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/bqg/ bike questions general

Previous thread over 300: >>1172552

Are higher-level cranksets (i.e., Ultegra, Dura-Ace over 105, and other equivalents in other brands) stiffer, or are they just lighter?
>>
>>1178242
Everything decent is more than stiff enough.
>>
Current gen's Ultegra crank is actually heavier than previous gen
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Thanks to trickle down, even Claris is similar in stiffness to DA. It's all about weight, number of gears, and shifting performance as you climb the ladder.

Also, current gen 105 and up have identical pins and ramps, so shifting is the same as well.
>>
For higher end bikes nowadays, you would be expected to pay around 6000+. Has it always been this way? Was it just as common to pay an equivalent adjusted for inflation amount for the highest end bike?
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>>1178315
No they don't. Have you even seen the back of a 105 chainring? They are similar and work well enough that you wouldn't be asking for more, but not the same.
>>
>>1178317
A 1970 Schwinn Paramount cost $2000 in 2018 dollars
1982 Trek 950 with Super Record - $3,500
1985 Cannondale SR 900 with Super Record - $2,300
1993 Bridgestone RB-1 with Ultegra - $2,500

So 2-3k would be fairly normal for a high end bike, but top-end bikes are more expensive now because of the expenses that companies incur in producing carbon fiber frames and parts.
>>
Is there a bigger meme than Gatorskins?
Is it made for idiots?

https://www.reddit.com/r/bicycling/comments/1k53w7/so_i_destroyed_my_gatorskins_in_one_week_can_you/
>>
>>1178327
The cost of producing garbon doesn't change much between midrange and topend. What does change is that rich guys want to use cycling as another way of putting their wealth on display, so now there's a class of exotic bikes that didn't really exist a few decades ago. An Emonda SL6 or a Supersix Evo Ultegra are around $2500, and very few roadies are going to benefit from anything more capable. The ones who do are likely getting paid to ride. But, since there are people who want to show off, companies market bling at much higher margins, and much of that bling sits in bike shops for a year or two before someone buys it at a steep markdown.
>>
>>1178353
>mounting your tire inside-out
how on earth is anyone retarded enough to do that o wai
>reddit
>>
What's up with these brakes? Why would you use them on a TT bike?
>>
So I need a new saddle.

I have pic related. It is stock on my 2014 Trek 820. I never really liked this saddle. Water would get into it through the stitching and then, after riding to class in the rain, my ass would be wet every time I would ride for days afterwards.
It recently got worse. The imitation leather is cracking.

Looking for replacement saddle recommendations. I use my bike to get around campus (Virginia Tech) and occasionally ride on the New River Trail.
>>
>>1178354
>The cost of producing garbon doesn't change much between midrange and topend
The r & d is what you're paying for
>>
>>1178362

Get your sit bone width measured before you buy one. Different models have different widths, and some are available in multiple widths, so getting it right is the first step to actually liking a saddle.

After that, a WTB Rocket would probably be right up your alley.
>>
>>1178354
>>1178327
Super expensive bikes did exist back then. They were just custom instead of mass produced. You also had options like titanium bottom brackets, pedals and axles.
>>
Unless going fast is actually how you make a living you don't want anything above the 105. 11 speed, really smooth quick shifting, great performance. Just not as light as ultegra or pansy-ace.
>>
>>1178387
i think ur confusigin "want" with "need" mate
>>
>>1178391
Not at all. When you're pro you're weight limited by the UCI anyway, and so if your groupset is heavier they just take weight off the frame. Pro teams are already just adding lead weights to frames to get the weights up.
Peter Sagan would still win on a 105 groupset.
It's just when you're a world-class pro you don't have to pay for the groupset since you're basically advertising high end groupsets to freds.
>>
>>1178393
>Pro teams are already just adding lead weights to frames to get the weights up.
No they aren't, that's mostly a myth. C'dale did that for marketing purposes. Other bikes try to get as close as possible, within an oz or two, to the limit then add a few grams. Either way, with modern heavy aero components, tubeless tires, etc, bikes are often well over the limit, or brought to the limit or near it using aero parts.
>>
>>1178362
git gud plebe
>>
>>1178387
>pansy-ace.
jealous faggot detected.
>>
Thank you Decathlon for providing cheap and quality tires.

Also the SKS mudguards I ordered didn't fit my other bike. Hate this life.
>>
>>1178432
Bodge them. I have some mudguards that didn't fit my bike when they arrived. They fit my bike now.
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>>1178315
How about a 10 year old 105 triple crankset, versus new Ultegra or Dura-Ace double crankset?

My original bike was bought 10 years ago, and 9 years and 11 months (almost to the day) I discovered a crack in one of the welds. Trek replaced the frameset, but the crankset is one of the few original components left over from the original bike (left side shifter, brakes, and the bars are the only others). I'm legitimately a poorfag who supports himself but I've been training and road racing on this for years. I'm over 6' tall and generate a lot of torque after all the work I've done for years. I'd rather build a whole new bike that's not based on an endurance frameset but that may never happen (again: self-supporting poorfag). I'll at least upgrade/replace the last remaining 10 year old components, which mean I'll finally get rid of the last of the 10 year old components, and there won't be any more goddamned triple crankset to deal with anymore.

Sorry for the blogpost but I thought it relevant to explain why I'm even asking about this.

TL,DR: I'll upgrade from a 10 year old triple at some point and am curious if this old POS crankset is not as stiff as a new double will be.

Please spare me the BS about me racing, okay? I'm not claiming to be Lance or Sagan or anything. It's just something I do because I like it and want to do well at it.
>>
>>1178432
Are these the 28mm tires? I was about to buy a pair for my beater
>>
>>1178480
Cumulatively a 2x11 group would be a big upgrade and yes the crank would be stiffer, but it's not a huge deal. If it's hollowtech already then there won't be a big difference. You're the one who knows how flexy your crank is. If it's not a problem that you're aware of then it isn't a problem.

Mainly just dropping the shift pattern would help imo, then weight, then stiffness.
>>
>>1178486
>You're the one who knows how flexy your crank is.
That's rather insightful of you, especially considering this is 4chan and 'insightfulness' is not common.
I'm pretty sure under heavy load, like a long climb at max sustainable rate, or maximum load, like the beginning of a sprint when you're out of the saddle, it's flexing. Sometimes I can even hear it, as the chain rubs against the front derailleur. This has made me wonder if, under those circumstances some torque is being wasted because it's flexible. Keep in mind it's a 10-year-old 105 (5603-series) crankset.

Just FYI I've been using an 11-23 cassette for years and years now to keep me honest with the triple chainrings. The total gear ratio range for 30/39/53 with an 11-23 cassette isn't that much different than if I had a mid-compact 36/52 with an 11-27 cassette. Didn't want to allow myself to get lazy on climbs because I had, say, 30:27 or 30:28 gear ratio.
>>
>>1178483
They're 25mm.
>>
>>1178490
5603 is hollowtech. Certainly stiff enough - Shimano is still using the same 24mm spindle on all their new cranksets. A little occasional chain rub is pretty typical on a triple.

Upgrading to a 2x11 setup will be nicer mostly because of the simpler shift patterns over your 3x9; I doubt you’ll notice any difference in crank stiffness.
>>
what is the best type of bike
who makes the best bikes
>>
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When it comes to bike cleaning, do I need bike-specific products? I've seen some conflicting information.
Do I actually need bike cleaner for the frame, or can I just use dish soap? Do I require a specific kind of degreaser, or will any work?
>>
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>>1178357
>aerodynamics could be better (smaller front profile) vs pic related
>direct mount brakes can be lighter, better modulation, more powerful
>>1178490
Chain rub on the FD could also just be from natural frame flex.
>>
>>1178499
It's not 3x9 it's 3x10.
>>
>>1178553
Your questions are 100% subjective and as such there are no absolute answers to either of them.
>>
>>1178569
For cleaning non-moving parts: mild soap and low-pressure water.

For cleaning any moving parts (drivetrain, bearings, etc) use non-water-based solvents only, and make sure they're completely dry before lubing/reassembling. Moisture in moving parts, especially bearings, will mix with any lubricants you put in them, turning the lube to garbage, accelerating wear on the part(s) in question, degrading performance and ruining them in short order.
>>
>>1178579
>>Chain rub on the FD could also just be from natural frame flex.

I get this on my alu gravel bike, but not the crabon roadbike, Both have ultegra cranks.

If I trim the FD out it usually stops any rub, however.
>>
Would there be any reason to convert my 90s rigid to a threadless fork? At some point in time I plan on doing a drop bar conversion with brifters. The only different I know with going threadless is that it'll be a lot easier swapping bars without removing tape (assuming the quill stem doesn't have a removable face plate) from the stem and there's more adjustability in reach and whatnot
>>
>>1178679
If you've got a nice classic keep the frameset complete or it just says 'front end collision'. The stiffness from threadless does make a difference, but if you've got a high end old rigid frame it will have really nice passive suspension from a good chromoly fork and if you don't then it's not worth spending that much money on it.
>>
>>1178569
I follow the park-tool video on bike washing. Use solvent to remove the grease from your drivetrain, and just use dish soap for the frame and wheels.
Then relube.

For solvent - Isopropyl alcohol works good. I do recommend a nice set of brushes though. Not too expensive and the utility of the various brushes is good for scrubbing various parts.
>>
>>1178499
Triples have an easier shift pattern than doubles.
>>
>>1178709
bruh

listen, I love my triples. 3x9 for life. But "easy shifter pattern" is not one of the selling points.
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>>1178679
I've been meaning to do the same thing mostly because of how quickly threaded headset cups become pitted by the bearings after some rough city riding
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>>1178731
Er, what? How many have you been through? I think this is down to incompetence
>>
>>1178722
Use the middle ring for flat solo riding. Use the big ring as sprint/downhill/tailwind overdrive, and the small ring for climbing and bad headwinds.

You're probably doing the wannabe racer shifting style of big ring until you have no more cogs, middle ring and compensating with cogs, then small ring. That's wrong.
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>>1178733
>the wannabe racer shifting style of big ring until you have no more cogs

the "wannabe racer" thing is "crosschaining badly"?
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>>1178735
It means using the big ring and refusing to leave it. These are many of the people that drive the 1x market. They can't accept that it might be a good time to shift chainrings before hitting the end of the cassette and the small ring isn't just bail out. It's a macho thing, like 52 chainrings when they'd be better off with 50/34 or 50/36.
>>
>>1178733
leglet detected
If you don't spend most of your time on the flat in your big ring, then it's too big.
>>
>>1178733
>middle ring on the flats
I hope you’re talking about a half step plus granny triple, because using a 39t on the flats is embarrassing
>>
I went from a basic bitch bike with a drop bar to a cyclocross bike that has a pretty tall bar. Does it take long to get used to different posture?
>>
>>1178741
>>1178738
>he doesn't average 30mph
>>
>>1178483
Life is far too short to buy cheap tyres anon, good grip saves skin.
Be careful not to fall for the "rolling resistance is important" meme.

>>1178490
It's a lot less likely to be the crank flexing and far more likely to be frame flex causing FD rub.
Go grab your bike, and with the pedal at BDC, angle the bike away from you and put pressure onto it with your foot to test your frame flex.
>>
>>1178744
There are actually people who don’t, you’d be surprised
>>
help my nuts are kinda uncomfortable after riding my new bike. Just adjusted the saddle angle to more forward position but not sure if that's gona help. I feel like the saddle is just pushing into the part between my balls and anus..
>>
>>1178827
Some 'all season' tires are a good bet as they have a nice grippy compound that's good for wet conditions.
>>
>>1178827
The good rolling tyres tend to have better grip either way.
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>>1178830
Sounds like you need to tilt your saddle up a touch anon.
Try having it dead flat, and then maybe up a degree or so and see how you go, there's a saddle tilt app you can get for your phone that'll tell you what's going on.
>>
>>1178836
>tilting saddle up
>>
What's the pedal in the OP picture?
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>>1178830
I always tilt my saddle downwards a little.
Puts pressure away from your ass to your hands/wrists.
>>
>>1178843
Powertap.
Actually looks less obnoxious now that I see it attached to a crank.
>>
Is Alfine Di2 a meme? I'm considering a few bikes on Alfine 11, one of them is on Di2 and slightly more expensive, but is it worth it?
>>
>>1178850

Unlike the regular Alfine, you can run the Di2 with drop bar levers but other than that I don't really see the point. Why do you want internal gears and what type of bike is this, city/touring/what? If the frames you're looking at are belt-drive compatible I guess I could understand IGH but otherwise it's just a lot heavier, more bothersome and makes for example fixing flats a lot more work compared to derailleur gears.
>>
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>>1178852
It will be used 90% in the city, occasionally for some touring or pulling a small cargo trailer. I never get flat tires (thanks, Continental Country Plus!), I don't have a problem with hub maintenance or additional weight. I like IGHs, they're smooth shifting in any conditions and tensioned chain is immune to hitting the frame on bumps. Currently I ride Nexus 7, but I feel I need some more, and Alfine 11 is affordable for me. Possibility of upgrading to a drop bar in the future might also be a big advantage for me. I have a road bike for outside the city fun riding, so it won't be my only bicycle.
Pic related is the bike I'm thinking of. I know that's not /bbg/, I just wanted some opinion on Alfine Di2 in general.
>>
>>1178852
>>1178866
You can get brifters for the regular Alfine 11 now, some guy tipped me off about it in a thread a while back.

I don't think I'd pay the extra cost for Di2 on an IGH. Shifting is already really simple and quick and it's less likely to go out of adjustment compared to derailers (and it's quicker and easier to get adjusted).

That said I don't actually have any experience with the Di2 Alfine, it could be super easy to install (cable routing is a bit fiddly with the regular one) or it could be a pain in the arse.
>>
>>1178327
Actually producing carbon frames is less expensive than producing steel frames. To an extent there's some R&D, but most of it is pointless. Pinarello has aerodynamic lawyer tabs, for instance. Crap like that has so close to zero benefit that you could probably gain more of an advantage by throwing the bottle a few seconds earlier than you otherwise would have.
>>
>>1178875
The advantage of Di2 and electric shifting in general is misrepresented because

1: people don't typically understand how adjusting the front derailleur every time you shift on the rear reduces friction and prevents the chain from coming off the chainring under extreme conditions and

2: not keeping up with maintenance causes shifting problems that shouldn't exist in mechanical groupsets (a lot of idiots don't want to pay extra to get their bikes worked on every month and don't want to learn to do it themselves) so having a little robot derailleur keeping your shifting crisp is actually a selling point for idiots.

IMO, the increased efficiency is worth it for pro riders, but the best amateur level group is Campagnolo Potenza. Stiff as all hell, durable, low q factor cranks, and shifts better as a mechanical group than any of the other stuff. It's more accurate to call it "mechanical super-record made out of aluminum instead of carbon fiber" than to equate it to a Shimano group of similar price (The new R7000 Shimano 105 group actually costs more now if you're looking at the cheapest available in the USA for each by about $20 I think, not counting bike shop employee discounts)
>>
>>1178894
Did you mean to reply to someone else? I'm aware of those points you mentioned but they don't apply to an IGH, hence why I said it's not really worth the extra cost to have a Di2 one.
>>
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my friend is selling me this for 350, should i get it or am i getting meme'd? He said the rear tire and tube is busted so i have to replace it muself. btw i'm a cycling iliterate so idk if this is worth my shekles.
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>>1178736
I prefer to cross chain then to leave the big ring if I am facing a short climb. It's a matter of laziness tho.
>>
>>1178931
350 is a fair deal, 250 is a great deal (filename). Replacing a tire is piss easy and you'll have to learn how to do it eventually so might as well jump in
Just make sure brakes and shifters work properly, wheels aren't out of true, chainring/cassette aren't too worn out, nothing rattles/wobbles/etc
>>
I'm looking at replacing my tires on an Ironman expert that came with the stock Wolber super champion alpines, and it turns out the previous owner was running tubeless. Looking online it looks like the wheels were originally clinchers. Any thoughts on if I should continue to run tubeless? I was originally planning on getting gp4ks, but I'm not sure what things, if any, I'll have to change to put a clincher on it.

Thanks in advance.
>>
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>>1178935
mmmkkaay, but how much does an entire tire cost? it seems the tube is also broken so i have to replace that as well. pic related
>>
>>1178952
a good tyre usually costs 40-60 ish dollars maybe less in usd. you can get for less but honestly don't skimp you'll have a bad time

tubes should be less than 10
>>
>>1178948
Tubeless rim/tire setups are a kind of clincher setup, did you mean tubular?

Tubular wheels and tires tend to be lighter and in some cases produce lower rolling resistance, which is why they're still used in racing. The reason why most people run clinchers is that tubular tires are expensive and require a lot more work to install, plus it's much harder to deal with flats during a ride if you run tubulars.
>>
>>1178827
inb4 anon breaks his Trek in half
>>
>rode my mtb a lot a year ago
>when I stored it in my basement I lubed the chain, cables
>come down to it
>chain is rusted solid
>cable housing split open
>cable all rusted
what the hell is wrong with this world
>>
>>1178743
It shouldn't, but you can always adjust things.
>>
>>1178894
Potenza is great, but comparing it to SR is a bit silly, since SR has 12 cogs and ultrashift, while Potenza has 11 and powershift, so you can't do the dubba dump with Potenza. One plus is that the thumb levers are in a better position for thumblets who ride in the drops.
One big disadvantage for Campy, at least here in the US, is that most shops won't deal with it, sales or service. You have to either DIY or find a really good mechanic and keep him housed and fed.
>>1178393
At this point he would win on Claris and a ropey old steel frame. I hope that he doesn't get screwed at the TdF like last year. That was a fucking farce.
>>
>>1179044
>dubba dump
This is a retarded meme and has never worked well. The number of times I have accidentally doubleshifted due to ultrashift outnumber the times I have intentionally doubleshifted with ultrashift. It's actually easier just to tap a 1 cog release lever x times than try to get the right amount of throw on that tiny little thumb lever for a multishift.
>>
>>1179016
Humidity
>>
>>1179016
You stopped riding and your bike committed sudoku
>>
>>1179095
Works perfectly for me on my 3 bikes with US mechanical ergos (Record Ti 9s, Record 10, Record 11). I think that the early 11sp stuff had smoother action, which made multiple shifts down the cogs easier, too easy for someone used to the older stuff. At the end of the day, double dumping is niche, but it's neat to have at the beginning of a climb.
>>
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So /bqg/, I had to replace the bottom bracket on an old bike because it was busted. However, I can't screw the non-drive-side of the new one all the way in, a few mm of the thread is still visible. Is that normal?

The shell is 68mm and the BB is 68 mm. Did I dun goofed?
>>
>>1179151
The thread in modern sealed BBs is usually longer than the thread on old steel frames. Maybe it just needs some incentive, if you catch my drift.
But if it's hopeless, you may want to put a spacer there, having exposed threads is never good
Also you should rotate the cranks (when installed) and see which one comes closer to the chainstays, that way you can know for sure which BB side is the one that's not fully screwed in
>>
>>1179154
I doesn't seem I can convince it to move any further. I'll try getting a spacer. Thanks for the advice.
>>
>>1179181
Bro did you crossthread it? Was it difficult to thread in?

Is the bb shell actually 68mm? Can you measure that?

Can you measure the depth of the threads in the shell and see if they're shallower than the length of the threads on the bb part you're trying to thread in?
>>
>>1179151
As long as there is no play in the spindle, you're good. I have a Shimano UN-72 on a contemporary steel frame and the NDS cup sticks out about 1.5mm.
>>
Hey guys, I have a Giant Boulder Se, and I want to convert it to disc brakes since I'll be doing more downhill. I have the mounts on my fork so that's no problem, but I do not have the mounts for the rear. Did any of you ever tried these? http://www.chasertech.com/bicycle-rear-disc-brake-adapter-kit-145mm-bl145.html Thanks
>>
>>1178242
Question about bike glasses. Is it worth spending stupid money on them and are their any cheaper brands anyone recommends?
I just got back from the doctor with some junk in my eye probably dust or something from cycling and it hurt like a bitch all weekend, so I'm looking to finally wear glasses while I ride but I don't want to waste money if possible.
>>
>>1179209
Hardware store safety glasses will protect your eyes just as good as bike-specific ones. They probably won't be as light, aero or fashionable, but who cares.
>>
>>1179209
Get some from aliexpress. Same shit without the brand markup a lot of the time.
>>
>>1179221
yeaaaaaahhhh nah they have absolute shit optics and they'll immediately scratch. Just awful to ride with. You want glasses with glass in them.
>>
>>1179191
Nope, I double checked if it was straight before I threaded it in. It was a little harder to thread in than the drive side, but not very much. It went smoothly until one moment where it refused to go any further.

BB is 68mm and shell is too, I measured it with a digital vernier caliper.

>Can you measure the depth of the threads in the shell
I guess I could do that.
>>
>>1179199
It's as stiff as it can go. I had the same issue with another old bike I tried to upgrade, so it seems that the thread in the shell is indeed smaller. I will measure it to be certain
>>
>>1179259
If it's a plastic cup, you can always just try to trim it shorter, but it isn't that unusual for there to be excess thread on the loose cup. The loose cup is there to take up all the side-to-side slop, the fixed cup is what references it to the frame.
>>
>>1179230
>You want glasses with glass in them.
>>
>>1179280
Good to know, thanks.
>>
>>1179230
I just got a free set of oakley's. If they scratch, I'm gonna order new lenses for 10 usd
>>
can I ask questions about bmx or will I get shitted on?
>>
Is there a website that will give me the actual dimensions of properly inflated tyres for a bunch of different sizes/profiles? I'd like to work out what the biggest profile tyre I can fit on an old roadbike is.
>>
>>1179428
just ask.
>>
>>1179530
https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/
>>
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Looking for a replacement for my right Shimano Revoshift 7 speed shifter (pictured) as it has stopped clicking. Can anyone suggest a low-mid range compatible trigger shifter to replace it? Failing that I am considering buying the SL-RS45 which may have some improvements to the SL-RS35.
>>
>>1179543
been looking at the Tourney 7 speed thumb shifter and the Atlus M310 rapidfire pod. One thread suggested the M310 could be better.
>>
I'm in the process of replacing pretty much every single part on my for two years neglected steel bike and found like a (huge) puddle of rust powder in the BB shell, which I assume was once liquid but it's been sitting inside for a while so it's dried up.
I realised I never used frame saver or the like on it when I bought it so now I'm wondering if there's any use to applying it now?
Or should I first spray in shitloads of rust solvent? I have a feeling it'll just liquify the rust but getting it out of the vent holes would be next to impossible
>>
>>1179568

I think I have the 9-speed Altus trigger shifter on my MTB and no complaints. When shifting to a harder gear you can't push the trigger with your thumb and instead need to pull it towards you with your index finger (more expensive shifters work both ways), but that's exactly how I prefer to use the shifters anyways so it's not a problem for me.

Triggers are so much better to use than grip shifters so definitely worth it to upgrade.
>>
>>1179586
sold. thanks for the recommend.
>>
What's a good road race bike for year round, with full guards (not clip ons)? Something with compact 30t to spin up anything
>>
>>1179593
Get a separate bike for winter. Mainly because the winter chews up mechanical parts and you don't want your nice bike to have that happen.
>>
>>1179227
1 up what this guy said. Bought some cheap foakleys on ali, work pretty well. Much better than hardware store glasses...
>>
>>1179016
Your lube is shit
>>
>>1179227
>>1179600
Enjoy your eye cancer
>>
So I've been having this problems with my penis going numb during and after riding.
I've tried selle italia SLR saddles, Flite's and some generic ones different saddle heights and angles. And the problem occurs on all saddles.
I've tried different chamois cremes, and a lot of different ones, endura, gore and those expensive ones.
The only relief is the chamois creme that numbs down everything, but still got the numb dick afterwards. At this point I'm willing to sell everything and get a recumbent or a velomobile.
Got anything I can try that I haven't already done?
>>
>>1179666
Look for a saddle with the right width for your sit bones making sure that your weight is resting on the bones rather than your soft tissue.
Personally I've had my sit bone width measured and got this saddle and am happy ever since. (https://www.sq-lab.com/shop/en/Saddles/ERGOWAVE/SQlab-bike-saddle-612-Ergowave.html)
I happen to have two other saddles that came with bikes, both push right into my perineum causing numbness after half an hour.
>>
>>1179594
Good advice. A snow beater is the ticket. I use a pinarello in summer and a Fuji mtb in winter, mostly shimano xt and deore, nothing fancy. Aluminum to prevent rust.
>>
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>Passed by a 4WD within 20cm yesterday
I think it might be the time to start looking at front mount cameras lads.
Any reliable entry level cams with decent battery life? I don't need high res and frame rate, as such.
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>>1179209
Get some good looking safety goggles m8, they're no more than 10 bucks for a good pair and you won't be afraid to lose them or break them.
>>
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>>1179717
FTFY
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>>1179679
How do you get your ass measured?
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>>1179666
have you seen a pro bike fitter and or a sports physio ?
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>>1179717
What spooks me about the door zone is less running into a door and more getting pushed into traffic if they open the door into you.
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>>1179734
just adapt to the rest of the world you knob
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>>1179717
>>1179734
>>1179797
This is why you shoulder check and indicate out if cars are coming, then leave the parked car a metre of space as you pass it.

Pretty hard to get doored/run over that way.

>>1179759
find the bony parts of your ischium and measure the distance between them center to center.

Pretty hard to do yourself, what with them being part of your arse, so get your mum to do it anon.
>>
>>1179759
my bike shop has a kind of gel pad you sit in to leave a sitbone imprint then measure that
>>
Are cruiser seats ergonomically bad if I want to go fast?
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>>1179817
yes
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>>1179818
why?
>>
>>1179759
Take a 1-gallon Ziplock bag and fill it about halfway with uncooked rice. Lay it out on a hard surface you can sit on, and spread it out flat and even. Sit on it; works best if your ass is naked. Your sit-bones will leave an impression (unless your ass is remarkably fat, that is). Measure center-to-center between the impressions.

>>1179817
>cruiser seats
Enjoy your CHAFING.
>>
>>1179759
My LBS offers that kind of service. They had me do this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xTp0Fennt7k
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>>1179821
they're designed for a very upright position
very upright positions are fundamentally incompatible with going fast
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>>1179666
The answer is always Selle SMP. Yeah it's ugly but it works.
>>
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Is it possible to convert mixed Shimano drive train components to 1x11 without any problems and special skills? I have road bike with rear Tiagra and front Sora with shifters, plus FSA crank.
I know I have to buy new shifters, rear derailleur, cassette, crank and chain.
Does crank require some sort of underlay to keep it in right position?
>>
>>1179878
>Does crank require some sort of underlay to keep it in right position?
You will probably want a Sram Rival 1 crank (or some narrow-wide from Shimano (MTB crank))

>Is it possible to convert mixed Shimano drive train components to 1x11 without any problems and special skills?
Easy.
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>>1179878
Don't fall for the meme bruh
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>>1179878
Why though? All that money for no gain in range or gears.
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>>1179875
I tried the ponza and it was okay but still made my dick numb
>>
Europe
300€ budget
Need a bike

Find me one

Now
>>
>>1179803
>>1179811
>>1179824
>>1179825
different guy here. I get how to measure my sitbones but the problem is figuring out which seat corresponds to my measurement. Maybe some brands include it but I don't see that measurement in any of the online listings I saw. If there even is a "width" measurement, it's a total width not a sitbone measurement. I found a bunch of online resources for ass-measuring, but when it came to how to measure the saddle, everything seemed to say "just kinda eyeball it."

I have a really narrow ass. I had a saddle that I otherwise really liked but could feel it starting to split me apart even on relatively short rides. I bought a Charge Spoon since it looked narrow and they're the meme for best value. It definitely fits way better, but there's no official sitbone measurement, just the total width on the website, and even then you have to hunt for it.

I don't think manufacturers want to publicize a saddles SB width since then they would have to make many widths. keeping everyone in the dark makes more sales. "lol saddles are a personal thing, ya gotta buy it and try it out. no returns on used merch, tho."
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>>1179901
Where in Europe? What kind of bike?
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>>1179901
go here
>>1174456
post what is asked for in the OP
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>>1179888
>ponza

That's a Selle San Marco saddle. Selle SMP is a different company. Try this:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/ca/en/selle-smp-well-saddle/rp-prod132384
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>>1178242
I know absolutely nothing about bikes and want to try it

I want a mostly road bike but may sometimes ride on grass or dirt and may carry a little more than a backpack (but not much)

What's the budget and type I should have in mind?
>>
Looking to get a 68mm 127.5mm suqre spindle BB on a budget. Should I get Shimano, VP or some other brand? Or there's not that much difference at those price ranges?
>>
>>1179953
SQlab shill here, I found this guide.
You should add a few centimetres depending on your position to determine the saddle size you should be riding.
>>
>>1179990
Shimano always if it's only a few dollars difference. Shimano (and Campy for ISO) make the best bottom brackets. Claims of other brands doing better are dubious at best. Some might beat them on seal quality for harsh environments. The only one that probably meets the claims of superiority is SKF because SKF is a proper bearing company with a custom designed bearing for their unit.
>>
>>1179981
You probably want a cyclocross/gravel bike.
It will have clearance for wider tires but geometry that is about the same as a road bike.
New cross bikes with an aluminum frame and decent but lower-end components will run ~1000$.
Depending on where you live, you can probably find a decent used one for 550 - 750.
Wouldn't recommend buying anything advertised as a gravel bike new, as gravel bikes are the hot new meme and are overpriced for what you get imo.
>>
>>1179996
Oh cool, thanks. What about the ones with plastic retaining rings though? Are they decent for the price or should I spend a little more on a fully metallic one?
>>
>>1180000
Just get a UN-55 and replace it after 10k miles
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>>1179953
If they offer different widths then you buy the one closest to what you measured yourself to be.
Otherwise go with a ruler/tape measure and measure it yourself.

If you indeed have a narrow width then frankly just about any road saddle will likely fit you since you're who they're marketing to. But if you want to be smart you need to match the saddle to what your measurement is. Too narrow and you end up carrying too much weight on your perineum (gooch/taint/whatever you call it) and you'll be in agony every ride. Too wide and you will chafe and get saddle sores. Also wrong shape for your build/thighs and you'll get too much chafing, or like me, snap saddles in half because you're riding too far forward all the time. There is some science to this, don't let anyone tell you different.

More manufacturers are starting to offer different widths because not everyone is a 5'4" tall 130 pound Italian road racer. They want to sell more saddles and that's the way to do it.
>>
>>1179888
Like we keep telling you: You need the proper WIDTH.
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>>1179999
For some reason I was thinking I could get a new one for like $600, but I guess I was mistaken. It feels weird paying that much, but if it's standard it must be ok. It seems that these hybrid bikes are very different, what characteristics should I be looking for?

Also, checked
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>>1180005
You could get started on a hybrid bike. Some of them are actually decent frames too that you could slap a set of road bars and shifters on later.
>>
>>1179981
it's not that the other guy is wrong, but you can honestly ride any old road bike across grass or hard-packed dirt and gravel. putting the widest tires that will fit is helpful and an easy mod.
Just saying if you just want to try it out it doesn't make sense to sink a lot of dough into it, and when you get more into it and able to really determine what you want, you can n+1 an upgraded bike and keep the old one for a spare or a friend or barhopping etc. Or transfer parts over, or sell it.

Try this thread
>>1174456
>>
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>>1179981
>I want a mostly road bike but may sometimes ride on grass or dirt and may carry a little more than a backpack (but not much)
+1 A used road bike.

Post your local craigslist and height and i'll give you some options. What you'll get new for under $800 is the equivalent of pic related. Wouldn't you prefer an older civic? A really nice older road bike is $200-$400 in most places.




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