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Old thread: >>1205596
>>
So im in need of a cycling computer that has decent gps navigation so that I can cycle anywhere without worrying about being able to find my way home.

Im looking at the garmin 820 or 1000. The explore models for these computers don't offer actual navigation right?
>>
Are there any single speed mountain bikes or do I have to get one converted ? What's a good inexpensive single speed road bike?
>>
>>1209858
Serious question, why do you want a single speed mountain bike?
>>
>>1209858

Kona Unit is a popular one and Surly also makes some.
>>
I've got a new 2 front gears road bike (which I also take on gravel/rogh ground), with 36-46 and 12-28.

Unless on steep hills, I basically stick in 46 only changing rear gears and changing to 36 upfront when I go on rougher harder to pedal ground. Basically I use it like it's 1x but with the front gear being selected of terrain instead of speed.

Is there anything wrong with doing this? e.g. is it going to wear out the chain very quick
>>
>>1209894
no, that's fairly normal
won't cause you problems
>>
>>1209858
On-One Inbred
>>
What are considered midrange pedals?
>>
>>1209899

Clipless? 5800 for road, XT for MTB.

For flats/toeclip pedals, MKS makes good stuff. I have zero experience with MTB flats(the kind with the pins on them), but I hear they're great if combined with the right kind of shoe
>>
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>>1209902
>MTB flats
>I hear they're great if combined with the right kind of shoe
pinned flats + chucks = maximum comfy with ultimate grip
>>
What should I look for in a bike if I wanna try out bike touring in the UK?
>>
>>1209905

Full fenders, disc brakes, very durable tires(marathon plus), triple crankset or MTB double. People go nuts over steel on a touring build, but if you're staying in a civilized country with plenty of bike shops, I say go with aluminum. Steel touring bikes tend to have extreme mark up, an aluminum CX bike with fender mounts will be cheaper and lighter.

Unless you plan on touring through Asia, Africa, South America later on. Then just go for the steel frame with canti bosses instead of disc.
>>
>>1209905
>>1209909

Pay special attention to the wheels, get 32 spoke wheels minimum. 36 is probably overkill for UK touring but couldn't hurt if you're the paranoid type. Sputnik Rigidas are crazy heavy but indestructable rims, pair them with a good cup and cone hub(skip the cartridge bearing stuff for touring.)
>>
>>1209909
>>1209911
Cheers lad
>>
Some absolute CUNT slashed my tyres while I was at work.
Never had to replace tyres before. They're 700x28C and I'm a fairly casual rider so was thinking about getting the maxxis detonator 700x28c tyres with Innova 700x25/32c 60mm tubes, is this all compatible or anything else cheaper and better you'd recommend?
>>
>>1209927

Should be compatible, unless you're running absurd deep section rims
>>
>>1209909
You might as well have not even said anything.
>>
This is just a PSA in case there are more idiots out there like me. I finally changed my chain yesterday after putting it off for months. It's like a riding a new bike. DO NOT hesitate to change your chain.
>>
>>1209950
You know you can lubricate a chain, right?
>>
>>1209950
Just change it at 0,5
>>
>>1209951

Of course. This is why I didn't change it. Just lashed some lube on and it was fine. But the difference between the new chain is still massive.
>>
>>1209862
He probably wants one for the challenge of never being in the right gear, thinking that it will make him better at climbing.
>>
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I have a bike that's basically pic related: 6 speed freewheel, revoshit and so on. Works well, except 14-28 for me is not enough, and while I have all the tools to install a FD and I've done it before, the frame doesn't have the cable stop and the bottom tube isn't good for adapters.

Based on the mileage, I would say 8s for me is more than enough, Sunrace has got a Shimano compatible threaded FW which is 13-15-17-19-21-24-28-32 42-13. 42/13-15 is good enough for pushing, 42/32 would let me climb walls. 42/28 is good for most hills but not all of them.

All the internet guides, especially Sheldon's, are the shits. A LBS told me he'd just rape my frame and shove it in, another more popular LBS told me the Sunrace 8s freewheel would just fit right in, while the internet tells me it fits or it fits and I have to spread, or spread and redish everything, center the axle etc.
>>
>>1209895
Thanks
>>
>>1209904
Cheapest one you would recommend? I don't feel like blowing 200€ on a mtb pedal for a road bike.
>>
>>1209957

Measure the width of your rear hub, is it 126mm or 130mm? Next, is your frame steel or aluminum?

If it's aluminum and 126 mm, you're out of luck. If it's 130mm you'll be able to fit a modern road hub that can take 8-11 speed and if it's steel you can just bend it a few millimeters.

Have you considered getting a smaller front chainring? Might not be able to change the chainring on those cranks but getting 104 bcd MTB cranks with a 30/32 tooth chainring might be cheaper than changing the hub/cassette/shifters.
>>
What are the most comfortable and ergonomic brifters?
>>
>>1209970

Campagnolo is generally regarded as the best, SRAM the worst and Shimano somewhere between and hydraulic brifters are always worse than cable-operated, but it really does come to personal preference.

Biggest difference is how they shift - with Campagnolo you have a thumb button that shifts to a smaller cog and a lever behind the brake that shifts to a larger cog. With Shimano you shift to a larger cog using the brake lever and the small lever behind the brake drops to a smaller cog, and with SRAM you have a single lever that drops to a smaller cog with a small push and shifts to a larger cog with a longer push.

Campy can shift several gears up or down at a time, SRAM and Shimano can shift several up but only one down at a time.
>>
>>1209964
Not that guy but I got Shimano Saints for $70, I love them

Cheaper still are VP Vice

Also no need for Chucks specifically, anything reasonably flat soled will be fine, even boat shoes
>>
>>1209964
raceface chesters are my pick. those are about $40, replaceable pins and serviceable internals. those with vans, or especially vans "made for makers" is best grip. chink copies of the chester are usually totally fine, and $20 less.
>>
>>1209772
a cateye and a map
>>
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Snapped a shifter cable this morning and I'll be replacing the cables/housing/tape when the order comes in.

Should I just go black+black+black again?

Was considering blue+blue+blue but I don't know how good it will look.
>>
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>>1209999
here's a pic from internet: single-speed with blue tape
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>>1209771
i have to shift my claris shifter twice when going to a larger cassette ring. there is slack on the cable that is tightened on the first press of the lever, but doesnt move the derailleur until i press it again. after the initial slack is pulled tight, one move of the lever results in one gear change. i got used to it, but im wondering if theres something i can do to fix it, because this didnt used to be a problem.
have u guys noticed they keep putting bicyles in the captchas when asking to select all with cars? im scared if i dont select bikes, autonomous cars wont see us
>>
>>1210006
shift down all the way
ubolt the cable
pull it tight with pliers
rebolt it

anon could you really not work that out yourself lol
>>
>>1209999
>>1210000
black cable housing is the only color that won't clash with the yellow headtube, and for bartape if you go blue it must be a dark blue to match the stays, otherwise black tape to match your saddle
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>>1209999
>wat would look good on my bike
how about you post an actual picture of your bike retard
>>
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>>1209969

Steel, 100% frames this brand and in this price range are steel. For some reason they consider aluminium "premium".

>Have you considered getting a smaller front chainring?

That's an interesting idea, but I would rather be absolutely sure I cannot go for 8 speeds. A modern road hub wheel is wasted on me. It'll suck if I have to retrue the wheel as I don't have the truing stand and I hate diy shit. I'll measure the inside of the hub later today.

>>1209999
>>1210000

I would say blue tape and black everything else, because at least it tries to make up for that retarded color scheme with all that blue back there and nowhere else. Shame frame is mostly black and not white, it would look like Williams Renault.
>>
>>1210006
How old are your shift cables anon? Have you checked your derailleur hanger alignment?
If you don't have the tool for it, most shops will and it's a relatively quick process to fix.

There's a minute chance that the internal pawls in the shifter itself are skipping, but it's far more likely to be cable or alignment problems because going to a larger cog requires increased cable tension and shifting into those gears is where most cable/alignment problems will show up (this can vary with wacky chainlines though).
>>
/g/ here. I need a word that concisely describes the concept of inserting an additional link in the middle of a chain.
>>
>>1210025
>>1210032
Thanks guys, I'll definitely go with black housing and probably black tape too, depending on what the blue tapes look like. Just wanted to be sure that I was making the best of this opportunity to change parts.
>>
>>1210053
lengthening
>>
>>1210018
if i do that then the derailer would just shift to a larger cog bc the spring always has a sppecific force. u couldnt work that out yourself?
>>1210050
they are maybe two years old. the shifter is fine it clicks 8 times. im pretty sure whats happening is just the cable is stretching. at the end closest to the shifter it moves maybe an 1/8th inch where the cable near the derailer moves maybe a 1/16. maybe i just need a new cable
>>
>>1210080
It could also be a bent derailleur hanger. That can cause ratios to get messed up
>>
>>1209955
It teaches you better line choice on climbs because you have to maintain your momentum to make it up steep hills. At least that's the theory. What really happens is that you just mash until your shins shoot through your knee caps.
>>1209869
>>1209858
I can vouch for the unit and if you end up not liking it you can convert it to geared. You will need to buy a new rear wheel and Kona sells rear hangers with a derailiur mount.
>>
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>>1209760
>>1209802

best i can do as far as quality/res my internet is limited and terrible where i am rn

i have 2 closeups of the gears at back and front i will try to upload
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>>1210125
>>
>>1210125
>>1210132
>>
>>1210125
>>1210132
>>1210133
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>>1210125
>>1210132
>>1210133
>>1210134
>>
>>1210125
>bianchi
>not turqoise or whatever they call it

is that colour a more recent meme?
>>
>>1210125
could be quite pretty if the laughable stem is replaced and the saddle is replaced and the bag goes and those reflectors in the spokes go and the pedals get replaced
>>
>>1210137
i believe this is 99-01ish model so its old, i bought it for $20 just because i needed a bike. read post here.

>>1209755

i like the color desu the metallic red flake looks really nice
>>
>>1210138
yeah im already planning on replacing the seat/reflectors/pedals. ive only had it for a day and im out in the middle of nowhere for the week. dunno what a stem is
>>
>>1210006
Slow down anon I'm a clarisfag and had this problem.

TAKE THE HANDLEBAR TAPE OFF AND INSPECT THE OUTER CABLE.

Lots of Claris bikes are fitted badly and the cable routing can end up resulting in the brake cable wearing through the outer. This ruins the shifting. Don't do what I did and spend 2 hours trying to adjust cable tension with the barrel adjustors and re-tensioning the cables, check the outers under the handlebar tape!
>>
>>1210125
i would also like to add that i have no idea how to shift with the little thumb button thing or those secondary levers, the button doesnt travel anywhere and the levers dont seem to pull any cables or anything, they also have a second hinge that makes them go sideways??? idk help me /n/ the road bike tuts ive found dont have the little buttons like mine does
>>
>>1210140
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stem_(bicycle_part)

good luck m8 you got a nice frame there
>>
What is it about Anglo-Saxons that make them objectively better cyclists?
>>
>>1210146
Adversity, they're lazy obese anti-cyclist cultures. The ones that do go for cycling against all odds are exceptional people.
>>
>>1210125
usually we point out when someone is a manlet to make fun of them for being short because we're assholes. But since you're new and you don't know any better: this frame is for really short people.

If you aren't really short, you should flip this bike and get a frame that fits. For a bike as nice as that, you can get a way better price for it than the $20 you spent, then buy something in your size and you won't be handicapped riding something that is the wrong fit.
>>
>>1210144
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stem_(bicycle_part)

i see, thanks. i imagine the proper tool kits and stuff will cost a good bit, need someone to into me to bike maintenance and stuff as well. would like new wheels, i trust the build quality is good here but they are nearly 20 years old, and so are the tires i imagine. i see lots of ppl use carbon fiber wheels, itd be cool to grab some, im the dumb type to buy a carbon fiber shoehorn if i can find one, love the stuff.

as for the stem yeah i didnt really think about it but seeing what modern bikes are using it does look funny and i can see how it would turn better as well. all the damage done to it including the nasty brown handlebar tape i think its called were done by me, regrettably some of the decals have been damaged and some scuffs here and there

but what i really need is someone to explain the fking gear shift to me reee
>>
>>1210152
gcn on youtube has great noob videos about maintenance and the like

shifter looks campagnolo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EY7yNx3Gj_Q
>>
>>1210165
campagnolo starts at 3 min mark btw
>>
Where do people even ride road bikes? I bought one but my streets are so bad I wouldn't even think of riding it. Do you guys have gashes and chasms in your roads too?
>>
>>1210168
first world tends to have pretty decent asphalt m8
>>
>>1210151
oh fuk i didnt even see this, im at least 6 and my partner is well above 6, that kinda blows. i testdrove it and it felt nice, this is worrying though....will look in to it. that probably means if i sell it whatever i buy wouldnt be as nice? and is there anything i can do to shape it better for me? like raise/lower handlebars/seat... im a hoarder unfortunately, i like my valuable thrifts :/ but ty for the heads up
>>
>>1210165
ive been testing it on a flat road, the gear shifts dont seem to work properly. neither lever seems to be connected to anything, the one behind the brakes just move around freely and doesntt seem to pull any cables while the small button lever things on the inside dont move at all like theyre stuck, they have just a tiny bit of give but hit a stop before anything actually moves. wish i could upload a vid but my phones dead/bandwidth sucks. may try next week when im home with the bike
>>
>>1210176
whoa nvm im weak and retarded i didnt want to break the levers so i just wasnt pushing hard enough, ones in the vid/modern ones seem to be seamless and light but you really gotta crank into the ones on mine, they work beautifully
>>
>>1210174
>anything i can do to shape it better for me?
Short answer is no - even if you put a freakishly long seatpost on that bike to suit the length of your legs, the reach from saddle to bars will end up being too short (and with too much vertical drop) for your torso.

Last week I sold essentially the same bike on my local craigslist for $350 (but in perfect condition, fully overhauled, and in a more desirable size), you should be able to get at least $200 for yours at a minimum - a fantastic return on your $20 investment.
>>
>>1210174
>>1210185
Think about it like shoes: you might could get away with one size too big or small if you had to, but several sizes is just not going to work.

I feel like you could get way more than $200 for it in my area. A Bianchi with a Campy group that hasn't been ridden nearly at all would go for above the standard $200 baseline for an /n/ approved, respectable used bike.
>>
>>1210185
>>1210193
alright ill take your word for it..in front of my mother IL's house theres a long stretch of flat fresh pavement, maybe its because i a. dont know how tall i am or b. because i havent been on a bikein 5+ years but it seemed to ride nice, i did need to bend a good bit but i didnt mind.

now that ive been on it a bit more i can feel a bit that a longer stalk for the seat would be better but i think its most likely i dont know how tall i actually am. ill post a scale pic tomorrow when the suns up and ill get more of a feel for it on the road. ty for the advice. i might be in denial, im already pretty attached to it, but 200+ is pretty tempting
>>
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>>1210200
to my eye, yours looks like ~54cm. you can google how to measure it, it's easy.

different guides vary slightly, but this will give you the idea.
>>
>boomer spic family insists that it's impossible to live in Miami without a car

Are they right or should I continue dismissing them?
>>
So, I held down on my brakes a little too hard on a descent and at the bottom I felt my rear brake handle kinda snap, and now I can pull it further than my left. I mean, the pads still make contact with the rim, but I think I fucked up. Did I fuck up?
>>
>>1210225
you value 4chan's opinion more than your family's?

But seriously, humans lived in Florida long before the invention of the automobile.
>>
>>1210237
Good job giving us practically no information to go on... maybe you broke something and your bike is completely ruined forever, or maybe there was some slack in the brake cable housing that got pulled tight. Inspect your brake and see if you can find anything wrong with it.
>>
>>1210237
Look at where your cable's clamped in your brake. Does it look like it slipped?
>>
>>1210137
'celeste'
eros was their cheapest model, i think made in japan. they didn't make those cheap bikes celeste. still a nice bike though

and yeah they do other colours too. and no celeste is not a new thing.
>>
>>1210200
I think it is worth quite a lot more than $200, as it looks unridden. There is 0 wear on the drivetrain.

I think it is worth more around $500. It is basically NOS. You can also market it to the meme bike crowd as a 'sport touring' bike and say that the crank will fit a 26 or 28t granny for light touring/bikepacking, and the ergos which have microratcheting front shifting, not indexing, will handle out of series chainrings and mention the fact it has rack mounts and a reasonably long wheelbase.

Don't ride it if you're not 5'8 or smaller. It might feel vaguely right because of that ridiculous stem but that stem fucks the handling and especially down hills it will be scary.
>>
>>1210255
They made everything in celeste. The Eros would come in red, silver, blue, celeste, and this absolutely balleur early 90s somethingwave colorway. It was a solidly midrange light touring bike (28c was the max tire width on my late-90s model), above stuff like the Trofeo, but below the Veloce and of course the Mega Pro.
>>
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>>1209969

If the way I measured it is correct, and the sheldon table is also correct

>135mm Rear 7- 8- 9-10-11-speed (MTB); rear with disc brake (road). Some MTB with 12mm through axle

I can fit whatever the hell I want in here, right? A 8s freewheel thread-on cassette is all I need.
>>
>>1210317

Apparently 8 speed thread-on freewheels have a tendency of damaging the hub axle, but if you don’t ride the bike very hard and can find one for sale somewhere, you should be good with it.
>>
>>1210053
Chain.append()
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>>1210317
You can always stretch it. RJ the bike guy had a video where he showed how, maybe someone remembers which one.
>>
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>>1210331

I watched the video, the thing is

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwxEPRk3LFg

>This process includes expanding the rear triangle (chain stays/seat stays) from 126mm to 130mm between the dropouts

Mine unless I'm looking at measurements the wrong way is more or less 135mm, which is more than enough without doing anything. I'm more worried about the fender bolt head into the frame, that could actually block the chain, and it happened to me before on other bikes.
>>
How many ks have any of you anons got on corsa g+? Have 3000 on mine and the rear tyre is pretty squared off, wondering if it's time to replace.
>>
>>1210141
do u mean the shift cables not the brake cables? my shift cables come out the top not under the tape.
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>>1210336
Any squared tire should be replaced
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>>1209771
im putting drop bars and a 90s mtb theres nothing u can do abot it. however, i spent the whole budget on adapters to convert from threaded the threadless so currently im just using friction thumb shifters off a bso mounted next to the brake levers. id really like indexed shifters or brifter for not much money. Is this possible? id like something with 8-10 gears in back and double or single chainring. how crisp and accurate are quality indexed thumb shifters or bar end shifters? ive never used bar end shifters but i think id rather thumb shifters bc u can use them in the drops.
>>
>>1210408

Shimano 9 speed MTB and road components work together so you'll be able to run a 9-speed XT/whatever rear derailleur and MTB cassette with Sora brifters. Brifters however only work with cantilever brakes, not with V-brakes so that might become an issue.
>>
whats the best place for good deals on tubes?

internet?
lbs?
ebay?
>>
>>1210446
Planet X.
>>
>>1210485
btw i'm in america
>>
Where to get cheap frames that don't fall apart?
>>
>>1210538
>Where to get cheap frames that don't fall apart?
Come to the loading dock behind the city auditorium after midnight. Ask for Bobby. Bring cash.
>>
>>1210446
Diy Triple butted lugged rebar and graphene forks .
Ask your lbs framebuilder to borrow a thread tapper for your bb shell unless you want to license bb30a for marginal gains. Make sure your dropouts are deep and that each triangle is supple, strong, and resonates with your spiritual frequency
Make each weld dialed to 5 Nm and use cup and cone bearings when applicable.
>>
>>1210538
>>1210541
>>1210542
Fuck
Go to the local bike coop with some herb and barter for a river
>>
>>1210543
Tube
I'm drunk and gassed from a cat 6 + dumbass keyboard
>>
>>1210544
Doubles!
>>
>>1210542
>>1210543
>>1210544
>>1210545
go sleep and get your shit together
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>>1209771
i need to get a bike because i don’t go outside n my therapist said i should try getting a bike again because i loved it when i was younger. i’m a poorfag so what walmart bike should i get? i’ve never had a road bike but plenty of mtn bikes. i’d mainly be riding on the road and some dirt roads
>>
>>1210559
Nou
Captcha: deathcages
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>>1210559
no u
>>
>>1210567
I'd recommend buying a nice bike instead of walmart tier garbage. The single most important thing about buying a bike is buying one that you want to ride.
>>
>>1210573
all i’ve ever had was cheap bikes either from garage sales or big box stores. i don’t have any income so i can’t afford a top tier bike
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>>1210582
Those are the best bikes. 90's rigid mtb and old ten-speeds. Steel is real.
>>
>>1210582
Top tier bikes are insanely priced, dude. I'm saying like $600 instead of $150.
>>
>>1210582
DO NOT buy a Walmart bike, even a Decathlon bike. They fall appart easily. You'll be left with a pile of junk in your hands with a resale value of zero and no bike.
Buy one from a reputed manufacturer even if it's a million years old.
>>
>>1210582
go to /bbg/ post craigslist height and budget and they will find you a 90s mtb
>>
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Hi ge/n/ts.

My rear wheel inner tubes are getting repeatedly fucked.

The valve patch tears out of the rest of the tube (I think on the 'back' side), deflating the wheel almost instantly.

It's now happened to three tubes.

I've re-seated the rim tape twice, lightly gluing the second time to make sure it wasn't the tape somehow dragging the tube out of position relative to the hole in the rim.

The only thing I can think of is that the tires are slipping around the rim as I apply force through them, so the rim moves relative to the tyre by fractions of a degree until it eventually drags the inner tube out of place enough to rip the valve patch.

The tires themselves are fairly old, but I've literally never heard of this happening, and I've been taking care not to break violently or try to thrash up hills or off traffic lights.

Any ideas?

Thanks.
>>
>>1210631
Off the top of my head, align the tyre logo with the valve hole. It's aesthetically pleasing and will tell you if the tire is moving or just the inner tube. When mounting the inner tube try to be symetrical and yank the valve in and out so it sits perfectly in its place, maybe it's just your technique that sucks.
>>
>>1210632
I realised after the third one died that I intended, and forgot, to mark the tyre and rim so I could check this.
I'm fairly sure it's not technique - I've never had this problem before with dozens of tube re-seatings.

What do you mean "yank the valve in and out so it sits perfectly"?
I always make sure the valve can be poked up a bit into the rim without any significant scraping/resistance, and squidge the tyre round as necessary to achieve that once 90% inflated.
>>
>>1210641
If you simply try to bend it so it's perpendicular to the rim, the tube around it won't move and it will eventually go back to a neutral position relative to the tube around it. You need to make it perpendicular and then push/pull the valve so the tube moves and is loose in both directions. Or at least that's how I've always done it, for aesthetic purposes mostly, I've never had one tip to the point of breaking.
>>
>>1210304
>this absolutely balleur early 90s somethingwave colorway.
looks cool senpai
>>
Looking for a first roadbike lads, I'm hitting the limits of my trusty city bike.

What do you recommend in the <€2000 price range?
>>
>>1210666

You have a lot of options in that price range. If you shop used, you'll be able to get a 5-10 years old top-of-the-line carbon frame with Dura-Ace/(Super) Record/Red, possibly electronic shifting also. But a used bike is always a used bike, and if you need to overhaul the drivetrain on a top-of-the-line groupset, it could set you back up 500€ so not a nice surprise there.

If you shop new, you won't be able to afford anything from a prestigious brand, but if you're okay with a more boring (online retailer) make you'll be able to get a very good bike, Ultegra level with the possibility of hydraulic disc brakes. I'm not a fan of hydro discs on road bikes personally and prefer old-school calipers, but disc brakes do allow wider tires and you can use carbon wheels without worry about the brake track. If you want a new bike, look into what Canyon, Rose Bikes, Radon, Cube etc have to offer, they usually have very good spec for the price.
>>
How likely is a blowout?

I'm a pretty heavy guy and I always pump my tires up to the maximum pressure. I'm just wondering how far past that would I risk blowing out a tire.
>>
>>1210684

Not at all. I ride a lot and the only time it's happened to me was on my fixed gear bike when I had skidded a hole in the outer tire and something punctured the tube from the hole.

Pinch flats/snakebites do happen, but they're usually not very dramatic.
>>
>>1209771
looking for a carbon clincher rem brake wheelset for around $1000. my local trek dealer offered me Bontrager Aeolus Pro 5 TLR for $998 USD.
Another bike store offered Zipp 302 for $1150.
Which one is best? Advertisment tells me the 302, but specs tell me the bontrager. (rim width, depth, tubeless compatibility)
>>
>>1210692
Those wheels are worth more than my bike, anon
>>
>>1210646
>I've never had one tip to the point of breaking.
That's kind of my point - I've patched and changed tubes dozens of times and I've never had this problem.
I'll try wiggling the valve when I get a new tube.
If that fails, I guess I'll geta new rear tyyre - this on if a solid 6+ years old at this point, and is looking pretty thin on some of the contact surfaces.

Thansk for your time.
>>
>>1210667
>. I'm not a fan of hydro discs on road bikes personally and prefer old-school calipers
what do you dislike about them?
>>
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Are the Bottom Bracket diameters on mountain bike frames pretty universal? The BB on my bike 73mm and the BB cartridge works with a BSA24mm spindle. Can I use a BSA30mm BB on my bike or does that mean my bike is incompatible with BSA30mm Bottom brackets? Or do BSA30 BBs use smaller bearings to make room for the larger spindle? I currently have a 24mm Bottom Bracket, But I really want a RaceFace Atlas crankset which has a 30mm spindle.
>>
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>>1210785
You're stuck with 24 unless you can magically make the bottom bracket shell in your frame get wider.

On the off chance you do have magical powers here's an appropriate spell to try:
>Pirika pirilala poporina peperuto - bottom bracket shell ookiku~nare!
>>
>>1210788
The Diameter of the BB on the frame is like 41mm. The BB (with the bearing and stuff) has a diameter of 24mm. I'm saying theoretically if you used more, smaller bearings you could spare 6mm and fit a 30mm spindle. Is this what BSA30 is?
>>
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Would slicks give me like 4-5mph more? I can really only hold like 12mph consistently. I really only ride 10 miles a day so obviously my endurance is pretty poor. Also why are Marathon Plus tires so expensive?

>inb4 "get good" yes I know thanks
>>
>>1210793
More likely 1-2. Marathon plus tyres are expensive because they're overbuilt to be bombproof.
>>
>>1210793
marathon pluses won't because they are rock hard garbage
I could see proper slicks giving you that kind of speed increase though
>>
>>1209771
My MTB with hydraulic discs has serious problems (fluid leaked out entirely due to having someone else try to adjust them before I learned how to).

Are mechanical discs that bad? I'm thinking of changing to a mechanical set. Otherwise, does that BMW/VW power steering fluid work instead of Shimano oil? Do I need a special funnel to bleed them? I just want something that will last a really long time. Extreme stopping power isn't the top priority as long as it works at least as well as a V-brake and won't go out on me.
>>
Hey, I just visited goodwill outlet the other day and bought a used Schwinn Winwood for $20 did I make a big mistake? First bike I’ve ever owned. I feel like it is stupid baby boomer bike and don’t know what to do
>>
>>1210808
how can you make a big mistake for $20?

definitely a dumb bike tho
>>
>>1210809
I am hoping to eventually get a nicer one. Needed something to commute bc my transmission blew out in my car. I live 20 feet from a max stop so I can ride and bike to work in 30 minutes
>>
>>1210734

It's complicated. Road bikes don't really need any of the advantages that disc brakes offer - I don't ride my nice bike in rain/snow/mud and we don't have any mountains over here so I don't run into any issues with rim brakes either. My Dura-Ace 9000 calipers fit 28 tires and I don't need any wider and don't think the frame could take any wider either, so it doesn't matter that the caliper brakes restrict tire width. I haven't tried the current generation brake hoods, but at least with the previous 11 speed generation the hydro disc brake hoods were really big and didn't feel as good to hold as the mechanical ones. And a bike with disc brakes will be at least 500g heavier than a comparable one with rim brakes.

So for my nice sunday bike I don't really have any reason to go for disc brakes since calipers are good enough and don't have any big drawbacks, but for a year-round training/commuter bike they definitely do make sense.
>>
>>1210801
GTFO.
>>
>>1210785

BSA bottom brackets have limitations with spindle thickness, but 30 mm is okay and any BSA30 BBs will fit your frame. Larger than that requires a press fit bottom bracket.
>>
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>>1210815
Thanks, out of curiosity what BBs/cranksets use a spindle over 30mm in diameter? I've already heard of people complaining that going to a 30mm spindle has no benefits over a 24mm one.
>>
>>1210785
If you're talking about this https://www.jensonusa.com/Race-Face-BSA-30mm-Bottom-Bracket-83mm-Width-30mm-Spindle

Then yes, the threads will fit your bottom bracket. BSA/English threading is the standard for threaded headsets since like the 80s, you just have to worry about spindle length

>>1210793
You can use this to estimate speed gains, it has knobby tires and high pressure slicks as options http://www.kreuzotter.de/english/espeed.htm
Aero makes a big difference too, try tighter fitting clothing, although not too much of a difference at 12 mph

12 mph is casual tier tho, if you're brand new I'd expect 12 mph to be easy in good weather on flats even on knobby tires. Make sure your hubs and cranks aren't binding
>>
>>1210793
You can get a pair for 50€, they're on the cheap side.
Don't skimp on tires.
>>
As a performance based touring cyclist, how important should weight be when looking for a cycling computer?

I want to use fresh routes but the computers with acceptable navigation are all big with heavy weights
>>
>>1210858
I suppose it depends if you're doing ultralight credit card touring but generally speaking no 100-200 gm should really be the least of your worries.
>>
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How common are those in your country? I feel like you can only find regular ass threaded rims or le sleek aerodynamyk raysin freehub rim for a gorillion dollars, at least in your LBS.
>>
>>1210869
The trick about cheapo wheels is building them. You can get new Rigida rims and Gurpil hubs for 10€. Your LBS may not sell them upfront, but that's what they'll do if they need to flip an OTS with wrecked wheels.
>>
>>1210871

But I only want to go in, pay 50 bucks, get one of those >>1210869 with freehub for 8 to 10 speeds, and leave. They make it sound like rocket science instead.
>>
>>1210873
Agreed, you can't go to the LBS for cheap custom stuff like that. They'll stick you with 20 bucks of labor costs and make it pointless. There are plenty of online stores that will sell you a wheel for 50 bucks tho.
>>
>>1210596
Decathlon (B'Twin) bikes are perfectly adequate bikes, they won't magically fall apart
>>
>>1210893
I've heard from people who got the walmart bike experience after buying one.
>>
>>1210895
Partly true. I owned one and while they do have real components, I did have a bad experience with the rear wheel taking out my rear derailleur. Replaced wheels and derailleur and hanger and it's fine now though.
>>
Has anybody here used zwift? It seems far too cool to be real
>>
>>1210897
I've also heard horror stories about the boys they have working on the bikes, like mounting forks backwards.
>>
>>1210899
Well if the fork is mounted backwards you can tell that shit. When I got mine I did a once over to make sure it was actually put together properly. It's lasted over a year and besides parts wearing out (and the wheel incident) it's been just fine.
>>
>>1210897
A wheel coming in contact with the RD means either improperly set limit screws or a bent hanger, both the fault of a shitty mechanic and not of the bike itself
>>
Are there actually any quality road/city bike pedals for clips?
>>
>>1210901
Bent hanger is the fault of the rider, not the mechanic.
>>
>>1210910
pd-t8000?
>>
>>1210901
No I know exactly what caused it. The wheel was fucked beyond any way to repair it. I had it trued at a LBS, and they told me that it needed replacing since it was fucked (paraphrasing) and I kinda ignored it and kept using it until it took my derailleur out. Also my hanger was actually loose since I wasn't taking care of keeping it firmly screwed in, etc.
It was more or less my fault though.
>>
>>1209771
After switching my crankset in a bikeshop, my bike started to squeak while pedaling in saddle. Removed and mounted crankset again this time with more lube. Squeaking stopped for around 80km and came back.

Its a square taper crankset, should I try to tighten the bolts? Or remove and remount again ?
>>
>>1210917
Usually I'd recommend checking the seat clamp, since that shit squeaks. Generally any noise that comes from your bike reverberates throughout the frame and always sounds like it's coming from the BB. Hence why noises are such a pain in the ass.
Sure you didn't adjust the saddle?
>>
>>1210912
I said clips. Not clipless.
>>
>>1210921
Switch to clipless or use good flats.
>>
>>1210925
this tbqh
>>
>>1210793
just get regular Marathons. the ones I bought were pretty cheap and good flat protection
>>
>>1210812
I mean, $20 is like one or two cab fares, or a week of bus fares. As long as you can ride it for a month, you've re-couped your investment.
But that bike kinda sucks. Looks cool, though.
A max stop is a train or bus you can take your bike on? your commute sounds fine and then after a month or so use /bbg/ to get a respectable used bike for $100-300 and your body will be primed from the schwinn, you will really notice the upgrade and then you have the schwinn as a spare or sell it.
>>
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>>1210910

MKS makes a number of pedals which you might find appealing.

Wellgo makes some good ones too, tbqh.
>>
>>1210910
there are still new pedals that are designed around using clips/straps (look at MKS pedals) but it is more or less baked into the design of all "normal" flat pedals (but maybe not yer xtreme-meme type) to accept clips.
If it has reflectors on it (or if it once did), the clips attach through the same holes. The reflectors just pop off and you bolt the clips on. even if there isn't an explicit hole to thread straps thru, there is generally some gaps in the body of the pedal that will accept straps.
tl;dr you can find something in a bin at the co-op that will work for a dollar, but MKS etc still make nice ones, too.
>>
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>>1210944
>>1210910

I have thousands and thousands of miles on my Wellgo LU-961s
>>
>>1210917
>>1210918
this and also tighten the chainring bolts
>>
>>1210918
Yes took the seat clamp off and cleaned it and greased the seat post. Too make sure its not the saddle, i switched to the saddle and seatpost of my other bike and it still squeaked.

>>1210947
Will try that..
>>
>>1210814
have you ever ridden marathon pluses? The roadfeel is beyond awful. Seriously what's the point of not getting flats if it takes all the fun out of riding?
>>
>>1210989
The compromise is using the bike as a practical object rather than for fun.
Personally though, I get so much fun from riding my bike to work it makes me actually want to go to work.
>>
>>1210991 (not that guy, I'm >>1210936)

ok but plusses are such overkill
>>
>>1210992
Agreed. Pluses are generally for when you're rolling over goathead/IED/detroit
>>
>>1210994
>>1210992
Thanks guys, I'll go for the regular Marathons.
>>
>>1210994
Best solution for goatheads is just go tubeless but that has its own set of problems too.
>>
I have a bicycle that's 700c with 23mm tires. I wish to increase the size because for comfort. I ride on nice roads, shitty roads, grass, and relatively packed dirt. I don't think I need tread, but I won't dismiss a good tire if it has a little. What are some good, tires at 28mm, and can I (or should I) use the same tube?


The inner diameter of the rim is 15cm, so the wheel can fit up to 32mm. There is way over 9mm of clearance, so the frame is not a problem.
>>
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I literally just want to ride to the park/shop a few times a week. So I want to be chill and comfortable and not have to take a bus.

Am I going to get fucked with this?

for £150
https://www.muddyfox.com/muddyfox-voyager-100-city-bike-938464?colcode=93846401

Everything said about Muddyfox bikes is just a bunch of 30 year old boomers on forums talking about how the brand hasn't been the same since the 80's.
>>
>>1211007
You can use the same tube, but it miiiight puncture a little bit easier because it's stretched harder.

At 28mm all the standard good road tyres are available, schwalbe one, conti gp4ks2m, vittoria corsa g+ etc etc

You could go a bit bigger and get pasela or compass or something like that too.
>>
>>1211008
Get a bike that you want to ride. Generally cheap trash like that will make you not want to ride it.
>>
>>1211008
You deserve better than a shit bike. A bad bike is a torture to ride on. Cycling should be fun, it'll never be fun on a pile of junk.
>>
What are hardtails actually like for commuting? I know a road bike is a better option, but there's a few trails on the way to work that I'd rather take than main roads and the only paved roads I'd be using are of a poor quality.

7 miles each way. Some moderate climbs, but nothing too serious.
>>
>>1211015
Lock out your fork, sit down and pedal. It'll be fine.
If you have mounts for a rack, even better.
>>
>>1211015

29ers do roll okay and you can put some fast tires like Thunder Burt on it. Some lower level hardtails also have mounting holes for racks and fenders so that's also nice for a commuter bike. You'll probably get a 20-25 km/h average speed with a 29 hardtail with fast tires whereas with a road bike you'll have 25-30 km/h average so it's not a very big difference.
>>
>>1211008
Get something like this and use the extra pounds to upgrade it to your liking with quality components
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Giant-Stonebreaker-Steel-Mountain-Bike-Retro-80s-Excellent-Condition/292627267596?hash=item4421f1c00c:g:m~sAAOSw2sZbO0OQ
>>
>>1211015
Generaly the meme is to take a half decent MTB frame and stick road tires on it.
>>
>>1211021
Fugg that looks nice. Get that exact one.
t. samefag
>>
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crash aftermath on chainstay
Is there anything else that could have caused this damage besides disc rotor?
>>
>>1211033
It's just scraping.
>>
>>1211018
that's the difference between walking somewhere and standing still, pretty big desu
>>
>>1210793
That's a pretty bike Anon. Slicks would definitely make you a little faster.
>>
>>1211012
Would I want to go to 30 or 32, though? How much slower is that?
>>
>>1211060
Rolling resistance does not go up as a function of tire width. It can actually go down, depending on surface. However, with the inner diameter of the rim being 15c, 32c tires are pushing it a little bit, and they may bulb out a little. It's one of the reasons why the industry is moving towards wider rims. 23 or 24 external, 17 or 17.5 internal.
>>
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i need 26in rim brake wheels for 90s mtb meme machine commuter. my budget is about 100-200$. ive build wheels before, is it cost effective at this price point to build my own wheels? any recommendations on hubs or rims?
>>
>>1211069
Panaracer Pasela, Vittoria Rubino Pro III, Vittoria Rubino G+, or Continental Ultra Sport II?
>>
>>1211094
None of them, get Continental Sport Contact II
>>
Do I really have to avoid cross chaining on a modern road bike? I just like to stay on the big ring and use the whole cassette for whatever comes up.
>>
>>1211104
Cross-chaining decreases your drivetrain's efficiency slightly because it forces the chain to flex more, but it's not going to hurt anything otherwise.

But if you're only ever using your large chainring, that suggests that either you're mashing on the pedals, or your bike is seriously undergeared, and so there are easy things you can do that will make you a faster and/or more efficient rider.
>>
>>1211108
>mashing on the pedals
I downshift whenever I find that I have uneven cadence. Mentally, I count the CPR rhythm (~110 bpm), and one of the cranks reaches top dead center on every beat. What does this mean for my pedal rev/min?
>undergeared
If this is the case, how can I fix it? If I'm looking at the correct manufacturer specification, it's 28 -- 48 in 3 for the front, and 11 -- 32 in 8 for the rear.
>>
>>1211114
>anything smaller than a 52 big ring
>triple with a 28
That's gearing for sissies indeed.
t. not that other guy
>>
>>1211116
this.

in your your big ring, you should only be able to mash the 11t cog on a decent downhill. a 50, 52 or so tooth
your middle ring should be in the 40s and the small should be probably over 32 since 32-32 is a 1:1 ratio and basically lets you climb walls. no wonder you never use anything but your so-called big ring.
>>
>>1211116
>>1211122
Thanks for the knowledge. Probably wouldn't have figured it out on my own.
Am I looking at replacing just the front cassette (or whatever the front sprockets are called collectively), or do I need to change the front derailer as well? Should I go to LBS for the replacements?
>>
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>>1210169
Same guy here. Actually took the bike out and it's absolutely fine. The bike is just really uncomfortable in the hoods because of the super long stem and tt combo. Going fast is so fun.
>>
>>1211128
Probably just the rings. What groupset is it (brand/model)?
>>
>>1211132
As far as I know it's a stock Specialized Sirrus, so I'm not sure the groupset itself has a name. Or maybe that is the groupset name.
https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sirrus/p/115192
>>
i can decide what kind of bike to get id mostly be riding on paved/dirt roads. road bikes look nice but i’d be going on dirt roads a decent amount. mtn bikes are a pain to pedal up hills a lot. hybrid seem nice but i’ve never road one so idk if they’d handle dirt roads well
>>
>>1211136
It's a mtb Shimano group, finding chainrings should be easy, although I don't know anymore, I thought it was a full on racing bike, don't feel pressured to change them (48x11 is not "sissy" for a hybrid).
>>
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>>1211141
Really depends on your preferences, where you live, etc. Road bikes are great on dirt roads that are reasonably firm and in good condition - sand and gravel are no problem as long as your tires are wide enough that you aren't constantly sinking into the surface.

>>1211136
Looks like a very basic crankset where the rings are permanently riveted to the crank arms, so you'd probably need to replace the whole crankset as a unit. The cheapest way to get higher gears would be to go to an LBS that has used parts or a bike Coop and get an old double crankset (an extremely common component) that you can swap in.
>>
>>1211059
Thank you. I really liked the color when I bought it. My Marathons are on their way.
>>
>>1211141
>>>/n/bbg

>>1211151
eh, he's got an MTB group on a bike he rides on the road and which he describes as a road bike. If he was a weak rider, that might be OK, but he said he never leaves his largest ring. He needs road gearing.
>>1211136
Whatever rings you get, you just have to make sure they fit on the bolt pattern of the spider on your crankarm. The number of bolts but also the bolt circle diameter or BCD has to match. Instead of a model you can look up, your crank is listed as
>CRANKSET Stout, forged alloy
which doesn't help, but it should be stamped on the spider somewhere or you can measure it fairly easily. rings in common sizes are pretty cheap.
Or >>1211155 may be right and you can just throw some new crankarms on there and change rings as needed. You could get another triple or a double and restrict the derailleur from going to the lowest position. Avoid a BCD of 144mm, an old standard that's too big for anything but racing. Anything smaller that fits on your bottom bracket spindle is prob fine
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/cribsheet-bcd.html
you can plug in your cassette from a pulldown, plug in current and different rings, then play with the cadence slider and get mph/kph outputs here
http://www.ritzelrechner.de
>>
>>1211172
you should have bought pasela pts
>>
>>1211183
Well I'll be using it for commuting at uni, so I think Marathons will be fine
>>
>>1211185
they will be but the anon earlier was right, they won't feel very nice on the road
>>
If I want a BB that says it for a 83mm BB, but I have a 73mm BB can I just remove the plastic thing in the middle to make it work?
>>
me again, ive brought the bike back home, rode it to a shop and got my tires properly pumped and stuff, they appraised it as 3-400 just as yall have, but i have decided not to sell it. i havent done my measurements yet but i will tomorrow, the ride really does feel fine and not like im too close to the drivetrain. one issue though. it has some pedals i can only imagine to be for racing, very similar to pic related >>1210946 the model on mine reads HTI-P29. ive done something probably dumb but ive unbolted the triangular washer, taken the plastic stirrup thing with the straps on it off and have just been using the stripped down pedals for the last couple days. ive decided to keep the bike and to just use it recreationally as everything i need is walking distance and its nice to get to kroger 20 minutes faster than walking. the ride quality is pretty sublime honestly its a joy to drive

what pedals does /bqg/ recommend? something like i had on my mongoose as a kid would be rad, nice big and studded, nothing super enthusiast-y high quality expensive but not shit either for now as i continue to into biking
>>
>>1211192
also id like to add that yes for now im not big on investing but i would like to know what my options are as far as expansion and customization, disc brakes sound interesting to me
>>
>>1211193
you can't put disc on that bike

and pinned pedals would look absolutely obscene
>>
>>1211194
good to know

and yeah i just rendered it in ps and it looks ridiculous im not doing that nvm, but still regular flat pedals would be much better for me
>>
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>>1211195
get something like these MKS BM-7's
>>
>>1211186
That's fine. I don't really want to mess with punctures
>>
>>1211191

83mm bottom brackets are for downhill bikes with 150mm wide hubs at the rear and they use cranks with a longer spindle that give a different chainline.

If you currently have a 73 mm BB, the 83 mm won't be compatible with your frame.
>>
>>1211223
pasela pts also have flat protection...
>>
>>1211227
So the external part of the BB that sticks out would be a different width? Because they both use BSA threading they would fit in the BB I was wondering if a 68/73 crank would work with it.
>>
>>1211192
guy, borrow or test ride a frame in your actual size and then go back to the eros and tell me again how it fits you fine and you're going to keep it. you have no frame of reference.
Or actually, just keep it and leave us alone. the answers to most of your questions is mostly just "lurk more" anyway.
>>
>>1210925
>>1210927
stfu
>>
What is the strongest spoke lacing pattern?
>>
>>1211241

I'm not sure, but I guess you might be able to use a 68/73 crank with the 83 mm bottom bracket if you use the middle part from a 68/73 BB or leave it out and just screw the cups in.

With 83 mm bottom brackets the entire BB shell is wider, don't think there should be any difference in the dimensions of the cups so if you install them with the spacer configuration required by your bike it might work as long as the spindle length of the cranks matches the length of your BB.
>>
>>1211073
If you only have that much it is probably better to build your own
>>
>>1211227

Speaking of that:

700c trekking frame. 122mm BB in the front, if I put a 135mm rim in the back with 9 speeds and all the proper hardware to make it work, is there any risk for the chain to slip if I go 42-36? I spoke for a while with a LBS that's what he said, but it's the first time ever I hear of such a thing. Everybody was like "does the rim fit? Yes. Do you have proper RD, shifter and chain? Yes. It's good to go then". Absolutely nothing about bottom bracket and crankset.
>>
What are some good, cheap tires for someone wanting to take a 26" mtb and convert to road duty?
>>
I've got a single-speed bike in an area with a lot of hills... how easy is it to change something like the rear sprocket for a lower ratio? Does it really make a difference? Current ratio is 44:17 (2.59).
>>
>>1211362
Get a bike with gears
>>
>>1211314
Cheap tires are often not the best idea. Reasonably priced tires tend to be a better idea.
>>
>>1211362

You need special tools - a freewheel remover if it’s a thread-on freewheel (there’s a couple different kinds, at least with 4 and 8 splines. Make sure to get one that fits your freewheel) and a lockring tool & a chainwhip if it’s fixed gear. With the proper tools if the parts aren’t stuck it’s a 5 minute job.

A difference of 1 tooth probably won’t be all that noticeable, but if you go from 17 to 19 tooth cog it’ll be significantly lighter. I’ve got 49:19 on one fixie (heavier frame, city riding) and 49:17 on another (lightweight, more road-oriented) so maybe try with 19 tooth.

If changing just 2 teeth you probably don’t need to make any changes to chain length if the wheel doesn’t sit at either extreme end of the dropouts.
>>
Is the salsa vaya the king of light touring bicycles?
>>
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After lurking for so long I finally got myself a proper bicycle. Riding bikes feels so good I could quit my job and do it all day.

Managed to grab this one new for around 1450USD. How did I do, anons?
>>
>>1211520

looks great! are the tires already set up tubeless? might be worth a try if they aren't.
>>
>>1211520
Ultegra for that money is very good. Managing to find a Giant without a disgusting paintjob is also very good. Tubeless is also nice.
>>
>>1211527
Yeah that's the best looking giant I've seen in ages
>>
Just rode 4 miles on a flat tire, my wheel seems fine, but is it really that bad to ride on a flat tire?

I bring a spare with me, but I was unable to change it because the little screw on adapter for my air pump somehow fell out of my saddle bag. I started walking my bike the 4+ miles home before it started to downpour, so I just hopped on and rode the distance since I really had no other choice. Fucking fishing hook did it too because these assholes like to fish off of bridges they're not supposed to, with signs and shit all over the place saying don't fish here but people still do it.
>>
>>1211540

The tire's probably fucked for good since riding it flat puts stress on the sidewalls that it's not designed for. Rim just might be fine - when y put a new tire, check that the rim's true and straight and that the spokes have about even tightness.
>>
>>1211552
oh I already threw out the tire, it was fucked, it had one puncture from the fishing hook, and another much larger one that I suspect is from me riding on it for that long of a distance. Thanks for the advice. Rin looks pretty straight, I only weigh about 150lbs so I'm not too concerned that I would damage the rim while riding.
>>
>>1211523
>>1211527
>>1211530
I'm feeling great about this. Thanks, anons.
The bike shop set up the tires for me with the sealant and all that. I'm so hyper I forgot to mention that the bike only weighs 7.7kg.

I'm very ignorant about tubeless, so I decide to tour a bit on it, could I trust the sealant to do its job? Would it be more reliable to just be able to change the tube whenever needed?
>>
>>1211561
>so if I decide to tour
Fix'd.
>>
>>1211561
>>1211564
I've never ridden tubeless but I was very impressed with the demonstrations I've seen online like this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALVtgcY1YeM

No idea how much the functionality differs per brand and tire though.
>>
redpill me on tubeless tired and give me some recommendations.

I'm tired of getting flats. It rarely happens to me but I've gotten two in the past month. I don't even care if it adds more weight, my bike is already 21+ lbs.
>>
>>1211579
What kind of flats are you getting? Sealant can fix most small ones with no additional input from you.

So you can run a more fragile tyre tubeless and let the sealant pick up the slack. Weight is about even with normal clinchers, you lose the weight of the tube but add sealant weight.

All the compass tyres 35mm and up are compatible, as are a couple of the marathon supreme sizes. For a more "pure road" tyre schwalbe do the pro one.
>>
>>1211579
>redpill me on tubeless tires
Only advantage really is that it's impossible to pinch flat... but tubeless is then susceptible to burping at very low pressures (tire bead unseating). The weight difference will either be a slight advantage due to lack of tube or a disadvantage due to sealent weight, it's really down to the setup.

Glass and sharp rocks can still fuck up the casing whether tubed or tubeless. The only real resistance to flats are straight up punctures but that's due to the sealant. In any case, if you manage to flat a tubeless, you can always install a tube inside a tubeless tire.

So again, the real advantage is pinch flat resistance for running very low pressure. Some might argue that tubeless are more supple but I don't know enough about that to argue for or against suppleness but it makes sense that a tubeless would be slightly more supple due to a thinner cross section.
>>
>>1211073
Bumping anons question as mine is the exact same, except I'm looking for a single speed hub with pad brakes - same budget, is it worth building my own?
>>
Are racks that mount onto disc brakes as good as the ones that use dedicated holes?
>>
>>1211661
u mean axle mount? Probably just as sturdy but a huge PITA if you ever need to change a flat
>>
>>1211579
Tubeless road is an expensive meme. You need tubeless-ready wheels, the tires themselves are pricey with limited selection and availability, installation is a bitch, and sealant can cook under sustained braking.

You didn't say what type of flats you've been getting, if you've checked the condition of your tires (I'd venture to guess that they're squared to fuck), what tires you have, what width and pressure you run, how much of a fatass you are, etc. Somewhere in there is the culprit.
>>
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Does this stem seem too long? Riding in the hoods is so uncomfortable. I'm also going to rotate the handlebars counter-clockwise and get a new saddle. I read on a couple of forums that Bridgestone bikes have long top tubes.
>>
>>1211579
>>1211600
Seems like more hassle than its worth honestly. My wheels are tubeless ready, but the advantages just aren't worth the increased price. Even the cheapest tubeless I can find costs 2x as much as a normal tire.

>>1211672
I'm 150lbs, and my tires are stock Bontrager T2 700x28c that came with my bike. I'd probably be better off just upgrading to some better tires I'm guessing. The tires are in good shape though, it's just the bike path I ride is pretty shit and littered with debris in some places. The bike I ride is only like 2 months old too so it's not the tires.
>>
Do I need to buy a whole set of torque wrenches or something? The installation for a set of cranks I bought has torque specs for some of the bolts like 12-13nm. I can't tell by hand and I've heard it is important to torque bolts to spec. Do I need to buy a set of torque wrenches that range from 1nm to 20nm or something? Or is there a single adjustable torque wrench.
>>
>>1211699
There are three kinds of torque wrenches: the sort that immediately display how much torque you're exerting (pictured), others that ratchet and can be easily adjusted with a dial to 'click' when you've reached your desired torque, and there are very simple torque wrenches that are set to a single value (used in bike shops for routine tasks like checking stem bolts). Whether you would benefit from owning your own torque wrenches or not depends on how often you work with carbon fiber parts or others that require torque measurement.

>>1211690
It looks like a relatively long stem, and the brake levers are mounted far forward on the bars, but it's a fool's game to try and evaluate anyone's bike fit with a picture. Can you reach the hoods comfortably with a little bit of bend in your elbows, or are your arms totally straight? If the latter, the reach is too long.
>>
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>>1211705
oops, forgot pic
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>>1211705
My arms are straight and my weight is on the edge of the saddle. I'm changing everything tomorrow. Thanks for the answer.
>>
>>1211696
Could be that you were just really unlucky. I once had three punctures in three different places on a 70 mile ride on a GP4000s II that I'd just purchased, and I wasn't riding on particularly shitty streets. After that, I had no more punctures for the lifetime of the tire.
>>
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>>1209771
Who makes nice modern lugged steel road frames? Is pic related the only option?
>>
>>1211733

Cinelli and Colnago also have lugged models but those are probably even more expensive than the Rivendell.

But it's not like steel frames go bad with age, you can get an older one for cheap and just build it up with modern components. Might need to stretch the rear end a couple millimeters to fit a 130mm hub but that's no problem.
>>
>>1211735
I've got a Tange 2 Centurion I love, been upgrading components to shiny mid/late 80s shimano 600 but I expect it to explode from rust eventually. Looking for something to swap all the part to including english BB.
>>
>>1211733
why would you want a new lugged steel road frame? Why not just buy an old one? Holy shit that stem looks awful
>>
>>1211744
why don't you just get rid of the rust
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>>1211745
yeah the classic frame looks far better with a quill. See >>1211744
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>>1211733
Hell no. There are hundreds or maybe even thousands of framebuilders who do lugged, at various price levels. Soma, Panasonic, Miyata, Toei (available in the US as "Ebisu," brokered by Jitensha in Berkeley), Nobilette, Battaglin, Mercian, Bob Jackson, Rourke, Spectrum, Waterford (who make the Roadeo), Vanilla, Llewellyn, Colnago, Cinelli, Torelli, Bottecchia, and many others.

The Roadeo is nice, but overbuilt and more upright than a racey bike should be, and overpriced, since you can get a custom Waterford R33 frameset for the same price. Personally, I'd figure out how to get a fresh new Panasonic or Miyata frameset shipped over here. Or even better, get one built up in Japan, ride it around for a week or ten, then ship it back.
>>
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>>1211800
Listen to this guy
>>
Why might someone go out of their way to specifically ask for a lugged steel frame?
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>>1211806
Because lugs are nice and retro, and most people don't actually like the stack of dimes, or worse, look. Lugs look fancier than fillet brazing too, although some lug designs become very dated.
>>
>>1211807
Wouldn't it be more expensive assuming the same quality?
>>
>>1211809
Generally yes. Heavier too. But you're asking why people want nice things. The answer is because they're nice.
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>>1211810
So it's purely aesthetic?
>>
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>>1211818
Not him but
No, it's also about tradition and craftsmanship and je ne sais qua and passion and heritage and la dolce vita
>>
how is this for a commuter bike? it's 60 bucks and the tubs, tires, and chains just got replaced. should i be wary?
>>
>>1211823
i just need something for school
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>>1211823
yeah, if hills, then don't, it's a heavy piece of shit with cottered cranks and steel rims so adjusting things is going to be stupidly difficult and it won't really brake in the wet but fuck, 60 bucks is not a lot, if it rides ok, why not.

You can do better, but i've got a lot of fun and use out of some real shitters that had no right to be that fun or useful.
>>
>>1211827
should I just buy a new bike? i'll be buying groceries and stuff with it b/c i don't want to buy a car yet. do you recommend anything specific?
>>
>>1211831
I'd recommend just a better used bike, if you live somewhere with a decent second hand market. You don't have to spend a lot. Murrica? Post your local craigslist & height and I'll make some recs.
>>
>>1211833
bloomington, indiana
5'7
>>
>>1211834
are u a cute girl ?
>>
>>1211834
hmm sorry there's not much on there.

imo go for the cheap one, see how you find it
>>
>>1211823
>>1211823

60$ is stupidly cheap, contrary to what most of /n/ says decent cheap trekking 700c bikes are hard to come by. The used market for sort of modern trekking bikes is horrific.

This is already pre-configured for both front and rear derailleur (huge bonus), top tube is low so given your height you won't land straight on the balls every time, and the rear baskets are god-tier. The only upgrades you may need in the immediate future are rear wheel rim (unless you can overhaul the hub which is fairly easy) and the bottom bracket, both are fairly cheap upgrades.

If it didn't have FD I'd say no, but this does, you'll be able to climb on walls, let alone hills. 5-6 speed are not enough on 700c steel unless your leg work is great.
>>
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My cheap fatbike's chainring and... two plastic guides? for the chain around it got mangled after I rode (fell) off a loading dock at the wrong angle. The LBS recommended I find the parts on my own and bring them to them, and then they could do a check over to make sure I didn't total something critical when I fell and replace the part. The guy said that it would be more costly for them to have to find what parts were needed vs the whole cost of the bike.

I don't care about an exact same-part replacement from pacific cycle, I just want something that will work reliably. Maybe an upgrade to a metal guide thing since the plastic piece doesn't seem to have saved the chainring from that fall. What do I need to examine/measure to know if some used, chinese, or decently-priced quality part will fit before ordering?

And no I'm not going to just buy a new bike because I actually enjoy riding this heavy sturdy-framed piece of shit over lighter bikes.
>>
>>1211866
The plastic things are a chainguard, not a guide. Mechanically it does nothing. All it does is stop your pants from going into your chain. Remove it. Tuck your pants into your socks or roll them up.

If it's held on with the same bolts as your chainring, you may need shorter bolts, or washers, to make up the space.

Is your chainring really bent? If it is, absolutely replace it. That shouldn't be hard. Handholding from your LBS should not be required.
>>
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Is this enough clearance?
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>>1211871
Yes the chainring is really bent. It has a wave like a hacksaw blade and throws the chain.

The guard only warped when I crashed and that snap in it happened when I was trying to bend the chainring back. I contemplated plastic welding the guard back together and using a heat gun to un-deform it, but I don't think it's worth it. It seemed a bash guard was a better long-term option so I don't get stranded if I crash way farther from home.
>>
>>1209957
>that headlight facing up into the sun
>>
>>1211880
Since it looks you won't be taking it offroad, yes
>>
>>1211883
You could try bending the chainring back by using a screwdriver as a prybar or something or hammer it.
Really I think you probably just want a new chainring.
Forget the chainguard.
>>
>>1211887

It's settles down as you ride it.

Also, can I just buy parts from same brand, different family granted they all support the same speed? Like CS-HG400 (alivio), RD-M591 (deore) for the back and ST-M3050 (alivio)? I can probably find an alivio RD but I'm trying to get everything off amazon to avoid having to wait for multiple shipments.

>>1211880

If you have a derailleur hanger in the back you have to be incredibly perfect when putting the wheel back in every single time or it could cost your ass. If you have a direct mount, it doesn't matter.
>>
>>1211883
>>1211871
>>1211866
>>1211889

I removed the guard since it was just held on by screws. It looks like the chainring is held on by splines, not bolts. The whole reason I was going to go to the LBS to get it fixed was that the guides I saw on how to replace a chainring said you needed a special tool for special bolts and I assumed they were just beneath the guard...

I also managed to find some info on the inside of the (square taper) crank - "Prowheel Forged 2n 170" and it's a 36t chainring. I can't find this exact crank online. I'm assuming it's an older model of the 6n, and the company appears to be chinese.

How do I determine which splined rings will fit? Or do I need a new crankset entirely?
I only ever use the highest gear as it stands, so would it be doable to say, upgrade the chainring to 44t so I actually get use out of my other gears?
>>
>>1209957
>42/28 for me is not enough
>42/32 would let me climb walls
based retarded marginal upgrades anon
>>
newish to cycling so excuse my ignorance please
am i supposed to be using gears on my hybrid/commuter like you would in a car? i see alot of you guys saying to use the big boy chainring but at the same time trying to pull off/stopping & starting again on the bigger gears i feel is way harder than it needs to be. am i supposed to be switching down to stop then back up again as you pull off and gain more speed or am i just a pussy who cant push the big gears?

thanks fellas
>>
>>1211894
As I said, you should try to straighten your chainring first. You can do it with it mounted on the crank. Also post a pic of these 'splines'.
>>
>>1211896
yes it's good to change down as you stop
>>
>>1211896
spinning is winning only losers push they're big gears slowly because they think it makes them look manly but in reality it just btfo their knees, it's just like lugging an engine at very low rpm in a too high gear but u know some engines are torquey as fuck and they don't care and some niggaz are strong.

another thing you shouldn't do i mean you can but you shouldn't, is crosschain like in pic related so try and use the 3/4 of the cassette at either end that is closest to whatever chainring you're using so the chain stays more straighter and it will wear less and be more efficient pic related are two examples of the most extreme crosschaining which is are bad
>>
>>1211895

I've already said I'm replacing the rim with 7-10s one, and upgrading the whole thing to go 12-36. I really want a new rim and I'm tired of triple crankshit.

>>1211896

Like with a car, let the "engine" tell you when to change. If you feel like you're pedaling too hard to get speed (like you see kids do), shift up, when you feel you're overpedaling to no fruition (like using a climbing gear on dead flat road), you have to shift down, little by little, until you find the sweet spot. Pushing is fine when riding down the hill, gain speed etc. Cadence is what you want, spinning.
>>
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>>1211901
aw lil diddums is front shifting too hard for u ?
>>
>>1211899
>>1211901

appreciate the responses guys

and what if everything on the big ring feels too hard? just accept defeat and use the smaller chainring until i'm less of a shitter? granted my entire commute home from work is uphill which is probably not helping
>>
>>1211906

The small ring really is there to be used, not to give signals of weakling so yeah, do use it. When you get to the smaller rear cogs while in the small ring, shift to the large ring on front and when it starts feeling too heavy, shift back to small.
>>
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>>1211906
yeah don't even trip about it either dawg being comfy and riding slowly is godly

i can push 53x11 gear for an hour before i burn out and i still like riding my upright grandma bike in a tiny gear on the footpath at near walking pace
>>
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>>1211904

I did it for thousand miles. My 700c frame cannot physically take a FD, there's no cable stop for it and the down tube is the flat large kind, that means no adapters. It's okay because I didn't really want to install another FD anyway, I do want to upgrade to 9v. New rim, new RD, new shifter etc. I never tried it before.

>>1211906

The biggest one should go with the lowest 3-4 gears at most. The middle one goes at least with the lowest 5, possibly all of them depending on how smooth it's adjusted. The lowest one goes with the 3-4 biggest gears in the back.

And again it entirely depends on the size of the crankset. 48-38-28 and 14-28 7 speeds? It will take months to use 48-14 with ease. 42-32-24? You'll overspin 42-14 in no time.
>>
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>>1211897
Bending it back seemed to work, though the profile is still a bit out of true. I'm not sure how it will perform when I test it out for real but it didn't throw the chain running in reverse or with the wheel elevated. I'm currently recovering from an injury so I can't take it out for a while though.

Here's the photo of the splines. I'm not entirely sure what keeps it from slipping off horizontally.
>>
>>1211823
it's more of a cruiser than a commuter. the frame and all the parts are comparatively heavy; this and the geometry will greatly affect acceleration and top speed, which could be an issue if safely joining traffic by matching its speed is an issue on your commute. But there's really nothing to stop you from commuting on it. But I like minimizing my commute time and pursuing speed when traffic and terrain allow for it; gets my heart pumping and ready for my day/awake/not feeling as terrible all day.

However, you've got probably more than $60 worth of basket hanging off that bike if you were
to buy it new, and decent fenders (which you'd def want on a commuting bike) start around $30.

It's a really neat bike and IMO worth $60 but not sure if it's the best bang for your buck for commuting. depends on you and your commute, primarily, and also your used market I guess. It'll be great for groceries, tho.
>>
>>1211834
CUTTERS
U
T
T
E
R
S
>>
>>1211920

A commuter bike is the bike you use to commute, it's not a specific model, a cruiser bike is a meme city bike, because it's usually single speed or 6-7 speed at most. You don't go on a long trip on a cruiser, it's the bike you use to go to starbucks, or the beach at the farthest.

Trekking bikes on the other hand tend to have double or triple crankset because you want to have that lowest one in case you're riding up the hill carrying loads of shit. His alleged new bike is a double, give or take a 50-38. With 38 he'll have no problems dealing with traffic even if he weighs 300 pounds.
>>
>>1211923
>he
>>
>>1211925
That's the kind of bike a filipino housewife or korean grandma rides to get groceries so you can probably presume anon is from the same area.
>>
What are the best online stores for buying bike parts that will ship to Canada? I'm looking to buy a new Race Face Atlas Cinch Crankset.
>>
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I want to replace the quick release thru axles on my touring bike with hex key axles to reduce chance of theft. However I can't seem to find any of "12*133b". Could someone tell me what length this is in the normal naming convention?
>>
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>>1211958
Pic showing end, zoomed in. End of cylindrical but at 115 mm, thread starts at 117mm, ends at 133mm. Pls note I just realised the quick release alters the length. These measurements were with the quick release in the closed position
>>
>>1211958

It's for this kind of fork, right? https://www.kinesisbikes.co.uk/Catalogue/Forks/Adventure/ATR-DISC-FORK

12x100 is what road front axles are usually called, but make sure the thread pitch matches with what you have.
>>
>>1211964
Yeah it looks similar to that, this is the exact bike http://rideblue.com/prosecco-al-touring

I know I sound like a brainlet but how do I find the dimensions of the ones I have and their thread pitch?

It's not on the thru-axles themsleves, the bike or documentaion and they are of different sizes (same diameter though 12mm).
>>
Why is 650b being pushed for road bikes?
>>
>>1211981
wasn't it so that companies could fit fatter tires into their frames and offer trendy gravel/adventure bikes and use the frame designs they already had on hand and were set-up to make in their factories without re-tooling?
>>
>>1211981
To keep alive the illusion that road bike technology has advanced in the last 30 years.
>>
>>1211839
>>1211846
hmm ty for the help i think i'll go for it.
>>
>threadless headset
>tighten topcap until no wiggle
>tighten stem pinch bolts
>headseat starts wiggling

what the fuck is happening lads
>>
How compromised am I compared to a road bike if I buy a used fully rigid mtb and stick skinnier tires on it?
>>
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>>1211690
>>1211705
>>1211711
Almost done! It did hurt ruining that nice tape though.
>>
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>>1212065
Bar tape and final adjustments tomorrow. I just can't believe everything fit with no issue. The stems were from two different decades.
>>
>>1212055
Less aero, heavier. But at least you don't have suspension.

If you want road and easy trails on the same frame you might want a gravel bike
>>
Hey dudes. First time on here.
I recently moved closer to things I can ride a bike to. My friend would selsell me this bike for $100. He said it normally costs $400
I'm obviously going to ride it first and see how it feels but is there anything I should know about this bike? I dont even know where to start to research it. Any help would be appreciated. Looking to get out an exercise more on this baby
>>
>>1212141
That's a fixie/single speed (you can choose by flipping the rear wheel), they're fun for getting around, but unless you live in the Netherlands I wouldn't buy one to exercise or taking trips (although people did travel long distances in them before gears were invented). A notable advantage is that they need 0 maintainance, aside from fixing flat tires and replacing brake pads. It's a nice bike for $100.
>>
If a 50cm frame suits you with 700c wheels, does that mean that if you try to size with a 650b wheel that 52cm frame is best?
>>
>>1212238
what? no
>>
>>1212241
But if you took a 700c bike and put 650b wheels it would be shorter unless you got some fat fucking tires, right?
>>
>>1212253
it doesn't change the distance between the saddle and the handlebars and such. That's what's important.
>>
Compatibility of Shimano ST-EF510-7R4A (7 speed brake and shift lever) with a Shimano Nexus 7 rear hub ?

I hear these levers are not compatible with Nexus hubs, which come with grip shifters by default.

https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/acera-m3000/ST-EF510-7R4A.html
>>
>>1212253
your feet are on the pedals when you're riding, not the ground.

c'mon man, think.
>>
>>1212280
Not compatible, Nexus requires different cable pull than other Shimano derailers. I saw once a bike with some Sram derailer with Nexus shifter and it worked well, so maybe some Sram shifter would work, but I'm not sure.
>>
Started biking my commute recently (~5 miles). I've just been wearing regular street clothing, but regular cotton underwear is pretty uncomfortable even over short distances. Without going with full on biking shorts or something I'd want to change out of before work, what's my best underwear option?
>>
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>>1212343
>>
>>1212377
new thread
>>
>>1209772
your cellphone
>>
>>1211801
yo that's a dope cap
>>
>>1212034
I think you really should consider a better bike, if you're commuting you're going to hate that heavy slow piece of shit and you're going to have problems with the brakes right quick.
>>
>>1211919
ya lookin to get another injury I reckon
>>
>>1212065
ya went too short IMO, looks a bit goofy
>>
>>1210989
How long did you ride them? I find that the stiffness recedes a bit somewhere in the 200-300 mile range.
>>
>>1214007
I got them used and put at least 1000km on them on my winter commuter




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