098207

Well, at least our terminal has the very first SAAB remote control tower in the United States :D

Edit: fucking image flip
>>
>>1098172
i much prefer the cozy and uncongested feeling of a small airport
>>
>>1098137

Thats a pilot problem not an A/C problem.
>>
>>1098172

theres always a 747 somewhere at my POS airport.

> atlas
> china
> national
> lufthansa
> delta
> ABC
> asiana
> EVA
> Korean
> Cargo lux

sometimes like 5 of them. Kinda annoying, 747s are boring.
>>
>>1098236
>Preferring to breathe the fumes from manlet beta planes rather than Jumbo alpha planes

wew
>>
>>1098370
Their mere presence is intimidating. Alpha af
>>
>>1098188
>why automate
because a man in the mix leads to problems

look at the air asia flight where the tards in the cockpit fucking unplugged the avionics because they got a reading they didn't know how to handle

BlackRock learned the hard way with this. human retards running the SAE group decided to override the AI and they lost billions because they thought it was making the wrong decisions

investors of course blamed the AI even though the problem was the people

emotions + impenetrable machine logic = everyone dies
>>
>>1098451
That's also how three mile island happened- the operator thought he knew better than the safety systems so he shut them off.

It's not how chernobyl happened though, that was "Hey let's turn off the safeties on purpose to test what happens when there's no safeties"
>>
>>1098448

when I did my first night XC we went to KRIC. It was pretty intimidating being in a little C172R at night taxing near UPS and FedEx cargo aircraft
>>
>>1098617
>Fed-Ex 1557 cleared for takeoff, caution wake turbulence from the departing 172
>>
>>1098620

https://youtu.be/HkcFtnBslys
>>
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Why hasnt our memelord and savior been posted yet?
>>
>>1098633

Moar of flight god
>>
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>>1098634
His insta is gone but his twitter is still up q_q
>>
>>1098635
Jesus christ that HDR.
>>
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>>1098635

>insta gone

:(
>>
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>>1095862
Kek
>>
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>>1098638

this is extremely gay
>>
>>1095869
Yeah, they have more leg room since they're older.
>>
>>1098626
I found a lot of videos of him lately. That controller is hilarious, but I believe he may have actually retired recently. That, or he's about to.
>>
>>1098369
sounds like a culture problem (fatigue/training)
>>
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Does anyone here ever feel nervous before solo flight?

I have all of my solo flight requirements completed, and I'm doing a few solos to practice for the checkride. But for some reason I always feel nervous before doing a solo.
>>
>>1098829
Only time was my solo XC as the weather was really bad. I'm sure you'll get used to it.
>>
>>1098838

I have another solo tomorrow. I feel confident in what I'm doing, as I just did my final stage check with the school's chief flight instructor, and he was really happy with my flying. So I know I'm doing fine. But I always just feel nervous as shit. Whenever I fly a dual, I feel totally normal.
>>
>>1098829
The nerves aren't entirely a bad thing, they mean you're not being complacent. Use them to keep you alert and "situationaly aware"

If the nerves are so bad that you're becoming tense, or rushing to "get it over with" to make the nervous feeling stop, you need to talk about this nervous feeling with your instructor.

The nerves are not a negative. They can keep you sharp.
>>
>>1098172
Mine has a constant source of military aircraft including C-130s and F-16s.
>>
why do regional airlines exist? why don't major airlines who contract regional airlines just operate the smaller planes themselves?
>>
>>1098933

mins sometimes has a random KC-135
>>
>>1098934

cheaper to contract it out than to run it them selves.
>>
>>1098934
Cheaper, and less legal responsibility for the parent company
>>
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>""""""""""G550""""""""""
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>>1099408

Italians
>>
Check out this thread about a guy asking for information on the b737 back up systems and then some mod banning him because he was scared that the person was a reporter trying to do damage to the industry.

Youd think that being rude to people asking about back up systems would be worse for the industry?

http://www.talkairline.com/showthread.php?235-Flight-control-system-redundancy-and-hardovers/page2&s=c9bdd1837ac19225a35d6c73d629aef5
>>
>>1099651
sounds about right. union goon bucket-o-crabs mentality

automation cannot come too soon
>>
>>1099667
Are you a pilot?
>>
>>1099667
Yeah but automation is even worse cause they are keeping pilots in the dark about how the systems work and things like af447 happen. There is an argument for keeping airplane back up systems secret cause of terrorists but at the same time the closed sourceness of the culture leads pilots with poor understanding of how they work which is bad.
>>
>>1099671
No, I'm a former union level airline employee though. I know how those people think
>>1099697
>"they"
Who? What do you mean "things like" AF447? You mean like Aeroperu 603?
>>
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wtf is this
>>
>>1099749
A jab against the United States Army Air Forces.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki
>>
>>1099725
Literally the AIRBUS and BOEING. Pilots are becoming system managers more than stick and rudder guys but the problem is that the designers are literally trying to keep it simple stupid and not explaining the details of how the backup systems work and their details because they dont want to "confuse the pilots." And type ratings apparently werent strict enough. There is a trend that new designs should require as little thought as possible but in Air France 447 the pilots thought they were in a different control law.
>>
>>1099749

Fucking idiots.

People don't know about Operation Downfall
>>
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>>1099749
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>>1099749
lol i just made a power point in my Japanese class about the nuclear bombings and how japan got BTFO

>mfw
>>
>>1099819
but to be honest i disguised it as a critique of america and how the generals used the bomb cause they were scared of being blamed for american lives lost if they didnt use it like dan carlin said so it was a subtle troll but still the class was full of weeboos and they were super butthurt even though I talked shit about america and tried to be fair
>>
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>>1099796
>Operation Downfall
jesus. glancing at the wikipedia article gives me chills. such an invasion would have been so incredibly glorious.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Downfall

its a shame we will never see anything like this, for the rest of human history.
ww2 was truly the last great war.
>>
>>1099824

People like to point fingers at us and say:

>"OHH USA... you're so terrible for killing 600,000 innocents!! Why did you do it? Apologize!!"

They don't know that if OP Downfall would have happened, the estimated death toll was over 10million.....
>>
>Idiots thinking the nipps capitulated solely because of the atomic bombs.
Bro-tip: They thought that the USSR wouldn't declare war on them and they could broker a peace through them and the other allies. That didn't happen and the USSR started taking over Manchuria and the nipps saw the writing on the wall and the mushroom clouds in the skies and decided to cut their losses.
>>
guise please listen to dan farltin so you can be educated about this:

http://www.dancarlin.com/product/hardcore-history-59-the-destroyer-of-worlds/

then laugh at liberal media's opinion:
https://soundcloud.com/media-roots/abby-robbie-visit-hiroshima-revenge-of-the-dc-shills

THEIR ARGUMENT IS THAT AMERICANS SHOULD HAVE CAPITULATED TO THE IMPERIAL JAPANESE MILITARY FOR A CONDITIONAL SURRENDER! HAHAHA

are they right tho?
>>
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>>1099772
https://www.faasafety.gov/files/gslac/library/documents/2011/Dec/59538/111229%20FLYING%20LESSONS.pdf

> a very big problem with today's automation, namely manual reversion scenarios.
We in the airline industry are NOT being instructed in the failure modes of the automation that hands us the
airplane when it reaches its maximum limitations. This is a terrible point to be handed an airplane to hand
fly. The lessons to be learned from the Air France Flight 447 crash are yet to filter down into our training
>>
>>1099832
the nuke was a mistake obviously. 35 million dead japs i have a boner right now and i don't know what to do with it.
>>
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>>1097980
Look at your reference, then pick 4 points around it at each cardinal direction that are the distancr you want to be at from the reference (if you drew a line around the reference intersecting the points it would make a perfect circle) then just fly to each imaginary point making corrections as necessary. It might be "cheater" method but it's a hell of a lot more reliable than just "dude just correct for winds lmao"
>>
>>1099965
I feel retarded for not thinking of that. Thanks!
>>
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Checkride is scheduled for next week
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>>1099965
It's not cheating if it works
>>
>>1099950

the copilot held his joystick back during that entire stall. He only realized when it was too late, he fucked up.
>>
>>1100059
If only the controls were linked so the other pilot would have realized that the copilot was interfering with his own inputs.
>>
>>1100060

> if it were a boeing
>>
>>1098638
>that uniform
Looks like Gaddafi making a comeback from the grave into GA.
>>
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>>1099824
>31 550 000 Japanese civilian conscripts
And every one of them would have been ready to fight to the death for their emperor.
>>
>>1100059
>>1100060

https://youtu.be/n-hbWO0gL6g
>>
>>1100093

point proven, look at that dipshit full nose up on the stick the entire time.
>>
>>1100100
Well it's a little more complicated than that. The Airbus' flight computer thought the AoA was so extreme that it was a false value and would reject it and silence the stick shaker. However, whenever they lowered the nose, and the AoA returned to a more modest degree, the stick shaker and stall warnings would kick back on.

Then you have the initial incorrect instrument readings and you can understand a bit where the confusion was coming from. All that being said, it doesn't excuse the poor airmanship displayed.
>>
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>select answer B
>"Sorry, the correct answer is C"
>click question explanation
>Answer B is correct

HOW IS THIS SHIT STILL NOT FIXED

REEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE
>>
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Once I meet the FAA minimum requirements (1500TT) what are the odds that I'll be able to Make America Great Again?
>>
>>1100664

pretty good for the next 20 years
>>
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>>1100721

I start ATP this fall, so I'm estimating I'll have the FAA minimums by fall 2019. I was originally planning on going the airline route. But chasing down go-fasts in the Caribbean while flying in P-3s or Dash 8s sound fun. I have a security clearance already, so I think I'll put in a application with CBP Air & Marine and see what happens when I'm eligible
>>
>>1100728

I'm starting my PPL soon, I'll have it before winter hits. I'll have my commercial before next September, and hopefully have my bachelors by the time I have 1000 hours and my restricted ATP.

After that applying to EVERY regional I can and dealing with the crap pay and crap hours until I can move up to a major.

The keyword is Bachelors, you need it.
>>
>>1100751

>The keyword is Bachelors, you need it.

I don't have one
>>
>>1100762

kiss any large airlines good bye, you wil be stuck in regionals. This isnt coming just from me, this is what I've been told by dozens of airline pilots, any airline job has hundreds of applicants, if you dont have a bachelors the computer doesnt even push your application to the human.
>>
>>1100771

well, that's part of the reason why I'm gonna try to get Envoy, PSA, or Piedmont. Because they give you a guaranteed path to AA. If that doesn't work, my backups are flying for Customs & Border Protection, or... I have a friend who's been a A320 captain for jetBlue forever. He offered to "throw me a blue dart" so that seems promising
>>
>>1100773

blue darts are very good, guaranteed job 90% of those guys get hired.

I talk to jetblue pilots alot.
>>
>>1100774

Really? That's great to hear. I've known him for about 10 years, and he's a pretty well respected Captain.
>>
>>1100775

yea a blue card is basically a guaranteed job.
>>
>>1100777

that's good. I saw that jetBlue is also very military friendly, which I have prior service so I think that might help for where I don't have a degree
>>
>>1100773
>>1100774
>>1100777

can anyone elaborate on those "blue cards/darts"? Cause one of my first instructors is a check pilot with Envoy right now.
>>
>>1100796

It's a special recruitment program offered by jetBlue

http://pilots.jetblue.com/blue-dart/
>>
So how do you guys go about doing an interview for a pilot's job? Do you just throw your logbooks at them or what.
>>
>>1100817
It depends on the job.
>>
Got invited aboard a G450

Fucking hell why wasn't I born rich?
>>
>>1100824
So you're saying sometimes that is all there is to it, just throw your logbook at them?
>>
Is partial aircraft ownership a good idea? I see aircraft partial ownership for as low as 8500 USD for 250 hours per year and I am about to finish my private pilot license and head off to an aeronautical college is this worthwhile for the four years that I will use the aircraft for while I am in college?
>>
>>1100837
Sometimes they want to see how far you can throw your logbook
>>
>>1100845

It's a test of how well you understand aerodynamics.
>>
>>1100845
>>1100850
I see. What if you hit them, or break something?
>>
>>1100903
>>1100850
>>1100845
>>1100837

cringe
>>
Question

If I get a General Studies Associates degree, or even if I just get 2 semesters completed and that's all, would that benefit me in anyway?
>>
>>1100904
thanks for the input rebbit
>>
>>1100907

yes, but then again you need a bachelors
>>
>>1101144

stoppp saying that ;__;
>>
>>1101152

literally any bachelors, it could be the stupidest women studies degree ever and it would count.
>>
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>>1095997
It's two separate flights, but it doesn't matter for the purposes of building hours since you can log the hours as cross country anyway

Mr. Private pilot, review 14 CFR 61.1(b)(3)(i) to see what you can log as cross country.
>>
>>1101153

I hate math
I hate hidden agendas
I hate having people tell me what I should believe
>>
>>1100838
If you fly all of those 250 hours it's $34 an hour. You can't do better than that.
>>
>>1101159

the most math I have to do is 2x+4=16

what hidden agenda?

I'm telling you the truth.
>>
>>1100278
For test prep you have 3 options:
1. Sheppard Air
2. Gleim
3. Private tutor (ground instruction)
>>
>>1096762
Their business wouldn't have lasted this long if as a flight school they didn't try and retain clients. Of course they would tell you to stay.
>>
>>1101161

In community college here they will not let you use a calculator. It's total bullshit. I went a few years ago and tried a semester. They put me into remedial math because I suck. On the first day I took a calculator out and the professor said "oh I'm sorry you can't use that", and told me "you won't get to use a calculator out on the job! You need to know how to do it from scratch". Bitch I've been working for the past 8 years and I've always used a calculator for everything. I fucking hate this shit. (No I didn't say that). But I did say I've always used a calculator on the job and she looked at me in disbelief

>what hidden agenda?

When I took ENG 111, all of the papers we had to write were all "feelings" based assignments. 80% of the videos we had to watch and write papers on were of feminists telling life stories.

>I'm telling you the truth

I wasn't talking about you
>>
>>1101164
What was ENG111?
Also >community college
>>
>>1101152
American doesn't require a degree. They have flow through program with envoy where after 3 years you go directly from left seat at envoy to right seat at American, no interview. Envoy pays for your ATP too.
>>
>>1101168

alot of places pay for your ATP.
>>
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>>1100907
YES. Single most important lesson I learned while pursuing a degree in Aeronautical Science: A degree helps a lot, but only by demonstrating that you are not stupid. It does NOT have to be a degree in aviation. It is not a legal/FAA requirement on any level...its a "get your foot in the door" thing. Protip: getting a degree in something marketable which is NOT AVIATION would also demonstrate "not stupid." Get a degree in business or whatever, take flying lessons at the cheaper FBO/Flight Club/lone wolf instructor.
Honestly, if I had a time machine, that's one of the first messages I would send back to myself. I've met ERAU grads who are supervising a Kinkos. Do it cheaper and faster.
BTW, I lost my financial aid & dad died...didn't finish my too-expensive degree. But now I fly UAVs for 6-figures, and own a plane that I fly for fun. When I have kids, gonna push 'em to get a scholarship, join the military, or go to college in E.U.
>>
>>1096534
b/c squares bend & twist very easily when pressure is applied...hexagons and triangles resist pressure against any one side. A child can crush an empty cardboard fridge box, but could stand on a pyramid of the same weight. That's why geodesic domes use those shapes as well. More strength for less weight.
>>
>>1101166

It's a required writing/reading class


>>1101168

I know about Envoy and I will apply for them in about 2 years once I finish all my training and have my hours. I just feel like Envoy would be competitive to get, since imagine they get shit loads of applications because of their flow through to AA
>>
>>1101195

>get a scholarship, join the military, or go to college in E.U

Well I did time in the military. Just I got really pissed off when I tried college after getting out. I've very reluctant to try it again
>>
>>1100664
I don't know what border patrol is like, but a lot of other law enforcement agencies (specifically highway patrol) require you to work on the streets as an officer first before you can apply for a flying slot
>>
>>1101278

They don't

https://go.usa.gov/xRwgB
>>
What the fuck are you supposed to do with a 'reference number' when mailing documents to the FAA? Do I just write the damn number on the envelope or what? They're so damn vague.
>>
>>1101299

yes
>>
Would it be smart to get my Instrument, Multi, and Commercial through my small local flight school, and then after that going to American Flyers' CFI Academy and attempt to be an instructor for them for hour building?
>>
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How realistic is it to fly this route and journey? A dream of mine is to visit every country in the Caribbean and flying seems much more realistic than sailing.

There are 25 stops; give or take a few. I figure the journey would be done in a smaller aircraft such as a 172 or similar. I see about 35-40 flight hours in total averaging about $50 per flight hour which comes out to be $2000 in total fuel costs that could be split among 2-3 people. If done over the span of 90 days, say mid-May until mid-August, that would leave about 3-4 days in each location. The single longest leg is less than 400 miles so no worries about range.

Are there any obstacles I'm not seeing? Has anyone ever done anything similar? Anyone who owns their own aircraft perhaps interested in sharing the experience and splitting costs next summer?
>>
>>1101609
avgas is very expensive/unavailable on some islands. Call ahead to get exact prices and availability to make sure you don't get stranded. Figure out what your landing fees, customs entry fees, parking fees, and what the typical bribe money is at each stop, it will probably be more than the operational cost of the airplane. Bring ocean survival gear. raft, life vests, etc. 90 days is more than enough time, should be fun!
>>
>>1101599
How many hours do you have right now? would it save you any time to train part 141? because it sure as hell won't save you any money.
>>
>>1101699

My checkride is this Thursday for private, and I currently have 80 hours TT. I know....before you say "it took you 80 hours to get your private??" here is the reason. When I was 15 years old my mom signed me up for lessons, I logged 30 hours when I was in high school, but never finished because I went into the military. I'm 26 now, and just started back up last year. Thankfully I still had my log book from before. So I did about 50 hours on this private and my old hours still count for TT.

But, I think my school does 141. I know I did my Private at 61 because of my schedule. But I'm going to drop to part time at my job so I can get this shit done faster. is there any benefits to 141?
>>
>>1101698

>what the typical bribe money is at each stop

This is not the Congo, Mexico or Colombia. In all of the lesser Antilles marks he has there are going to be the main and often only airport on the island.

On smaller islands there is generally only one airport that deals with commercial regional and international, charter and private airlines in the same terminal, apron and hangar. Because of the commercial flights they have to follow regs. After 9/11 the FAA came down on every island where an American airline would ever touch down. Even as American eagle had pulled out there is still amerijet, DHL and FedEx doing cargo and courier runs so those regs are still in place.

Avgas does exist because the smaller charter companies have piston aircraft but I don't know if they are their own private stores. I occasionally drink with the mustique airways and grenadine alliance guys and I can ask a few questions.

Seeing the Caribbean through aviation or sailing? I would say that sailing is the "better" way even if it prevents you from ticking all the destinations but in this case chartering a yacht for that time period is going to be pricey.
>>
>>1101609
There are frequent boats between Martinique, Guadeloupe and Domenica and a number of other islands. I guess there might be some aswell between the other islands.
>>
>>1101609
heres a guy that flew the bahamas. he's a little pretentious but not too bad
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tiUTcgQ978Y&t=822s
>>
>>1101724
80 hours isn't bad.
>>
>>1101972

So we just filled out the ICARA shit today, and realized I actually have 90.1 hours lol
>>
>>1102177
Nobody is going to look at how long it took to get your certificate. Checkride passes and failures, written scores, And accident history yes.
>>
>>1102177
iacra? Because with icara my google told me about International Child Abduction Remedies Act.

>>1101749
Oh that fraseology is weird, and doesnt appear to be icao standard. You yanks..
>>
>>1102321

Yes I meant to type IACRA, it was a typo
>>
>>1097881
Looks like an ERJ-175
>>
>>1098172
My airport doubles as a base for a refueling wing also we get alot of C-17s in Maine
>>
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>>1102391

But it's not




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