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Could America ever become as rail-heavy as Japan and other European countries? I would certainly love this, but I feel like it could ever happen.
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>>1212729
There's some promising stuff happening. It's mainly private companies right now, but there are two rail projects I'm excited about.
First, there's Brightline in Florida, a privately-run intercity service which opened a few months ago. They're a bunch of real-estate moguls who decided to run a train in-between their developments to make more money.
Second, there's Texas Central Railways, in, well, Texas. They're a bunch of old Bush administration figures who partnered up with JR Central in order to link Dallas and Houston together, and to get JR Central a foot in the door in the American market. They're still buying land, but they're making good progress and almost have their EIS done.
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Where's that Tucson to phoenix light rail they've been talking about for years?
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>>1212729
Yes along the Northeast Corridor, but definitely not under our current administration...
https://youtu.be/FWf-ipNl5fQ?t=211

They're building one in Texas and in California.
Florida has there fast-ish Brightline now too.
Vegas almost got one, but muh FRA standards.

But otherwise the U.S. will probably eventually have high speed corridor trains, but never ones that go across the country, that'd be pretty dumb.
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>>1212756
wups I thought OP was mainly talking about HSR
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>>1212756
Eh, a coast to coast HSR connection could happen due to natural network growth. It won't be a neat way to cross the country, but you weren't meant to do this in the first place.
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>>1212729
Oil is gonna run out or at least become extremely expensive within the next 50 years. Even the US won't be able to keep the supply steady for their country.

Either it's all gonna turn into electric cars, or we're gonna see the readvent of trams and other urban railways in the population centers, as well as hyberloob :-DDD and conventional passenger railways between them.
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The best way the US could become rail lovers would be if the US built a 400+km/h line from the West Coast US to the East Coast and then obtained a fleet of high speed trains and modified them to be sleeper trains.
Imagine this: Los Angeles to Washington DC in one night. Cheaper than the flight and hotel, plus you can just spend all day in DC and get the HSR Sleeper back at night.
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>>1212729
no, america is far too rural. The major cities could do it of course, but about half the country lives in a rural setting, and they probably aren't keen on paying for a system they will never use.
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>>1212772
This would un-ironically be amazing desu and could very well end up obliterating the cross-country redeyes if they could get the total trip time under 12 hours.
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>>1212829
This idea gets better the more I think about it. Basically, you would need to build a quad-tracked mainline to French LGV standards that runs from Pittsburgh to southwestern Nebraska via Chicago and Des Moines. In the east, it would fork into Philly/NYC/Boston and DC Spurs, and in the west, it would fork into a Denver/Las Vegas/LA spur and a northern SLC/Sacramento/SF spur. The mainline would bypass every major city in between, with dual-tracked loops branching off of it to serve the cities along the way. You would run service like JR runs the Shinkansen on the Tokaido+Sanyo main line, with Kodama-style trains that run Acela-level stop frequencies, Hikari-style trains that stop only at the major cities, and Nozomi-style trains that run nonstop between LA/SF and NYC/DC, with a few that also run nonstop from Chicago to either coast. On the Nozomis, run 16 car sleeper consists and treat them like long-distance airline service and have each train travel with two crews that switch off halfway through the trip.

It's crazy, but with 400km/h service, it could work.
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>>1212832
I think Shinkansen networks only work for Japan. The US needs European designs and European construction to be much more viable.
You see, Japan has come to the conclusion, conventional rail above 320 km/h is not for them. Instead, they'll go to 500 km/h with Maglev systems.
Europe on the other hand sees no future in Maglev since the infrastructure costs would be too high, plus the unique rolling stock couldn't use existing infrastructure and rail stations.

The US is also huge, well, the contiguous US is. The only comparable systems are China and Russia, and even then Russia just has 7 day long train journeys, and China has overnight sleeper trains, and HSR that can take a whole day to get from one part to another.

My proposal would be something inbetween China and Europe's design. Super long distance HSR at 400+ km/h, but instead of using Alstom AGVs and Siemens Velaro trains, the only 2 right now that can achieve 400 km/h, why not go for a TGV/Talgo style solution?
My proposal is taking the basic concept of Renfe's Trenhotel. Japan used to have the same sort of thing, but they've been scrapped entirely in favour of the Shinkansen. Anyway, the Trenhotel (and former Japanese services like the Cassiopeia) is a set of permanently coupled cars, with the ability to attach a locomotive to either end. The trainset cannot be broken up, but it can be hauled by pretty much anything.
If you were to then add a pair of TVG POS/Duplex like powercars to each end and have those also be permanently coupled, you could have a high speed sleeper train.
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>>1212729
The US has more freight on the rails then Japan. Everybody praises Japans high speed trains but they forget that their rail freight business has been going down for years.
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>>1212840
And service on board would be pretty cool as well.
A restaurant and bar car could serve passengers an evening meal or dinner as well as breakfast before arriving at their destination.
There could a couple of different class types, including a room type, where you get a bed and a small bathroom with a shower, toilet and sink, a bunk type, where you share a compartment with other travellors, but you have a bunk to sleep on, but have to use a shared bathroom in the car, and an open carriage where seats can fold flat, like business class seats on flights.
Of course these trains would need to be scheduled right. A 12 hour train would mean leaving one city at 9pm and arriving at the destination at about 9am. Get that time shorter, and you can have scheduling that makes more sense to business travellors wishing to save money on hotel costs, and just tourists wanting to have a day trip to a city on the other coast.
Right now, if you want to fly coast to coast, that's about 5 hours on a plane that will do about 800 km/h. Take the car, and it's about 44 hours, fastest speeds would probably be about 130 km/h (depending on speed limits). Take Amtrak, and you're looking at probably 72 hours, plus waiting at Chicago to change trains, which can take even longer, and I have no idea how fast Amtrak trains are on those long distance lines.
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>>1212772
Unlikely to be cheaper than flight, even if you add the hotel cost onto flight cost it still seems unlikely.
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>>1212729
The untied states itself will not be fully capable of HSR. What will happen is with organic growth sections like the us NEC be built up. Brightline in Miami is doing the same thing. You will see metro areas that have hsr that will feed to local/suburban rail and bus systems that feed into the regional hsr. Anything outside of said region will be operated by planes for the price point and speed.
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>>1212729
The big problem is that a lot of America built up around cars, and while intercity HSR might work it's hard to see rail working well for local travel. A city like LA would need dozens of lines and hundreds of stations for rail to become a viable commuting option for more than a select few people, simply because everything is too spread out.
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>>1212772
>Cheaper than the flight
>LA to DC is ~200$
Unlikely.
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>"We don't want Texas Central to use Eminent domain to make a viaduct over land that will have attempt to have a low impact"
>Bats no eye to the ever expanding use of eminent domain for more lanes on highways

Why are rural farmers so easy to be baited by politicians?
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>>1214680
Because they themselves use cars and never use public transport




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