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old thread
>>>>1209771
>>
>Bought a speed sensor
>wheel axle is too thick to mount it

what do?
>>
>>1212038
Okay so I installed a new headset today to see if that fixed the issue and I'll get the topcap right but when I tighten the stem bolts the topcap will be actually loose.
>>
What are the best online stores for buying bike parts that will ship to Canada? I'm looking to buy a new Race Face Atlas Cinch Crankset.
>>
>>1212475
chain reaction or wiggle - postage is pretty quick, cheap or even free over 100 bucks canadian, and the prices are allright
>>
>>1212475
jensonusa will collect the tax so you don't get hit with brokerage fees, it also reduces transit time. Their shipping prices are fairly reasonable too. I think when you hit the "free shipping" threshold (there is no free shipping to Canada), they apply a discount to the shipping fee instead of charging you the whole shot like a lot of places in the US do.

They aren't usually my first choice, but they carry stuff I can't find in the UK stores.
>>
What are my option if I want to run hydraulic dropbar style brifters with a triple chainset? Are there any?
>>
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>>1212545

Gevenalle makes these but they are expensive as fuck and it's really just a down tube shifter attached to a single speed hydro brake lever so doesn't work like proper STI ones do..

With old Campagnolo front indexing you could use the same levers with double and triple cranksets, but no idea if the current H11 hydro levers still work the same. That's a grossly overpriced option as well.

Probably the best idea to just go with either a Shimano 2x11 or SRAM 1x11 hydro setup and run the front shifter with a bar end and the rear shifter with the STI paddles.
>>
>>1212395
If you meant your hub is too thick, use cableties.
>>
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>>1212555
Nice. Bike art is very pleasing.
>>
when do 2019 specializeds come out?
>>
I could use some recommendations on better spoke wrenches or spoke wrenching technique.
>>
>>1212591
Just buy a park tool spoke wrench
>>
>>1212555
>Slowing the pace for fatty
>>
>>1212593
Which one tho? I rounded off those spokes with a 3 sided wrench from Avenir. I was trying to be very careful but as my tension got up to about 90kgf it was almost impossible not to round them over.

Is the "4-sided" from Park tool really that much better or am I doing something wrong?
>>
>>1212585
They should all be out by the 22nd, but they've been gradually releasing the 2019s since the beginning of this month. I work at a Spec dealer.
>>
>>1212595
Are you getting some oil on the spoke holes and spoke threads before you start lacing?
>>
>>1212598
Nope, that seems like a great idea tho. It definitely could have been just stuck spoke holes and threads. This wheel has seen a lot of all weather conditions.

This was not a full build to begin with. I was truing this up and noticed that my entire left side of this rear wheel had tensions likely down below 40kgf so I decided to bring those up and had to tighten down the drive side to keep it dished.
>>
>>1212600
The NDS spokes on the rear wheel will always have fairly low tension, assuming it’s not a single speed
>>
>>1212601
It is not a SS. I only brought the NDS up to just over 50, but whatever they were at previously felt rather flimsy and was off of my tension meter's chart, so it just felt wrong to leave them like that.
>>
What's a good bike a for a completely sedentary woman who wants to start cycling that isn't an abomination like this?
>>
So, as far as I know, you can get these bike parts in carbon:
Wheel
Frame
Fork
Handlebars

But which ones are most worth getting carbon, and which ones don't matter at all and should be left as more traditional materials as far as weight and other factors go?
>>
>>1212601
Not if you have 2:1 lacing
>>
>>1212732
There is nothing wrong with a town bike anon. If you go to a country with an actual bike culture, that's what 66% of people are riding men and women.
>>
>>1212745
Whatever part weighs the most offers the most weight to save when converting to carbon. First and foremost that would be the frame. Having carbon wheels would also decrease their rotational inertia which would make it marginally easier to accelerate or decelerate. If you're on a budget and could only choose one of those to convert to carbon, it should be the frame for sure.
>>
>>1212745

Fork is the easiest, saves a good 500 grams of weight vs an aluminum one and maybe over a kilo vs steel, improves ride quality a lot (steel level ride quality with lower weight than aluminum). Most road bikes and higher level sport hybrid bikes have a carbon fork.

Carbon wheels are not recommended if your bike has rim brakes - the brake track on carbon wheels is a lot less powerful than an aluminum one and you don't want to wear out those expensive wheels by riding and braking in the rain. Makes a cool sound when braking though! If the bike has disc brakes, carbon wheels don't have any disadvantages to conventional aluminum. Carbon wheels only make sense when the rim profile gets deep (35-50+++ mm) since at lower profiles there's not much of a weight difference between carbon and aluminum but aero aluminum wheels are very heavy.

Carbon frames are nice, if you can afford one definitely get one.

Seatposts and handlebars are minor upgrades that save a little weight and make the ride a little more comfortable, if you get a good deal go ahead and install them, but I wouldn't pay several hundreds for those. Make sure to use installation paste & a torque wrench.
>>
>>1212745
Wheel is the one that will increase speed at the cost of braking.

Fork will save just as much weight as a frame.

Frame is the one that has to be exactly your size and geo and most expensive. It's not unimportant, but it is harder to find one just right at a decent price.

Handebars are either a sign of being poor or filthy rich. They're cheaper than most other carbon things so it either means poorfag upgrade or rich guy spending every last cent on carbon. They might offer some compliance, but they're also touchy about clamping force and slipping, they stick out so will hit the ground for sure in a crash, and they're covered in tape so hard to check for damage.
>>
>>1212749
>>1212755
>>1212767
So varying emphasis on the fork, wheels, and frame. How much of it should I look to dengfu for and how much to just look elsewhere (any material) when looking at it from a cost standpoint?
>>
What's the most cost effective cycling snack food (or energy drink)?
>>
>>1212779
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jMJEIiWV3VQ
>>
What causes bottom bracket creaking sounds? Should I just ignore it?
>>
>>1212732
Try to get your hands on a classic Gazelle city bike, which is the real real vs what you posted.
>>
>>1212786
usually something other than your bottom bracket. seatposts and chainring bolts are notorious for being mistaken for that
>>
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Hi anons,

I'm a total biking pleb who wants to start learning but doesn't know where to turn. Is there an archived FAQ or pastebin or something for clueless questions and answers? I know /fit/ has one for this purpose.
Love ya
>>
>>1212799
sheldonbrown.com
>>
>>1212799
How much money do you have to spend. Cycling isn't even really worth getting into without spending at least $1000 on bike, clothes, pedals, shoes, helmet
>>
>>1212799
gcn has some great noob videos explaining the basics of stuff like shifting and such
>>
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>>1212799
nah. there was an attempt to make a sticky years ago but nobody could agree on anything.

basically
1) buy a frame that fits you. pic related is one guide but other guides size things slightly differently. This gives you the idea
>ok, but what?
2) go here, read the OP and make a post >>>/n/bbg
3)other questions usually found on sheldonbrown.com
particularly
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html
read the whole thing eventually but first scroll to the Adjustment section, read it and watch the video.
Good repair instructions/videos: parktool.com
>>
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>>1212821
>this is what freds actually believe
>>
>>1212821
false.
like I said, use the /bbg/ and money will be taken into account over there.
I'd budget like $200 for an old road bike or 90s rigid MTB and like another $100 for repairs/upgrades/incidentals like a lock etc. in terms of minimum entry cost
>>
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>>1212815
I thought this was an elaborate shitpost but it looks quite helpful, thanks

>>1212821
I already have a bike and a helmet, I'm gonna be moving soon and probably getting new stuff and I want to get into it more. Learn how to change tires and actually take care of a chain, quality of different stuff, etc.

>>1212822
I'll look into it!

>>1212823
Excellent! Thanks anon
>>
>>1212786
Try removing your BB, cleaning and regreasing the threads. But yeah it also could be seatpost or something else.
>>
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Is steel (more) real?
>>
Any thoughts/recommendations on my bike?

I haven't owned a bike in about 5 years but recently moved to Sacramento and cycling seems like a viable transportation option now. I am about 5 miles from downtown and there are plenty of dedicated bike trails/bridges.

I didn't want to get a walmart bike but I also didn't particularly feel like spending a fortune, so I found this on craigslist for $40. It looks like this bike originally MSRP'd for about $350. One of the shifters was busted and a lot of the brake/derailleur cables were rusty so I replaced the shifters and all of the lines, only cost about $20. I am contemplating replacing the tires/tubes but I have them inflated to about 45 PSI and they have not been giving me any trouble.

I also decided to re-use a 10mm master lock I had and use it with a case-hardened 10mm chain, wrapped in duct tape. Isn't too heavy. I also have a separate cable for the front wheel because it is a quick release and would be easy to steal.

It rides pretty nice now that i've put some work into it. The brakes use a yoke which was a pain in the ass but i have them adjusted to hit center-rim.

Curious if anyone has any recommendations or if there is anything blatantly stupid I'm doing that might warrant /n/-specific autistic shreiking.
>>
>>1212888
Get better tires
>>
>>1212888
It's a sick bike and u did gud fixing it up.
Photo is from the wrong side.
It's probably way too small for u unless ur a manlet and the seat is too low for proper leg extension.
I'd get a rack, front or rear, and zip tie a metal basket to it

u could upgrade the tires saddle and pedals if you like it a lot but it's cheap and cheerful so dont feel like u have to.
>>
>>1212773
I'm disappointed that you're getting serious answers and 90% sure that you have a shit bike and want to rice / nigger it up with chinese garbage carbon for no reason. Well, absolute cheapest carbon is generally not light or not safe.

Don't.
>>
>>1212892
Will do, that will be the next thing to work on.

>>1212898
Thank you for the advice. I am actually 6ft 2in, and I think the bike is technically a womens' bike. I could raise the seat a bit higher, but I am actually pretty comfortable riding it how it currently is, although I don't have another bike to use for reference or scale. Granted it is a bit difficult getting size scale from craigslist photos. I will see how it rides and maybe give it to a relative as a gift if I get something better in the future. I don't know yet if my future commute will be bike-able or not. If I find myself using it only occasionally, it will serve the purpose well enough.
>>
>>1212377
I have Giant Escape as my only bike. I ride in a city with poor road quality and few bike lanes.

Is Giant any good? I'm getting more serious about cycling and I know basically nothing about it. Is there a good place to start online on basic maintenance and things about how to adjust my seat properly? Also who do I reduce the ass pain?
>>
>>1212923
I answered this question like 10 posts ago:
>>1212823
yeah Giant is legit, don't know the Escape specifically tho
>>
>>1212873
>Is steel (more) real?

yeah, real fucking heavy. Nowadays a 6061 or 7001 frame is light and much more forgiving than years past. Plus put on a pair of gloves and tough it, nobody wants to ride a boat anchor.
>>
>>1212888
>Any thoughts/recommendations on my bike?

looks like you did gud. I would look into other options than a junkyard-dog tier lock with a master lock on it. Keep in mind any thief knows how to break a master lock so that is your weak point on the security.

You have nothing mounted on the inside you could either buy a mini u lock and mount it on the inside triangle or just buy a retro bottle cage (the $3 metal ones) in blue or white and buy a blue or white bottle. Polar bottles work great and often come in blue.

Long term you'll want to change out the tires for a pair with lower rolling resistance but until they get a flat don't worry about it.

You may also want to remove the reflectors and the 'dork disc'. The reflectors aren't fashionable and can be replaced by spoke LEDs if needed. The 'dork disc' is functional but considered uncool especially when it gets faded like that (it protects your rear wheel from getting fucked by a broken rear deraileur).

A set of MTB 'pin flats' might suit you better depending on the type of shoes you wear riding. They provide superior grip but some complain that they eat up shoes and shins.
>>
>>1212923
the giant escape is a perfect bike for what you ride (city riding, on road). If you have a 8 speed drivetrain it'll be worth upgrading when things break. if it is a 7 speed drivetrain just replace with like parts.
>>
>>1212973
It's pretty trivial to get a good steel racing bike built from Spirit HSS like an Enigma Elite down in the 7.5kg range. A stainless bike can be built up at 7kg. The problem is that steel doesn't come in aero shapes, and 25-30W savings at 45kph is much more significant than a bit of weight.
>>
What are my options? I want a 26" tire for street, park, and riding on packed dirt? Something like the Maxxis Holy Rollers.
>>
>>1212903
Dengfu isn’t the absolute cheapest carbon available, but you make it sound like there are dozens upon dozens of stories of their products failing catastrophically. Care to share at least 10 of them?
>>
>>1212993

I suppose absolute cheapest means $5 aliexpress stuff. With chinese carbon you get what you pay for, so if you get the mid-level open mold stuff and not a direct copy of something, you should be good.

Locally I've heard of several cheap copies of the Canyon VCLS 2.0 seatpost cracking and a few sets of cheap-ish carbon wheels, but nothing catastrophic. Weightweenies has a lot of threads about the open mold frames and they seem to be pretty nice for the price.
>>
>>1212992
I rode Schwalbe Table Top professional tires. They're really fast and act consistently in corners. Good puncture resistance and durability too. 5/5
>>
>>1213013
Sweet it looks like you can get with them with skinwalls too.
>>
>>1212996
Yeah if you stay away from the no name too good to be true priced stuff you can actually get decent products for your money from China. A good sign is a manufacturer operating under the same name for a number of years.
>>
What
>>1212547
Thanks, I'll look at using a bar end shifter
>>
>>1212903
When I said anywhere else with any material I meant similar price better quality

If you want a western steel frame it's fucking $700
>>
>>1213033
In fact, it doesn't even have to be carbon fiber at all, it's just that whenever I look around people only vouch for hongfu and dengfu
>>
>>1212591
Use a fitting spoke wrench. Park Tool SW-0 should be good for most standar nipples.

Use brass nipples. Alu nipples round off very easily.

Use Wheelsmith spoke prep or some other type to prevent the thread from rusting etc. making later truing a pita.
>>
Japanese subculture
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfdFq2pAXUs
>>
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>>1212377
What should I do to bring my old bike back from the dead and turn it back into the proper road machine it once was?
>>
So I own one of these bitch niggers, and the frame is a little undersized for me (54 for my 184 cm height) but I like slightly smaller frames for the better authority I have over the bike.

Only problem is when I get down on the lower drop bars, I have slightly restricted breathing through my diaphragm since it feels restricted in the aero position.

Do I need to lower my saddle or extended the stem?
>>
>>1213075
Just get some mid-range modern wheels and some Gatormemes.
>>
>>1213076
Post your bike so we can spitball a proper fit for you.
>>
>>1213077
Yeah, what would be an appropriate Italian wheelset for it? I like the mid-range campys but I also love the vintage look of my 1998 bike and most of the mid-range campy wheelsets are too "out there" looking to go with the more classic looking frame.

What about replacing the crankset/triple chainring with something less annoying? The previous owner also upgraded the real dereilleur from the bike's as-built Campy Avanti to a Centaur and I was thinking of bringing the chainring/bottom bracket/shifters/front dereilleur up to a similar standard as well.

Also, fuck gatormemes, I loved how the pro3s rode at 110psi and I never once had a flat despite riding on shitty New England roads for years.
>>
>>1213075
New brakes, tires, wheels
>>
>>1213034
Buy a Taiwanese steel/aluminum frame, then get the fork and wheels from dengfu
>>
>>1213083
See: >>1213080

What are some wheelsets in the sub-$500 range that'll be appropriate for an Italian lugged steel bike but will still ride fast. The skinnier, the better. I have no idea what's out there now, but in it's day 6-10 years ago, this thing was quite the Fred-slayer.
>>
>>1213086
I just heard old bike and those are the things that come to mind for old bikes. I don't know shit about how much space a campy needs.
>>
What does a cyclocross/gravel bike do that a fully rigid mtb doesn't?
>>
>>1213090
more hand positions
>>
>>1213089
It's actually not that old, it's a 1998 which IIRC was one of the last years for Italy-built lugged steel frame Bianchis, if not *the* last year. My issue is mostly aesthetic, as most modern wheels seem to all have black detailing and loud labels which will look like ass on an otherwis classic-looking steel frame bike.
>>
>>1213084
Who makes good cheap steel/aluminum frames?
>>
Bending over more on a bicycle is more aero, but how much can you actually go before you impact how well you pedal?
>>
>>1213103
yes
>>
>>1213098
Nashbar
>>
Hey mates
i need a bike for someone 310lbs
in the US
from specialized or giant since thats what the local shop carries
intended to ride very casually on paved bike paths and light gravel
would like to have a cushy seat. i know less cushy seats are better for serious rides but this is just for casual riding
>>
>>1213104
Are you saying that bending over at all always impacts how well you pedal?
>>
>>1213114
Nah, I'm saying it's pretty impossible to determine at which point it affects pedaling. It most likely also varies greatly from rider to rider
I guess it's just a trial and error thing
>>
>>1213109
>>>/n/bbg
>>
>>1213096
I'd just look up shimano wheels and see which one has the spacing you need.
>>
>>1213076
saddle height should be adjusted to leg length and nothing else.
>>
>>1213075

How many speeds does it have? Campagnolo changed their freewheel splines after 8 speed, so 8 speed cassettes aren't compatible with modern wheelsets and the other way around, so if it's 8 speed and you want to upgrade the wheelset but not the rest of the groupset, you need to get a vintage wheelset.

Scirocco 20 for example is a great vintage 8 speed wheelset, deep dish alloy rims with bladed spokes, very heavy but also VERY fast!

Brakes of that era aren't very powerful though I think it looks like you have the double pivot brake on the rear too. Get new pads at least, old ones are probably quite hardened.

If you want to get rid of the triple crankset, I think you can still use the same derailleur and shifter since both double and triple cranksets of that time have 5 clicks of indexing.

Maybe take apart the headset and put new grease in. Also the rear skewer is on the wrong way, flip it so that the skewer is on the non drive side :)

Looks like a very good bike that has been somewhat valuable when it was new (not super high grade though since it has an unicrown fork and the triple crankset), but defnitely worth taking good care of! Does the frame have a sticker somewhere that tells what grade of steel was used? I think Bianchi used Columbus tubing at least in the 80s and early 90s, but no idea what they'd use for a newer bike like that.
>>
>>1213174
>very heavy but also VERY fast!
>20mm v-shaped rim
>fast
By whose standards?
>>
>>1213158
There's no way in hell that I'm putting anything Shimano on one of the last lugged-frame Italian-made frames Bianchi ever built. I feel bad even thinking of putting Mavics on it.

I've just been out of the bike world loop and have no clue what else is out there for aluminum European wheelsets beyond Mavic and Campy. Fwiw, I actually like the old OEM Rigida rims on Miche hubs rhat are on it now when they weren't beat to shit from all the miles I put on it.
>>
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>>1213175

It's not a 20 mm rim, the 20 is the number of spokes. Shamals have 16.

I think it's a 40 mm rim. Just seems to hold speed and get really good top speeds.
>>
>>1212975
Thank you for the input. I never realized how shitty masterlock padlocks were. After watching some youtube videos, I'm definitely going to be replacing it.

I think I might spend some more cash on a better lock to use with the same chain. I have thought about u-locks but I prefer the versatility of having a chain-link.
>>
does anyone know the model of this escape?
>>1213144
>>>1213144
>>>>1213144
>>
If the most aero bikes are those with tubes that are kind of wide, then why don't they just make a bike where a few of the tubes are teardrop or oval shaped?
>>
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>>1213175
those 90s aero campy wheels feel really fast at speed. Faster than the new srirrocos i have. They also have a nice ride quality, kind of a hum, really great wheels
but big meme tax on them and most are kill, or tubulars. these ones are kill. (well i still have the front).

>>1213184
if that's 8 speed, and you want to keep wasting money on 8 speed campy, look for some aero wheels, and look for some record/ chorus ergos. There is a huge difference between the low end ergos, especially worn ones, and the high end ones.
Keep the triple gearing if you can. You can still get rings for your crank and new cartridge bbs. That is the gearing serious roadies in europe rode in the 90s. If you want to be more pro, get a tighter cassette. One of the main reasons to ride ergos is that the micro ratcheting is so great for triples.

But just be aware, it's not a real true 'classic' frame. It's at the very low end for a nice bike. The paint is ugly and the unicrown fork is ugly. What matters more is how you like riding it, but check yourself, before you end up spending so much you could have gotten a new allum roadie with claris which would unironically be nicer to ride. It's a bit of a dead end with the muh aesthetics because it doesn't look that great, but the pedals and the red tires are the biggest offenders currently.

By all means fetishise it, i did with my >muh low end 90s campy bike, but i honestly got more enjoyment with that bike after i put a junk bare metal tange fork on it, mismatched wheels, shimano 600 parts bin build and stopped giving a fuck and treated it as a beater and stopped getting triggered by sloping top tubes and based nips.

Sorry for the rant anon but that's not pope JP2's colnago
>>
>>1213316
there are tons of bikes like that
>>
>>1213316
That isn't the most aerodynamic shape for a bike. The entire bike needs to be teardrop shaped, not just a tube.
>>
Hi friends, my bike was stolen (while locked to a rail) at a festival on Sunday. I reported it to the police and began searching online for it. But while on lunch Thursday in the park I spotted a guy riding it. I took a good photo of him and sent that to the police. He refused to give it back when confronted claiming he bought it two days ago from "someone" and refused to give me any details so I called the cops. They gave me an incident number but closed it down almost immediately. Police have the photo but I'm not confident that anything will happen because they were all protecting Trump this week.

I was advised to call 999 again if I see him. He's a big dude and hangs around with a group of homeless people in parks it seems. I want my fucking bike back he has ruined my Summer.
>>
>>1213406

do you have trusty lads?

call the banners, beat him into submission with baseball bats and take your bike back
>>
>>1213406
I have spoken to a security guard I know and he may be wanted for shop lifting in town too. I have e.mailed local businesses and organisations to warm them of him. If I can't get the bike back I want to make life very difficult for him. Ideally I would like to just roll up with a baseball bat and take it but I don't know if he would be stupid enough to come at me or not.
>>
Is there a better deal than buying most of a bike (frame, fork, wheels) from hongfu?
>>
>>1213516
I've been riding one of their framesets for the past week and have been pretty impressed with the quality with respects to the price I paid. I've read pretty decent things about their rims too so I'm thinking about ordering some of those eventually, but I can't tell what hubs they put on their wheelsets. I'm probably just going to buy the rims and lace them up to some DT 240s.

Definitely a lot cheaper route to buy new components, but probably comparable to buying something used.
>>
>>1213409
lol he would fuck u up lad, u sound like a real bitchboy
>>
If tuned right, can I use a long cage RD on a single chainring?
>>
>>1213545
Does the derailleur have a clutch? Does the chainring have narrow-wide teeth? Do you have a chainkeeper?
>>
>>1213550

No, no and no.
>>
Had a nice ride today expect one annoying thing.

There seems to be something wrong with the drivetrain. When I'm on the big drive, while approaching the smaller cogs, the drive makes a motor like sound

Can't tell if its coming from the rear derailleur or if its the bb.

Anyone have this happen to them? Vibrates a lot, too.
>>
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>>1213576

If it shifts all gears, it's possible you only have to play with the barrel adjustment on the RD because it's too tight or too loose. Does it misshift from time to time (as in you go up and stays down and go down and it stays up?). The "roaring" anyway is usually the stuttering of the RD due to cable tension or adjustment being off.

The only noise a BB does is a grinding sound and you can tell when you push. If the BB was so fucked up that it actually causes the chain to jerk around, then you need to service it immediately.
>>
>>1213579
Thanks. Doesn't misshift at all or even roughly. I'll work on the RD first.
>>
>>1213576
is it the chain scraping the FD cage?
adjust the trim or limit
>>
>>1213559

Get a NW chainring, it'll be okay with that. I converted a 3x9 shimano XT to 1x9 with an NW chainring and it doesn't drop the chain even in rough terrain even though the 9 speed doesn't have a clutch.
>>
>>1213576
Cross chaining, dude. Get off the bike and shift to the same gears and turn the pedals and look at where the noise is coming from.
>>
buying a vintage bike on holiday in tokyo, where would you start looking?
>>
>>1213603

Can I keep my cartridge BB? It's 122mm.
>>
>$3000+ bikes weighing over 18 pounds
Why is this allowed?
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>>1213629
ebikes are pricey breh
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>>1213629
top tier spesh roubaix costs $10,500.00 and is 17 pounds

freds want to be comfy i guess
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Who else fell for the bike computer meme?
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>>1213651
>Where Am I
>>
https://indianapolis.craigslist.org/bik/d/trek-300-elance-road-bike-21/6642088807.html

Is this a gud bike if I'm 5'9" and looking for a road bike? /bbg/ isn't responding to me.
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>>1213660
why dont you do any research if you're sat about being able to post in another thread or are you that dense?
>>
>>1213662
My research has turned up a resounding "Maybe, if the price is good."
Do you need me to cite websites that I looked at? It isn't exactly easy to find a plethora of reviews for a 30 year old bike.
>>
Is going 23 mph on a flat bar road bike considered good?
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>>1213673
if you are climbing - yes
if you have a motor disorder in your legs - yes
if you are on flats - no
>>
>>1213174
The previous owner actually replaced the rear derailleur with a 00s 10-speed Centaur unit, so if I upgraded to modern wheels all I'd have to replace are the Avanti shifters, which were OK-but-not-great anyways and certainly not worth what paying what an old wheelset would cost me to keep.

>>1213325
Oh, I totally get what you're saying about the actual value of the bike. Right now, it's mostly sentimental with a decent helping of me liking how it rode when it was in better condition.

As I just said to the other poster, it already has *some* 00s-era Centaur hardware and my short-term goal would be to bring the rest of the bike up to a similar standard on a mid-range set of Campy or Mavic rims, with a double chainring up front (unless I can find a nicer Campy triple crankset, I was already planning on replacing the cranks/bottom bracket because they're old and worn out), but with a long-term goal of keeping an eye out for a nicer lugged frame from either Colnago or one of the other boutique manufacturers and migrating all of that nicer hardware onto it while rebuilding the old Trofeo frame as a city bike or cyclecross setup or something similar.

What's bad about the unicrown fork, though? Back in the day I was actually thinking of swapping it out for a softer-riding carbon fork but never got around to it.
>>
Any suggestions for a folding bicycle?

I'm not really looking to spend more than $300 one.
>>
>>1213675
Well, shit. That means the gears on my bike are too low.

Bigger = faster in the front, right?
>>
>>1213660
It's a fine road bike to start on, but the price seems really high to me for a bike with 27" wheels and Shimano Z-series parts. This was a bike near or at the very bottom of the Trek hierarchy when it came out.

>>1213673
'is [speed] good' is a question to which there's no way to give a real answer without context. If you can hold 23mph average on your fbrb for 5 hours you're a god, but if that's your max sprint then you're really slow.

>>1213679
cheap folding bikes are invariably terrible because their frames flex a lot - if you're committed to buying one just pick one that comes in a color you like
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>>1213684
Would you say it would be better to save up for a Tern?
>>
>>1213684
I feel like 18 mph is something I can do forever (I've only tried an hour, though). I can do 23 for a while, but after 20-30 minutes I can tell that I'll have to lower the speed. I can't go any faster, because that's as high as my bike goes and I can't pedal much faster anyway (I got a 42t for the top like a moron, because a 48 was an extra $20).


Well, at least I'll know better next time. Luckily I don't plan to be a racer. Just for reference, what should a good sprint speed be?
>>
>>1213685
It really depends how you're planning to use this bike - if you're going to carry your folding bike on a bus and use it to cover the last quarter mile to work faster than you can walk, then you might well go with the crappiest, cheapest bike you can find because there's not much purpose in buying something nicer for that use. The more hours you're planning to spend on this bike, the more important it is that you get something that's efficient and that you'll enjoy.

>>1213690
If you're regularly getting spun out in your highest gear, then yes, that's an obvious indication that it's time to change your drivetrain so that you can keep pedalling at higher speeds.
>>
Occasionally when I drive, I feel a cool-hot pleasurable sensation in my anus. Is this normal? Shall I lubricate it? I have Crohn's Disease, so my anus is frequently raw from the wiping. Could that be a factor? Thank you for your time.
>>
>>1213703
butt plug
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>>1213692
I put some numbers into a calculator and it says my cadence is 80. Is that a good number?
>>
How much of a difference is there between a $700 cyclocross bike and a $1600 one?
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>>1213728
900 bucks.
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>>1213625
The correct way to buy a vintage bike is off some casual who doesn't know what they got, not off a tokyo collector.
I'm pretty sure japanese vintage bike prices will be highly inflated.

This is unless you want something specific and want to pay the $$ for it in which case why are you even asking us
>>
>>1213728
like weither it has a decent frameset, especially a nice fork, or not and reasonable entry level wheels or disposable trash. Also a higher tier groupset.
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>>1213750
*likely
>>
>>1213676
What, are the chainrings really dead? They don't look it. Is the taper enlarged badly? Just get a new BB and a new chain and maybe a new cassette. CLEAN it all. Some nice bartape, nice black tires & black pedals, matching silver cages, brake pads, flip the skewer around, service all the bearings.

If you want a better road bike get something modern one day and forget the italy memes until you have serious money, honestly a allum frame, carbon fork, sora/claris/tiagra/105 basic bitch is a better dream and if you want a proper classic/ vintage bike then do that separately. Upgrading this gratuitously and then building something else arbitrarily based off what you have now and tearing this bike down again is crazy. If you want a proper vintage/classic bike it's almost always better to buy a complete.

It's a good road bike and if it aint broke don't fix it and one day it will be your beater
>>
>>1213766
The chainrings are worn down and have gotten bent a bunch over the years from wear and tear, dumping it, etc, and the bottom bracket/bearings need to be cleaned/rebuilt. The relatively soft Ofmega cranks are also bent inwards from my weight/power (I'm a former college rower who used the bike for cross-training in the late 00s and favored high power/low cadence because it was the closest analog to rowing for leg training purposes)

I spent a few hundred on it 10 years ago and other than new tires, new bar tape, and a used forged quill stem I bought for $25, I put nothing into the bike and got thousands of miles out of it. I really like the frame geometry and how it rides, don't care about the non-classic color, and I can't think of another way of spending $500-700 that would get me a bike I'd like as much as this one, before I even get to the sentimental value aspect of it.

I want to keep it under $800, because I have other things that I spend my money on (see: /o/, /k/, and /gag/ here) but I have the money to spend on making it my own unique thing. It's a little irrational, but I can afford the irrationality right now and everything else on two wheels that speaks to me costs $2k+ that I'd much rather spend on a SCAR-17, the Kpax Performance exhaust for my Polestar Volvo, or half of my multi-engine rating.

But for under a grand? I'd love to throw together the rest of a NOS Dubya-era Campy Centaur groupset with 2+10 gearing and a nice new set of mid-entry range Mavic or Campy rims for a bike that was my loyal friend all through college back when I was too broke to do anything about the parts of it that I didn't like, all to have an entertainingly nostalgic way to cross-train on the weekends.

I'm mostly interested in what order I need to fix all this stuff in, where I should start and what order of replacing things would give me the most bang for my buck.
>>
>>1213719
i believe cadence dorks shoot for 90 constant.
>>
>>1213792
kind of echoing the first poster here but a new Bianchi Via Narone is literally 700 dollars.

I certainly wouldn't scrap the old bike but keep the price to fix it reasonable and yet yourself a second bianchi bro.
>>
>>1213821
What part of "nothing new under $2k gets me excited" did you not read. If I wanted a bargain basement aluminum roadie I'd buy a bargain basement aluminum roadie, but I'm looking to bring an old steel bike back from the dead when all the other steel bikes that have caught my interest are $1k or more, used.
>>
>>1213822
Also, if I wanted a modern bike I'd do the Fred thing and buy carbon.
>>
>>1213823
>>1213822

In that case check out Masi's website. They have some pretty awesome modern steel builds with Campy groupsets running 52/36 up front which is nice.

The modern steel builds start at 1200 or so and go up from there.
>>
>>1213828
>The modern steel builds start at 1200 or so and go up from there.

Which is why spending ~800 on new wheels, cranks, and shifting gear for a steelie I already enjoy riding makes sense, haha. But I'll check them out.
>>
Hello /n/, first time poster on this board here.

one month ago I have bought my first bike since 15 years. It is a entry level mountainbike for 500 €. Some days ago I saw that not all gears can be selected (like the very first one) and other gears are jumped. And the chain is sometimes grinding on the front derrailer.

So I brought my bike to a bike shop where the dude has setup the front and rear derailer. He told me that is the best he could do. But still some gears are jumped.

Now I am wondering if he just did a bad job or is this a thing I have to live with because the bike didn't cost thousands for euroes. Should I try another bike shop?

I don't know if this is of help but the gear changer is Shimano Acera, derailer is Shimano Tourney.
>>
I am moving from Greece to the Netherlands and I have heard that the weather can get pretty shitty during autumn and winter. I am thinking of getting rollers or something to train indoor. Do you have any recommendations? It's a rather small apartment so something that doesn't take too much space would be great.
>>
>>1213848
Those are bottom-of-the-barrel Shimano products, chiefly found on department store bikes. They're never going to shift as nicely as a mid-range setup, and you don't need to pay thousands for that. Just be better at shopping for bikes.

Some of that is also probably cross-chaining, which is user error not an equipment flaw. You need to make sure that you're not running gears on opposite extremes, this is a result of trying to make one shifter do all the work.
>>
>>1213860
>pretty shitty
What does that mean, like, 10 degrees centigrade? Wear warmer clothes, and pay denbts.
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>>1213860
Just go out in the cold you fucking pussy or just kill yourself

>>>/o/
>>
Currently have a shimano 105 34/50 with a 11-32 cassette & hydro disc. If I wanted lower gearing, what's the easiest way? New cranks? Bigger cassette? Should've done more research before buying but it's too late now
>>
>>1213905
there's basically 4 options

you can get a new subcompact/ supercompact crank with 30/46 rings

you can get an r8000 med cage rear derailer, which will let you use an 11-34 ultegra cassette or an 11-36 sram cassette, or maybe wider

you can get a wolftooth road link which will let you use wider cassettes with your current derailer and some futzing. An 11-34 might work even without that even though shimano says it won't.

or all of the above
>>
My bottom bracket unscrewed itself on the left side after ~8 years of use I thought they weren't supposed to be able to unscrew from riding? Full disclosure: a deer scared the shit out of me on the bike path and i kicked super-adrenaline-hard and maybe bent or broke something?
>>
>>1212996
you own a carbon frame manufactured outside asia?
>>
If I take an mtb crankset with something like 34-24 or the like and replace the 34 with a 52, will there be problems?
>>
>>1213918
Yes, derailleurs are not designed to work with that much gap.
>>
>>1213918
If the BCDs match up you just need to figure out how to get the FD to jump 28 teeth
>>
Does anyone know where I can buy a Flying Pigeon? The only way I can see (other than some defunct hipster businesses trying to sell them for $400) is to order a sample through a Chinese wholesale website.

Looking for delivery to the UK btw.
>>
>>1213917

No, I’ve got a Taiwanese frame with stickers from a prestigious Italian brand which cost several thousands :D it’s good - you get what you pay for.

I was more referring to that if you buy a Pinarello that’s made in Taiwan it costs a lot because of the brand but you can be sure it’s good because it’s a Pinarello. If you buy a Chinarello that looks exactly like a Pinarello but costs $200, there’s a significant risk it’s shit and dangerous to ride. If you buy a Hongfu that doesn’t pretend to be a Pinarello and costs $600, you’re probably getting a very decent frame for a reasonable price.
>>
>>1212377
ive got a 2x8 hybrid/road/gravel/meme/commuting bike and will need to replace my cassette and chainrings soon. Currently running 50T-36T in front and 11-34 in rear. Id like a slightly lower gear and am wondering if I can get a 32 tooth chainring? or maybe it makes sense to instead get a 11-40 cassette? I don't mind the larger jumps in between gears of an 8 speed system so I figure i wont mind the jumps of an 11-40T 8 speed cassette. thanks
>>
>>1213931
probably?
the issues are:
1) the BCD (bolt circle diameter) on your crank physically limits how small a ring (with x-number of teeth) will fit on the crank. If you're already at the smallest one, then you'd need a different crank to get smaller. see if the BCD is stamped on the crankarm or look up your model online.

2) will the FD be able to physically move to cover the spread? 4 less teeth than your current set-up doesn't seem like a big deal, but check the specs don't take my word for it.

for the larger cassette, you need to make sure the RD cage will fit around it, I think 40t needs a long cage but dunno. your pic looks like a med cage.
>>
>>1213932
or maybe i just get 26in wheels. more torque right
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>>1213931

Unfortunately neither will work. Your rear derailleur won't be able to handle a larger cassette than what you have, your front derailleur won't be able to handle the jump from 32 to 50 and I'm not sure if there are 32 tooth chainrings for compact cranks either.

With Shimano 8 speed you can run an MTB rear derailleur with your road levers, so if you get a 11-40 cassette and an 8 or 9 speed MTB rear derailleur you should be able to get it set up & working.
>>
>>1213934
ha, yeah, that's another way of looking at it. I guess since disc allows brake compatibility that should work?

seems like >>1213942
>With Shimano 8 speed you can run an MTB rear derailleur with your road levers, so if you get a 11-40 cassette and an 8 or 9 speed MTB rear derailleur you should be able to get it set up & working.
would be less money than new wheels, tubes and tires tho, and it won't fuck up your frame geometry/handling, either.
>>
>>1213931
>I don't mind the larger jumps in between gears of an 8 speed system
Then you definitely don't need 50x11

Get a subcompact crank, it won't cost you much more than two new chainrings and a new bb. Something like 30/46 or 28/44
>>
>>1213923
It was more of a hypothetical. I was actually thinking something more like 52-32 (or 34), because apparently 3 front chainrings will die someday.

Speaking of which, is it better to have road or an mtb derailleur/cog setup? I don't mind losing the lowest gear on the front, but then would I have to get a larger cassette so I can keep spinning at a high cadence?
>>1213924
What's a BCD?
>>
>>1213987

FSA makes a very cheap square taper subcompact 46/30 chainset called Tempo Adventure, maybe go for that. You should be able to use your current bottom bracket with this.
>>
>>1213987
You could just use a normal 50-34 compact if that's your goal, then. Also, they don't make bigger rings that would actually mount to an MTB crank in the first place.
>>1213992
I'd say it's way more likely his BB would be hollowtech wouldn't it? Not much new stuff is square taper.
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>>1213987
>What's a BCD?

see >>1213932
>>
>>1213992
>>1213994
Don't road bike derailleurs only go up to 32t?
>>
>>1213942
>>1213948
>>1213960
>>1213992
thx im gonna look at subcompact cranks. u rly think its worth replaing the whole crankset not just the rings? and yeah i dont have a square taper crankset.
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>>1213998
on the back or on the front?
The current generation of ultegra and 105 medium cage now officially goes up to 34 teeth in the rear, and you could probably wrangle more.

On the front it doesn't matter for the derailleur specifically how many teeth you have so long as the gap is consistent and you can move the derailleur up or down as needed.
>>
>>1213999

Hm, all of the subcompact cranksets for outboard bearings are pretty expensive (FSA, Praxis and Sugino make them, but they're $200-300!), so maybe it's the cheapest if you just get a wider cassette and an MTB rear derailleur.
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>>1214000
Rear, but I guess if it goes to 34 then it must be alright.
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>>1213999
>u rly think its worth replaing the whole crankset not just the rings?
figure out your BCD and see what rings are available. if you can get the rings you need in, go for it.
>>
What is a decent commuter tire? I have meme skins and am looking for something that doesn't feel so shit.

I was thinking of (pic) but I'm a little weary of their current low price on wiggle. I don't know if they are trying to liquidate an older model or people hatted them.
>>
>>1214011
If you want adequate puncture protection without going tubeless, it's always going to be a tradeoff with ride quality.

As for the price, looking on wiggle it's not out of line, their tyres are often 50% off or more. Don't think I've ever spent more than 50AUD each for the top of the line clinchers.

On the bicyclerollingresistance.com puncture test they do slightly better than the standard "all round" tyres. Consider maybe the grand prix 4 seasons for a slightly less dead gatorskin, or apparently the michelin krlion 2 endurance are decent.
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>>1214011
They're decent at best, not a bad tire especially if you can find them at a good price. I like Vittorias but they have several trims between each of their tire models with very different specs. If you do go Rubino, make sure they're the Pro G+ or Pro III and not the non pro 60tpi wire bead.
>>
>>1214011
You're not getting good ride and good puncture protection at once.
>>
What would be faster on gravel/dirt roads:
Light chink frame at 16 pounds with mtb geometry but fully rigid
Moderate weight cyclocross bike at 20 pounds

But really, I'm asking if the difference in aero matters.
>>
Looking to have a 27.5+ wheelset built up. Anytone recommend a great wheelbuilder service or company?
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>>1214048
comfort matters as well. if you're getting the shit shaken out of you it's hard to go fast.
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>>1214048
For really rough mountain gravel roads probably the MTB, for long rides on rolling packed gravel farm roads probably the CX bike since you're going to care more about having lots of hand positions on the drop bars than descending comfort. Otherwise, the answer (assuming that both options have appropriate gearing and tires and are a good fit for the rider) is ultimately going to depend on rider preference - personally I like drop bars for everything so I'd definitely go for the cx bike, but somebody else might feel differently.
>>
>>1214053
>>1214058
Well, the only difference I can tell is that the mountain bike has flat handlebars and the seatpost is shorter. If the mountain bike had drops and the seat was also higher than the handlebars, what makes the mountain bike more comfortable and yet slower than a cyclocross?
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>>1214063
if you have different frames you have different amount of flex and shock absorption and such. even frames of equal weight and the same material can very widely in comfort levels.
>>
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>>1212377
Left foot forward or right foot forward?
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>>1214066
So, something in the geometry causes the mtb to flex even without suspension causing losses despite not having a suspension fork? What is it?
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>>1214067

Left.
>>
Sometimes I have to park my bicycle in cages where you have to hang it up vertically on a couple of hooks but when my bicycle is up there, my U-lock isn't long enough to reach the metal rods if I try to run it through both my rear wheel and frame. If I only have the option to attach it to either the frame or the rear wheel, which one is the better option?

Should I just buy another lock?
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>>1212377
How fucked is this crown?
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>>1214099
Frame, of course.
Aren't those hooks usually guarded by a security guy though? Because if they aren't, I suggest you lock your bike to something else.
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>>1214113
I probably should've posted a picture of what I meant by the hooks. The cage itself can't be entered by anyone without having an access card and there's a few security cameras inside as well. Even though I don't use the cage much, I figured this would be the best place to put it whenever I'm close-by since my friend told me that he saw a bike get stolen from a rack that's outside of it. I usually see police hanging around since it's near a train station.

Thanks for replying.
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>>1214067
Right foot forward is wrong foot forward
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>>1213929
Don't. It's not worth it.
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>>1213684
that bike has triple butted ishiwata, i really don't think it's that low end
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I'm an idiot when it comes to bikes, so I didn't want to kill an older thread with my possibly stupid question: I had a crash with a car, nothing bad happened, but the front rim of my motobecane Juvenile from the 70s is bent now. The writing on it says Rigida Superchromix 10 and a 82 in a diamond shape. Also there's a 26 X 17,6 or something like that written on it. Maybe 26 X 1 ?/6 or something? Pic related.
I don't know wich numbers I have to look for, when buying a new rim. I know that 26 is the size of the rim.
The tire I've got on it is a 28-590 Hutchinson 650x28 A.
The rim tape says 20-584.
The tubing is from continental, says Tour 26 37/47-559/597 and has a french ventile.
I find all those different numbers quite confusing and I can't find the same rim online.
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>>1214161
the other writings on the rim
>>
>>1214161

650a and 590 are the numbers you're looking for. It's not the conventional "26 inch" sizing so regular mountain bike wheels are not the same size.

Google "650a rim" and pick one to buy that has the same amount of spoke holes as your current one.
>>
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What is the cheapest, most reliable road bike for commuting in dense Vietnamese traffic?
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>>1214168
>650a rim
great! thank you very much!
>>
>>1214161
>I had a crash with a car
lol was it because you have steel rims and your braking is awful?

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html

Is this bike worth having a new wheel built for it? You'll want new spokes as well.
>>
>>1214169
Fixie, shimano nexus, or singlespeed
>>
>>1214174
Any fixie, singlespeed will do? Any ShiNex component will do? What are you sayjng here?
>>
>>1214169
Bell UH-1
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>>1214200
Nice dubs, but please. I put my trust into your hands.
>>
>>1214192
A fixie has very few parts to break. But I hate them because I live in a place with hills and it sucks going up and down. At least with a singlespeed you only have a shitty time going up and can stand on the pedals, then coast all the way to the bottom because you don't have the gearing to do an easy climb and go fast downhill on the fly.

But some people love fixies.

A nexus is also cheap, and some people love igh. Never tried, though. All 3 of them are cheap and reliable.
>>
Is it worth it to build your own wheels?
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>>1214172
>steel rims and your braking is awful
possible, the bike is old and doesn't brake that well, but the crash happened because the driver of the car was driving backwards onto the bicycle lane without noticing me and I wasn't able to come to a full stop fast enough.
The bike isn't that good, it was laying in a shack for 30 years, it's too small for me, a little bit rusty and no one else enjoys riding it, but I don't have the money for a new bike and over the years it has really grown on me.

>new spokes
yeah, right, the old ones are probably bent too. What do I have to look for, if I want to replace the whole thing? I've still got the rubbertire, rim tape and tubing, like half a year old and basically new, so I'd need the rim, spokes, axis and all of that.
>>
>>1214226
lol sorry man, it's not going to be cost effective to build a new wheel for your shitter

also that sucks and i'm sure it was the drivers fault, but it being their fault is not a good consolation when you still get hit. You need a bike with good brakes and you should ride like you're invisible and not live in a fantasy land where drivers look out for your safety and aren't often retarded.

Also, what the fuck? Why is the driver not paying for this?
>>
>>1214207
It's only worth building your own wheels if you have a specific need that can't be met by a commercial available wheel, because it costs more to buy hubs, spokes, and rims separately. If you're looking to get really good wheels for cheap, the most cost-effective option is to buy a cheap factory wheelset with good rims and then perform final truing by hand to a high tolerance.

>>1214226
>What do I have to look for, if I want to replace the whole thing?
The first step is to choose a rim and a hub you want to use, then you'll measure the two and run the numbers through a spoke calculator (like this one: https://leonard.io/edd/) to find out what length spokes you need.
>>
>>1214230
How would I know what a cheap factory wheelset with good rims would be?

Also, is it best to have spoke tensioner and truing stand or is plucking strings and putting a stick next to the wheel while spinning on the bike good enough?
>>
>>1214227
I didn't realize that my bike was damaged, he got out and asked me if I was okay. I said yes, we've checked his car, I put up my bike and nothing fell off or was lying around. So we were both happy that nothing bad happened, wished each other a nice day and he drove off. I had a cigarette, after that I sat back on my bike and then I noticed that my front wheel was bent like one and a half centimeters and touches the braces every 3/4 of a turn. But I have neither the name or number of the driver.
I'd invest like a hundred euros to get that piece of shit running again, I really like it. But those bicycle numbers are so confusing, that I really don't know what to buy and the bicycle store near me is super expensive.
>>
>>1214234
I've done this before too. You're always in shock after a crash and eager for everything to be ok. In future, if a car hits you and they're at fault, tell them that you don't know if your bike is damaged, but it probably is, and you need to get their insurance details and you'll have a shop inspect it properly, later. Ask them to call their insurance when they get home and admit fault.
I got a fucked frame i had to pay for the first time and $1000 from their insurance the second time.

You will need to buy a NOS (new old stock) 650a / 590mm rim, which is an archaic meme size. Like;
https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Vintage-Alesa-Rim-650a-720-Alloy-590-x-20-36h-Eroica-NOS/121648512379?hash=item1c52d0fd7b%3Ag%3A4isAAOSwBLlVULS4&_sacat=0&_nkw=650a+rim&_from=R40&rt=nc&_trksid=m570.l1313

Then I suggest you take your old hub, and the rim, to a bike shop, and have them order you spokes, so they're correctly sized, and build the wheel. Labour will be around $50. Also consider buying a new hub, if your current one is rough, and it invariably is low quality, so it's a good idea regardless. If your rim has a different spoke count than your hub you will need to buy a new hub that matches the spoke count. You can save money measuring and buying the spokes yourself. You could build the wheel yourself but it's not easy.

The shop is going to find you doing this to a cheap old kids bike, hilarious.
>>
>>1214232
>How would I know
google the rim names

As for equipment, a good stand makes the process much easier, but a tensiometer isn't something you really need unless you're working with low-spoke count wheels
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>>1214239
alright, I'm gonna do that! Thank you so much for your help, I'd never managed to figure this out by myself!
>>
my front deraileur does not move a mm when adjusting limit screws. What do?
>>
>>1214260
Do you have a shift cable installed that's holding it in place?

Adjusting the limit screws doesn't cause derailer to move on its own, except that as you loosen the low limit screw, the spring in the derail will continue to pull the cage to it's lowest possible point (continuing to loosen the limit screw from there will have no effect).
>>
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>>1212591
duuude!
>>
>>1212377
what do you guys think of buying this bike for $100?

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-cruiser-commuter-hybrid/calgary/kona-dew-commuter-bike/1369771958?utm_campaign=socialbuttons&utm_content=app_ios&utm_medium=social&utm_source=ios_social
>>
>>1214295

sure, much better than a $100 walmart bike would be
>>
>>1214301
I'm just wondering if it would be better than like, a steel 90's mtb for a comparable price, I also can't find a dew in the kona archives that looks like this one which seems a little sus?
>>
>>1214305
nevermind, its a 2012, I didn't go up that high as I assumed it would be older. Found specs for it I'm gonna buy it.
>>
Can somebody please explain barrel adjusters to me please. How do i know which direction tightens/ slacks and how do I know when I've hit the min/max of what I can do with them
>>
>>1214317

Unscrew the barrel adjuster to add tension - when you make the cable outer "shorter", the cable tightens. So on the rear derailleur add tension by screwing it toward the spokes, on the shifter add tension by screwing it counter-clockwise away from you. With inline adjusters it's the same, turning it counter-clockwise increases the tension.

You should start by screwing it all the way in (least possible tension), detaching the shifter cable, pulling the cable with pliers and re-attaching it to get initial tension. Check if it shifts okay, and if the cable doesn't have enough tension to properly shift to a larger cog or chainring, twist the barrel adjuster half a turn and try again, and if it's still not sufficient, go another half a turn again until it successfully shifts to a larger cog or chainring.
>>
Am I being hamfisted with these hoses or do I ahve to get my bike fixed? I can't get air hoses to sit properly on my valve stem. I had to use a fucking mechanic's air hose (from a gas station garage) to get my tire inflated but they removed it and installed a more modern one, but all I seem to do is let air out.
>>
>>1214334
Post pic of valve
>>
Whats the cheapest zwift setup?
>>
Pretty stupid question, but how significant is the difference between a mountain and road bike? I'm commuting 5~15 miles (depending on whether or not I take the bus) on a mountain bike every day and I'm wondering if a road bike would make my life much easier.
>>
>>1214487
if you're commuting on paved surfaces, switching to a road bike would make a big difference, yes
>>
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So after spending the majority of yesterday working on my front indexing i've hit a roadblock that I cant fix.

I finally have clean shifting with my gears, I have access to trim and derailleur movement but I cant get my derailleur to move any further outward than this. h limit screws seem to be having no effect and making any changes to my cable tension removes either trim or shifting in general.
>>
>>1214487

I've got an 8 mile commute which takes maybe 33-34 minutes on a hardtail MTB and 27-28 on a road bike. Traffic, stoplights and such of course contribute more than the speed of the bike.

So it's not a huge difference, just a few minutes per day, but of course you can use the road bike for much more than commuting so if you find one for a decent price and might consider it fun, sure, but just to make your commute faster it's probably not worth it.
>>
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>>1214501

sorry about the ugly picture with flash & dirty derailleur :D

Look inside your derailleur. When you've shifted it to that position, is the limit screw touching the body of the derailleur so that it can't physically move further? If it is like in my picture, you need to screw the limit screw out so that it allows movement further.

If there's still room between the limiter screw and the derailleur body, you just need more cable tension. The 5800/6800/9000 generation front derailleurs need a LOT of cable tension to function properly. Do you have an inline barrel adjuster for the cable tension? If you're not getting enough tension with it, first release tension from the inline barrel adjuster, then release the cable, pull it hard with pliers so you get it initially very tight already and then screw it back in the derailleur and then add tension from the barrel adjuster as required.
>>
>>1214501
Maybe your BB axle is too long
Also clean your chain you filthy fuck
>>
>>1214510
I have those really really shit barrel adjusters that is just a wound lever attached to the gear cable at the handlebars. Theres literally no way to tell from tactile feedback if im tightening or loosening the cable. I really wish I had those bolts that literally every other bike on the planet has.

>>1214511
My chain was cleaned about 5 rides ago, what you are seeing is the exact reason why im fixing my front indexing in the first place. I have high chain rub and my small-to-big shifting regularly knocks off my chain. When my shifting is perfect, then ill clean all of my drive train.
>>
>>1214487
if you're commuting on the knobby tires that came on your MTB, they're slowing you down more than the overall style of bike you're riding. If you switch to slick or semi-slick tires on your bike, I'd guess that an under 5 mile trip through traffic will ride about the same, because like other anon said
>Traffic, stoplights and such of course contribute more than the speed of the bike.
You'll always be able to be a bit faster on a roadie, but you'd really start noticing it toward your 15 mile commutes more than the short ones. If you have a suspension fork, it's robbing your efficiency on the road (pedal bob), see if it can be locked out.

An OK set of slick tires will probably start around $60+US. the /bbg/ thread can often find an OK or even great used road bike for under $200, less if the seller doesn't care/doesn't know what they have. But it depends greatly on your local market.

Invest in one or the other. Try borrowing/test riding a road bike, you'd be surprised.
>>
is putting together a bike fun?
>>
>>1214655
yes but not if you don't know what you're doing. Overhauling old completes is the better way to learn
>>
>>1214657
ok thanks
>>
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>>1214655

Definitely get a bit of experience first - I've been riding and tinkering with bikes for 5 years and just a while ago did my first complete build from parts up. I've done most of the things before but there was stuff like installing the headset and press fit bottom bracket, cutting hydraulic brake hoses, setting tires up tubeless and such that was new to me and I had to get a few new tools in addition to the plenty I already had. Was able to do it otherwise all by myself but had to go to the LBS for help in getting one tire to mount when floor pump wasn't enough and installing the star nut in the steerer since I didn't have a vise and a big enough hammer.

Another thing when buying all the parts for assembling a bike is knowing which parts to get - there's a million different standards for bottom brackets, headsets, axles, brake attachments and such so you really need to do your research before buying so everything works together.
>>
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>>1214655
for certain definitions of fun
>>
>>1214136
I mean I’ve heard the pedals are crap and the front brake is... outdated. But it’s a beautiful looking device I can buy for around $60.

Also I’m weird and have a fascination with mass produced commie shit.
>>
>>1214655
Are you James May?
>>
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>>1214790
yes, yes bike mechanic, well done... however
>>
>>1214655
>>1214701
Solid advice here. Make sure you order parts from a shop with a very liberal return policy, since there's a 1% chance you'll buy the correct headset or bottom bracket on the first try and very subtle differences (e.g., 26.4 vs. 26.6 mm seattube diameter or 68 vs. 70 mm bottom bracket width) will determine whether parts are compatible.
Also, you will have to buy some special tools and jury-rig or borrow things like pressing tools which are not cost-effective to buy for a one-time building project.
But it's great fun and you'll be hella proud afterwars. However, maybe start with something simple like building a single speed bike or fixie.
>>
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>>1214958

Building the press for the bottom bracket and headset was actually one of the cheapest tools I've had to buy - just a bit of threaded rod, big enough washers and a couple nuts to press everything together.

But yeah, definitely recommended to start with a single-speed so you don't have frustration with setting up the derailleurs, those always have threaded bottom brackets which are easier and the standards are quite a bit more standardized as well.. even easier if you can get a frameset that has the headset already installed, after that a single-speed shouldn't require anything complicated to put together, maybe ask a local shop to cut the steerer and hammer in the star nut since those can be a little difficult to do at home.
>>
>>1213109
>Hey mates
>i need a bike for someone 310lbs
>in the US
>from specialized or giant since thats what the local shop carries
>intended to ride very casually on paved bike paths and light gravel
>would like to have a cushy seat. i know less cushy seats are better for serious rides but this is just for casual riding


Any 32 spoke wheel that is 'double laced' will support your weight. You won't have to buy anything new. Just keep your tires inflated to near max psi.

Try a Giant ToughRoad (2019) or a Giant AnyRoad (2018). the latter if you want a discount. From the specs the anyroad looks like it has 2x9 instead of 2x8. Both retail around $1000.

Direct-to-Consumer option would be the Raleigh Willard or the Diamondback Haanjo.
>>
>>1213905
where do you live where a 34-32 isn't enough to get up a hill

plz be from andorra
>>
>>1213929
just get a bobbin birdie or a new vintage styled Raleigh or even a gravity 21 from bikesdirect

are you nutz man
>>
what are my options for non-vintage 130 bcd road bike cranksets in either 50-39, 50-38, or 52-39 or 52-38?

Top choice would be a 52-39. I heard it won't fit a smol cog smaller than 38. Right now I'm running this no-name racing crank from Ounce that isn't that bad but thinking long term here (plus Im starting to spin out on any downhills)
>>
>>1214978
oh and it's a claris 2400 model with claris long fd and claris rd.
>>
>>1214978
5800 or 4700 you can buy them on wiggle for reasonably cheap. You can get 53/39 or 52/36

>50-39, 50-38
what the fuck? How would those stop you 'spinning out'? Plus they don't even exist
>52-39 or 52-38
I don't think those exist either
>>
>>1214978
100rpm in 50x11 is aprox 58 km/h
100rpm in 53x11 is aprox 61 km/h

if you can't spin that then you're an rpmlet and if you can then , really? Does it really matter?

A much, much better, and cheaper upgrade, if you don't care about low gearing is to get a tighter cassette.
>>
>>1214973
I'm just fat, old and weak
>>
>>1214978

Why do you want 130 bcd? Shimano nowadays has their proprietary 4-bolt asymmetric 110 bcd and their non-groupset 5-bolt road chainsets are also 110 bcd, SRAM has 130 for the outer and 110 for the inner chainring and I think the old FSA Tempo/Vero square taper cranksets that often came on cheapo bikes are 110 bcd too.

If you replace the entire crankset with a previous-gen Shimano unit (5800 or 4700 or R2000 Claris/R3000 Sora) you can be sure you'll be able to get replacement chainrings for a very long time.
>>
Can people do touring with a low of 34t in the front?
>>
>>1214999

Depends on the terrain and how much you're hauling. Modern groupsets nowadays have larger cogs on the rear, 50/34 with 11-34 isn't that far off from an older road triple with a 30 granny gear and 11-32 cassette.
>>
>>1215002
Small tent, sleeping bag, food and water for a few days, little things. May be a few hills, but it's not like I'm going up a mountainside. There will be some dirt, but I'm not trying to go through a technical trail loaded or anything.

If it helps, I'm also somewhat light at 135 pounds and do a little weightlifting.

11-34 for the rear
>>
>>1212377
Anyone know about electric bikes with front and back wheels electric?
What's the deal with no flat tires?
>>
>>1215058
powering the front wheels on a bike seems cool on paper but terrible in practice. Any form of front wheel slip = going down
>>
>>1215061
i know
any form of back wheel slip going up hill (pop-a-wheelie)
I just don't see both wheels electric
>>
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>>1214999
Yeah, you'll be all good.
People have toured on way more brutal gearing just fine, worst comes to worst, you're walking some bits.

personally I have a 26x34 low gear and would like lower.
>>
I broke my shoulder socket 3 weeks ago by getting t boned at a stop sign, I've noticed as I've been recovering I've been having increasingly worse back pain, do you guys think it could be from not riding? Also any guesses as to when I can ride again? I haven't seen a dr besides the emergency room b/c insurance.
>>
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>>1215101
>I haven't seen a dr b/c insurance.
>>
>>1215101
Why didnt you claim medical compensation from the driver you fucking idiot.
>>
>>1215107
Because I'm at fault, you fucking idiot.
>>
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Why are bibs padded instead of saddles? Other than hygene and asscrack exposure, which I don't think Sky cares too much about.
>>
Hi /n/, I rode my bike to work today and it was a good ride, but my sit bones really have done a number on my butt. Coming home was quite sore, and it still is a fair bit.

Please advise me on good bike seats? I'm hoping to cycle daily to and from work
>>
>>1215170
fix your seat height and angle and you'll get used to it fag
>>
>>1215170
bike saddles like opinions: everybody's got one.
>>
>>1215170
road bike saddles are designed for performance and not comfort as comfort increases weight. thats why bike shorts exist
>>
>>1215005
That combo would put you at 27 gear inches for your low gear. That's probably okay, around where 80s touring hikes were stock, maybe a bit higher. Most people with lots of touring under their belt prefer to be around 20 gear inches, because the less wear and tear on knees the better and because on day 25 of a tour climbing a shitty mountain with a headwind, it's nice to have a very low gear.
>>
>>1215167
Because we want to remember how it felt to be a qt baby with diapers.
>>
I've got my first mountain bike race in a few weeks (17-18 km of xc singletrack, lots of rolling hills but not much long straight climbing). I've been riding the trails that the race will take place at in prep, but due to some work stuff I won't have access to my bike for about two weeks, then I get back Friday with the race being on Sunday.

Should a typical running and lifting plan hold my form? I also might have some access to a stationary bike, but that might be a lot more relevant to road riding than singletrack--how should that factor in if I can? I'll do a light pre ride of the course Saturday, but what should my training look like on Friday? Most of the day's gonna be a train ride and then I get back to my home (and bike) at 5pm.

Thanks /n/!
>>
after 4 years of using my minipump to pump my tires, i finally got a proper bike pump and oh my god, i should've starved for a day and bought one earlier
>>
>>1215170
>Please advise me on good bike seats?
go to the shop and ask to sit on them and find one you like. then get used to being sore for 2 weeks. after that you wont feel anything

i recomend any specialized road saddle. giant's are also fantastic but easy to damage
>>
Had my first fall since I've started getting into cycling. Other than replace the flat and recenter the handle bars is there anything I should lookout for that might also be messed up?
>>
>>1215227
I wouldn't do much at all the 2 days before the race. It's too late to train then, you should use the time to rest, and stretch, maybe a very basic small ride, to stretch
>>
>>1212547
>front shifter with a bar end and the rear shifter with the STI paddles
lance armstrong homage, hah.
>>
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Any 2-bolt SPD / MTB shoe recommendations with a wide toebox (but not necessarily a wide shoe)? I'm wearing giro privateer r mtb shoes right now and they're just destroying my 4th and 5th toes in terms of width. I run the ratchet pretty tight though, so the high volume / wide model would be too loose elsewhere. I've read that shimano has roomier toe boxes?
>>
>>1215316
dont buy shoes online you retard lol
>>
>>1215167
>Why are bibs padded instead of saddles?
The idea is to keep the padding in a static position relative your skin so that it doesn't create more friction. If you did 100% of your riding while seated in the same exact spot on your saddle then the padding would have the same benefits regardless of where it was attached, but in practice riders move around the saddle frequently, and each shift of position on a padded saddle means your skin experiences surface friction (very slight, but over the course a long ride even the slight irritations repeated countless times can develop into a serious sore).

>>1215309
bent derailer/der. hanger, or wheels out of true are the most common kinds of crash damage
>>
>>1215316
Lake or Sidi Mega.
>>
If I don't plan on doing any technical stuff/fast singletrack, but just riding firetrails and gravel, am I better off with a hardtail mountainbike or a "gravel" memebike?
>>
>>1215367
gravel memebike, especially if you ride road already
you can descend faster on a xc hardtail though and it's better if you have bad bike handling
>>
>>1215367
Rigid would work fine, but something that can run at least 38mm tires. You don’t need drop bars unless you want them.
>>
>>1215367
Hardtail MTB might mean an all mountain HT with a 160mm fork at front or a XC race bike with 80mm front. Two different kinds of bikes. Assuming you mean an XC bike...

The main difference between those two is tire width and bar type. You're going to be fine with both.

As long as you use disc brakes, you can usually convert an XC bike to 700c wheels with narrow gravel tyres and you can usually put 47mm tyred 650b wheels on gravel bikes.

I'd go for a gravel bike with flared drops, but I am biased as this is my favorite bar setup.
>>
>>1215371
I meant just a basic, cheap hardtail mountainbike. I don't know the different sub-categories that well
>>
>>1215375
Then get any of which you fancy the most. You're going to be fine with both.
>>
Is it common to be completely inept at climbing as as an absolute beginner?

Im doing climbing training to try and improve but I can only do a few hundred meters up a steep climb and its killing my self esteem
>>
>>1215417
of course, gravity is a harsh mistress
and when you do get it you'll feel amazing, so keep working at it
>>
>>1215316
bontrager
>>
>>1215417
Keep trying, it will never stop hurting but you'll see the results.
Since I started I like to climb a local 400-500m tall hill with some +10-15% stretches, I couldn't do it without stopping but every time I tried to make my stop a little bit further away, very good motivation, in a few weeks I was doing the whole climb unimterrupted, then I went for time, and every 1/100ths of a second gained felt amazing. Now I'm kind of stalled but still like to go up and down a couple of times because it's a beautiful quiet road, but really, cherish those noob gains beacause they're so easily tangible it's like receiving a prize every time you try.
>>
>>1215447
god it must be depressing being a statsfaggot
>>
>>1215450
stats are fun anon
>>
>>1214992
>Why do you want 130 bcd?

I was told that is what my current crank is and I was under the impression that is what I should replace it with?
>>
>>1215316

Kind of on the same tip but is there anybody out there who makes a Euro size 50 in Wide/Mega?

At this point I just want to be able to clip in sometime this century. I have a road bike but would actually prefer SPD instead of SPD-SL. Also any of the weird non shimano ones would be fine. The priority is finding a pair of shoes for these giant fucking feet.

Right now my alternative is to ride with extra large MTB pin flats and ride with EVA foam running shoes where the EVA foam has been compacted down or the shoe is cheap as fuck ($60 asics GT-1000s work great).

I'm reluctant to change but literally everyone I know who rides clipless loves them. My reluctance is right now I've got no hot spots and I'm riding in comfy 15 4e asics that I could give a shit if they get tore up by the pin flats.

TLDR: Clipless shoes in 50 EU, Wide or xtra Wide.
>>
Is there an equivalent of hongfu for bicycle frames but made of steel, aluminum, or titanium instead?
>>
>>1215459
You are so FUCKING STUPID
go to a PHYSICAL SHOP
TRY SHOES ON
>>
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>>1215469
for steel just cop something used. you can get pretty great deals on land sharks, ritcheys, lemonds, etc.
>>
>>1215317
>>1215469
What's wrong with getting recs before you head to a bike shop to try stuff out?
>>
>>1215469
Chinamen do make reasonably priced ti frames. For steel and alu it's probably not worth it (shipping costing more tan the frame).
>>
>>1215481
I'll check eBay sometime, my Craigslist is terrible
>>1215485
What manufacturers would you recommend for ti? Doesn't have to be chink.
>>
>>1215484
nothing i guess but the best you'll get here is oh i have this and it's great well guess what most shoes are great
the only thing that matters is fit

im just triggered because the millenial mentality is to buy everything online to save shekels and pick based on reviews and specs and that's all near totally irrelevant. The only metric that matters is fit, and there's no way to give you opinions online about that

also fuck, how many options, in your size, and even, on special, are you going to have? You'll be lucky to have 3 reasonably priced pairs at a bike shop to choose between. What help are 'recs' from /n/ then.
>>
>>1215493
>boomer getting mad about capitalism
lol
>>
>>1215493
It's helpful to know what brands have what characteristics though. Fizik and Giro tend to run narrow while Shimano and Lake have more toebox room.

The fact that shops only have certain brands makes it more helpful to know what you're leaning towards before you go to a shop so you know which shops will be more helpful to you.
>>
Are singlespeeds worth it?
>>
>>1215513
Depens on where you live and what you want it for.
>>
>>1215513
They're fine if you have no hills. Or gradients of any kind.
Gears are really good.
>>
I got a full tuneup and put a new bb, crankset, cassette and chain on my bicycle over a year ago. Unfortunately I only rode it a few times before it sat and collected dust.

It's been stored indoors this whole time, so I was a bit surprised to see some rust on the new chain's rollers. Will lubing it up and riding it wear down the cassette/chainrings significantly faster because there's a little rust on the rollers? Probably not a big deal, right?
>>
>>1215528
Just ride it as if you'd ride anything else. Check the chain stretch now and then.
>>
>>1215513
No
>>
>>1215528
lube it up and wipe it off.
>>
>>1215492
Don't know any. From the little research I did back in the day they're a lottery just like carbon, with some people claiming their wielding cracked and others that it didn't.
>>
>>1215577
new thread
>>
>>1215529
>>1215559
Thanks.
>>
What are my options if the usual methods for stopping a disk brake pad from rubbing the rotor don't work?
Usual methods being loosening them, grabbing the levers to clamp it down, then tightening it down.
Second usual method, screwing out the pad adjustment screws on the sides of the caliper.

Re-clamping it just makes it end up in the same position as there's very little movement available to it. Screwing the bolts down just plonks the calipers back where they were, since the force of a screw going down just bends the rotor.
Adjusting the pad adjustment screws can't work since they're already maxed out.
They're TRP Spyre-C calipers.




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