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File: winter-cyclist-1903.jpg (391 KB, 690x731)
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Hello fellow fa/n/atics : ^ ) I recently moved to Alaska from a place that doesn't snow. I'd like to be able to bike year long, and I'm wondering if I need to get a 'fat bike' to be able to do that or if I can work with what I got.

I have a steel roadbike with disc brakes and a 29er with a coaster brake. Riding with a coaster brake sounds sketchy in the snow and the ice but I imagine studded tires would help some. I'd be looking to use the trails around where I live as opposed to the road so I don't die.

Can anybody who rides in the winter where it snows offer any input? And are there just some things you can't bike (like freshly fallen snow)?
>>
MTB that can accept wide tires + disk brakes or you'll probably have a bad time.
>>
>>1114259

there are definitely snowfalls after which you simply cannot bike for a while.

after a good snowstorm, the trails will need to be packed down before they are rideable again. The normal process is to get as many people together as possible and have them tamp the trail down with snowshoes. After maybe a day or two of heavy snowshoeing you can get out the fatbikes and continue packing the trail down with those for a couple days.

Then eventually the trail is rideable with like 29+. Call it three days to a week, on average. Assuming no more snow.
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Fixed gear I found works best; low ratio, slicks work fine to cut through drifts like a knife
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>>1114259
This year will be my 7th winter since I quit driving entirely and switched to cycling everywhere. What works for winter cycling really depends on the conditions:

Fluffy dry snow doesn't really impact your riding unless there's a lot of it. Heavy wet snow will slow you down, and the deeper it gets the more challenging it is to ride through without getting bogged down. Ice isn't really a problem to ride over unless the surface temperature is right around freezing (this creates a layer of liquid water over the ice, then it's really slippery), or if it has been formed into icy ruts that your front wheel can't climb out of. Slush on pavement is the worst thing to deal with - it's dense, slippery, and can be packed into hard ruts when it refreezes.

A coaster brake isn't a good idea when riding on snow because it doesn't offer modulated braking - slamming on your brakes when you have reduced traction is what causes uncontrolled skids. You want both front and rear brakes on a winter bike - the ability to modulate braking effort on both wheels is more important than anything else.

Tire choice depends on ground conditions: Wider tires will help you float over loose snow and rutted surfaces but do nothing to help with small amounts of snow or ice. Studded tires can't be beat for riding on ice but will give you horrific rolling resistance when you're riding on a firm surface that isn't ice.
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>>1114342
For clothing, it's better to have multiple thin layers that you can change to suit conditions than to bet on a single well-insulated jacket or other item - in practice you're more likely to have issues with overheating than being too cold. If you're warm at the start of a ride then you're overdressed. Things made of wool are good. Pogies that go on your bars are better than gloves for protecting your fingers. Your winter shoes should be a size larger than you usually wear to accommodate thicker socks - if your toes get cramped and sweaty that can lead to chillblains, which are horrible. Remember to cover all exposed skin when riding in temps below zero (f). Let your facial hair grow out during the winter if you can, it really does help in cold weather.
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>>1114342
>>1114343

Some of the best 4chan posts ever made.
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All you should need for winter is max a flannel, shirt and singlet on top and shorts down the bottom. Don't worry, unless you live on a mountain it won't snow. Also, why worry when winter is over? Just make sure you maintain your chain for when it snows.

From Australia with love.
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if you have the money, buy a faired trike.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5x1Zw5kovA
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>>1114342
>>1114343
based anon
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>>1114259
Studded tires and I just wear whatever i use when snowboarding and pedal awaaaaaay.
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>>1114294
Not really.. a disc brake MTB can be nice, but there are lots of other good options.
>>1114307
Hmm, I rode trails most of last winter with a normal 27.5" bike. I didn't go on the worst days, but most of the time it was fine.
>>1114332
RIP
>>1114342
>>1114343
5 star posts. I just have some snowmobile gloves, never used "pogies", they were fine at -20c. Also having facial hair means you have icicles hanging from your face...
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>>1114342
>>1114343
These
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>>1114259
comfiest thread
>>
I bought 35 mm hybrid tires hor my road bike, but they are more like 40 mm tires and don't realy fit in my fork.
Should I buy other tires or keep riding 25mm slicks?
I don't expect snow for more than 1 week but it will be wet all the time and I am not a heavy rider (56kg and dropping).

I do have a backup hybrid, but don't realy like it as much as my roadbike...
>>
>>1114343
that's an absolutely beautiful bike man
i love the bars, the fenders, everything
>>
>>1114375
god the infrastructure there is so nice
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>>1114343
It is starting to get a bit cold here. I can ride in shorts and jersey down to about 60f. I rode in the upper 40s with shorts and a base layer and jersey under my windproof rain jacket and it was perfect. Any recommendations on insulating layers that are affordable(under $20, need 3). Someone said thrift store wool sweaters, but the hipsters gobbled them all up in anything under 3XL.

Worst case the bus is a 10 minute walk away and $7 round trip. Beats getting towed for $200
>>
>>1114968
I recommend a triple layer setup:
Inner layer: base layer t-shirt/long sleeve made of an athletic wicking material, this should fit you closely and not bunch up.

Second layer: buttondown shirt or a jersey that provides a little insulation (if your inner layer is long sleeve, go short-sleeve, or vice-versa, unless it's really cold). For temps around 20 or below make this a fleece, sweater, or other insulated layer with a zipper.

Outer layer: lightly insulated windbreaker for temps in the 30-60 range, a mid-weight jacket (read: not a heavy coat) for when it gets below freezing. A cycling-specific winter jacket is really nice because they're cut shorter in front and longer in the back to account for the riding position, plus have vents on the back or side, so if you can spring for one item of bike-specific winter gear this is where to invest your funds.
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>>1114992
What clothing would you recommend for around -5C and also for -20C?
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>>1114953
Buy CX tires for snow.
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>>1114998
for -20c/-4f I wear from head to toe:

wool cap w/ear flaps + balaclava + face mask + ski goggles
jacket + fleece + long sleeve inner layer
thin liner gloves + ski gloves (+ pogies worn by bike)
long sleeve tights + pants + rain pants
wool socks + winter cycling cleats + shoe covers
>>
do winter tires work on ice? theres rarely snow on the bike lanes because they use the same shit on bike lanes that they use on car roads so theres always ice and sometimes small rocks that they throw on the ice. the places with traffic lights are most dangerous here because they are always covered in ice and its there as long as it does not melt away.
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>>1115100
for ice you're best off with studs, they really do work
however, they suck ass on anything but ice, so if you can have 2 wheelsets, 1 with studded tires and 1 with regular tires, and switch between them in the morning depending on weather, that's best
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Thoughts on chains? It seems studded tires would not be needed most of the time from what I'm reading. Chains have the benefit of being portable so if it turns out you do need the extra traction you can just throw them on no problem. Where as you can't exactly take an extra set of studded tires/wheels with you everywhere. Only downside I'm seeing is there is some slippage but they seem to get the job done well enough.
>>
You'll be fine with either a mountain bike with some decent tires or a hybrid with studded tires unless you live somewhere where the roads are never plowed
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>>1115100
>>1115116
>>1115172
Just get studded tires. They are not that bad to ride on clean roads if you don't go full Schwalbe Ice Spiker Pro.

Nokian Hakkapeliitta A10 @ 32mm or Schwalbe Winter @ 30mm will be reasonable to ride all winter and way better on ice than anything studless.
>>1115176
Really wide tires and low pressures do kind of work, but they are still quite unpredictable on ice. i like living on the edge so I'm not getting studs for my MTB, only for the CX bike.
>>
>>1115172
What a dumb idea. The people who buy those things are probably the same kinds of people who buy flat bar $2000 "urban/commuter" bikes and leave the demo pedals still on them
>>
>>1114992
Sounds like what I got will now will work most of the winter where I live. I just need to stock up on base layers. Feel great being able to go all out and get to work/home and not be a sweaty mess.

>A cycling-specific winter jacket is really nice because they're cut shorter in front and longer in the back to account for the riding position, plus have vents on the back or side, so if you can spring for one item of bike-specific winter gear this is where to invest your funds.

Awesome. I got a long torso and short legs which leads to epic ass crack in anything other than cycling clothing. Any reccomendations? Worst I deal with is 15f for 10 days a year. I am fine taking the bus below that for 3-5 days a year.

I will need a new pair of shoes. Don't feel like switching to clipless, but my waterproof clarks are not bad enough to be dedicated bike shoes. I got wool socks and an REI is on the way home.
>>
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>>1115187
but are they really so good that its safe to ride the bike on real ice like that in this picture or are they just for well maintained roads?
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>>1115278
I have ridden 32 mm studs on local ice rinks for fun plenty of times. Also every year the roads here turn into icy hell resembling your picture for a few days in the spring and fall and I haven't had any problems. Studs won't magically turn the ice into asphalt but they provide enough traction to ride. That's for your average 30 - 40 mm commuter studs that aren't awful on everything that isn't ice. Something like ice spiker pros have amazing grip even on ice.
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>>1115278
I've ridden the A10 with 72 studs on lake ice and a hockey rink, of course you can't shred on them like a tire with 240 studs, but if you know their limits it's fine.
If there is a thin layer of water on top of slick ice, good luck with any tire. There was once a cambered road with water flowing sideways on top of ice. I tried to stop on it, but the bike just continued to slide sideways with both wheels. I just pedaled away in a drift. This was with W240 front and W106 rear, so lots of studs. I don't want to scare you away from studded tires, this has literally happened once. Most of the time you don't need to worry about grip at all, just like riding a gravel path in the summer.
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>>1115172
I see more problems than benefits. Tire damage, installation and clearance issues (e.g. hub/disc brakes only, specific tires only).

Simply running more aggressive thread would work better in random conditions.

In city just run some smoother studded tires when it goes below zero and you'll have no issues.
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>>1114342
>Tire choice depends

wide or semi-wide tyres with small knobs, like cx tyres, or some touring/commuting semislicks with a lot of rain grooves are rather versatile in winter. big knobs or slicks ar of no use indeed.
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>>1114259
I lived in Fairbanks for a few years. I remember seeing one lone bicyclist throughout the year. He had affixed some kind of shell over the handlebars so his hands wouldn't freeze in the -35F temperature and was covered from head to toe with what looked like several feet of animal fur. Year after year I would see this guy so he must have been doing something right. Winter in AK is different from winter everywhere else in the US. Some places across the US are colder or have more snowfall but an Alaskan winter is something you will never forget and must thoroughly prepare for.




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