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Maintenance, gear, and other questions that don't necessarily deserve their own thread.

Previous thread (currently on auto-sage): >>1111660

***

My question:
Looking for recommendations for a seat bag that either has a zipper that won't die in less than a year, or that has something other than a zipper as a closure.

Pic marginally related; I thought it was nice, even if it's not what I'm looking for at all.
>>
>>1114253
could you fix the one that broke? replacement zippers are like 4 $
>>
>>1114253
Rolltop bags are nice. Ortlieb sells them in several sizes. Outer Shell Adventure makes a pretty nice one as well.
>>
>>1114258
Somehow I think a $4 zipper is just going to fall apart on me like the rest of them have, I don't have a sewing machine and don't hand-sew well enough, and what it costs for someone else to replace it would end up being as much as a whole new seat bag. Just not worth it.

>>1114268
I'll check that out, thanks.
>>
>>1114288
i would def fix it if i were me instead of paying way more for something that might break again
to each his own i geuss
>>
>>1114295
I understand and very often employ your thinking; I fix rather than replace things all the time, I even have made my living that way much of my life. But there's also a point where I don't really want to just improvise something that ends up being cheesy, especially if it's going to aggravate me later when it fails.

Now, what I *might* do is stitch some industrial-strength Velcro onto the newer one that has a borqed zipper, essentially converting it. But I have to look closer at it to see if it'd run any risk of coming open while riding. I don't care to lose the contents.
>>
Could someone recommend a rugged vike for shit roads? Ideally I'm looking for the AK47 of the bike world, easy to repair, single speed would be a bonus. Speed is not needed, bot bothered about the look.
>>
I've never ridden a road bike before and want to try one out before I buy one
I know stores let you do this, but has anyone ever done this as someone who is a complete beginner to road bikes (to the geometry and the drops etc.) but not to bikes of course I can at least do that
Was it embarrassing, I'm almost autistic hence the autistic question
>>
>>1114394
Take care of your things, asshole. Bikes handle tough conditions better when cared for.
>>
>>1114394
90s rigid MTB SS conversion
>>
>>1114396
I figure if the salesperson wants to make a deal with you they will try to help you along the way to your purchase. Just ask for a few pointers on adjusting to road bikes like drop bars / brifters etc. as well as taking it for a test ride, and a salesperson should be happy to help you buy their road bikes, after all the road bikes are probably the expensive ones.
>>
>>1114394
Maybe what you're after is belt drive. I hear it's low maintenance. Gearing is limited but apparently that's not something you're too concerned with.
>>
>>1114394
Kona Unit
Surly Karate Monkey
or
>>1114399
>>
Looking for a heavy duty, industrial, american made bike.

Is workman the best choice?

Leading a project at work to replace golf carts with bikes at our factory.
>>
>>1114400
Thanks anon, I guess I'll be less nervous about this if I think about it that way
>>
>>1114396
i had never ridden a road bike before. i went to the shop and asked for a cyclocross bike to try. i had never used sti shifters before (when the shifting is done with the brake levers). i tried it then came back and asked how to shift. they were nice about it. im normally pretty nervous abt that kind of stuff but it was fine. u will b fine
>>
>>1114396
My advice to you is Do Your Research long in advance of going into any bike shop. The reasons why are:
1. A bike shop wants to sell you a bike. Most will want to get rid of what ISN'T selling, and they might well convince you that you DO want it, whatever it is. If you have no idea what you want they'll probably succeed at convincing you it's the right bike for you.

2. There are lots and lots of different kinds of bikes out there for different purposes. Decide ahead of time what your expectations are of any bike you buy, and use that to narrow down the field to the ones you might be interested in. Then look at things like frame geometry; for instance a cargo bikes' geometry is going to be different from an endurance road bike, which is different from a racing road bike, which is different from a TT/Triathlon bike. Shouldn't have to say this, but: worry about how it looks and 'non-essential' features, last. How the bike fits you and your purpose in having it is more important.

3. Once you've got a solid idea in your head of what you want, then find a shop. Don't go to some trendy 'boutique' shop that price-gouges you, with high-pressure salespeople, trying to convince you that you need a $5000 bike with $1000 of accessories and shit, that'll just annoy the fuck out of you. Find a shop with competent people, who understand how to fit a bike to someone beyond 'stand over the top tube'. Make it clear to them you're serious about buying a bike from them (even if you're not quite yet). If they won't let you test ride a bike for an hour or so then maybe it's not the best shop; they should understand that you're going to need to be happy with your purchase in the long run, and 5 minutes in the parking lot isn't going to get you that.

4. That all being said: If you've never had a road bike before, you probably don't have a basis for comparison, therefore knowing if a bike is right for you will be difficult.
>>
>>1114424
Sounds to me like you want a cargo bike, if you want 'sturdy'.
>>
>>1114424
>american made bike.
I don't think there are any, anymore. everything's Chinese now, including Cannondale. Maybe boutique brand like Rivendell is still in the US? The US does have good custom framebuilders, but no factory produced, i don't think.

anyway, by "heavy duty, industrial" bikes I assume you mean low maintenance and durable? the golf carts just hauled people and hand-baggage? or do you need to haul cargo because there are cargo bikes for that or you could get trailers.

For no-nonsense get-on-and-go bikes that are friendly to non-bike people, I'd honestly look into the Ikea bike. they're designed to be low-maintenance. 2 speeds with a step-through frame seems like exactly what a factory situation would need. there are baskets and trailers for them, too.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30326728/

anyhow, are there any opportunities for fleet maintenance with y'all?
>>
I just got my new bike, a hybrid with Shimano Tourney, and the front derallieur keeps choking up when I go from the second to first gear, is there any way to fix it or is it just something you have to live with when using a low-end groupset?
>>
>>1114540
What do you mean by choking up? What is it doing?
>>
>>1114541
I'm not sure if I use the right terminology but it doesn't shift right away but just stays in the second gear and growls at me until the chain pops to where it's supposed to be
>>
>>1114542
You can try twiddling the barrel adjuster (s) to have it pull the chain over more. This is usually neccessary after buying a new bike since the cables change tension as the fittings are pulled tight by usage.

careful though, it's totally possible to make it worse, so give yourself a good chunk of time so you can get a feel for which direction makes it better. If you have a good eye you can look to see minute movements that happen when you turn the adjuster, which usually pushes it left or right relative to the chain.

Chainring shifting is often a bit burpy, but it should change. If you can twist the shifter a bit more to pull the cable a little more when shifting that can help, depending on how it works,
>>
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are they really that good?
>>
Crank arm came loose during ride. Bike hadn't been ridden in a while. How to prevent?
>>
>>1114593
Depends on bottom bracket type. Take a picture a axle height.
>>
>>1114577
The best way of avoiding punctures is getting tyres that makes you ride less. Less risk exposure. So yes, theyre very good at reducing punctures.
>>
>>1114607
Square taper
>>
>>1114540
Adjusting a front derailer is wizardry and tourney will never shift the front very well. Bear in mind that the chain is under load at the top of the run where it's being shifted by the front, so you need to ease up on the pedals momentarily (soft pedalling) to pull off a clean shift, or it will be too taunt to move sideways. Don't downshift the front when you have to, do it a bit before.
>>
>>1114449
>>1114487
Thanks for all the advice guys, this is why you're my favourite board
And definitely I'm doing my homework beforehand, it's something I want to seriously get into but it's a bit of a catch 22, I won't know what I'll like until I actually try shit and I suppose it's important to get it right the first time, hence why I wanted to go into a shop and get my fit right. Will definitely keep all your pointers in mind, thanks guys
>>
>>1114593
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/brandt/installing-cranks.html
I'm still not sure if i totally agree with this but Brandt would say your crank is fucked now. Anyway, torquing it down extremely hard and maybe loctite.
>>
>>1114609
why would they make me ride less? i also have a bigger crank cog on my bike that makes it go faster if you arent weak but makes the bike heavy if you are weak.
>>
>>1114577
yes, they are.
i find them comfy and fast on my touring bike, haven't had puncture for more than two years of touring and commuting.
>>
Is bobbing when going over bumps and pedalling hard unavoidable on big tyres, or is it an indication my pressures are wrong?
>>
>>1114593
Get a torque wrench and torque the bolt(s) to manufacturers' specs.
>>
>>1114542
Okay.. is it really a 'new' bike, or is it just 'new to YOU' (i.e. a used bike)? If it's new, then you just need to tighten up the cable adjustment and/or potentially adjust the Upper Limit for the derailleur; note that new cables sometimes stretch and cause a problem like this.

If it's a used bike then the above may apply, but it may also be that drivetrain components are worn to the point of not performing well. Large chainrings sometimes have 'teeth' that are riveted onto it, that are intended to catch the edges of the side-plates of the chain, to help it climb up the chainring; they can get worn, and they can also get clogged with old chainlube and dirt. Also a worn chain may cause shifting problems both front and back. A very dirty drivetrain that's been overall neglected can develop all sorts of problems. If it's a used bike you need to start with cleaning and lubing the chain, and cleaning the chainrings, cassette, and rear derailleur pulleys, then making sure everything is adjusted correctly. If it still doesn't perform properly when shifting chainrings then you start looking at what's worn out.
>>
>>1114258
zippers are a terrible technology

I hate zippers.
>>
I got my new bike a couple of days ago, a hybrid with Promax V brakes, and already I've had to fix the front brake and now I can't brake without waking the entire neighborhood up. How and with what should I lube it with? The only thing I have at home is silicone lube and WD-40, does any of that work?
>>
>>1114844
What the fuck are you doing. Don't lube your fucking brake pads.
Clean them, and rub them with some rough sandpaper, and then make sure they're actually positioned correctly. Youtube videos.
>>
>>1114847
So they're supposed to squeal until they've been broken in?
>>
>>1114849
No they're not supposed to squeal ever. If they're squealing it's usually one of two things:
1. you put them in wrong
2. They need replacing.
>>
>>1114850
Turns out that most of the noise came from dirt and hosing it down got rid of most of it but I couldn't get rid of all of it, even when trying to set them up correctly and adding as much toe as I could. At least it bites like hell when I brake now.
>>
Do disc brake have any kind of downsides compared to V brakes or is it an upgrade in any way? Is maintenance easier or harder on disc brakes?
>>
>>1114866
Get a stiff brush and brush that shit with some soapy water, then rinse it off.
>>
>>1114866
Squealing means vibration, it could be caused by the pivot bolts being loose or the brake arms just could be flexy pieces of shit.

>>1114867
>Do disc brake have any kind of downsides compared to V brakes or is it an upgrade in any way?
They could possibly be heavier, probably more expensive, and spares like pads could be a bit harder to get hold of (say you're in the middle of nowhere in some third world country, Abdul's bike shop is more likely to have some rim pads that'll fit). Other than that they're better in every way.

>Is maintenance easier or harder on disc brakes?
They should require less maintenance, especially hydraulics. Some people have trouble bleeding hydros, others don't, it can depend on the particular brake.
>>
>>1114867
There are only two downsides to disc brakes:
1. they require frames and hubs designed for discs, which adds weight and a slight aerodynamic penalty
2. cost

The only time that V-brakes are actually better than discs is on really cheap bikes that come with terrible disc brake calipers

But you might also choose V-brakes if your riding habits mean you wouldn't see much benefit from discs: discs work better in wet conditions and provide more power and better sustained braking with less effort (important for mountain biking, which involves lots of braking), so if you'll typically be riding on roads in a dry climate there's not much point in spending extra for braking power you're never going to need.
>>
>>1114424

Worksman bikes are bombproof.
>>
>>1114517
fuck off.
>>
Any tips for removing rust? Specifically from inside bolt's heads. I've heard Coke works, never tried it though
>>
>>1114875
If you're in the middle of nowhere I don't think you're going to find kool-stops either, but have fun with your yak butter fantasies
>>
>>1114936
They're more likely to have generic rim pads (which will still work) than specific disc pads (you might get lucky if you have a really common design such as some Shimanos). That said for most people it's not a huge advantage, me included (all my bikes are disc).
>>
first question may seem stupid but english aint my native language and i cant find a translation: what are these cycling clothes (pic related) called in english?

and now to my main question: is it a bad idea to use one like pic related (all black) ? any experiencies using one like that? im kinda scared due to visibility, but they are one of the few options i have to buy right away in my size. another option is sagans world champion bora suit. and i think wearing a world champion one is kind of silly aint it?

mainly concerned about cars seeing me as most of my training is done alone and live in a big city. thonks!
>>
>>1114949
Left: jersey
Right: bibs
I wouldn't worry about the color or world champ stripes.
>>
>>1114949
btw what do you guys wear? road biking speaking.
i find sponsored ones / team ones are a little dumb (dont wanna disrespect) cause youre not really in team sky nor sponsored by movistar whatever. but options are limited.. that makes me think. what do you guys wear. cheers!
>>
>>1114951
There's plenty of choices for nice looking kits with no "sponsors". Pearl Izumi makes some nice understated jerseys and bibs. Rapha makes some more fashionable stuff but it's way expensive.
>>
>>1114798
Zippers are a great technology, just not in this application.

>>1114844
You don't oil your brake pads!
Take some coarse sandpaper (240 grit wet-or-dry, or emery cloth) or a fairly coarse file to them and break up any glaze.
Then clean the braking surface of your rims carefully and completely with something that won't leave any sort of film behind.

>>1114935
Naval jelly.

>>1114951
I'm on a road race team so I have team kit.
That being said it's made by Voler, and they actually made pretty good stuff that isn't too bloody expensive, and it doesn't have to be all custom, they sell generic that just says 'Voler' on it. I'll recommend them.
>>
What are some good head/tail lights that don't look like an overglorified flashlight? Preferably something that looks like it's supposed to be on an old bike
>>
>>1115006
Look for german dyno powered stuff, probably.
>>
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>>1114949
>english aint my native language
Don't write like a full acoustic turbonigger then, mate.

>kind of silly aint it?
REEEeeee
>>
>>1115099
Are you trying to imply that "ain't" ain't a word? Besides a lack of punctuation his English is quite good.
>>
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is it normal for the rear 700x25 tire to flatten a bit while riding? I pumped up the tire but it still does this and i weigh 58kg.
>>
>>1115148
What psi did you pump it up to? It is normal when you sit and the weight from your body depress it a bit. Are you losing air while riding?
>>
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>>1115152
the tire sidewall says 120psi and i pumped them up to 120psi.
>>
>>1115153
I would say it's normal unless you notice it losing air while riding. You might just have a small puncture, but other than that, it is normal for it depress when you are sitting.
>>
>>1115152
yea it's losing air. now that i check back it feels like my rim bottoms out after the ride. i just got this bike 2 weeks ago too ffffff
>>
You guys think us rim brake owners have to worry about the industry completely moving to disc brakes and having a hard time finding rim brake wheels in the future?
>>
>>1115156
Take the tyre and tube out and check it out.

Rub your fingers in the tyre to see you find anything. Pump the tube and look to find where air is creeping out.

It's not a big deal and simple to fix. Puncture kit costs like $4 and is fine to use.
>>
>>1115153
The sidewall says MAX 120 psi
>>
>>1114844
>I can't brake without waking the entire neighborhood up.

That is not a bug it is feature.

My discs squeak like crazy. They get stupid peds attention through their earbuds. My fix is to wipe the rims or discs with alcohol to remove oil and dirt. Otherwise it is a vibration issue which other posters have addressed

>>1114951
I don't feel like being a rolling billboard so I stick with the cheap $10 amazon jerseys. The quality shows after a year, but they cover me and have the pockets. Spend the money on good shorts. I have an awesome pair of peal izumi padded liner shorts I wear under normal shorts that work great. IMO normal underwear works for rides under 25 miles.

>>1115157
Not at all. Rim brakes are standardized and cheap so spares will be around until the end of time.
>>
>>1115157

It's 2017 and I can walk into any bike shop in the country, probably in the world, and walk out with a 7 speed freewheel for under $30.

Shitrims aren't going anywhere.
>>
>>1115210
High quality shitrims might become rare though.
>>
>>1115239

Hard to say.

Materials science and manufacturing technology have come so far, so fast that the cheapest, crappiest parts you can buy are way the fuck better than what you find on a pre-refurb bike-boom ten speed.

That trend may continue, and be applicable to what we presently regard as modern bicycles. Certainly top-of-the-line wheelsets today are astonishingly better than comparable wheels from as recently as five years ago.
>>
Are carbon forks from Aliexpress worth it? Should I get some nice life insurance to go with it?
>>
How do I know what PSI my tires are pumped to? Do I need to get one of those fancy schmansy pumps?
>>
>>1115148
probably not. i weight more than that and had to fill my back tire after 100 km but i changed it now and i have not needed to fill it yet.
>>
>>1115274
If by "fancy schmansy" you mean "quality", yes.
>>
>>1115265
When are you guys going to learn to NOT buy no-name CF bikes?
>>
>>1115289
Never because there's nothing wrong with them
If one of them exploded under you I'd like to see it please
>>
Being honest, is a 90's rigid with slicks the best type of bike for commuting?
I have a road bike, town bike and 29er.
The Town Bike is usually my commuter but I am starting to dislike it.
Would it be a good idea to get a 90's rigid?
If it is a good idea, why?
>>
>>1115274
You can buy separate pressure gauges, but having a track pump is a good idea in any case to actually get your tyres up to pressure without spending an age.
>>1115299
What exactly is dissatisfying to you about the city bike?
>>
>>1115300
City bike -
Pros : Lighter than my hardtail, steel, stem shifter, full mudguard and pannier rack.(I use pannier bags on all my bikes)


Cons: Gears are starting to skip when I stand up (80's bike so can't get that fixed without buying wheel which would be more than the bike is worth). The handlebars flex a fair bit when grinding up hills (only 5 years with a decent hill peaking at 8% on my commute).
>>
>>1115300
Also, my commute is 5 miles with around a mile of cobbles, quite steep on a cycle path, with the option to cut through mud/woods as a shortcut on better days and I lived in a cold and wet climate and need to go to work anything from 2am to 1pm as a start time, varies week to week.
>>
>>1115304
>80's bike so can't get that fixed without buying wheel which would be more than the bike is worth
False. You can still get new freewheels and chains, chainrings are less common but that's less likely to be worn, and if it is a whole new crankset isn't much.
>>
>>1115307
Fair point, the main problem with that is my LBS says that the freehub is starting to give up but it is built into the hub, and showed me a lot of rust on the inside with a nearly worn out cup. Overall it would be cheaper to replace the wheel and I haven't seen the state of the bottom Bracket so not sure it would be worth replacing it all.
>>
>>1115309
How exactly is the LBS guy able to show you the cup is worn if the freehub body is fixed to the bike? Have either of you tried putting a 10 mm allen wrench in it and turning?

If the bottom bracket still spins smoothly, why get troubled over it? It is a good idea to get new chainrings if you get a new chain and cassette, though.
>>
>>1115323
Would be cheaper for me to get one of these: https://www.gumtree.com/p/bicycles/raleigh-twenty-vintage-bike-bicycle/1268799696 https://www.gumtree.com/p/bicycles/bsa-20-shopper-bike-bicycle/1268800549 https://www.gumtree.com/p/bicycles/road-bike-1970s-bsa-javelin-steel-frame-/1267442879 https://www.gumtree.com/p/bicycles/raleigh-bike/1267954621 https://www.gumtree.com/p/bicycles/triumph-road-bike-bicycle/1268801752
>>
>>1115325
Sure, those are all dirt cheap, but there's no way to tell the condition of the parts without inspecting them closely. Just eyeballing those pictures, they look fairly old and worn. If you buy one of those, you might well quickly end up having the same drivetrain problems you're currently complaining of.

You said you like the frame and loadout of your current bike, so you should maintain it. Maintenance is normal and entails replacing parts as they reach the end of their lives, not scrapping the whole bike.

I'm also still skeptical about your freehub body not being removable.
>>
>>1115289
So that's a "no"
?
>>
>>1115337
all bike brands sound like some cheap chink scams and most look disgusting too because they use bright colors on the frames are filled with ads that also use bright colors so everyone sees it even if they try to not.
>>
>>1115309
Pretty sure an 80s bike will have a freewheel and not a freeehub (which a cassette slides into and is built into the hub, a freewheel is basically a cassette and freehub in one piece that threads onto the hub). Bottom brackets are also cheap. To replace the freewheel, chain, cranks, and bottom bracket I'd say it'll cost you $75 at most for the parts, labour will be under an hour (if you don't want to do it yourself) so maybe something like $100 in total if that.
>>
so I red that you are supposed to put a small spacer above your stem.
benathe the topcapand above the stem.

do you guys do this ?
I've done it in the past but also didn't do it on other bikes and never had problems.

I feel like with many modern stems , especially integrated ones this isn't even possible.

do you do it ?
>>
>>1114951

I wear all black kit from specxel.
you order their shit straight from china via aliexpress.
it's real good and real cheap.
>>
>>1115529
It's just a safety measure for carbon steerers, but if you're careful and use a torque wrench there shouldn't be any problems.
>>
>>1115294
>Nothing bad has ever happened to ME, PERSONALLY
>therefore nothing could possibly go wrong!
You buy no-name, off-brand, or (especially) counterfeit Chinese shit like this, and you're gambling that you're not getting complete garbage.
Poor, weak designs, bad or no quality control. May look nice right up until it fails.
If you're bombing down a hill at >=40mph and your cheap Chinese forks shatter on you, don't go complaining about 'carbon fiber is garbage' to people (assuming you're alive to complain) because you cheaped out on your purchase and bought from somewhere sketchy and highly questionable.

ALL the pics you see of CF bikes that exploded into shards were either cheap-ass Chinese shit or outright counterfeits. The real, high-quality stuff doesn't do that unless something extreme happened to it (like you legitimately crashed). ***MOST PEOPLE*** not having this happen to them with the cheap shit means NOTHING.
>>
>>1115551
just spent 5 minutes browsing google for exploded carbon and it's mostly big brand stuff

Mike Sinyard plz go
>>
>>1115529
>>1115548
Google says trek introduced this meme to cover their asses after numerous peoples bikes exploded
>>
>>1115551
All the pics you see of CF bikes that exploded into shards exploded because of a crash, Chinese or otherwise.
>>
>>1115551
my brother died when his S-works venge exploded & specialized are suing his wife
>>
>>1115556

that's pretty interesting !
>>
>>1115551

everything you say makes absolute sense but there is one thing you miss.

chinese companies are companies too and exploding products still aren't good for a company and thus they do anything to avoid somethign like this happening.

as you said they mostly don't have any quality control to speak of. however they usually just overbuild stuff a lot.
most china carbon parts aren't particulary light.

this is however pure personal speculation, it's someting I have noticed while buying about 4 forks maybe 5 seatposts and a few handlebars.
nothing ever broke.

I once had a rigid 29er fork on a xc bike that I ran straight into a wall coming from a descent.
I only noticed a few weeks after the crash while changing tires that it had a tiny crack right below the crown.
I don't know if any fork from any material ever could have survived that.
>>
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ALRIGHT YOU FAGGOTS HERE'S A FUCKING QUESTION

Let's say I live in a city.

And let's say I want a bike for getting around, commuting, but also maybe something I can use on weekends to go cycling.

Should I get a single speed (perhaps better for commuting, lower maintenance, looks cooler, but obviously won't be as versatile if I want to do weekend rides) or a proper road bike (probably worse for commuting because gears might fuck up, and it's potentially a bigger target for thieves, and arguably doesn't look as cool for urban commuting, and there's a chance that if you have to lock it up outside for a while then someone could smash the derailleur, whereas that danger doesn't exist with a single speed)?

Or maybe I should just use Boris Bikes (bike hire in London) because it's just easier and there's no hassle
>>
>>1115598
Get a used road bike. Make it look a bit trashy to reduce theft chance
>>
>>1115551
You're always gambling if you buy a product, no matter how reputable it is, dipshit
>>
>>1115598
What you're describing is a hybrid bike, you can get something like this that has 8 gears but no front derallieur so you can still go on longer rides and have less hassle with maintenance.

https://www.evanscycles.com/pinnacle-lithium-1-2018-hybrid-bike-EV275571
>>
>>1115598
I don't get why you think having gears is a negative attribute for commuting. "because gears might fuck up" applies to any other application as well, but once set-up, gears don't really fuck up. "someone could smash the derailleur," yeah, and they could cut your brake cables, or slash your tires, or vomit on your bike. where are you getting this from? I've been commuting on geared bicycles in cities since about 1991 (yeah, I know) ; I've had one bike outright stolen, and someone stole a light that I left on that I didn't want to go through security check with to a sports game once. Nothing else, no smashing of anything, intentional or otherwise.

But you think fixed-gear looks "cooler," so obviously there's no hope for you anyhow. go ahead and choose a bike based on your emotions.
>>
>>1115598
just get a 1X CX bike.
>>
>>1115614
>he thinks i want a fucking dorky hybrid
HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

>>1115617
>go ahead and choose a bike based on your emotions
So do you make your decisions based on other people's emotions?
>>
>>1115632
Hate to break it to you but you're going to look a hundred times more dorky commuting on a road bike than on a hybrid
>>
As a meme-tier prepper, what's the ultimate bugout bike?
>>
>>1115632
What are you 12?
>>
>>1115690
cyclocross, made for road and light offroad.
>>
>>1115690
90s rigid MTB
>>
>>1115613
>I need to justify (to myself!) buying a cheap carbon fiber bike frame made in Asia so I don't shit myself when I ride it!
You clearly have no idea the quality difference and quality *control* difference between a CF bike made by a reputable company (that need to PROTECT it's reputation) and some no-name Chinese factory that doesn't really give a shit if some roundeyed gaijin in America crashes or not.
>>
>>1114424
http://surlybikes.com/bikes/big_dummy

"Big Dummy is a long-tail cargo bike, which means that not only can you haul a serious amount of cargo, different accessories can be added to your Big Dummy frame and deck depending on what you want to carry."
>>
are there any cock warmers? after last ride my penis got chilled and it burned for two days
>>
>>1115807
Uhhh.. I'm pretty sure that's a different problem entirely. Go see a doctor. :-(
>>
>>1115807
Rapha makes a nice one. It's worth paying $$ for as the cheap ones can be extremely painful or even dangerous if you get an erection, and it's hard to actually go fast in winter unless your cock is safe and warm
>>
>>1114424
You sure bikes are what you want?
The factory I work in uses tricycles for safety reasons. Also has better tools/equipment hauling capability
>>
I'm looking to buy a bike, but I'm quite poor so i'm looking into buying a used one in my country.

Found this listing, but the seller doesn't give much info.

All it says is
Cannondale bad boy
28 wheels
hydraulic brakes

What do you say, is it worth it to look more into it, price is listed as 250eur
>>
>>1115841
>>
>>1115841
look into it. most important is ride it and if u like the feeling and can afford it, then get it. it looks like a pretty all purpose bike which most likely is what u want.
>>
>>1114253
couple questions
1 my derailer started sqeaking and i took it apart to clean the jockey wheels. One of them is slightly wider than the other and I do not remember which wheel goes where.
2 i realized my chainset is missing two bolts. dunno if they fell out recently or if the ppl that built my bike lost them and i never noticed untill now. How important do u think they are? its probably only a couple of dollars to get new ones so ill probably buy them
3 having to charge lights is a pain and my lights always go out in the middle of my commute so i want a dynamoo system. thing is,i try to keep my bike as cheap as possible bc its most likely gonna get stolen soon. Any1 kno a cheap dynamo lighting system? just a front and blinking rear is what i need. also a disc specific hub. thx

ps why r all these captchas about bikes and buses? hopefully autonomys cars wont hit us i geuss
>>
I have a rigid MTB with slicks (hybrids, rather) 26 x 1.5 at 60 psi

How much of a difference will I see if I get 26 x 1.25 at 100 psi (or 26 x 1.5 @100 since idk if my rims can do 1.25)
>>
>>1115934
You'll probably save around 2-5 watts (per tyre) but lose a lot in comfort. Why not just try it, or do you need to buy a new pump to get that high?
>>
>>1115940
My current tires are rated to 65 psi, I was thinking of buying some rated to 100
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>>1115942
I don't actually know if you'll be able to find any rated for that, that's pretty high for tyres of that size (32-38mm), that's the sort of pressure you'd be running with 23-28mm road bike skinnies. Your current tyres almost certainly could actually handle 100psi, the max rating is much lower than the actual max, but I'd be more worried about your rims.
>>
>tfw 300 pound rider
>could never do uphills even when I was younger at 250 pounds
>lost 30 pounds and finally conquered an uphill I could never ride on.

What is something I can work on next? My longest ride is only 4 miles or so. What would be a good milestone to strive for? I do hope to do a 100 miler one day.
>>
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I'm looking into getting back into mountain biking, but I don't really know what I should be looking for. I've been riding bicycles since I was 4 or 5, and riding motorcycles for about 5 years, 5'8, 30 inch inseam. I have wrenching experience so old bikes are no issue. If I could take a dirt bike where I want to ride, of be ripping around an old 80 to 125cc two stroke, but I have no idea how to translate that to bicycles.

I live in NYC in the Bronx, tons of hills everywhere. I'm looking for something than can take a trashing and doesn't have expensive parts. It should be fairly light as far as bikes go. And I guess that's pretty much it? Gearing for the steep hills is a must.

Any recommendations? Wisdom? Advice? Anything would be great.
>>
>>1115949
Just set a goal to ride for a certain amount of time two or three times a week. Increase that time when it stops wearing you out. Don't worry about speed or distance right now, because you'll get faster.
>>
>>1115949

If you want serious results, take your health seriously and start consulting with a nutritionist and a personal trainer. They'll be much better at setting realistic milestones than fucking 4chan.

>>1115954

Any old steel mountain bike will do fine.
Since you are riding on roads, put slick tires on it.
>>
>>1115949
>What is something I can work on next?
Lots of things.

1. Ride 5-6 days a week in a pattern similar to this: short, longer, short, longer, short, longest
2. Focus on turning smooth circles with the pedals, no 'dead spots'
3. Focus on pedaling *continuously* as much as you can
4. Plan out 4-week cycles of riding: 2nd week longer than 1st, 3rd week longer than 2nd, 4th week ('recovery' week) shorter than 1st week. Then repeat.

Do that for a couple months and tell us how you do.
>>
>>1115960

Is steel heavy? Will.i run into any traction issues on the trails with slick tires? I assume they're the equivalent to road tires on a motorcycle, right?
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>>1115883
1- the top jockey is prob the narrower one as it's supposed to have some float to correct indexing, the bottom one shouldn't have any play.
2- yes that matters, take them off a bike in the street
3- Cheapest is probably a prebuilt wheel from an online german shop, with a shimano hub, bike24 or bikediscount.de prob have them. For the light I have an edelux II and it's amazing, don't know about others. You can't get rear blinking as blinking lights are illegal in Germany. It's also a real bitch to cable a rear light to a dynamo and battery rear lights last for ages.
>>
>>1115967
He's memeing, ignore him. Get a reasonably modern hardtail, say no older than 2008, 100-120mm fork, 27.5 preferably for future tyre options but 26 is fine, 29 if you're particularly tall (maybe 6'2"+) but not overweight (larger wheels are weaker). Look for hydraulic brakes, fork lockout is ncie for road riding and climbing, a double crankset will get you gearing for climbing without spending the extra money for 10/11 speed. New you'll probably be wanting to spend at least $500 (converting from my currency so just a rough idea), fuck knows how much second hand as market's vary a lot.
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>>1115967
>cheap
>light
>strong

It doesn't exist. The difference between a new, 5yo, 10yo, 20yo and 30yo road bike is not a lot. For Mtbs it's huge. If you actually want something good by modern standards you need to buy new, and poney up some cash. It's not going to be the bike you can ride around nyc on. It'll get stolen, and the tires will suck for on road. An old rigid steel 'mtb' is fun to ride on trails, it's a great alrounder, but it's not really the same thing as mtbing. It's better value then a very entry level mtb you see in stores though. Basically now if it's new with a triple crank it's too cheap to be good.
>>
>>1115969
>take them off a bike in the street
fag
>>
>>1115972

Ten star post.
This anon knows his stuff.
>>
>>1115972

I see, I should clarify that this bike is mainly just for around town dicking around and the multisurface trails in my local park (mainly dirt) so im not trying to spend a bunch of money on any trick/expensive stuff.

But thank you to >>1115971
For advice, I'll keep this in mind as I shop around.

It's important to me that whatever I get doesn't leave me with a bent wheel after a three foot jump or hard landing from a stoppie, nor a bent frame. Cheap, doesn't fold like a paperclip after some harder riding and not obnoxiously expensive. Control on technical/dangerous downhills is important.
>>
>>1115980

What the fuck.
You're in NYC.

You don't have technical downhills. Period.
You don't have technical anything or downhill anything.

I bet you couldn't taco a fucking alexrim if you tried.
>>
>>1115981
Let the man have his cheap light technical downhill bike for riding mostly on the road where there's tonnes of hills and multisurface trails in the local park.
>>
>>1115982

Once again you give great advice.
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>>1115981

Hey, man. Check out Van Cortland Park, admittedly I'm not as technically savvy with the bicycle side of two wheel stuff, but it's actually really fun to ride around the nature trails and time yourself across all sorts of points to points and loops. The elevation changes can be fairly stark and there are a bunch of unofficial trails that have their own challenges to them.

Have you ever been to NYC? It's not like I live in midtown Manhattan, I'm like two minutes from the Westchester border lol. This place is quite varied!
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>>1115969
i thought the skinnier one is the bottom one and the thicker one that is closer to the cassette is the thicker one so the chain is aligned more precisely with the cassette.
are u suggesting i steal? or are u saying its so important i should stop using the bike?
im not from germany but ill look into those lights. i have basic electronix understanding so i might try to rig something up for the blinking rear light.
>>
>>1115985

"Technical" riding refers to the degree of balancing skill and plyometric instantaneous power-to-weight a rider can exhibit.

This is an example of what would be considered "technical" riding for an absolute beginner. Pre-teen children ride this on their mountain bikes.


Don't worry about any of this stuff though.

What is most important is that you are out there riding and having fun. I respect that and so does anyone else who loves riding.
>>
>>1115988

Why are you being a pompous ass? Anyone can do that. Are you trolling?
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>>1115990

>Why are you being a pompous ass?

Because you don't seem to actually know what any of the words you are using mean.

>Anyone can do that.

I'm about 90% certain that you can't do that on a bicycle.

>Are you trolling?

Actually no. I am trying to be helpful and friendly without being demeaning towards someone who is way, way out of their element and doesn't want to admit it.
>>
>>1115991

You're acting hella bitchmade. And yes, literally anyone can traverse a short section of rocks on a fucking bicycle, provided it isn't a road bike.

Your ham handed use of sarcasm isn't impressive. I admitted i'm a bit of a noob when it comes to bicycles, but I'm not a blithering idiot.

I'm just trying to.learn from people who clearly know more.than I do, why participate in a general like this if you're going to act like a dick?
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>>1115987
no dude, the top pulley is the one that floats. It's normally labeled 'g pulley' or 'upper'. Look this up if you don't believe me.
I'm just kidding, do replace it though. You can keep riding but take it easy/ don't mash.
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>>1115993

You're just overtuned to shit-tier NYC social-network nonsense.

I am not being sarcastic. At all.
AT ALL.

I'm not being a dick. At all. AT ALL.

I'm trying to point you in the right direction.

You've never ridden anything technical and probably never will.

The picture of the rock garden I posted I have seen ridden on a 1970's bike boom road bike, at speed, without any difficulty.

Not trying to act like a dick.
Like I said, I dig that you ride what you ride.
I'm just trying to tell you that it is not technical and that you could ride it on literally anything.
>>
>>1115995

I don't want to sound like a dick, but are you autistic? Because that is the most roundabout, snobbish, holier than thou way of getting to that point.

But hey, Thank you for pointing me in the right direction. I appreciate it.
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>>1115998

Probably slightly autistic, yeah.

I think you need to start asking yourself the same question though. Why would you need me to work so hard to explain something so obvious?
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>>1115998
Assume autism here
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>>1115988
ooh I can do this one
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>>1115999

It's obvious to you because you already know and understand this. I do not know this, how the fuck am I supposed to know this already? I even gave you some background to show my basic understanding. I even gave an example of what would use with the dirt bike.

You do realize that you are not as straightforward as you think you are? You are actually quite cryptic.

>>1116000

Noted.
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>>1116005

Well for starters, I'm sorry. Legit sorry.

Like I said. Not trying to troll or be a dick or otherwise diminish your enjoyment of riding.

You're doing fucking awesome stuff all the time, just by being out there and especially by wanting to do just a bit more and explore just a bit more than you already are. It is godamn great.

But some of your ideas really align with reality at all.
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>>1115961
Will do. I don't have any major commitments right now so losing 100 pounds while mastering cycling is my current goal for 2018
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>>1116005
LMAO you sound like a pussy
>>
>>1116040
NOTE: I'm not ANY of the people in this 'conversation', I'm an observer.

tbqh this thread is starting to sound like it's infested with 12 year old underage b&'s instead of anyone who should be giving advice about anything to anyone. How about you all take a couple steps back and cool the fuck off for a while?
>>
Any reason not to buy? https://www.gumtree.com/p/bicycles/mens-mountain-bike/1269182941
>>
How fast is fast when riding on flat roads? I recently replaced my old shitty bike with a new hybrid and my average speed on flats went from around 15-17 km/h to 20-22 km/h when riding at a cadence I can comfortably hold for a long period of time, but I'm 190 cm and weigh 90 kg as well. Is it realistic for someone who's heavy to reach speeds of like 30 km/h with a comfortable cadence or do I need to shed a bunch of weight from myself and my bike?
>>
>>1116129
You're being slowed by your position at speeds above 20km/h. drop bars aren't a meme, they make you go faster.
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>>1116132
I know, I have these on my handlebars, but even when I ride downhill I max out at like 45 km/h.
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>>1116134
Aero more.
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>>1116134
those are for climbs, not aero, dumbass
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>>1116129
>>1116132
I can hold 30km/h on flat ground and have hit 58km/h downhill on my hybrid. My bars are fairly low and I have bar ends that I've put inboards of the grips for a slightly more aero position. I'm only 178cm and 68kg so a little more aero (although my clothing isn't aero at all) but also probably a bit weaker.

Raise your saddle to the correct height if you haven't already, it really helps for efficient power transfer. Then slowly work on lowering your bars for more aero but don't go so low that you're uncomfortable. Tyres will also have a fairly big affect on how fast you can go, both the particular tyre as well as the inflation pressure.
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>>1116138
They're still more aero downhill than using the flat bars you muppet
>>
>>1116134
>>1116146
Well I could just flip then 180 degrees and have ghetto drop bars
>>
can i use a different REAR BICYCLE DERAILLEUR than the one that it came with as long as the speeds are the same?

Also the trigger shifter for the rear is broken, cable is all stretched anyway to keep the shift cable or should i buy new?

last question. how hard is it to change shift cables?


Also when replacing a chain for a MTB any tips?
>>
>>1116148
>can i use a different REAR BICYCLE DERAILLEUR than the one that it came with as long as the speeds are the same?
You'll also need to match the brand and in the case of Shimano you may not be able to use a road derailer (depends on how many speeds), I think SRAM road and mountain is mostly interchangeable.

>keep the shift cable or should i buy new?
Cables are cheap, no reason to keep it. Also treat yourself to some new housings.

>how hard is it to change shift cables?
Physically changing them is pretty easy, setting up the indexing might be a bit of a challenge. There are plenty of guides out there for that, written and videos.

>Also when replacing a chain for a MTB any tips?
Match the speeds. If you have a suspension frame you want to make sure that it's long enough to allow full travel when in the largest gear (let all the air out your shock or remove the spring and get a buddy to compress it). If it's a hardtail then set the length the same as a road bike, long enough to go round the largest cog and chainring combo (but not through the derailer) plus 2 links.
>>
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how much should i price two 80s low end bikes (miyata and panasonic)? you think 80-90usd sounds fair?
>>
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Is it possible to remove the spider and have the arm still be functional? If so, how?
>>
local bike shop having some bikes on sale and one of them caught my eye a little warakin iirc its by some company called otos or otso. looking at the RSP the shop has it on sale by quite a few hundred bucks so I'm just wondering if anyone's had any problems with the bike be it new, second hand, or just after long use.
>>
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>>1116213
Flip side
>>
>>1116213
>>1116215
It's probably just heat shrunk on there so you could pull that one off and replace it, but that would probably mean machining the new spider or arm to fit. No idea why you'd want to go through all that effort for some shitty cottered cranks.
>>
>>1116217
I want to use the arm by itself on a unicycle that currently doesn't have crank arms and requires cottered cranks.
>>
>>1116226
Oh right, in that case go right ahead. If you can't pull the spider off (heat will help) you could just cut it.
>>
>>1116214
https://otsocycles.com/pages/warakin
this?
>>
Do V brake bosses come in two different types? I bought Deore brakes only to find that the boss shoulder is too long for the Deores, so the springs don't fully engage the boss holes, and the brakes remain loose and not fully seated.
>>
>>1116454
Some thread in posts can be a little longer with a thicker lip behind the part with the wrench flats, but I wouldn't have thought it'd be enough to cause an issue (the springs should go in more than enough to make up for it). However with you saying the brakes are actually loose I'm guessing it's the actual shaft that's too long, so either they're some really shit posts with crappy tolerances or the brakes are meant for Mafac bosses. If you've got a file it should be easy enough to shorten them if you don't want to buy new ones (or wait for them to arrive).
>>
>>1116454
>>1116459
Actually, it appears there are "XT and modified XT" bosses that are longer and shorter than regular respectively, so perhaps your brakes are meant to use those.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Titanium-TC4-Bicycle-Brake-V-Stud-Bolt-Washer-Group-Set-M10-for-e-g-Birdy-Fnhon/32373564313.html?spm=2114.search0304.4.104.EK5XE4
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>>1116461
Yep, that looks to my problem. I have regular bosses, but the new brakes need XT bosses. Thanks. Trying to find this out was maddening.
>>
What are the main differences between mechanical and hydraulic disk brakes? I have a budget hybrid with rim brakes right now and I want to upgrade to a cyclocross for fitness and commuting, and probably use it for triathlons, but does it really matter if you get mechanical or hydraulic disk brakes unless you're riding in the Tour de France? Which is easier to maintain?
>>
>>1116466
Forgot to add that the bikes I'm looking at have mechanical disk brakes
>>
>>1116466
Hydraulics are more reliable, require less frequent maintenance, have more power, better modulation, better pad wear usually (a lot of cable calipers are single piston so one pad is going to wear faster), a more consistent feel that's the same front and rear, a better feel overall (smoother with less force required).

The downside is cost, especially when it comes to drop bars. If you can't afford to pay extra for hydros then make sure the bike comes with Spyres or factor in the cost of those as replacements.
>>
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>>1116241
I just went straight to the hacksaw. Worked out very well.
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>>1116507
I think they're going to work out fine.
>>
>>1116507
I would've cut through just the spider but whatever works. I'm guessing it's quite an old uni to be using cottered cranks, photo of the full thing? Can you already ride one or is this your first? I bought a cheap one years ago and never could get the hang of it.
>>
>>1116425
yeah seems like this is it
>>
>>1115981
>NEVER RIDDEN IN THE BRONX
>>
Is there any way to avoid chain slap short of swapping to a clutched MTB derailleur? My chain gets so close to the tyres in lower gears on offroad stuff it's marking the sidewall.
>>
>>1116666
You may be able to shorten your chain, you can also use devices that put more tension on the chain like a lower chainguide (mounts at the bottom bracket, just below the chainring) or one of those chainstay mounted guides.
>>
>>1116517
I don't have it finished yet. I would've had to cut the excess metal off of the crank arm either way. I just cut the spider off and the extra metal on the arm off all in one shot. Figured it'd save some time. I can ride it a little bit. I can't free-mount it yet. I have to start off holding onto something to start. Also unable to idle in one place yet. Just have to keep practicing. Check YouTube for some instructional videos. Worked for me!
>>
>>1116684
>chain
When I measured it out I actually needed every single link. Long stays + big(kind of) cog.
>those other things
Will they work on a non-1x system?

Thanks.
>>
>>1116687
The chainstay guide would, the lower chainring guide would need to be 2x specific with a wide enough pulley for the chain to move sideways.
>>
>>1116666
Sounds to me like your chain is the wrong length.

Two conditions need to exist:
One: In your largest chainring and largest cog, there should still be some movement left in the derailleur cage (i.e., it should not be jammed up against it's stop). If it doesn't meet this condition, your chain is too SHORT; you now need a new chain.
Two: In your smallest chainring and smallest cog, the lower part of the chain should still have spring tension on it from the derailleur (i.e., again, the derailleur cage should not be up against it's stop, leaving the chain slack). If it doesn't meet this condition, your chain is too LONG; shorten it.

It's also possible to not meet both conditions because the derailleur cage is the wrong size, (i.e. you have a triple chainring crankset and for some reason have a derailleur with a short cage). If so you must replace the derailleur. A medium or long-cage derailleur on a standard double crankset (or 1x) should work fine, but you end up with a longer chain than you otherwise would. Functionally it's fine though.

If your bike or derailleur is old, it's also possible the derailleur just needs to be replaced, or just dismantled, cleaned, greased/lubed, and put back together/reinstalled on the bike; the spring could be worn out, or the pivot point is mucked up and needs to be cleaned and lubed so it rotates freely again.
>>
>>1116706
It's an 11 speed system, I have compact cranks and an 11-32 cassette with a medium cage 105 RD. The bike has fairly long chainstays, I think.
>>
>>1116666
>>1116684
>>1116706
>>1116709
The spring tension on road derailleurs isn't as high as MTB derailleurs. If chain slap is a concern for you and you don't want to replace your drivetrain, then pad the top of your drive-side chainstay with an aftermarket chainstay sticker, chainstay pad, wrap the whole stay in innertube, or glue a section of old tire tread to the topside of it.

>BB mounted Chain guide.
If you're running road cranks on a 68mm external cup BB, you might night have enough space to mount a guide between the frame and BB cup which could keep you from fully mounting the NDS crank arm.
>>
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>>1116713
>The spring tension on road derailleurs isn't as high as MTB derailleurs.
You can change the spring tension on Shimano derailleurs.
>>
>>1116687
If you're confident you can avoid crosschaining then you could take a link or two off the chain and have an exploding big + big combo
>>
>>1116715
ugh don't do this. You will inevitably forget about it at some inopportune point and break your shit.
>>
>>1116709
Well then check the chain length as per my original post. If the chain isn't too long then it's just something I guess you'll have to put up with.
>>
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if my stock specialized axis rims are about 15c ETRTO, possibly even narrower, should i run 23c tires or is 25c ok?
>>
>>1116838
25c will work just fine.
>>
Ignoring the story of that one guys battery blowing up, anyone have any lights from alibaba?
>>
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Someone talk me out of this
>>
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>>1116850
I ordered two of pic related

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/300LM-Cycling-Bicycle-LED-Lamp-USB-Rechargeable-Bike-Front-Light-Waterproof-High-Power-Head-Flashlight-Warning/32805573781.html

they were both cracked. They worked fine except for the lens coming out because of the cracks, but I taped it up and it seems to work ok. Pretty bright and I like the usb charging.

Apparently you're not supposed to charge these more than 1A, so not even going to try...
>>
>>1116850
Bought a chink light for $15 a few years ago and it still serves me well on commutes. I did, however, buy a good quality battery pack on eBay for $50, and that's still working nicely, too. The capacity is far too much for what I use it for, though. The capacity of the battery the light came with was pathetic, like 30 minutes on low.
>>
>>1116850
>>1116852
Also have these on the way, will see how they are in a few weeks

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Portable-USB-Rechargeable-Bike-Bicycle-Tail-Rear-Safety-Warning-Light-Taillight-Lamp-Super-Bright-ALS88/32807783601.html

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Meilan-X5-Smart-Cycling-laser-Light-Bicycle-Rear-tail-light-USB-Rechargeable-Wireless-Remote-Turn-Signal/32678977173.html
>>
>>1116851
you could probably get a better deal on a complete from an in-house brand
you're up to $450 for a tiagra groupset, and an alu frame + carbon fork
you'll still need wheels, stem, bars, seatpost, saddle, tires, cables, and other random shit
just a good wheelset alone is going to be like $200
all in you're probably spending close to $800 to build that up
>>
>>1116851
>cabron
not even once
>>
>>1116850
Chinese knock off lithium batteries being charged with chinese knock off charging circuits built with chinese knock off components.
There are plenty of reports of the cheap batteries failing with proper charging. Also plenty of reports of genuine batteries failing with chinese chargers that don't terminate the charge (the voltage just slowly creeps up until something catches fire/explodes/etc).

But yeah I have one. Just be careful anon.
>>
>>1116855
can you find me a new bike with a Tiagra groupset for $800
>>
>>1116860
Motobecane
>>
>>1116851
At least it's aluminum, and at least it's from a reasonably reputable dealer, comes with a warranty of some sort, and if something happened (to you) there at least would be someone to hold accountable. $200 for a frameset, though, that seems pretty goddamned cheap; I wouldn't expect more than transportation out of it.

>>1116857
Oh, grow up.
>>
>>1116859
Yeah, *KABOOM* in some cases.
Poorly-build Li+ cells can become VERY upset when they fail. If there's an entire pack of them, one cell failing can and will cause a chain reaction, overheating adjacent cells, causing them to fail. Li+ cells and battery packs are something you definitely need to buy from reputable sources and manufacturers.
>>
>>1116895
Yeah, Bikes Direct at least has been around for a good long time.
>>
Is it possible to replace the rim brakes on a hybrid bike with mechanical disk brakes or is it too much hassle to be worth it?
>>
>>1116907
Front isn't too bad, you can just swap out the fork. Back isn't really doable without all kinds of faffing about.

Most people will tell you swapping to mechs isn't really worth it, though.
>>
>>1116909
Can't I just run a disk brake in the front and a rim brake in the back since having better stopping power and more reliable brakes is more important for the front brake? I'm almost scared to use my front brake because I feel like it's going to collapse if I brake too hard since I've had that happen too many times in the past.
>>
>>1116913
Yes, you can
>>
>>1116907
t. shit brake pads
just get a new fork lol
>>
>>1116913
>because I feel like it's going to collapse if I brake too hard since I've had that happen too many times in the past
Um, what the fuck? Collapse how?
>>
>>1116923
I got my bike like a week ago

>>1116924
Shitting itself
>>
>>1115954
Look for an older 26'' mtn bike on craigslist. I recommend a 3x9 for smaller budgets.
If you want something new, look into a $400-600 entry-level mtn bike from a major brand. It'll probably be okay component-wise but you can always upgrade them. Don't put slicks on either if you want to go off-road.
Mirroring what >>1115972 said, if you want a really good mtn bike, spend a decent chunk of change, enough that will get you into a 2x10 at least with good components and rims and tires that can go tubeless.


>>1115961
Definitely focus on cadence over speed, shift so you are always pedaling smoothly and constantly. Find a nice route and go a bit farther every time you feel like riding.
>>
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Hi guys, first time posting on /n/, dumb questions ahead:

If I were to affix an engine to a run-of-the-mill Walmart 29in mountain bike, would a chainsaw engine or a weed whacker engine work better?

How do I find out which weed whacker or chainsaw motor is right for me? I ask because engine kits need some tube on the frame to be no more than 1.5in in diameter and said tube on my Genesis GS29 is 1.75in

Any help would be much appreesh'd

Here's a vintage reaction image
>>
>>1116895
The Virgin cycle meme is real? Ok I'll give it a shot, seems safer than vilano at least
>>
>>1116950
please don't desu
>>
>>1116950
Pedal you lazy cunt
>>
>>1116962

I didn't come here to get told how dangerous it was, I just want some help. Riding a bike in the Miami sun I thought would be easier than the hills of North Carolina and Mobile but it's just as bad. :( I promise to only turn it on when it's safe to do so, and wear a helmet, and I've already got anti-abrasion arm sleeves come on
>>
>>1116973
yeah man you bike on two miles of sidewalks and traffic stops in +90 degree sun and see how sweaty you don't get to your job like. I'm just a broke kid my guys, I need options for broke kids
>>
>>1116976
How fat must one be to get sweaty after two miles?
>>
>>1116860
if you're willing to settle for a fsa crankset and everything else tiagra, then you can go even cheaper than $800
>>
>>1116974
its just plain retarded
first off, you aren't starting with a bike, you're starting with a bso
an extra shitty bso most likely, because usually the worst parts of a bso are the shitty steel wheels
29 inch wheels are kinda bad even from reputable makers since they're either very weak or very heavy
i can't even imagine how terrible 29 inch wheels from walmart are going to be. i bet you can taco them on a 2 foot drop
since its a "mountain bike" it probably has "suspension" which will have failing seals within a year and won't do anything useful
however, in its natural state, even a shitty bso is usable as short term, disposable transportation
if you go through with bolting an ice to it, it will go from being very shitty transportation to just being garbage
if the weak walmart frame and walmart wheels can even take the weight of the obese motherfucker riding it and the engine that is
you won't have a usable moped, you won't have a usable bike, you won't have a usable motorcycle, you won't have shit
if you want pedal assist because you're a little bitch, then at least use an electric setup instead of an ice
but you'd probably be better off throwing that bso away and buying a real one
the reason you think its too hard to ride around on a bike is hard is because you've never ridden a real bike, just a piece of shit from walmart
retard
>>
>>1116994
Isn't that always the case with prebuilt bikes?
>>
>>1116976
nigger i live in houston, don't be bitching to me about heat and shit
you are a weak fucking pussy if you can't ride 2 miles
and for fucks sake, get the fuck of the sidewalk
>>
>>1116999
pretty much yeah
they have to save money somewhere, and they usually do it by using a cheap crankset and cheap tires
the fsa cranksets honestly aren't that bad though, they're a bit flexy but they'll hold
>>
Today, for the first time, I wore knicks and a jersey for my commute. I usually wear baggies and a t shirt. What a revelation! So cool and comfortable.

Question: am I gay now?
>>
>>1116998
man if I'm gonna dish more than 600 for a bike I might as well get a fucking scooter. I guess the superiority must come with anti-sweat superpowers you gain only from being a big enough loser to get into cycling for the sake of cycling, cause obesity is most definitely NOT an accurate physical descriptor of me. of course I am wearing street clothes and not that lame-ass biking gear so maybe it's not superpowers

but insults aside think of the thought of being the reason I die should be enough to spur some of you into helping me. because I'm trying to /not/ spend 200 bucks or more on a mode of transportation, that even if it lasts just two months (unlikely since I'll be turning it on very sparingly. miami's a dream when it comes to bike lanes on major roads and long, well-kept, empty sidewalk) it will have served its purpose

tl;dr if you guys think i'm so retarded humor me so you can kill me then. also I'm not fat fuck you
>>
>>1117013
You sound incredibly insecure
If you're poor just walk
>>
>>1117013
This will not end well for you
>>
>>1117012
Yer gonna have a dick in your ass before you know it
>>
>>1117016
I thought this was 4chan, not reddit
>>
Any good recommendations for cheapo but durable bikepacking stuff? Looking to start putting a kit together over the winter, and then going for a few trips in the spring, probably 1-2 nights.
>>
>>1117013
> think of the thought of being the reason I die should be enough to spur some of you into helping me
I'm thinking of the thought that of being the reason you die because i say it's not a retarded idea and go for it but it is a retarded idea, however genius is often borne of stupidity and if you go full circle and meme a lawnmower engine onto your garbage wallmart bike then come back here with your head held high and you will be well deserving of the (you)s
>>
>>1117072
message received
>>
Is Reynolds 953 currently the best steel tubing available?
>>
slowly converting a neglected 80's steel fixie I found back into a geared bike. 2 questions:

I think the rear spacing is 120 or 126mm. The smallest cassettes I can find on Amazon are 7spd, are there smaller ones that would work well with an old road bike with smaller spacing?

And since it's a fixie, am I going to have to get new wheels or is there a way to put in a freewheel with relative ease?
>>
>>1117082
126 is enough for a 7 speed cassette. I have a 7 speed cassette with 90s Exage hub on my 80s 126 steel frame.
>>
>>1117082
I have an 80s steel atb, spacing was 125 mm, it had a 6 speed suntour freewheel stock. A Shimano 7 speed fit but I had to put a ~1 mm washer in next to the hub to clear the frame.
>>
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I'm refurbishing an old bike (pic related, found that on the internet) and everything was going surprisingly well, but once I tried raising the saddle my fat ass bent the seat post back.

Need to buy a new seat post around 20mm diameter. Any tips, and how do I have this not happen again?

Also would it be conceivable for me to buy a piece of tubing the right size? I think the old saddle would attach to it easily.
>>
>>1117093
>around

Seatposts are measured in .2mm increments, "around 20mm" is just not precise enough to have success with purchasing a seatpost.

Also you did a good thing. A steel seatpost bending so easily suggests a stress riser which would've revealed itself later on in a less forgiving situation.
>>
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Why don't you people not use regular bikes? Whenever I see Americans talk about bikes you are always posting mountain bikes.
>>
>>1117095
Australian here. It's always baffled me too about why so many people think it's a great idea to ride mountain bikes around. Of course, your humble fiets might be too tame for roads outside Europe.
>>
>>1117095
For three reasons basically
1. Mountain bikes are easier to come by
2. People exaggerate the poor state of their roads and think they need fat tires and full suspension for commuting
3. People fool themselves into thinking they'll give their commuter bikes offroad use, which they hardly ever do
>>
>>1117082
You'll need a new wheel, or a new hub at least.
>>
>>1116950
I'm not even going to go into the multi-paragraph explanation why that's a bad idea, just believe us when we say "it's a bad idea, don't do it, just PEDAL YOUR BIKE".
>>
>>1116976
>two miles
>90 degree temperatures
>TWO MILES!
I agree with others, you're a fat lazy cunt. When you're riding 50+ miles in 100 degree heat with 5000 feet of elevation gain, THEN you can come in here and whine about 'hard'. Otherwise stop being a fat lazy cunt and RIDE YOUR BIKE.
>>
>>1117013
Again:
>TWO WHOLE MILES! WAAAH!
For fucks sake I *WALK* two miles on a regular basis, too short to bother with a bike. You're a lazy piece of shit and need to HTFU, either that or go schedule your gender reassignment surgery, pussy, you're obviously a weak little girl trapped in a man's body -- and you deserve all the flack you're taking for posting your pussy shit in this thread.
>>
Is it OK to have a Dogma F10 as my dream bike as a casual rider? I wonder if that is overkill
>>
>People in this thread acting like they've always been able to ride hard, fast, and far.
Kek
>>
>>1117131
It's a luxury item, so how can it be overkill? Dream bike also generally implies that the chances of you actually acquiring on are slim so... who cares if someone else thinks it's overkill?
>>
Hi, I have a Merida Big Nine 100 2015. I know fuck-all about bikes but I need help.

First thing: My gears keep slipping and take a lot of time to change. For example if I am in 7th gear and I pedal hard, it makes a strange noise and can even change to 6th or 8th at times.

Second, I let my idiot step dad use the bike and he pumped up the tire without my permission. He pumped it too much and the (I think it's called a valve stem) came off and cracked. He sealed it with soap and it seems like a good temporary solution but I want to fix it properly.

Can anyone help?
>>
>>1117111
Settle down, no need to go crazy on the guy for just being lazy.
>>
>>1117142
1. Consult the ParkTool site for front and rear derailleur adjustment
2. Replace the tube. The measures needed are written on the side of your tires.
>>
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>>1117142
I'm gonna guess worn chain and cassette if its going on 3 yrs w/ the original for gear slipping and your dad didn't pump it up too much he likely broke the valve stem taking the pump off an an angle- perfect excuse to spend $20 and go tubeless. A cassette and chain will be at least $50.
>>
>>1116852
you sure the batteries aren't bulging? if they are they're done.
>>
>>1117174
Nah, I pulled them out and looked since the lens was off anyway. They're ok.
>>
Where can I get short (150mm) cranks for a square tapered bottom bracket and compact chainrings while not spending insane amounts of money on custom made ones?

>inb4 why so small
I have verry short legs...
>>
>>1117183
If you're okay witrh 1x you could look at juvenile BMX racing stuff.
>>
>>1115969
>>1115994
i went to my local bike shop and they gave me new chainring bolts for free. i rode maybe 100 miles since then and two more of the original bolts seem to have fallen out again. why does this keep happening and what can i do to stop it? i have a fear now that ill be riding and all the bolts fall out and i cant find them and im stuck somewhere with a bike and two detached chainrings
>>
>>1117194
>1x
That is not a option for me, I ride mostly in the hills with up to 15% inclines.
>>
>>1117196
You might possibly get away with fitting a chainring on the outside of the spider too if it's flat, although you may have to use some spacers to get it the right distance from the inner ring.

There will also be plenty of other juvenile options but I'd imagine most will have pinned chainrings, probably too small as well. Can you not move up to 165mm? I think that's a reasonably common option for adult cranks.
>>
>>1117197
>converting a 1x to a 2x
At that point I could convert a cast aluminium 175 mm to a 150 mm as well by using a drillpress.
>165mm
I have legs like a 145-150 cm small child, 165 mm would be too long.
>juvenile options
That could work
>small chainring
Could I use a cassette with a smaller small cog, like 9 tooth, change that?
>>
>>1117200
>At that point I could convert a cast aluminium 175 mm to a 150 mm as well by using a drillpress.
It wouldn't be anywhere near as involved as that, just some fiddling with some washers.

>Could I use a cassette with a smaller small cog, like 9 tooth, change that?
That's a good point. Kiddy bikes will typically use freewheels so will be something like 13/14t on the small end, so with 10/11t on a cassette it might be enough. Looking on Ebay most of the 150mm cranks seem to top out at 42t or 48t (Suntour seems to be common).
>>
>>1117200
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B002I7ICC6/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1507759847&sr=8-4&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=origin8%2Bcranks&dpPl=1&dpID=41waShqr3NL&ref=plSrch&th=1&psc=1
They have 145 and 155
>>
>>1117200
These come in 150
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000AOA6PA?psc=1&th=1
>>
>>1117219
>>1117220
The first one would be ok if I would live in the US, the second one is single speed.

Thank you for trying to help me.
>>
>>1117095
The main reason is that there is a huge surplus of used rigid mtn bikes in the US. Seems like it's a fairly recent phenomenon where bikes specifically designed for city riding are being marketed to Americans.
>>
>>1117086
>>1117091
cool, thx. I assume it doesn't matter if it's a "mountain bike" cassette for a road bike?

>>1117104
I hate the person who made this into a fixie then. any good recommendations on cheap, decent wheels? I'm running 700x25 right now.
>>
Should i use grease or anti seize paste on bottom bracket thread and spindle while replacing it? Frame's aluminum.
>>
>>1117348
Grease
>>
>>1117235
>Seems like it's a fairly recent phenomenon where bikes specifically designed for city riding are being marketed to Americans.
Eh not really. Hybrids have been a thing since the early 90s (but they called them "Cross Bikes" lol in marketing materials.) and they have always been marketing toward urban/city riding.

The reason there is and always will be a surplus of used MTBs is due to the rapidly changing technologies compared to other types of bikes.
>>
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Here's a blast from the past: ruined cotter pins.

In 2017, only sizes 9 and 9.5 are commonly available, but these measure around 10.5. Am I hosed, or can slack in diameter too be fixed with adding soda can aluminium slips as Sheldon Brown suggests?

This is, by far, the shitties way cranks have ever been attached to a bicycle.
>>
Been riding my bike daily for about 7 weeks now. Starting yesterday I've been having knee pain. Do seats lower over time from being sat on or am I fucked up somehow?
>>
>>1117406
On and off or constant? Extreme or mild? I get it mildly from time to time after doing random sprints without downshifting, if you're used to spinning and suddenly start standing or otherwise overgear it can cause pain.

How long is your inseam? Are your cranks a good length for your height? Google inseam crank length and you can find charts that match them up. Although I have a question for this as well, I must have ghost inseam or I'm measuring wrong or something (book under crotch against a wall). I measured 30.5" inseam but my bike has 30" standover height, and it feels like I have a lot more than .5" clearance (maybe 2").

Seatposts can slide down, mark or measure and check again after riding. Or just check your full extension leg angle, see if it's what you remember.
>>
>>1117301
I think for 7 speed it's the same. I have an mf-tz21 (this is the 80s atb poster). Actually would like this confirmed myself, I got an RD-M360 acera rear derailleur and ordered some A070 2x7 speed shifters for handlebar room, crossing my fingers for compatibility.
>>
>>1117420
It's mild pain, and I just use a hybrid bike to get around on campus so I'm not looking to replace parts nor do I have the money to do so. I'll definitely make the post and keep monitoring the height. I feel like my seat is lower, but I thought "lol it's not a qr why would it slide easily"
>>
>>1117425
It might have slid to a part of the tube where it's less likely to slide more, if it already feels low why not raise it a bit and then mark?
>>
>>1117425
your legs can grow by up to 5" when you start cycling
>>
>>1117406
It's more likely that your saddle is too HIGH, not too low, and it's also very likely that the fore/aft adjustment is wrong, which puts pressure on your knee in directions it's not evolved to deal with. Put your bike on a trainer, get a plumb-bob (or something you can use for one), and get a buddy to help you check the fore/aft adjustment. Also check the height to be sure you're not hyper-extending you knee.
>>
>>1117425
If you're really convinced it's sliding down then wrap a piece of electrical tape around the seatpost right where it meets the top of the seat tube. If it's slipping over time the tape will get wrinkled up at the bottom.

Use a torque wrench to tighten your seatpost clamp, and if it's actually slipping then pull it off, clean the seatpost and inside of the seat tube with some non-water-based solvent (evaporates completely) then reassemble. If it still slips then get some carbon-fiber grip compound (bike shop may give you single-use tube of it for free if you ask nice) and put some of that on the seatpost then reassemble and torque the clamp.
>>
>>1117359
thanks
>>
>>1117388
Trash that motherfucker and get square taper
I wish for all cotter pin cranks to disappear forever
>>
Do you guys think this is a legit Trek?
The paint looks kind of weird to me.
>>
>>1115841
size is the number one consideration, read these articles, use a measuring tape, and get a properly fitting bicycle.

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm
https://www.rivbike.com/pages/fit-sizing-and-position
https://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-sizing.html
>>
My rear wheel keeps going flat and I don't know why. Giant factory rims (S-R2) with factory tires (S-R4) and 700x25 innertubes inflated to 100PSI. I keep finding a needle-sized little rip/puncture on the outward facing part of the innertube (the part that's in contact with the tire), but I checked everything and there are no foreign objects in the tire or sharp bits in the rims. The first time it happened was outside, but the second two times were on a trainer. Anyone know what might be causing it?
>>
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What's the right height to set my bike's handle bars at? My bike's a mountain bike, but I mostly ride on paved roads. How much should I be leaning over when I ride my bike?

I raised them an inch already, but I can't raise them any higher, because the stem isn't long enough; I guess I need to buy a new handle bars?
>>
>>1117723
Whatever is comfortable. They shouldn't be too high- being too high can make it more uncomfortable unless you change the saddle, since saddles are designed to work in certain positions.
>>
>>1117733
Is it wrong for me to say I don't want to bend over at all while riding because it hurts my back?

And speaking of saddles, my butt starts hurting after riding only 2 miles; Is there a saddle that'll make it comfortable to sit for longer?

(Sorry if these are noob-level questions.)
>>
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>>1117761
I read a dutchman once on this board, he said that the omafietsen are good because they keep your posture while you're on your bike. So if you want to be slow and safe like the dutch, then you don't need to bend your back. Not sure it would be great for handling speed though.
>>
>>1117761
You should ride a bicycle leaning forward with your back arched, so that it can flex. If you sit upright with your spine straight, it cannot flex and your vertebrae will jam together over bumps causing back pain.
If you put effort in on a bicycle the reactionary forces from your legs will partially support your upper body. This is why racing cyclists can sustain a far bent over position comfortably for hours. If you're not putting in any effort then your entire weight will be on your ass and hands which is not good.
For saddles generally your ass does have to break in, but a leather saddle like a brooks or even a sprung saddle could help. Saddles are highly subjective though so it's hard to know what will be comfortable. Wider supple tires at low pressures will also make the ride more comfortable, although the bike will become slower. If you have knobbly mtb tires wide slicks will make it more comfortable and faster.
>>
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>>1117780
>You should ride a bicycle leaning forward with your back arched, so that it can flex. If you sit upright with your spine straight, it cannot flex and your vertebrae will jam together over bumps causing back pain.

Absolute nonsense. Typical Anglo-American go-sport or go-nothing attitude to cycling. Fact is for the majority of people sport bicycles are not the way to go.

>>1117761
You need to get an upright bicycle with a large, soft, padded seat with springs. If you want to go speed and even more comfort, but less utility, buy a recumbent. If you want to do racing in groups, you buy a roadbike. But that's racing, so it's uncomfortable, and life is not a race, and racing isn't meant to be done 5 days a week. In fact even spending 3 to 4 hours a week on a small, perched saddle hinging forward will greatly increase your chance on erection disfunction disorder, because the more you lean forward, the more weight rests on your perineum full of important nerves, instead of your buttocks.
>>
>>1117095
Riding sport bicycles seems to be the norm in all anglo countries and it's completely retarded. They will never achieve mass cycling adoption that way. Cycling that way means it will never become more than just a weekend outdoor activity, or a means of transport for a younger age group who are by far no means the majority of people. You may think you look cool wearing your retarded lycra gear, helmet, expensive shoes and clipless pedals, but you are in fact actually doing more harm against cycle adoption if you dress like that, because people will think it's a specialized sport or leisure activity instead of being a utility means of transport. Dress for the destination, not the ride. Don't identify as a "cyclist".

plus they're all on clipless pedals, riding down on the drops in the aero position, on their way to get mail from the superbox at the end of the block. get 3 of them together and they block traffic because they're are so entitled. Stop acting like you're in a fucking hurry, life is not
a race, you're not riding the Tour de France, drop those gay clothes. Stop looking different than normal people.

No wonder cycling adoption in anglo countries is so shite.
>>
>>1117788
It's funny, because i'm basically parroting Sheldon who pioneered the idea in America that racing trends where not suitable for most people. I recommended looking at a leather or even a sprung saddle and you think that's a 'go-sport or go-nothing' racing bullshit attitude?
>you need to
How about YOU stop being a dogmatic faggot. Your binary of dutch masterrace and racing scum is pathetic.
>>
>>1117793
You complain about impacting cycling adoption yet you use a new riders request for simple advice as an excuse to sperg out on an almost completely irrelevant rant.
You complain about dogmatic attitudes yet you have an absurdly dogmatic attitude yourself.
You complain about hobbyism yet here you are on a cycling board talking about it.
You complain about anglo countries attitudes yet you completely ignore that not everywhere is a flat utopia of cycling infrastructure.
And you complain about racers yet advocating wide low pressure tires, sheldon ideas and sprung leather saddles is racing nonsense.
You're such a hypocrite.
>>
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>>1117761
I'd go with
>>1117777
and
>>1117788

If you want an upright position, you could go for a Dutch bike. They have been around for decades virtually unchanged simply because they are practical and comfortable for what they are designed to do: short trips in the city with little elevation (if you are in a hilly region, they are shite). They are real workhorses and will last you a very long time. I'd go for a used Batavus or Gazelle good condition.

Pair your Omafiets with a sprung leather saddle like the Brooks 130 or the Lepper Primus (pic related) and you will get a nice smooth ride.
>>
>>1117811
I forgot: I do longer trips on my Gazelle and you can easily do 40+ km on it but it's not their main purpose.
And: Get a steel frame bike (gaspipe). The frame will add to your comfort - pic related.
>>
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Man I fucking hate rim brakes but I'm too poor to get a bike with disc brakes. I got my new bike, a cheapo hybrid, just a few weeks ago and my front brake is already starting to shit itself, it keeps coming loose and I constantly have to retighten it.

Is it worth it to just hand my bike in to a shop and have them install mechanical disc brakes on the bike? Or is it something I can do myself? I've read that it's a pain in the ass to do on the back wheel so is it worth it to just install it on the front?
>>
>>1117814
Just get pads that aren't garbage. If you've done that and you still hate them, you're just stupid.
>>
>>1117814
There are plenty of cheap hybrids with disc brakes, should've saved up.


To install a disc brake on the front of your bike would require a new fork, new wheel, and of course the brake itself. On the rear you might be able to get away with a disc brake adapter but if not then that's a new frame as well as the wheel and brake. This is all assuming your bike isn't already disc compatible and they just stuck rim brakes on it because that's not very likely.
>>
>>1117822
>There are plenty of cheap hybrids with disc brakes, should've saved up.
I realized that afterwards but I literally grabbed the cheapest bike in the store because my old bike was a rusty piece of shit, I'm going to upgrade to a proper cyclocross bike when I get the budget to afford something decent, at least 800-1000 bucks. I might as well stick with the cheap rim brakes instead of getting cheap disc brakes now if I'm going to upgrade my bike later and repurpose this to a winter commuter.

>>1117820
Getting good pads sounds reasonable, what do you recommend?
>>
>>1117814
Oh for fuck's sake, are you so inept mechanically that you can't tighten fasteners properly, even?

Spend a whole $10 and get DuraAce brake pads.
Actually TIGHTEN THE BOLTS PROPERLY after adjusting everything.
If you still claim to have everything come loose then you're obviously too lame to be trying to do work on your own bike, TAKE IT TO A SHOP AND PAY THEM to do it.

There's nothing worse than inept idiots blaming everything but themselves.
>>
>>1117827
I do tighten the bolts to the point I'm afraid to strip them you muppet, otherwise I wouldn't be complaining
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Are these good? My neck fucking kills trying to ride in an aero position.

They bend your field of vision 90 degrees.
>>
>>1117814
I'm looking at getting new brake pads, but is it better to get longer or shorter pads? Will these work on regular hybrid bike wheels? It seems like these are more tailored towards road racer wheels but does it really make any difference?
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>>1117793
>Dress for the destination, not the ride.
>drop those gay clothes. Stop looking different than normal people.
So I should wear my good office clothes while riding to work in 100+ degree heat in the hill country?
Cycling specific clothing exists for a reason, it handles sweat better and prevents chafing
And I don't really give a shit what other people think of me, especially anons, so I'll keep wearing whatever I want to
>you are in fact actually doing more harm against cycle adoption if you dress like that
I have priorities other than being a living pr campaign for cyclists, like getting to work in 1 piece
>get 3 of them together and they block traffic because they're are so entitled
Bicycles are a part of traffic and have the same rights as any other vehicle except on limited access highways
You sound like you're advocating for riding all the way to the right, on the line, so that cars can pass in the same lane
That shit isn't safe, close passing laws are almost never enforced here, so unless the lane is 13+ feet wide I'm taking it all
>Stop acting like you're in a fucking hurry
But I am, and more importantly, the slower I go the less time the cars approaching behind me have to see me and change lanes
>No wonder cycling adoption in anglo countries is so shite
It isn't because of the cyclists you fucking retard, its because of the complete lack of any halfway decent infrastructure
>>
>>1117812
>Get a steel frame bike (gaspipe)
if you're gonna get a steel frame, then get a quality steel frame
gaspipe frames are the absolute shittiest ever made, there's no reason to buy them
quality old chromo frames can be had for not too much money, and good steel is miles better than shit steel
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>>1117825
>Getting good pads sounds reasonable, what do you recommend?
kool stop dual compounds are the best pads on the market imo
they're like $10 for a pair, and last for quite a while
you adjust them a bit different than normal pads, they're supposed to be toed in a bit to help clean the rim
they squeal a tiny bit at first, but that goes away once they break in, and they do amazingly in the rain
they don't work that great on steel rims, but nothing does. if you have steel rims then you'd be served with better wheels
>>
What would be the cheapest brake blocks that would work for Steel Rims in the wet?
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>>1117195
pls help another fell out i dont want to losing them over and over
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>>1117833
hahaha just b less aero maybe?
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>>1117812
>Get a steel frame bike
yeah, steel is a good material and a good value
>(gaspipe)
nigga, you retarded as fuck
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>>1117890
>Steel Rims in the wet?
nothing will, get better wheels
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>>1117890
Just buy some R500s, the wheelset is like $90.
>>
Got a dogma 60.1 frame for the cheapish, wanna do a build that's not dumb expensive. Probly gonna get ultegra grupo, most talon handlebars, fizik seat. What wheels do you guys recommend?
>>
What are some good go-to 32H 700C rims? Looked on cyclingdeal and chainreaction and there doesn't seem to be much variety.
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>>1117890
>Steel rims in the west

Might as well just de-cable your brakes at that point
>>
>>1117777
>>1117780
>>1117788
>>1117793
Thanks for the replies, everybody.

Yes, I'm an American who's currently using the mountain bike that I've had since I was a teenager. (My small home town had gravel roads at the time, so I suppose it made a little sense at the time to get a mountain bike instead of something else.) Anyways, all these years later I need a bike for simply getting around in the city (Going to work, bank, grocery store, etc.) My city's really flat, so this "dutch bike" design sounds good for me.
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Is there any bike maintenance online course I can take for free, and get a certificate I can use later on my curriculum vitae? If there's any, please point me at least one.

If there's no-one with free certificate, so, please, point me at least one where I can learn for free, and pay for the certificate if I want one. Thanks.
>>
I've got an old bike with single pivot caliper brakes. No matter how well I adjust them, either they come loose or one side is stuck and the brake pads wear assymetrically.

Will that problem solve itself if I get some new low price dual pivot brakes?

I barely use it and I don't want to spend money one a whole new bike, but fixing some problems for little money seems like a good investment.
>>
>>1118047
It might just be that there's too much slack in the bolt that holds the brake onto the frame, so it never really gets tight enough. You could try putting a washer on that bolt.

>>1118034
Shimano has one, but honestly it's mostly marketing drivel about how great Shimano brand products are rather than practical knowledge.
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>>1118068
>Shimano has one, but honestly it's mostly marketing drivel about how great Shimano brand products are rather than practical knowledge.

Thanks for the info. I have already taken some marketing-driven courses about other topics, and they were pieces of shit.

You mean this here? http://shimanocyclingworld.com/?project=basic-bike-maintenance-courses It's not online.
>>
>>1118068
>It might just be that there's too much slack in the bolt that holds the brake onto the frame
I'll try it again, thanks for the hint.
Regardless, can such an issue even occur wih dual pivot caliper brakes or can you only avoid this with cantilever brakes?
>>
>>1118081
I mean this one. You can just say that you work at your LBS.

http://na.s-tec.shimano.com/login
>>
Are there any good mini pumps out there or should i just go for the floor models?
>>
>>1118156
You should have both, a small pump you can take with you on rides and then a larger pump for at home that will be easier and quicker to use and potentially get you to higher pressures.
>>
Just wondering how many people here in the unfortunate event your frame gets scratched, do you just leave it or do you try to find a way to cover it up
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Totally new to bikes, sorry if this is an obvious question.
How the hell do I inflate these tires? The nozzle is different from any I've ever seen, it doesn't seem to have any openings for air, every pump I've tried hasn't been able to get anything in.
The rims are Araya japan px 35 and the bike it came from is a crossroads cruz specialized, if any of that will help. No clue on the tires though, too beat up to make out a name
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>>1118264
Show a side view.
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>>1118284
Sure my bad
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>>1118285
that's a presta valve, which is standard for bikes except the crap you get from walmart still uses Schrader valves (the car type) so normies think presta is some rare thing from outer space. it's not. they're better and have been in use since the 80s.

you have to manually open the valve. it looks like you did in the pic but if not, unscrew the very end piece (it won't fall off).

any bike-specific pump should work. if your pump is for cars or basketballs, then maybe not. Many times, the head of your pump can be disassembled and converted between presta and schrader. unscrew the bezel, there's a little barrel, the inner dimension of which fits around presta on one end and schrader on the other, that can be turned around; a bit stuck into it to depress either valve that also gets turned around (may want to google this) then re-assemble.
>>
>>1118307
oh, and you can also screw a converter onto the valve so you can use a schrader pump (i.e. compressed air at gas stations when you catch a flat.) I have one that I threaded thru my key ring so i have it in an emergency. Almost every bike shop has a jar of them next to the register for like a dollar.
>>
>>1118264
>>1118285
>>1118307
another pic
>>
>>1118307
>>1118313
>>1118311
Thanks a ton anon, I had no idea about any of this. I'll check my pumps as soon as I can
>>
Will the rear brake always be harder to pull than the front?
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>>1118380
If you have cable brakes then yes, a longer cable as well as possibly tighter bends will mean more friction.
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>>1114253
the rear wheel of my bike keeps getting off center. Did proper alignment of the tires too but just riding for a bit makes it turn eccentric. Only in one afternoon i had to adjust the fucking thing 3 times
Help pls, i know the wheels arent warped because i straight them out yesterday
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>>1114253
my bike was stolen, where do i check other than craiglist, ebay, let go, and fb for it?
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>>1118427
Check that your hub is alright. And even before that, that it's properly seated in the dropouts. When you say you "straightened" your wheels, I'm assuming you mean truing right?
>>
>>1117858
>>1117911
Classic Dutch bikes only come in gaspipe quality.
>>
>>1118427
tighten the nut-end of your quick-release skewer a bit?
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>>1118428
Gumtree, police, local university lock ups (usually a lot of students buy second hand)
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>>1118439
Yeah, I meant i trued it.
Will i have to disassemble the whole rear side along with derailers and such to check the hubs??

>>1118550
It doesn't have a quick release system, its just two bolts, one on each side, both of which i tightened bretty hard the two times prior to when the wheel got so eccentric it started hitting the frame, which begs the question, is there really a limit when tightening the rear bolts?
>>
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>>1118639
>>1118439

Now i rememberd that the bolt that keeps the rear derailer's main arm steady is actually bolted in the way of the dropout, which forces the whole hub to be tightened a bit away from the dropout's end, like pic related
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>>1118644
Did straightening that out fix it? There's little adjustable pieces that fit in dropouts on bikes like that so you can get it straight every time without having to fiddle. I'm not really sure where to source them or what they're called because they usually come with the bikes that have those sorts of derailers.

By checking that the hub is alright, I mean that there's no play in it (i.e. you can't move the rim side to side relative to the axle) and that the axle (not the skewer, mind you) spins freely with no catching or crunching. You'd take the wheel off the bike and use some cone wrenches to first remove the parts that hold the bearings inside so you can clean them and/or apply fresh grease. Then you adjust the tension on the cones until the axle turns properly with no play. I'm assuming that any bike with a derailer like that has hubs with loose bearings rather than sealed cartridge bearings.
>>
>>1118650
After checking both hubs (on which i found out that both have that open ball bearing config you mentioned) , found out the front hub was actually missing a ball on the left side, which made it have a lot of play. The rear was good on steadiness but a bit dry on grease, the main issue here is i think the wheel not being true, on which i can only think of trueing on a vice or something similar

Mainly because time and time again after straightening the wheel, if i bolted it even a bit on the non-derailer side of the dropout it would just move a bit and fuck up all the alignment i just barely managed to pull out.

Tl;Dr i give up, ill take it to the bike shop tomorrow and just hope for the best, thanks for everything tho, i learned a lot in the progress
>>
NOTICE: Thread is on AUTOSAGE now.
It's someone else's turn to make a new thread before this one scrolls off Page 10.
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what fenders do I use for 2.2 tires ? 60mm ?
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So I'm gonna post this in they dying bread because I really need help.

My Bike Friday's headset isn't attaching to the steerer tube properly.
Normally, there's a little skirt that goes around the threaded part, but it won't fit over for some strange reason now.

The part highlighted in red has somehow gotten super close together, so the threaded tube (in blue) can't fit through it anymore.
What happened? Is something bent? Is there any way to make it un-bent?
>>
>>1119278
Think I figured out what caused it, the QR flanges have stretched closer together from overtightening.
What's the best way for me to un-stretch those?
>>
>>1119282
Wedge something in the split, the part that closes when you tighten the lever. A flat bladed screwdriver will probably do it.
>>
>>1119291
Thank you kind anon, that worked better than I would've thought.
Steel really is real.
Those flanges were practically touching before, I couldn't even get a sturdy screwdriver in at first. Had to work my way up with progressively bigger tools.
>>
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How do I stop this caliper from moving around?
I have to keep tugging on the cable to keep the pads from rubbing the wheel.
>>
I need some advice on fitting. I commute about 11 miles every day for work, and if I make some stops, I'll notice two things, that my lower back kind of hurts and I tend to slide off the front of my saddle. I don't have perfect KOPS, it's a little behind there. However, my saddle is already adjusted as far forward as I can get it.

What's the best solution here? Should I try to move my handlebars back? Do I need to get a bike with a shorter top tube? It fits me by the some space to your junk when straddling" metric. I've been riding this much for a few years now, continually trying to adjust my posture, but I can't seem to avoid the low back pain on longer rides.

Thanks guys
>>
>>1120297
If you have a seatpost with some setback you can flip it around or buy one with zero setback, if you already have a straight post then you'll need to get one with setback and flip it.
>>
>>1119278
CALL THEM. BF IS VERY HELPFUL.




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