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stupid combination edition


Old thread >>1103736
>>
When I put the front wheel on my bike's fork, it doesn't sit on the dead center. If I spin the wheel, it's perfectly straight, yet when I install it, it's a bit skewed. So far I'm just eyeballing it and lifting it a couple of mms on one side so it's straight, works great, but I'm afraid this could damage the fork ends (it's a carbon fork). Is this something I should be worried about?
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>>1111662
Did you crash it? The axle or the hub or the true or something must be wrong.
Cos if your carbon fork is bent you're heading for catastrophic failure.
Borrow another wheel & try it.
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>>1111668
Yes, I crashed on this wheel a couple of times before, though it was on a different bike. Guess I'll go have the wheel re-laced, thanks.
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Any other fat cunts here?
Got any general advice?
I'm 140kg and ride on a steel frame with lods of spokes and wide tyres, still get more flats that the avg person but I'm getting there.
trying to get in the habit of riding to uni, but sitting in class in the clothes that are most comfy to ride in is a little demoralizing.
Plus I think all the local dentists hate me because I ride in a polo and shorts (still have a bib underneath).
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>>1111683
You should carry a change of clothes
>>
Does anyone have an opinion on bar-saddle drop on gravel bikes? I have the stem "slammed" on mine and compared to the road bike with 1 spacer there's a fair bit less. However the headset cover thing is at least one spacer width so I was thinking about replacing it with something flat, unless getting super low off-road (the bike will be used for both) is somehow unadvisable?

>>1111683
What is the source of your flat? If they're pinch flat, that means you need more pressure.

If not, schwalbe professional bike tyres.
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>>1111683
>Plus I think all the local dentists hate me because I ride in a polo and shorts (still have a bib underneath).
what?? what are you even on about
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>>1111686
Trying it is the only advice I can give you, if you can. As long as you're comfy with it then it's fine, there's no absolute rule (minus slicks tire sucks).
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>>1111686
Trying it is the only advice I can give you, if you can. As long as you're comfy with it then it's fine, there's no absolute rule (minus semi-slicks tire sucks).
>>
How's wearing these under a bicycle helmet?
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>>1111712
Retarded?
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>>1111712
Huge aero drag, a cap under helmet can be nice on tour though if you're getting raped by the sun, rain on glasses, or to clip a flashlight to.
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>>1111683
You're a fat fuck like I was about 15 years ago.

Unless you're literally riding a cargo bike (which is made to handle that kind of weight) you're going to go through tires and wheelsets, because frankly they're not made for that kind of weight.

You need the strongest rims with the most spokes possible, and you need to literally RIDE YOUR ASS OFF.

I used to be ~320 pounds. I'm 201 this morning, on my way down to 190. I road race these days, and am on a team. It can be done.
>>
>>1111726
>I'm 201 this morning, on my way down to 190. I road race these days, and am on a team.
What does it mean to be on a team? How can you be serious if you're like 15 kg overweight? I just don't understand. Is this like racing on the flat only?
>>
Help I'm an idiot

I was cleaning my chain and backpedalling when the chain came off the front cassette
I can't even lift it up and put it back on because its jammed against some metal cage thing at the top of the front cassette

What do please
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>>1111742
The front chainrings are called chainrings. Pull it harder. You really need to pull that shit outta there as hard as you can.

And then set your limited screws
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>>1111742
Grab the rear derailleur and push it forward so there's slack on the chain, then wiggle it free
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>>1111766
No, but it must be clean unless you want to sound like a motorbike.
>>
why do most bike wheels/tires/tubes/whatever not tell what the max weight limit on them is? also almost all that i have seen are garbage that allow max 5 bar pressure and they are still too soft and feel like they are empty. (had some continental chinkshit that exploded today and didnt have right tools so it was really hard to remove because it has some metal wire that makes it really hard to remove without breaking other parts of the wheel if you dont have some metal cutters)
>>
>>1111776

lol what the fuck is wrong with you
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>>1111780
He's fat
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>>1111776
Schwalbe tires do note the maximum weight limit(on the site at least)
But do mind this is per tire,and depending the the type of bicycle the weight is distributed differently.
>>
Just make sure every race is downhill and you'll have an advantage in being fat.
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>>1111776
>why do most bike wheels/tires/tubes/whatever not tell what the max weight limit on them is?

because the practical weight limit is so high that it just doesn't matter. Go watch some downhill riders. Landing a big jump can apply hundreds, maybe even thousands of pounds of force.

>also almost all that i have seen are garbage that allow max 5 bar pressure and they are still too soft and feel like they are empty.

Because you are riding the wrong type of bicycle for your needs.

Mountain bike tires are typically run at 25psi or lower for offroad use. The whole fucking POINT is that they are soft and compliant so that they will conform to uneven terrain and soak up a degree of chatter/bumps/hits.

> (had some continental chinkshit that exploded today and didnt have right tools so it was really hard to remove because it has some metal wire that makes it really hard to remove without breaking other parts of the wheel if you dont have some metal cutters)

Contis are excellent, well reputed tires. The problem is you.

Google the proper way to remove a tire. I can't be bothered to explain it to you. Suffice it to say that you DO NOT FUCKING NEED CUTTERS OF ANY GODAMN KIND, you dumbfuck hick.
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>>1111776
dem revolutionary digits
>>
What's the difference between all the different kinds of brakes anyways?
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>>1111796

Hydraulic discs are good.
Everything else is trash.
That's about all.
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>>1111796
And also, those of you who commute during the winter, what tires do you use? Is Schwalbe Winter Marathons the way to go?
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>>1111792
i didnt have internet available when that happened and almost bent the wheel while trying to drag it off by holding it with my foot and trying to rip the tire of as hard as i could. managed to break the metal wire enough by bending it with a screwdriver and bolt key or whatever they are called.
>>
>>1111804

Inspect your wheel to make sure it is still true and round, and that you did not damage the rim with your shenanigans.

Willing to bet you are going to be buying a new wheel.
>>
>>1111800
Depends on the weather. If you expect quite a lot of ice, get a tire with studs. If not, standard marathons will do.
>>
is kalloy brand stuff shit?
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>>1111807

It's just generic.
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>>1111676
you have no idea what you're talking about
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>>1111683
More tire pressure
Watch what you are riding over
Carry a small bag with a change of clothes for fucks sake
what the fuck dentist comment
You're a creep
>>
>>1111805
it has only some scratches on the side but its still usable. i already replaced both wheels with some spectra branded ones because the stock ones were made of weak materials and someone had already fucked them because its an used bike. the tire was fine for 2000 km and failed soon after that like i expected but its still annoying.
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>>1111808
albeit useable, right?
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>>1111813

yeah
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>>1111809
Very helpful, thanks
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>>1111810
whats this more tire pressure thing that i see here every day? isnt it unsafe to go over the max pressure of the tire?
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>>1111838
Allegedly, though tires and tubes have a much higher tolerance to pressure than the required "max limit". Also since the guy is fat and constantly getting flats, I doubt he's anywhere near the recommended max pressure
>>
Why the hell are old Cannondale road bikes so expensive? I know they are quality and all that, but the prices just seem ridiculous to me
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>>1111841
i thought that going over the max limit would stress the thin tube too much and make it explode if a fat person would ride the bike.
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>>1111857
Nah, tubes can take ridiculous amounts of pressure, as long as you haven't patched it yet
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>>1111660

not that I particulary liek it , but what's te stem in OP
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>>1111859

Those are Cinelli integralter bars.

Also comes as just a stem, called the Cinelli Alter
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>>1111858
are you sure that those arent some special tubes that you need to buy from internet or a real bike shop? i dont really trust the 5€ continental made in china tubes they sell here.
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>>1111857
fatties get flats when pressure is too low, not too high
their disgusting worthless bodies cause pinch flats on even small bumps
tubes are enormously strong at containing pressure, just not when pinched or poked
therefore they can be overinflated a bit to support a sub human piece of shit who can't stop stuffing their fucking mouths
>>
>>1111787
someone who weighs 400 lbs and isn't fat is going to be faster than someone who weighs 400 lbs and is fat
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>>1111870
The tube isn't under any kind of stress really, tye tires casing is. Continental tubes are perfectly fine, there are only a few brands that have marginally better stuff.
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>>1111873
both they are both worthless wastes of flesh
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>>1111866

nice , why don't more modern stems clamp in front of the steerer ?
it has the posibility of looking really nice and clean
>>
>>1111857
>>1111858
The tube really isn't stressed any differently at low pressure vs high pressure. The tire bears the tension.
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>>1111879

doing a quick google search , why aren't there more stems like this out there ?
the alter and sesamo seam to be super ahead of their time.
aren't aero stem all the rave right now ?
>>
Building a 90's MTB with slicks for a buddy. What are the cheapest pair of 26' slicks for a mtb rim? He does not care about looks or rolling resistance. Anything will be better than walking 5 miles to class.


TLDR: Cheapo 26' slicks
>>
>>1111885
Geax Booze or Tattoo
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>>1111882
People concerned about aero just get a combined stem+handlebars
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>>1111885
Kenda Kwest
>>
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Hello, /n/iggers. I just bought this for $80. Was it a good deal?

The rear tire is fat in one area. How do I fix?
>>
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>>1111907
>Hello, /n/iggers. I just bought this for $80. Was it a good deal?

not good not bad, if you are happy its OK.


GREASE FOR LOOSE BEARING

Im having to change my grase in loose bearing on my late 80s road bike at least every 6-8 months (4 bearings). What grease would you recommend me to last longer? I use lithium cheapo grease.
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>>1111909
That seems like a perfectly reasonable time frame to repack your bearings. What do you mean by "4 bearings" though?
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>>1111911
>That seems like a perfectly reasonable time frame to repack your bearings. What do you mean by "4 bearings" though?

Yeah, I know 6-8 month is not dramatic, but with mtb, they could easily last over year. I greased them recently, they were almsot 100% DRY - I think its the bigger road speed and more rotations/year that pushes grease out (after I repack them fully, usually it pushed some grease out).

4 bearings - 2 hubs, threaded headset, cup cone italian BB. Its a lot of work and I built my own front wheel recently.
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>>1111915
Ah, so by 4 bearings you meant 4 bearing sets, I was going crazy trying to figure out how the hell could a hub work with only four ball bearings.
>after I repack them fully, usually it pushed some grease out
Perfectly normal, better to use too much grease than too little.
Just get the thickest grease you can find, that blue marine grease (sold at auto shops) is great, pretty thick and water resistant. Some say grease too thick results in more friction, but come on, it's fucking grease. Who could tell the difference.
>>
>>1111919
>that blue marine grease (sold at auto shops) is great, pretty thick and water resistant.

thanks dude! heard good stuff about the blue stuff- lithium one is yellow.

is the blue more temp resisntant? I think that is the primary factor since I dont ride in wet much.

>I was going crazy trying to figure out how the hell could a hub work with only four ball bearings.

Ive heard stories of people modding hubs from 10,11 to 6,7 in order to less friction but it messes up in the long run. 4 lol, idk.
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>>1111907
Get new tires, they're cheap and make a world of difference
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>>1111921
>is the blue more temp resisntant?
Well, the one I use says -40 to +500 F, and even has "hi-temp" on the name, so I'd guess so.
>>
suppose i want to buy a bike with like a 14.5" seattube--
what is the tallest seatpost i could safely run with this given that i usually ride 25" frames?

is there a point where steel frames just cant handle the lever force from a seatpost like 1.5x as long as the seatube?
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>>1111924
Actually, I just deflated the tire entirely, and reset the tire plug thingy properly so it's not tilted. Then I inflated it, and no more bump.
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>>1111683
Get those 26" or 650b "touring" meme wheels going, they're probably the best bet to support your extra lard

Also, seriously at least bring a change of underwear/socks and a towel. Do you have a gym on campus? Rinse off after your commute. Welcome to the student commute club friendo
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>>1111662
Try removing it, flipping it around, and reinstalling. If it's the same amount of off-center in the opposite direction, it's out-of-dish.
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>>1111712
Where do you even buy a visor in 2017?
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>>1111895
This.
>>
what bike lights does anon recommend?
>>
Is a chain guide worth it for my 1x hard tail, or a silly accessory?
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>>1111935
Yeah, it's just as skewed.
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>>1111948
If you actually ride it off-road, sure.
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>>1111949
Then have a redished at your LBS.
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>>1111951
I will. It's also slightly out of true and some spokes are pretty lose and banged up, I think I'll just have it rebuilt with fresh spokes
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>>1111926
no limit. Just make sure you have enough post in the frame.
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>>1111953
funny- i was actually just thinking about getting a brompton seatpost but i think those have a special lip that'd prevent you from getting it into any other frame. where can i source just the seatpost for these things?
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>>1111953
I assume it would depend on the seattube angle also, right? I have a little bike with a veeeery relaxed geo, I'm really afraid of putting a seatpost long enough to give me proper leg extension since it's so laid back
>>
I want to turn my multispeed old rigid MTB into a single speed. Can I keep using the arguably crappy current (2x or 3x speed, don't remember) crankset to keep it a cheap conversion, and just get a single speed cog, spacers, chain tensioner and a single speed chain?
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>>1111954
Ebay or alixpress just search seatpost and 500mm or whatever. Lots of generic options. How does the lip even work for bromptons? You could maybe just cut it off anyway.
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>>1111660
Who makes road tubes that aren't complete garbage?
>leaks where the valve stem meets the tube
>seams that blow out
>leaky Presta valves
Tired of this shit.
I'll patch punctures all the time and not complain, but when a tube is useless because of poor quality, it's like lighting money on fire.
>inb4 "go tubeless"
nope.jpg
>>
>>1111957
Yes
You could also just not shift
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>>1111961
the derailleur is bust, and I figure the single speed kit costs about the same as a new derailleur.
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>>1111964
so take the chain off the derailer, put it around a cog in back with a decent ration and shorten it until there's no slack
problem solved, $0 spent
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>>1111960
You sound like someone that has never used latex tubes, rubber isn't air-tight but that shit keeps air in longer lmao. The valve is not the culprit here, if you want to keep the air in the tube longer you'll need thicker tubes.

Why don't you want to go tubeless?

How about going full retard and going solid tire m8?
>>
Is the cartridge bottom bracket sturdier than the loose bearings one?

I replaced it no more than 200 miles ago, and it's already loose on the right side. I guess it's because I like to spin and push hard. No matter how many times I replace it (third time over 5000 miles), it always seems to come loose a little. I guess it's because the bearings cages can't take my punishment.

If I install the cartridge one is it better or the same shit?
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>>1112024
Loose bearings are sturdier than cartridge simply because you use more ball bearings. Neither should come lose though, you're doing something wrong (and no, you're not that strong)
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>>1112037
>>1112024
More likely they just weren't installed properly. You really need to screw bottom brackets on hard.
>>
>>1112037

I close the lock ring with mallet and flat screwdriver. Could that be it? That tool is literally the only one I do not have.

>>1112039

Right one is locked down hard, left one is for fine tuning, and I lock it only when it's tight rather than loose, there's no wobbling, I lock when I can spin it with a very very faint grinding.

If it's like the other times it's the left cage though, last time bearings rolled out of it because the cage was bent out of shape.
>>
>>1111683
Eat lesss, ride more. When you are not riding, you should be walking as fast as possible. If you are eating shit food, stop doing that, eat healthy food, not junk food or pre-cooked food or some shit americans use to eat. Don't eat fat and you will be losing weight every day and every week. And never give up, cycling is awesome.
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>>1112042
>Don't eat fat
That's not good advice for a guy his size, you'll need a certain amount of fat in your diet to avoid gallstones m8.
>>
>>1112042
You forget to mention a very important thing, stop drinking calories.
>>
are these good? http://www.continental-tires.com/bicycle/tyres/city-trekking-tyres/contact
i used an old version of these before and they were fine for 2000 km before the back wheel tire was almost flat http://www.continental-tires.com/bicycle/tyres/city-trekking-tyres/ride-tour
>>
>>1112043
Yes and no. A general rule is do not eat anything with added fat or added sugar. Fats naturally present in things like meat and cheese are not as bad as fats from deep fried food and other fast food with a fuckton of added fat and sugar.
You can eat whatever you want so long as it:
1. Doesn't put you over your calorie expenditure for the day.
2. Existed in 1900.

It's a pretty good cutoff point for food, since it's after refrigeration and canning, but before hyper-processed garbage.
>>
>>1112046
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/tour-reviews?b=continental&max=34&min=16&minpr=10&maxweight=899

honestly on paper for touring/city tyres schwalbe have conti beat.
>>
>>1112043
>>1112048
A high fat diet in conjunction with endurance training (i.e. cycling) promotes fat oxidation and thus helps increase long-term endurance by preserving your blood glucose levels by "training" your muscles to metabolize fat over carbohydrate.

Obviously as the other poster said, you shouldn't be eating processes shit with added fat. Meat, cheese, and nuts are the way to go.
>>
>>1112052
more rolling resistance is only good for me because that means that more energy is used to move the bike and that might mean that some weight is lost. i care more about them lasting longer than 3 months. the plastic material of the old tire was so shitty that it was worn completely flat after only 2000 km.
>>
>>1112067

I commuted 6000 miles on two slick 10$ Kenda and I never fell once, like two pinch flats and that's it. You'll be fine, also more rolling resistance to lose weight is dumb, let that shit roll, reach high cadence like 90 or something, and keep pedaling. Continental is good though, go for it.
>>
>replaced chain on bike
>Now my most uses sprocket on the cassette is skipping

Why did I let this happen to me?
>>
>>1112073

Did you fuck up the link count? It's the only logical reason.
>>
>>1112074
Link count is the same, in the worst case it's 1 link longer now.

I have a feeling I just wore the sprocket out.

It's fine when I shift to other gears.
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>>1112075
Sounds like you replaced the chain too late, now you need a new cassette too.
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>>1112075
Yeah you need a new cassette. Change it now or you'll want a new cassette and another new chain to wear them in together. If it's so bad it actually skips the whole cassette will be worn and maybe your chainrings too.
>>
>>1112062
To a degree, yes. Don't eat crap/processed foods. However, high veg quantity, decent amount of fruit and balance are far better for long term health and performance. Look at the British Cycling website for some dietary tips. Mist people eat too much and too many of the wrong things.
Add a side serving of exercise, up cadence, slowly up distance and add hills. Works wonders for health, weight and happiness.
>>
How confident should I be that a chain sold as '8 speed' (as a 6/7/8 speed) will work just find with my current 8 speed cassette?
>>
>>1111998
Oh, for fuck's sake.. is it really necessary for you to sperg out so much over a simple question?

Okay then.. My TT bike has tubulars, which have latex tubes in them, so I damned well know that compared to butyl rubber tubes, they leak like a (molecular) sieve. Those have Stan's in them against punctures and I accept that over 24 hours they go flat. That's not the issue though.

I have literally had a tube blow out while I was riding, and the seam in the (butyl) rubber had split. No damned excuse for that.

I have literally had the valve-stem-to-tube-seal fail, *while descending a goddamned mountain*, because the rim got too warm. The only reason I'm not dead is I was coming to a stop anyway; if I'd've been carving through a curve at 40mph I wouldn't even BE here.

I bought a pair of Slime tubes before the last few road races this year, because I had a puncture in the middle of a race that I would have placed well in, and that killed the whole race for me; for what a goddamned Slime tube cost me, it should have been better quality than having the valve-stem-to-tube-seal fail *for no reason* (swapped it into another wheelset and it just started leaking). I don't even use the supplied nuts anymore so you can't blame it on improper installation.

I've had otherwise perfectly good tubes go straight into the trash because the non-replaceable Presta valve cores weren't replaceable, and the damned things were slowly leaking (as verified by dunking in a sink full of water). There's $6 down the drain..

I've even had problems with actual name-brand (specifically: Continental) tubes have problems like the above, and you pay a premium for those by the way.

More below (because I'm a wordy bastard)
>>
>>1112108
(continued from above)

My understanding is that the vast majority of tubes are made in one (or a few) factories in Asia, and they just slap their brand names on them, and there's damned little if any actual Quality Control on these. Furthermore I understand that the *only* company that makes their own tubes anymore is Schwalbe, and they (ostensibly) have good Quality Control -- but try to find a bike shop that actually sells them instead of whatever cheap Asian-made tubes everyone else sells. I do not fancy the idea that I have to *order tubes over the Internet* just to get good ones. I'll do that if I have to but if there is more than just the one source (Schwalbe) for decent-quality tubes then I'd like to know that -- and I don't think it's asking too much to discuss the subject without the usual 4chan too-edgy bullshit, okay? Thanks.
>>
>>1112109
>I do not fancy the idea that I have to *order tubes over the Internet* just to get good ones.

Why?

This is completely irrational
>>
>>1112109
>tfw I have no previous biking knowledge but I ordered tubes yesterday and both are schwalbes

thank god I picked the right ones

they were pretty cheep too, 4.18 US Dollar / piece
>>
>>1111998
>Why don't you want to go tubeless?
I don't want to go tubeless because it limits my options if there is severe damage to the tire, which would of course happen when I'm in the middle of nowhere with no cell service to call for a rescue (or that would have me sitting for 1-2 hours waiting for friends to show up to haul me and the bike back home). The sealant makes a huge mess, I wouldn't be able to install a boot very easily, I'd lose the sealant, and have you ever had to get the bead to seat on any sort of tubeless tire? I've worked on motorcycle and automobile tires in the past and it takes a compressor to get enough air volume in to make the bead seat. I can't see doing that with a hand pump, and I'm not carrying a shitload of CO2 cartridges with me and just taking my chances. Besides which that's a shitload of money in one-use cartridges and that nullifies the so-called tubeless advantage. Just not going to bother with what amounts to another fad.
>>
>>1112042
>Don't eat fat
Dietary fat is NECESSARY for proper health. It's used in hormone production, and nervous tissue and your brain need it to form replacement tissue. Also it's used for energy.
>>
Schwable Marathon for touring?
>>
>>1112113
If you get tyre damage like that just put in a tube, I think that's what people do for tubeless.
>>1112115
If you're at all concerned about durability, then by all means. The new GT model has less tread which is probably appropriate for most people's use cases.
>>
>>1112042
>Don't eat fat
Dietary fat is an ESSENTIAL nutrient and is used by your body for many things, not the least of which is hormone production and the formation of nervous system tissues (not the least of which is your BRAIN). Eating a low fat or no-fat diet is NOT healthy.

That is not to say that eating excessive amounts of dietary fat under the premise of 'Fat is healthy' is a good idea. People wanting to lose excess adipose tissue must limit overall calores. The best way to do this is to limit (not ELIMINATE, as in so-called 'ketogenic' diets) carbohydrate intake to no more than 40% of total daily calories, while maintaining a 500-or-so calorie overall deficit. One must be sure to eat enough protein (first!) and fat (second!) to ensure you're getting *enough* calories. One must also be sure to not fall for the incorrect idea that a caloric deficit of more than 500 calories is a good idea; a larger deficit will likely leave you with little energy and endurance, which will hamper efforts on the bike to burn off bodyfat -- effectively sabotaging weightloss.
>>
>>1112073
>>replaced chain on bike
>>Now my most uses sprocket on the cassette is skipping
I never let a chain go more than 1500 miles, 2000 miles at the absolute maximum, because a chain is ~$30, while cassettes are ~$70-100, and chainrings cost at least $100, plus you have to wait for them to get shipped to you.
>>
>>1111849
I got a used Synapse for a good deal
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>>1112102
Is it the chain recommended by the manufacturer of your drivetrain? If yes then don't worry. If it's an aftermarket chain then you'd better do some research to be sure it's compatible.
>>
>>1112117
>If you get tyre damage like that just put in a tube, I think that's what people do for tubeless.
I just had to roll my eyes hard when I read this.
*If I still have to carry a damned tube with me just in case then why the ever-loving-fuck am I bothering with this tubeless meme in the first place?* Makes zero sense. That's another reason why I don't want to bother with it.
>>
>>1112122
It's a sunrace cassette and I'm looking at a shimano chain. I'm wondering how good the standards are cross-manufacturer when it comes to same-speed chains.
I know campagnolo doesn't play nice with others but shimano and sunrace should be the same, right?

First time buying a new chain. My chain wear indicator says it's worn (on 0.75) so it's new chain time.
>>
>>1112124
If you're so concerned about eventualities then get some fucking airless tyres and carry a spare rim when you bust that on a pothole.

Why does carrying a spare tube become so ponderous simply because you no longer have them in your tyres?
>>
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>>1111954
long seatposts are good but helps when the bike is built for it, im 6"3 and ride this regularly easy bike to travel with dont see them very often
>>
>>1112128
>If you're so concerned about eventualities then get some fucking airless tyres and carry a spare rim when you bust that on a pothole.
That makes zero sense. Stop being ridiculous.

>Why does carrying a spare tube become so ponderous simply because you no longer have them in your tyres?
Because if tubeless is supposed to be so great then why do I have to use the same exact strategy against as if it wasn't tubeless in the first place? I still end up dealing with tubes one way or the other (buying them, patching them, etc) plus the expense of converting wheelsets to tubeless, plus the mess of having to deal with the sealant out on the road somewhere because I didn't see that rock or piece of metal or piece of glass or whatever that damaged the tire past the point where the sealant can deal with it. Why should I even bother? It's a meme and I'm not interested.
>>
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oooppps
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>>1112132
The whole point is that for a lot of minor punctures that would have had you off the road and changing a tube, the sealant will self-seal and you'll just keep on riding, no problem.

I'll say this, I've had probably a dozen or more punctures since I started riding seriously 2.5 years ago, and only a single one of those would actually have caused a real problem for tubeless, I ran over a piece of metal and ruined the tyre sidewall.

So I'm converting to tubeless with zero reservations desu.
>>
>>1112120
Cassette is like 20 euros, just a cheap 7 speed.

I don't think I've driven more than 1500 miles with it, but I wasn't very consistent with chain lubrication either so that doesn't help.
>>
>>1112142
Clean and lube chain every 200 miles or when it starts looking/sounding dry.

If your cassettes are so cheap then just replace it the same time you replace your chain. May as well replace your chainrings too then, then everything will always perform like new (because it is).
>>
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Hey, maybe somebody here can help me. I need a new training wheelset, because I need to use a different tire for my smart trainer, so I need a new wheelset for the road.
Would you rather buy FSA Vision Team 30 or DT Swiss R 24 Spline QR ones?
>>
>>1112147
FWIW DT Swiss makes a really great quality product. The RR585 rim I had my PowerTap wheel build around is as bulletproof as everyone claimed.
>>
>>1112147

DT Swiss all the way
>>
>>1112127
Don't get shimano chains unless you really need one for some reason: they don't come with master links. SRAM and KMC chains do.
>>
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which brakes have the best braking power for calipers? I don't care about durability.
>>
>>1112279
SRAM or Magura hydraulics
>>
>>1112140
I don't get enough punctures to even care enough to want to spend the money and time to change everything over to something that I don't even think is all that necessary in the first place -- especially if I have to carry a tube anyway. Stop trying to convince me, I'm not buying it no matter what anyone says to me. I just want decent quality tubes; other than Schwalbe, do you know who makes good quality tubes, that's all I wanted to know!
>>
>>1112240
You don't need a master link, you clean a chain while it's on the bike.
>>
>>1112121
Noice
>>
>>1111660
i have a small scratch/mark/chip in my carbon fork. Im not really sure how bad it is. any way of telling if it needs to be replaced? or can i fix it cuz im somewhat /diy/.
>>
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>>1111984
This, works fine as long as the chain is tight and straight enough
>>
>>1112301
>that tyre combo

what
>>
>>1112302
Hybrid bike
>>
>>1112298
why don't you post a pic fuccboi
>>
I'm looking for a saddle that wider than usual. I have a Brooks B17 that I found is too narrow
The indentations in the seat from my sit bones are right on the edge of the saddle.
>>
>>1112301
Ghetto suspension, the fattest tyre goes to the front wheel to receive the bumps.
>>
>>1112332
Get a ladies saddle, they're generally wider.
>>
>>1112240
I think the newer ones do.
>>1112334
You feel the bumps way more on your back wheel tho
>>
>>1112345
They still come with the pin that you snap off. Shimano is very proud of their asymmetric chains that are more durable than anyone else's chains or some shit, even though their chains cost like twice what anyone else's chains cost and definitely do not last twice as long nor do they perform even noticeably better.
>>
>>1112302
that is a man who is not made of money
>>
>>1112379
i've always had the best luck with kmc chains
they shift smooth and last quite a while, and they're way cheaper than anything else
>>
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What kind of bike is this?
>>
>>1112406
looks like a low end mountain bike from the late 90's, early 00's
>>
>>1112332
Specialized, Trek, Shimano, Selle Italia, and most other saddle manufacturers offer different widths for their saddles. Go to a dealer for whoever you like and get measured for one.
>>
>>1112379
Sez you.
>>
what is the best kind of bike to commute and also be able to go on cycle tourism trips?
>>
>>1112439
Something you enjoy riding.
That's what comes first.

Really though; something reliable and with standard parts but not too expensive so you're not grinding ultegra cassettes down in the winter salt.

Alu or steel would be best, and steel if your touring gets really long. Get a frame that's the right size for your body.

Overall; low end shimano groupset, alu or steel frame, mudguard/pannier mounts, and most likely drop bars. They are more comfortable over longer rides due to the many positions you can hold them.
>>
>>1112439
90s rigid mtb with slicks
>>
I'm in the UK for a week (normally US). It seems like my garmin doesn't have any UK maps?

Where do I download these?
>>
>>1112444
Probably an option in garmin connect somewhere.
>>
>>1112439
linear swb
>>
>>1112439
Unless your winter is really bad, a hybrid. You get a bike that can ride decent speeds on the roads, has all the gears you need, can ride on dirt and gravel easily. Throw some panniers and racks on it and you're good to go.

t. somebody who has never cycle toured but rides a hybrid and is constantly trying to defend it in his own mind.
>>
>>1112439
Hybrid or adventure bike, depending on your budget.
>>
Who else spends more on cycling clothing than regular clothes? Tell me I'm not alone.
>>
Palms of my hands are crazy painful after long rides. Grabbing or holding anything afterwards is painful.
standard stock rubber grips

normal or not?
>>
>>1112494
No. You're most likely putting to much of your body weight on your hands, and/or not shifting them around enough. Since you mention grips I assume you're riding on flat bars, which isn't ideal for long rides.
Adjust your bike fit and get some bar ends.
>>
>>1112439
That's as personal a choice as what kind of underwear you prefer, friend. Go online or to lots of bike shops, look at lots of bikes, try some of them out, think hard about it, and decide for yourself what sort of geometry and cockpit setup you think will work best for you.
>>
>>1112494
Sounds to me like your bike isn't fitted properly for you. Was there any sort of fitting/adjusting done, or just the usual shitty job of just raising the saddle until it 'felt right to you'? Go get someone who knows what they're doing to evaluate your riding position and make the appropriate adjustments. You might even need a different stem.
>>
>>1112514
>the saddle until it 'felt right to you'?
Yeah they just did that.
>>
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Hello /n/. I bike fairly often, but I'm super inexperienced with bikes themselves; my current bike has no working brakes and is rusting to hell. I saw this listing for $50, I have no clue what brand it is. Is it worth checking out from?
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>>1112520
no
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>>1112522
And why not?
>>
Hey fellas, I’m visiting from another board(s)

I just for my first bike that I will be using for transportation and this week I rode 170 miles. Yesterday and today I noticed my knees being extremely (especially today) sore in the front.

I think it’s because the bike isn’t set up properly for me. I bought it used on CL and the guy was about an inch shorter than me and I didn’t need bother setting it up right for my biomechanics. I’m gonna go get it professional adjusted today

My question is:
Can I continue on riding this week now that the bike will have been adjusted? Correcting the fitting should remove the unnecessary stresses from my knees, no? Or should I take a week off? I know, listen to your body and all that good stuff but since this wasn’t necessarily an overuse injury, shouldn’t correcting the problem remove the continuation and progression of my knee pain?

Thanks!
>>
>>1112520
>vintage gaspipe BSO
>>
>>1112546
w-what does that mean
>>
>>1112520
that's a piece of garbage
>>
Chain is rhythmically clicking as I ride. Not smooth at all

When I backpedal the top half of the chain slacks
Whats happening please
>>
>>1112544
The soreness chart says saddle up and maybe forward, but are you just leaping from 0-170 miles in one week? Getting used to heavy cycling takes some time.
>>
>>1112553
Adjust your derailleurs
Visit the Park Tool site for guidance
>>
>>1112551
It means it's a piece of shit
>>
>>1112551
its a piece of shit made out of shitty steel
>>
>>1112471
You're not touring on a hybrid. You need the drop bars for long bike rides
>>
>>1112544
You rode a long-ass way. Only worry about joint pain if it's chronic. Else, it should heal and be fine again. What you did is stress the joint beyond what it was used to (joints, ligaments and bones are alive like muscles and grow in response to stress) and it hurts.
Let it heal before riding again though. Don't ride on sore joints.
>>
>>1112553
Index your gears.
>>
>>1112571
No you don't. There are plenty of other bar types that offer multiple hand positions, some even have more than drop bars and are more comfortable. Drop bars are for getting aero and going fast.
>>
>>1112575
Drop bars are for comfortable riding. Why you want to be unaero and add an extra 30-50W to your ride is beyond me. I like going further for less effort
>>
>>1112577
>Drop bars are for comfortable riding
The hoods are comfortable, the drops aren't comfortable for extended use. They sacrifice comfort for aero, thus they're for situations where going faster is more important than being comfortable (racing).

There are much more comfortable positions and there are even more comfortable aero positions, just take a look at TT bikes.
>>
>>1112581
It depends if you're comfortable going slowly or not.
>>
>>1112582
What? Being comfortable doesn't automatically mean you're slow, just take a look at recumbents, ebikes, and as I mentioned TT bikes. Also being fast doesn't always take priority over being comfortable, in fact it shouldn't unless you're racing but we're talking about long distance touring here.
>>
>>1112583
Then go for a recumbent. You get to go faaast.
>>
>>1112554
Yeah I tend to go zero to sixty mighty fast. Gave myself plantar fasciitis three years ago from running too much too fast as well with bad shoes. I’m very athletic and find it very easy to push myself.

I also read that I was using too high of a gear with too low of a cadence, which was contributing to the pain. Yesterday I rode with a high cadence and low gear and felt the commute to be much easier.

I do ride a fixie for exercise but this is the first time I’m gonna be using a bike to commute with. I’m gonna be averaging 20 miles or so commuting to my new job so I used this week to get used to the route and double it up as cardio to prep myself for this climbing comp that’s next month.

Yeah I know the saddle is too low and even though I’m sure I’m capable of setting it up but I’d feel much more comfortable having someone competent do it for me.

>>1112573
>only worry about chronic pain

I’ll be sure to keep track of the soreness

>stress joints/bones/ligaments

Those damn things need to grow stronger faster! I pull a tendon pulley in my finger from climbing too hard as well as gave myself sore ass knee joints when I was squatting over 300lbs. Muscle grows fast but damn joints do take their sweet ass time healing!

>don’t ride on sore joints

I start my new job next week, hopefully it’s not sore by then. Been taking glucosamine and chondriton with msm plus some NSAIDs to help promote recovery.
>>
Changed my front gears/cranks, and they sometimes make a loud click when I push hard. Are they not on right? What do I need to check?
>>
>>1112599
Make sure the chainring bolts are torqued correctly and greased. Clicking chainring bolts are really common.
So common that I greased mine and my drivetrain still clicked so I gave up.
>>
>>1112601
How do I know what the correct torque is? They didn't come with any instructions.
>>
>>1112604
Google it. Usually it tells you on the chainring itself, it has a little N/m on it.
>>
>>1112042
>Don't eat fat
are you fucking retarded?
>>
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im looking to sell my spare bike, whats a fair price for pic related, given that the chain is no longer as rusty as in pic related, and its had a new set of bars and gear shifters installed so it can be ridden like a hybrid?
>>
>>1112609
My first impression was:
New chain, handlebar tape, and give it a clean. It's a shame you put a flat handlebar on it though.
Turning it into a hybrid actually reduced the value substantially, so that's something to consider.
>>
>>1112610
hybrids are far more popular here, i actually hate the kind of bars it came with, theyre not suitable for the streets round here. cant remember if i outright replaced the chain on it or if i just gave it a liberal oiling, but either way it runs with no hitches.

i should mention this is UK btw.
>>
>>1112612
Shiny bikes sell for more.
>>
>>1112613
thanks for the solid sales advice senpai
>>
How much of a hassle is it to replace the handlebars on a hybrid to drop bars? Can't you just buy some drop bars that you just slap onto your current bars?
>>
>>1112040
Get the proper tool for the job. Bearing cups should not be savaged with a screwdriver.
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>>1112609
A carbon boardman with 105/Tiagra is selling for £480 near me.

A busted up AL frame with Sora? Maybe £200?
>>
>>1112147
Vision Team 30's are fucking garbage, DT Swiss or some other Giant made brand.
>>
>>1112652
There are drop bar ends you can attach to your flat bars. If you want to go full drop bars though, you also have to replace the brake levers, and probably the shifters.
>>
>>1112657
Also potentially the derailers if it has MTB ones (certain Shimano ones won't work with brifters). Also depending on what brakes he has they might have to be replaced to work with drop levers. And if the frame is the correct size he'll probably need a shorter stem with drop bars.
>>
>>1112654
its an al frame, in generally decent condition besides a small chip or two in the paint

sora?
>>
>>1112581
On a touring bike your bars should be close to level with your saddle, so the drops are actually comfortable for extended use. Don't give me your 'if the drops are comfortable then your bars are too high' bullshit, because you don't know shit about touring.
>>
>>1112609
>World champ colours on a Boardman when CB won his world champs on a Merckx and a Lotus
absolutely disgusting
>>
>>1112750
If you have drop bars high enough that the drops are comfortable for extended use then the hoods are unnecessarily high and the tops would probably never be used. Something like a Jones H bar would be just as comfortable, have more hand positions, and potentially be even more area in the most forward position.

I'm not saying drops would be terrible for touring, but they're far from the best choice.
>>
>>1112753
The drops on a touring bike are comfortable for extended periods of time at relatively high effort. Your effort on a bicycle supports your upper body, that's why on a fast road ride you can comfortably maintain an aero position. On tour you're often going to be riding at low intensity, which requires a more upright position, because the reaction forces from your leg work are not supporting your upper body. If you ride like this in an aero position, you'll bear down on the bar straining your hands and back. In a sprint say, you'll actually be pulling up on the bars. On tour you're also sometimes (atleast i do) going to feel fresh and put in a road-esque ride, where the drops give you a good reasonably aero position, which becomes comfortable. None of drop positions should go unused or be redundant on a touring bike, as your effort levels and soreness fluctuate wildly.

So imo, a good setup to tour is to have your drops around the same position your hoods would normally be, or slightly higher. This is what i've seen on the majority of touring bikes out on tour, and for sale, and peoples setups online. I've met one guy riding an H-Jones bar, he had been across a few continents, and he hated them. That doesn't mean a lot, but the majority of touring cyclists riding high drops means more than your opinion, and i doubt you've even toured before.
>>
>>1112760
>So imo, a good setup to tour is to have your drops around the same position your hoods would normally be, or slightly higher.
But then your hoods are stupidly high, potentially uncomfortable to have your wrists at that angle. The advantage of drop bars is you can get down in the drops for aero, if you have the drops as high as the hoods would usually be then you can get just as aero using "flat" bars and potentially more so.

I'm not arguing that drop bars can't get the job done, if you go back and read my first point I was disputing the other guy (you?) who said
>You need the drop bars for long bike rides
>>
>>1112763
So you're saying a touring bike with drop bars should have the same fit as a road bike?
>>
>>1112764
Yes. Obvious it shouldn't be a racer fit but they should be low enough that the hoods are the primary position and the drops give a significant aero advantage, but not high enough to make them comfortable for extended use. The thing is that aero advantage is as important for touring, so no drop bars aren't a requirement for touring. That is my point and if you disagree with that then you're an idiot and must think that the only two types of bars are drops and plain straight flat bars.
>>
>>1112765
You are fundamentally misunderstanding drop bars. Varying degrees of aero position are not always a function of comfort, the comfort might remain static while your effort fluctuates. I already explained to you why a higher or lower bar position is comfortable depending on the degree of effort that you're putting in. This is from the book of Sheldon, you'd be foolish to continue to remain wilfully ignorant. If on tour the drops are not comfortable for extended use at high effort when you're fresh then your bars will be too low to be comfortable on a slow day. On tour you generally won't be riding hard, so the hoods remain the primary position, sure, but the your bar should be higher than on a road bike, because your effort is generally lower.

Drop bars are certainly not necessary but they are what i, and the majority of touring cyclists prefer. There are a lot of reasons why, but I realise it's highly subjective, many people are simply used to drop bars, and i think different kinds of bicycles are cool. If you actually have a touring bike with some meme bars, why not post it and proselytize for your cause. If you don't tour, then maybe you're not a great authority on what's 'best' or not for it. All you can have is your preference anyway, and if even that is entirely hypothetical, then maybe shut the fuck up.
>>
>>1112652
You need to do quite a lot. It's doable and not all that hard but it's some work.
You'll need to recable your gears and your brakes, change the shifters to STI shifters, and possibly change your dérailleurs. RJ the bike guy has a video on the exact thing (and the reverse)
The used market for STI shifters can probably get you something pretty cheap and compatible with your current front/rear derailleurs, just make sure that the number of gears (the x speed) of the shifters is the same as the number of cogs you have on the back wheel. Same for the front.
Recabling, reindexing, doing bar tape, no individual part is difficult or expensive, it's just there's a lot of things to put together. RJ the bike guy is the best youtuber for bike work like this.

But it's worth it, drops are great.
>>
>>1112764
It's almost as if endurance bikes don't exist.
There are no endurance bikes with flat handlebars.
>>
>>1111683
295lbs (133kg) here, down from 360 (163) back in March. I only bought the bike when I got down to 310 or so, and did a bunch of research beforehand and got a frame rated for 300lbs. Haven't had a flat yet but I'm sure it's coming unless I keep the pressure on myself.

Like people are saying keep your tire pressure up, check it literally every time you ride and top it off to an appropriate level before you get on it. My hybrid's tires can lose up to 10 PSI overnight since they're so damn skinny.

Also, don't make riding a bike the only thing you're doing for exercise. Unless you're going uphill a lot it doesn't actually burn all that much energy since it's a very efficient method of travel. You'd be surprised with the results walking can get you. Also, figuring out a simple dumbbell workout you can do at home is another great way to burn calories and improve your conditioning, flexibility, and overall strength.

Diet is just as fucking important, by the way. It doesn't help to burn 4000 calories in a day if you eat 4500. If you don't know how many you're burning and consuming, get on that shit. Consult a nutritionist if you can afford it, otherwise there's a shit-ton of apps and websites out there that will provide you with loose guidelines to figure out what your intake and daily burn levels are. Quit drinking sodas and juice and sweetened ice tea and lemonade and beer and whatnot. Stick to water 99% of the time. Don't be afraid to cheat once in a while for the sake of your psychological endurance, but make sure it's just once in a while (special occasions maybe) and if you're going to cheat make it fucking count. Don't waste a cheat day on some prepackaged garbage from the convenience store. Have a fucking steak and savor every bite. Something like that.

Most of all, keep shit gradual. If you try to do a bunch of weight loss all at once you will crash in some way, either physically or mentally, and from there it's all to easy to backslide.
>>
Had my chain partially slip off the front wheels during my ride this morning and I'm not sure if there's something specific I can do to prevent it apart from being more careful with my shifting.

I might have tried to shift too many gears at once on the rear derailer or something like that. No damage but my drivetrain locked up and I had to stop and finagle it back onto the sprockets. I stop pedaling when I shift gears, too, but I think I got a little lax on that this morning.

Also, my front sprockets seem to be a little resistant shifting up from first gear to second. I can make it happen by shifting to third and then slipping back down to second, but I'm not sure if it's something I'm doing wrong or if my bike needs some adjustments. Just bought this thing and they threw in a year of free tune-ups, but I don't want to bother making an appointment and riding down to the shop if it's something I can fix myself without too much trouble.
>>
>>1112776
I recommend sparkling water. Shop around and you can get it cheap, and it has the same sparkly feeling that soda does, just without all the sugar and garbage.
>>
You fatties ever consider riding with some weather baloons tied to you?
>>
>>1112779
Or just get a SodaStream
>>
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>>1112779
>>1112787

Or stop wasting money on sparkling water and invest in a decent vacuum-insulated bottle instead and just refill it all day long from the water cooler/fridge/whatever

carbonated water is bad for your teeth anyways
>>
>>1112789
>carbonated water is bad for your teeth anyways
[citation needed]
>>
>>1112802
breaks down into carbonic acid in your mouth and can damage your teeth over the long term if you're drinking too much of it

it's better for you than soda for sure but he'd be better off just making drinking still water a habit
>>
>>1112803
Not a citation, and the effects can just be nullified by rinsing your mouth with water if you're really that paranoid
>>
My Cateye Strada slim computer battery last only 2 days since it get washed with glass wash. Any tips ?
>>
>>1112120
is this really a thing? i thought that you only need to replace the chain when it snaps and that has never happened to me.
>>
>>1112808
Yes, chains do wear out, and if you don't replace them in a timely fashion they'll prematurely wear the rest of your drivetrain, too.

That said using a strict distance measurement is ridiculous, the conditions you ride and how well you take care of things will greatly influence a chain's life. Get yourself a chain checker or ask at the LBS for them to do it.
>>
>>1112808
I'm not made of money; I don't like throwing it away for no reason. Chains are cheap; cassettes and chainrings are expensive comparatively speaking. That's my reasoning.

A bicycle drivetrain is more precise mechanically-speaking than you think it is. The chain, cassette cogs, and chainrings mesh in an exact way, for best performance of the drivetrain in general. The more the chain stretches due to wear, the less precisely it meshes with the cogs and chainrings, which causes them to wear. Since they're all wearing at relatively the same rate it doesn't seem like an issue when you're riding the bike, but then you go and put a new chain on it, after riding the chain for, say, 5000 to 10000 miles (purely a handwaving figure for sake of this discussion) and you discover that the new chain skips all over the cogs and chainrings, makes all sorts of noise, hangs up, and whatever else it might do, in general performing like *shit*. Now you have to spend a bunch more money and time replacing cassette and chainrings to make the bike work properly again.

I've long since been through the above and therefore came to the conclusion that replacing a chain (which costs me maybe $30-35 for an Ultegra chain; other chains may be cheaper yet!) every 1500-2000 miles (before it starts stretching much at all) is far-and-away preferable to wearing out everything else and having to spend $100 or more to replace everything, and having to wait for chainrings to get shipped to me.
>>
>>1112822
>That said using a strict distance measurement is ridiculous, the conditions you ride and how well you take care of things will greatly influence a chain's life.
Yes and no. If someone only ever rides slow and easy on the flat, their drivechain will probably last a little longer, and if they never pay any attention to it, never clean and lube it, it won't last as long as it otherwise could. Using total mileage on a load-bearing, moving part like a drivetrain is a good rule-of-thumb for replacement, especially for something that is cheap and easy to replace.
>>
>>1112832
11 speed chains aren't that cheap, at least from my LBS.
>>
>>1112836
They're cheap compared to cassettes and chainrings, which you'll end up having to replace too soon if you don't replace your worn chain
>>
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>>1111909
>GREASE FOR LOOSE BEARING

anyone has exp with grease nipples MOD. The hubs I have are shimano 600 tricoulour, so 30 years old almost but not used much...Im wasting too much time regreasing 4 bearing set every 6 months.

will they handle the grease nip mod?
>>
>>1112843
>Im wasting too much time regreasing 4 bearing set every 6 months.
No you're not
>>
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>>1112847
>No you're not

Yes I am, I have 3 bikes and do almost all of my mainintence - truing, adjusting,just built a front wheel for the same roadie...

The grease on my road bike bearing sets doesnt last nowhere near to the grease on my commuter and mtb.

*5 bearing sets, pedals included

anyway, does the GreaseNip mod increase the chances of cracking on the road hub? Would do the same on my commuter btw.
>>
Peugot racer, cop or not?
Also, I'm not really sure what questions I should be asking the seller and what I should be looking out for when looking for a second hand bike. Thanks lads
>>
>>1112853
Are you a big guy? That's a very large sized bike.
>>
>>1112854
yeah it's a 25" frame, but I'm around 6'1"/2"
>>
>>1112563
how do you see from that image that the steel is shit? my bike frame looks almost like that but its fine even with lots of weight on it.
>>
>>1112853
>cop or not
That would depend on the price
>what to look out for
700c wheels (as opposed to 27")
Alloy rims (as opposed to steel)
Square taper bottom bracket/crankset (as opposed to cottered)
Downtube shifters (as opposed to stem shifters)
Brake levers with rubber hoods (as opposed to naked ones)
Derailleur hanger on frame (as opposed to clamped to the axle)
Wobbly, creaky, loose or rattly (sp?) parts (test ride it and make sure everything is tight and straight)
>>
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>>1112858
this is what it looks like
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>>1112860
Price is £100 including a D-lock, but I imagine I can haggle that down. What do you think it's worth?
Thanks for all the info, I'll email the guy. Is there a sticky or something I could look at for more info?
Thanks a lo
>>
>>1112863
Sorry, no sticky, but you're free to keep asking around here.
That's a good price, as long as everything works properly.
Remember to inspect the frame for cracks and rust, too.
>>
>>1112843
>>1112851
>GreaseNip mod

BUMP 4 NIPPLE

any exp with it here?
>>
>>1112803
Carbonic acid breaks down into CO2 in your mouth.
>>
>>1112789

>carbonated water is bad for your teeth anyways

nah
>>
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I accidentally bought a 23" XL frame, it's for a hybrid bike.
And I'm 5ft 11 inches tall (I'm European, no idea if I even converted that correctly).

How bad is it? I hate frames that are too small but this time I think I overdid it. The seller convinced me it wasn't too big but later I realized of course the seller would say anything to make me buy it, duh.

The frame looks gigantic but technically I can ride it if the seat post is as low as it can be.
>>
>>1112947
It's gonna be uncomfortable.
>>
>>1112983

You're probably right. I guess I'll sell it.
>>
>>1112984
Can't you just return it?
>>
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I just freegan'd a Schwinn Ranger 2.4 (pic related). The shifter is borked beyond hope, the brake cables have been cut, and the chain is off both the cassette and chainring. Is it possible to have it easily/cheaply converted into a beater fixie? Longtime /n/ browser first time poster pls be nice
>>
>>1113001
>easily/cheaply converted into a beater fixie?
No. For a fixie conversion you need a fixed gear hub.
I suggest you put the chain on a gear combination you find comfortable and ride it without shifting.
>>
>>1113003
fug, also the rear derailleur is beyond repair
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>>1112067
Why have rolling resistance when you can instead go faster, and have more aerodynamic resistance?
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>>1113007
The cheapest way of making it rideable is to remove both derailleurs and shifters, break the chain, put it on a sensible combination, and leave it as a single speed. That bike really isn't worth wasting money on.
>>
>>1112524
It's literal gas-pipe construction. Ancient, heavy, and really low quality.

Another give-away, what the fuck are those one piece cranks lmao

and that kickstand! Wow.

The bar angle being set like that, it's a good give-away the previous owner has no idea about bikes too. It's probably poorly maintained, which just adds to the BSO Shittyness. steer clear desu senpai nani
>>
If you're having knee pain issues stemming from poor cadence, a fixie with it's inability to select gearing for cadence is not going to be very helpful
>>
>>1113001
not worth spending money to fix that thing. It's a supermarket BSO.
>>
>>1113011
What's the difference between a single speed and a fixie?
>>
>>1113026
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=what%27s+the+difference+between+a+single+speed+and+a+fixie
>>
>>1113009
because just sitting on the bike uses no energy. i dont even have any aero meme things and it still feels like i just sit on it and look on my bike computer showing 30 kmh speeds while i do nothing.
>>
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Im less than 100mi on a new Surly Straggler, wanna get off normie pedals. Do I go for RaceFace or Rockbros?
>>
>>1113053

You go SPDs & walkable shoes like everyone else with a trace of common sense and a moiety of experience.
>>
>>1113053
Imo high end plastic bmx pedals are the way to go for platforms because they're nice on your shins.
MKS makes good street pedals too. Consider going cages & straps.
>>
>>1112836
Then don't buy them from your Jew LBS. xD
Performance Bike moves enough volume that they can put chains on sale all the time. Or order one online at a discount ahead of the need for one.q
>>
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>>1112653

You don't hammer the bearings, you hammer the screwdriver to lock down the ring, that's it.
>>
>>1113062

i am hesitant to get clip shoes because i have a weak left knee, damaged my meniscus about a year or so ago. dont want to fuck up my knee because i dropped bike at a intersection
>>
>>1113083

I would suggest MKS Urban Platforms with half-clips.

You really will want some degree of foot retention. Half-clips are plenty for a lot of applications, and you can get plastic ones for like $10. I've put literally thousands of miles on a pair of nylon half-clips which are just ziptied to some ancient flat pedals.
>>
>>1113083
>>1113084
>>
>>1113085
Yeee I'd rather get something with toeclips like that than clips
>>
>>1113083
Look at Shimano Click'R.
>>
>>1112947
Return it or sell it.
It's useless to you.
And next time, look up the fucking frame sizes before buying.
Fit is crazy important.
>>
So what's the difference between tubes and tubeless tires? Which are better if you're not a spastic about performance and just want something that's easy to maintain?
>>
>>1113197
tubeless
>for best results, use rims and tyres specifically designed for it
>tyres extremely hard to put on
>use sealant to maintain airtightness and seal minor punctures
>top up sealant every so often

tubes
>tyre is probably ok to put on
>hope u don't get puncture and have to put another tube in

If you just want something easy to maintain get marathons and set them up normally with tubes.
>>
>>1113308
Limit screws determine the absolute ends of where the derailer can move. Unclamp the cable on your rear and play with the high limit screw if you want to see that in action.

Indexing is mostly that, yeah. If you find that you can't get it perfect, you might have a worn chain/cassette. Or even some other problem like a bent derailer hanger or your cassette lockring wasn't tightened enough so the cogs shift around.
>>
>>1112609
Damn, that's the longest ass save I've ever seen.
>>
How important is warming up during a ride?
I have a tendancy to go full tempo from the start, but am begining to feel like I'm missing out on something here.
>>
>>1111866
Got an alter stem on one of my bikes. Bought it new and kept it when I sold the bike I got it for. Too bad it's only for 1" and it's not that many compatible bars around.
>>
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$99 kmart bike.

im going to die
>>
>>1111660
Any recommendations for a steel frame bike with disc brakes?

I'm okay with either new or used, but I'm a poorfag either way.
>>
>>1113308
Look up some youtube videos. But the short of its you shift to the hardest gear, and fiddle with the barrel adjuster until the gear doesn't do any phantom shifting and doesn't try to hook onto the easier gear.
Then you shift to the easiest gear and repeat the same, adjusting until it makes no phantom shifting etc.
Run through the gears to check that they run smoothly and make small adjustments here and there. Once you do it for a while you get a feel for what happens when you turn the adjuster- does it move a little to the left? to the right?

There's also limit screws but unless you bent your derailleur or messed with them you shouldn't need to touch them.
>>
>>1113398
Waste of money.

>>1113455
Why do you want steel? Alu is a better cheap frame material.
>>
>>1113320
wat
>>
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>Just got my new bike in the mail
>Spent at least 10 minutes trying to put the pedal on and was freaking out thinking I had broken it before I just turned the crank the opposite way
It's a miracle that I can even ride a bike without seriously injuring myself daily
>>
>>1113352
Try it and find out. My legs feel pretty terrible for the whole ride if I go all out from the beginning.
>>1113398
You are not going to die, but are going to have a shitty time trying to tighten, adjust and fix shit as you ride along.
>>1113455
What kind of bike/riding? MTB, road, something in between?
>>1113507
Haha, well that kind of shit happens to everyone sometimes. Just be happy that you didn't ruin the threads and keep riding.
>>
>>1113507
We've all been there
>>
>>1113508
>>1113509
Yup, and it seems like I managed to put it together properly because I just got back from my 3 km commute and I rode about 5 km/h faster than my previous average, and this is without even being used to the feeling of the bike or having all the small details being set up properly.

I straight up just ordered the cheapest hybrid bike that my local bike store had on their website, it's pretty crazy how good quality even the cheap stuff is getting. I can't wait until I can get a proper budget for something like a good quality cyclocross or gravel bike.
>>
can't figure out my chain problems or how to index this shit
Fuck this I'm just buying a new bike
>>
Just bought my first pair of bib shorts and I seem to be getting major moose knuckle, my cock and balls just don't seem to fit properly in them (it's an average size cock). Pretty sure the shorts are the right size for me too.
Anything I can do about this or is it normal?
>>
>>1113507
the hardest part will be removing after its been used for a while. did it today and i had to stand on the tool to get enough force for it and almost fucked a chain before i understood that its better to do it with the crank removed.
>>
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How much of a death sentence are AVA stems on old Peugeots?
>>
>>1113533
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/velos.html
depends how 2meirl your brand is
>>
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I'm planning on buying an e-bike for my daily commute to work (I have to work in a suit, so I can't afford to sweat). I was thinking of a Giant triple X E bike for men. The motor is at the front wheel.

Can anyone comment on the quality?

https://www.giant-bicycles.com/be/triple-x-eplus-gts
>>
>>1113521
Tuck upwards.
>>
>>1113546
Do you have a shower at work?
>>
>>1113053

if you use the bike as sports equipment then clipless if you use it around town and stuff I'd just get some rockbros as long as the look sick.
>>
>>1113548
No, I work in a bank without a shower. Otherwise I would've gone in earlier for the good cardio, but an e-bike allows me to ride in a suit.
>>
Trying to decide between getting a cyclocross or gravel, I assume I should go for a cyclocross if I want a more relaxed riding posture and better offroading capabilites?
>>
>>1113081
who knows for that ancient stuff, assumed it would be for something like hollowtech
>>
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Is this tire okay to rise on gravel?
>>
Can I do cyclocross on my roadbike frame with caliper brakes if I can fit 35mm tires?
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>>1113081
>that pic
someone doesn't know what a goddamned SPANNER is.
Fucking plebs.
>>
>>1113666
You can do cyclocross on your roadbike frame with 23mm tires if you really want. But 35s are great for cross.
What sort of terrain do you see on your local courses? Mostly grass/paved with some dirt/gravel sections?
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>>1113675
Grass/Mud/Dirt and paved surfaces, but no gravel or sand.
>>
>>1113650
Looks kinda narrow. How wide is it?
>>
>>1113666
The bigger issue is you need enough room leftover for mud clearance.
>>
>>1113610
In theory the cross bike should have a more aggressive aero position, longer top tube & shorter headtube, handle quicker with a sharper headtube and shorter wheelbase, have less clearance because cross racing is limited to 33c tires, be lighter, narrower gearing range, not have mounts for racks & fenders and be all round more of a fast racing bike.

A gravel or 'adventure' bike is designed for better comfort and luggage capabilities, kind of more towards a touring bike, while a cross bike is more like a road bike.

In reality there's a lot of crossover between these memes.
>>
>>1113521
forget about trying to hide your dick
>>1113547
this
>>
>>1113650
You can theoretically ride any tyre on gravel, but how well it works is going to depend on what kind. Some gravel is a lot deeper and easier to sink into than others. Width and volume is overall more important than tread.
>>
>>1113650
Underbiking is really fun but it's easy to damage your wheels
>>
I've got an '80s road bike with old 27" wheels. I live in a place with awful winters (-20F, frequent snow, roads aren't plowed) and don't feel like riding with the slick 11/4" tires I've got no, but I haven't been able to find studded tires for a 27" wheel size. So my question is, should I buy modern 620mm wheels and do the conversion, or buy a walmart bike for winters and throw studded tires on it.

If I do the conversion, how much of a pain in the ass would it be? Could I use the gears on my current wheel, or would I need to replace the entire drivetrain?
>>
>>1113719
Check the brakes, as you may need to replace them to get the pads in the right spot. A friction drivetrain should still be OK. Also make sure you have enough tire clearance for whatever it is you want to do in the first place.

If you go beater route, I'd try used mountain bikes before walmart.
>>
>>1113719
What's the spacing on your current hub? Is it as wide as modern ones?
>>
>>1113731
I think the brakes have enough travel, but even if they don't, they're horseshit I should have replaced when I bought the bike anyways.
>>1113733
I don't think so. I talked to the owner of a LBS and he just found a set of 620mm wheels made for the slimmer spacing. Should I just measure the distance to make sure I know what it is?
>>
>>1113650
Yeah it's fine. Put the tire pressure down a little bit though.
>>
>>1112133
tf is this
intrigued
pls explain
>>
>>1111660
Punctured a tube two days ago, and I noticed that I can't properly switch gears (near the middle, it's a Sora 9 speed cassette) anymore. How can I fix it, I don't want to mess with the screws since it was fine before and it's a bother.
>>
Could someone educate me on those cheap carbon wheels from aliexpress.

Has anyone tried them out to see what the difference is between $400 and $2k DT swiss/Mavic wheels?

Seems like the chinese steal blueprints from these companies to make these wheels. What is the real world application for them anyway.

I've seen videos of guys coming down descents over 60kmh and some of their chinese wheels getting fucked up due to brake heat.
>>
>>1113846
Well it depends. With chink wheels you have it so that if they're actually trying to knock off a legit brand, stay away from that shit like cancer. It'll break under less stress, it'll be less resistant to heat, and it won't last as long. It'll be a hazard, and more importantly, will make riding unfun.

If they're a standalone chink brand trying to actually sell their own wheels rather than pretending to be someone else, then the quality should actually be quite high. Or at least the intended quality. Who knows how good their protect testing and QC is. You really want to be riding on something with unknown reliability when bombing down a hill?

If you can't afford carbon, don't get it. You can get some good alu wheels for much less money. And hell, carbon wheels at the low end are just getting cheaper.
>>
>>1113847
Thanks, I don't need them, just trying to figure out where the industry is going. I'd figure they would eventually become cheaper and better as the engineering grows.

I'd figure the QC would be where the biggest questions would lay as well as what you're paying for marketing.
>>
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>Tfw just got my new bike and I ride like 5-7 km/h faster on average on flats while putting in the same effort

Man my old bike was a piece of shit, I got the cheapest hybrid bike in the store I could find since it's not really worth trying to find something like a road bike or cyclocross bike on such a low budget.

But I'm wondering if it's worth getting those drop bar ends you put on the ends of your handlebar? Does it really make much of a difference if I ride in a more aggressive position if I'm tall, wide, heavy, 6'3 and 200 lbs, and just ride in regular workout clothes and not lycra and stuff like that?
>>
>>1113878
You might be able to gain another 3-4km/h. You could also look at bar ends or clip ons. You can also flip your stem and lower it if you haven't already. You may also benefit from some better tyres to reduce rolling resistance or increasing the inflation pressure.
>>
>>1113878

What was the bike before that, 26 or 28 steel?
>>
>>1113896
I meant that the bike I bought now was the cheapest hybrid in the store and it's still miles better than my old bike that I've had for like 6-7 years, it was also an aluminum hybrid but much heavier and the brakes and gears were shitting the bed, the tires were junk and the chain was rusty as hell.

I think having a new chain and better tires is making the biggest difference since I can put down more watts with less rolling resistance from the chain and tires, and the lower weight helps as well.
>>
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>>1113878
If you feel you can get lower and stay there for a long time, the drops might be good. The bigger issue is that you wouldn't have access to your shifters or brakes while on them. I'd consider those clip on horns instead.
>>
THREAD IS CURRENTLY ON AUTO-SAGE.
Don't post new questions here, use the new thread: >>1114253
>>
anyone use a fitness tracker for cycling?




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