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File: poncho.png (180 KB, 680x453)
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ITT: We discuss gear, ask and answer questions, and post our own stuff.

To start with, do any of you anons have experience with adding padding to shoulder straps on a backpack? Mine are literally just leather belts.
>>
>>1054612
No, I don't buy urbanite meme backpacks
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>>1054612
buy a set /repair set and replace them. or you can DIY some but its gonna cost more time and might suck if you dont have the skills. straps are sold online google says 2 20 € in my country.
>>
>>1054612
hey you actually did use my quote
anyway, padding to shoulder straps? I just wrap duct tape around if I really need it, but I wouldnt buy a pack that had bad straps
>>
Can't Polish a turd
>>
anyone able to keep a wood fire going in the canteen stove? I want to use mostly wood to boilwater, and thought it would make a good stove for that, but the fire always dies.
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>>1054889
Thanks, anon. For reference, this is my pack. It's basically Norway's version of the ALICE pack, but I find the weight gets distributed a lot better in this than the ALICE pack. The way it's built makes me think I'll be able to hand it down to my grand-children pretty easily.
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>>1054928
there are also strap on pads like this pic related that you can just pull over. but donno how good they are that might be easier with the pack you posted.

German page as example: 14€

https://www.amazon.de/Hazard-Taschenzubeh%C3%B6r-Single-Shoulder-ACS-SPAD-CYT/dp/B00889AVOA
>>
>>1054928
That's Neato
>>
>>1054926
All I can figure is to git gud or start using those little burners. Could just start a proper fire and then stick the canteen cup into the coals.

What is everyone's preferred cookware? I'm thinking of getting a little cast iron skillet and possibly a dutch oven. Will probably get one of those racks to throw over the fire in order to make my life easier.
>>
>>1054982
I have a steel canteen cup, and titanium 1.6l pot and 450ml mug.

The steel is ok but heavy, looking to replace it with more titanium. Titanium is great because it's very light and transfers heat well, with no funny taste in my experience.

If you want a stove for twigs you can make one out of a metal coffee can or a huge soup can that restaurants get.

However I use a trangia with evernew titanium cross stand and it suits my needs perfectly, just need a better windscreen thAn my home made one.
>>
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>not pictured
>matches
>extra food
>extra water for other people
>knife
>flashlight
>blue thing is a blanket
>orange is a tarp
>green is a hammock with mosquito net
>20m of rope
>10m of guylines
>>
>>1055664
Looks nice, anon. Is a blanket all you need usually? I know that I'd for sure prefer a sleeping bag.
>>
>>1055712
It may not be, but it's all I was willing to afford. Nights are usually above 10 celsius here.
>>
>>1055742
How much did it cost? There are some pretty nice sleeping bags you can get on the cheap.
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>>1055746
About 50 Reais? Or 25 dolarinos. Here things are way more expensive. But I'll be comfy anon I promise. Sleeping bag would be bulky to use on a hammock. My latitude is 27S, we are in winter but this week it's not very cold
>>
>>1055747
Ah, and it's a fleece blanket. I'll probably sleep in my anorak too. (It has no insulation but it's watertight so it can get very hot)
>>
>>1055747
Ah, you're from Brazil? Not sure what all you can get shipped over there, but I would do research into the MSS patrol bag if you ever feel like your blanket doesn't quite cut it. It'll definitely cost more than $25 though. Probably around $40-$50.
>>
>>1055752
Ah, I saw one similar at decathlon last week. desu I never slept with a sleeping bag in my life. I'll try one next /out/ing
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>>1055793
I personally find them to be a lot more comfy than just a blanket, but different strokes for different folks. I'm also from Canada, so having something that doesn't unwrap and let cold in is always a plus.
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Anyone recognize this canteen bag? I've tried searching for my own, but can't find it.

For reference it's a Swiss army canteen for sale on some site, and the bag is pictured with it.
>>
What's a good, relatively durable sleeping pad that I can fit in a midsize pack? It doesn't necessarily have to be as cheap as possible, nor featherlight - just more compact-able and a bit lighter overall than pic related. My old egg-carton pad strapped nicely to a vintage external frame Kelty I had before, but that frame finally bent after a few hundred miles of abuse, and I have an internal frame pack now which just doesn't have the room inside to fit a non-collapsible pad and everything else I need for solo hikes.
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>>1054612

I'm doing a Peruvian 5-day Trek into the Andes with a SPOSN Gorka-S (pic related) suit and just a nice Arxteryx fleece.

You guys thing this will be warm enough?
>>
>>1055999
Why not just strap to the outside?
>>
>>1056078
Get a real shell. That thing is cool and all but seriously, cotton kills.
>>
>>1055999
my internal frame backpack has two straps on the bottom which i can use to secure a tent or a sleeping pad conveniently
>>
>>1056191
>>1056196

I mean, I could. This pad's just also not as comfy as it used to be so I'm mostly looking for an excuse to upgrade
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>>1056194
have to agree with anon
peruvian andes literally perched above rainforests
I have like 5 or so sets of liners and fleece or down layers, and thats just for unpredictable southern ohio winters
>>
>>1056194
>>1056217

You mean for water? I intend to wear an Arcteryx fleece underneath and will carry a poncho for when it really pours. I just like the idea of the flexibility and breath-ability of cotton canvas.

The SPOSN Gorka S is also lined, so it's not like some of the cheaper models and is generally heavier.
>>
What trekking poles should I get for $100 or less for thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail?
>>
>>1056260
For only 100, then I would suggest something aluminum that will last the entire trip. I have about 500 miles on my Leki ultralights, no shock absorbers, and they're holding up great.

If you have more money, then go with carbon fiber. Budget for 2 sets of poles, and consider the fixed length poles at gossamer gear. Very light and a pleasure to swing, but treat them as consumables.
>>
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>>1054982
>What is everyone's preferred cookware?
I don't have found anything I like yet.
>>1055030
>and titanium 1.6l pot and 450ml mug.
Which 1.6l pot? There's hundreds of ~.5l things, but any size to actually do something seems hard to find.
Its all either really small solo-hiker-wheight-wankery or huge group-camp stuff.
I just want something a bit bigger than 1 liter, so that two hungry adults can eat from one round of cooking.
There are some in this size, but those are always in triple sets (2 pots, 1 pan, WTF would I need a second pot for? that's just 30€ that are collecting dust) and they have always this wide and low form, like pic related, which sucks for packing.
That said:
Apart from the form and the less than optimal lid (it does not serve as a pan and it also does not serve as a colander, neither as a plate nor cutting board), this set was quite nice, especially for its price.
>>
>>1056445
but something in this form factor seems much more practical.

Or am I mistaken and just suck at packing?

And why is this stuff so expensive in Europe?
I see a nice littel snow peak Ti set on Rei that would exactly do what I'd want to, for $60, and on the Euro shops, I would have to get €100 worth of stuff to get something close to it.
>>
>>1056222
The concern isn't just outward water but your own perspiration. If you get that thing wet it could ruin your trip.
>>
>>1056416
Seconding this guy's recommendation of Leki poles. The aluminum ones are tough as nails and leki warranties em for life.
>>
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I have a brand new out the bag outback oilskin poncho that I just used for the first time today. I plan on using it in my hikes in the rain, at work, at the ranch etc. I purchased it for the rugged look and for rugged use. It's fresh and I have not done anything to it and it stopped all the water perfectly, everything beaded right off. I only had one big issue! My face and arms were all greasy from the oils in the hood and as a clean freak that bothered the fuck outta me. It felt like I had not showered for months.

Is there a proper way to remove some of that excess oil residue without ruining its water resistant properties or do I just have to be uncomfortable everytime I use it? I was thinking maybe letting it sit out a day during a light rain or maybe a cloudy day with a nice breeze, I'm not sure what's the proper protocal for these oilskins tho. I definetly dont want it in the wash and getting stripped of the water resistant properties.

What do you guys think? Advice appreciated from Oilskin apparel owners.
>>
>>1056514
>he fell for the oilskin meme
...
Sorry man I actually don't know shit about oilskin. Condolences. Try to rub it off with some coarse cloth maybe or hang it to dry, maybe the oil will harden with air contact. Water is unlikely to remove the oil.
>>
>>1056194
they're a 50/50 cotton poly blend.
>>
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I want to use machete instead of an axe to cut small tree branches, thought Gerber Gator is a good one until I read some comments.
Any recommendations for machete?
>>
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>>1056646
CONDOR
O O
N D
D N
O O
RODNOC
>>
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>>1056659
Truper is a total trash, I take it?
>>
>>1056662
Generally speaking, anything with a saw-back is mall ninja tier quality. That being said, my cousin got a Truper machete when he was about 6 and it's still going strong. He's probably ground off 1/4" of the edge from sharpening.
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>>1056678
>anything with a saw-back is mall ninja tier quality
So, now I need a machete and a saw. Also, no Condors sold here, kek. Any details I should watch to spot a bad tool?
>>
>>1054911
Can you German a turd tho?
>>
>>1056683
If you aren't familiar with the brand, avoid handles without a clearly visible full tang. Stay away from mystery steel as well. I'd say to avoid stainless steel, but it does have it's uses, particularly in humid climates. Truper is actually a fairly good option for the price range, as well as Tramontina, but they are fundamentally cheap machetes. What country are you in, anon? It would help to know what the local blade market is like.
>>
>>1056692
Russia. I googled little so far but I already see there are not so much vendors out there.
>>
>>1056696
Ah, yes. Russia seems to like it's axes a lot more than machetes. If you can't find any machetes, look into Leukus. The Saami use them for exactly what you were mentioning. I'm also pretty sure that Varusteleka ships to Russia, so maybe check what they have on their website.
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>>1056709
Maybe I should take a look at smaller axes, too.
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>>1056719
Axes are definitely more versatile, but nothing beats a good machete for limbing trees.
>>
>>1056416
Thanks
>>
Can anyone talk to me about water filters?
They vary widely in price and are pretty heavy.
Are they worth it, or is it only good for longer trips, where they'll be lighter than the additional fuel I'd need for simply cooking a few liters of water?
>>
>>1057321
Sawyer Mini is the /out/ approved filter. Using it is fucking brainless, it weighs under 3 oz, and it can be bought for less than $20 at any walmart.
>>
>>1057346
>Sawyer Mini i
Seems like this is also available at euro-amazon.
Damn, that thing is light and cheap!
Where's the catch?
>>
>>1057362
>Where's the catch?
Does anyone know if there are fakes of it around? EU amazon only sells it via third parties, none of which look particularily trustworthy, and there are quite a few
>drank some water filtered with it
>became ill
1 star reviews, and not all of them are by obvious idiots.
>>
How should I be planning my meals for a first time multi day hike anons? I've been fasting on purpose for a while because I realize my meal planning will be shit. Was thinking of something like :

>Breakfast: sugar and startup stuff like instant coffee, oatmeal and some just add water nutrient stuff

>Lunch: something with lots of salt, unsure really

>snacks: something like peanut butter, crackers, naan bread

>dinner: probably heaviest meal of the day. I want to kinda just get those "just add water" types but they're ridiculously expensive

Right now I've been thinking about just eating constantly so as to spread out the calorie intake (this would in turn reduce the size of the "main" meals) so that I'm just snacking everyday of the trip. Also kind of in the dark on how to do it cheaply, I've never done calorie counting and I've been told to do 2500 a day minimum. The hike isn't so bad itself (just long with almost no elevation gain), any advice?
>>
Getting together some gear to go backpacking (not sure if thats the right word traveling on foot till we find a nice spot then setting up for the night) this is some of the gear I've managed to put together, what am I missing, what should I change?
already own
>knife, mora
>axe
>saw
>hand torch

having trouble posting images to 4chan

https://imgur.com/a/xQnIL
>>
>>1056557
For me, I don't care if it's just 2% cotton, it is 100% disqualified. Aside from the very real hypothermia concern, cotton is just a royal pain once it gets wet. Feels bad and can't dry it out short of full sunlight.
Get something that you can just wring out and be wearable. The synthetics do stink, but still slightly less than your dead body.
>>
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Jet boil or MSR for backpacking?

Locations: High Sierras, low sierras, foothills in and near sequoia national park

Time of year: 4 seasons preferably

Length of stays: anything from overnight to week long trips

Things I'd be making: heating water for coffee, dehydrated meals, and melting snow for drinking water
>>
>>1058029
>Getting together some gear to go backpacking (not sure if thats the right word traveling on foot till we find a nice spot then setting up for the night)
Could probably also be called hiking or something, but your description seems quite understandable.
>this is some of the gear I've managed to put together, what am I missing, what should I change?
>already own
>>knife, mora
>>axe
>>saw
>>hand torch
Well, how about a backpack, to carry it all + a sleeping bag and matress and maybe some cover (e.g. tent)?
Since you are listing a knife, an axe AND a saw, this seems like you want to built a fucking cabin or have a bonfire.
First, you should make sure that this is actually legal at your intended area and if it is, think about if that really is a wise choice (forrest fires, but even without causing one, you probably will leave a giant "footprint").
How about a canister stove for a fire (they are available for really cheap and quite a lot lighter than an axe) for a start.
>>
>>1058010
My standart eating for multi-day hikes goes as this:
Breakfast:
Musli/oatmeal mix with added milk power and sugar, packed in small, meal sized plastic bags. I just add cold water and eat it from the bag. Alternatively I eat it from a cup and make tea or coffee in it afterwards, so I don't have to wash it.

Lunch:
Depends on the trip, but often compact and lasting bread with things like peanut butter, driet/smoked sausage or pesto on.

Dinner:
Usually differet variations of the same: Fry some lasting and compact meat (smoked, dried, sausage etc.) in oil to give fat and protein. Add water and either soup powder, boullion cube, vegetables depending on the dish. When it biols add rice, bulgur, couscous or other carbs. This is quick and easy, and you only have to use one pot.

In between the meals I carry some snacks like nuts and rasins, chocolate or musli-bars. On some trips I don't take a lot of time for luch, in which case it just consists of even more snacks
>>
>>1058199
Literally the same thing
>>
>>1058300
the MSR pocket rocket isn't the same thing, and it weighs a lot less but uses more fuel. I am leaning more towards the jet boil.
>>
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post a pic of your pack on an outing you sub human forest tourists.
>>
>>1058244
thanks for the help, I'm in the UK and plan on wild camping I've found a spot I like where wild camping is illegal but accepted kinda thing - also checkout the imgur link to see some of the gear I plan on buying if you don't mind
>>
>>1054612
As far as the emergency trash bag ponchos go, who makes the best? Any that come in different colors?
>>
>>1058301
Diff anon, but I have one of the sub $10 Chinese ones and I only use it once a day for dinner boiling water. I could use one of the standard fuel cannisters for 3 weeks easy possibly 4, though ive never spent that amount of continuous time /out/. Is fuel efficiency enough between the two to make that big if a deal or do you just use it frequently?
>>
>>1058888
>I'm in the UK and plan on wild camping I've found a spot I like where wild camping is illegal but accepted kinda thing
Keep in mind that this acceptance generally hinges on people camping staying low profile and not being dicks.
So unless its a site with an official fire pit (do you have those in the UK? They are quite common in some areas of Germany), I'd strongly recomend to not do a fire. And even if you can do, just some collected twigs and sticks ought to be enough, no need for an axe and a saw.

> - also checkout the imgur link to see some of the gear I plan on buying if you don't mind
I'm not trying to be an ass, but this looks like some underageb& living out his tacticool /k/ fantasy.
Apart from the stove and canister, everything seems like crap. Sure, it'll get the job done and will certainly serve you quite a few times, but it all looks tryhard tacticool.
And a (camo)bivy + kilometers of paracord + a groundsheet? WTF. Groundsheets make sense for ultralight and very expensive tents, to not wreck them at some casual outings, but your bivy tent is neither.
And your pack seems quite small.
And why do you buy a backpack anyways? Have you never been on hikes before? I'd strongly suggest to try a few hikes without a night out before, to see if that's actually your thing, before you "commit" to overnight gear.
>>
>>1058199
Look up the etek city stove off of amazon
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>>1054928
I have one of these too. My thing is that I wish it had a waist belt. Any ideas?
>>
>>1056646
Tramontina
>>
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>>1059072
I'd probably sew one on to the cloth bit at the bottom of the frame. That thing is tough as old boots though, so you might want to get some leather-working needles to do so.
>>
>>1058199
I'd get a multifuel stove if you'll be above 7000ft in winter, even the most cold friendly iso canisters don't do well when it's both high elevation and much below freezing.

I have and really like my MSR Whisperlite Universal
>iso/butane/specialty blend
>1lb propane bottles
>white gas
>ethanol
>petrol/methanol
>highway diesel
>kerosene
>rubbing alcohol
>drinking alcohol over 120 proof/60%
>>
>>1054612
Where do you acquire a high quality poncho from? I have a decent place to go innawoods but I require a nice sturdy poncho.
>>
How much of a meme is ultralight? I like the idea of not hauling around tons of weight, but I don't want to spend $100 to save grams. I'm looking at buying some beginner gear and getting into backpacking.
>>
>>1059508
Pretty big meme. If I had unlimited funds I would buy ultralight but I do not have enough money and I am still strong.
>>
>>1059508
It's become buzzword magic but shit, all it means is you can cut a few pounds off your pack. If you hike for a while and find that pack weight is a limiting factor in the quality of your hike, sure, go ultralight. But unless you're some sort of ultra(wo)manlet, you'll be able to steam up and down the hills with normal gear. Either way, you shouldn't just jump into backpacking or any activity and buy expensive gear right away - once you get used to your gear, there will be features you wish you had or could do without. Just get the most basic stuff until you have a sense of what you do and don't want from your gear.

And be sure to save up your rancid trail gas, only releasing it after passing a stick-legged ultralighter.
>>
>>1056078
I have the same used a water resistant spray on it and it worked fine up in co
>>
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Does anybody have any experience with The Kilimanjaro backpacks, I found one on Ebay that I like but I'm not sure it'll be my first pack so I'm kinda going for something used to get it cheaper

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Rare-World-Famous-The-Kilimanjaro-No-229-External-Frame-Backpack-Hiking-/322572724138?hash=item4b1ad527aa:g:pVsAAOSwMvtZVXxH
>>
>>1059572
I'm a manlet (5'6") so I figured I could get away with smaller/ lighter shit.
Definitely wasn't going to get top-of-the-line gear out of the gates. I was looking at /r/ultralight's (Sorry for reddit) recommended pack list and a lot of it seemed reasonably priced.
https://lighterpack.com/r/776crf
Anything particularly shit about the stuff on the list? Would I be able to get set up for significantly cheaper than the stuff listed there? Not significantly committed to the ultralight concept, just figure that a lighter bag would make it easier to punch out miles.
>>
>>1059458
Hmm. Good idea. I was thinking of doing some flap like thing to secure it.
>>
>>1059508
$1000 will get you a complete set of quality ultralight gear that would last for several hundred days on the trail. Saving 5 or ten pounds on your pack and making it so you can hike further and not be exhausted. You don't need to go ultralight, maybe light. Don't be a gramweeny be an ounce weenie. It helps to make a spreadsheet and weigh things on a kitchen scale
>>
>>1054928

>The way it's built makes me think I'll be able to hand it down to my grand-children pretty easily.

Will it be in the original packaging with the hang tags?
>>
>>1059891
Considering it came issued, no. Not that the Norwegian army does anything these days tho.
>>
What are some good large packs for backpacking?
>>
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>>1060041
80 LBS OF TOOOOOOOOLLSSSSSSSS
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>>1060073
Nice
>>
>>1060073
Where to buy pls
>>
>>1060073
This is probably just the EDC pack of some anons here with all their medicine and tourniquets and portable dialysis equipment and whatnot (you never know when you might need to create an apicoaortic conduit for yourself in field conditions).
>>
>>1060147
>Assblasted ultra lite manlet detected
Sorry about your 10 year old girl physique broseph.
>>
When is a knife necessary to bring?
When is it not?
>>
>>1060190
>When is a knife necessary to bring?
Always
>When is it not?
Never
>>
>>1060190
Why would you ever not bring a knife? Muh grams?
>>
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>have like 4 great packs
>2 good rucks
>still want more

How do I stop myself?
>>
>>1060320
Run out of money. Then use all your backpacks to be the king of the homeless people.
>>
>>1056646
avoid saw back designs, they're not even real saws and limit your ability to baton or draw the blade
>>
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>>1060321
Can't forget the pouches
>>
Are wool blankets a meme, or a decent piece of gear?

I want one just as a permanent fixture in my kit, but too many reviews say the shedding and smell is unbearable. Right now I use a snugpak blanket which is nice and lightweight, but a little small and soulless, has that ultra synthetic feel as well.
>>
>>1060363
Why is everything meme this, meme that these days? Where are all these people memeing about wool blankets?

I have a massive, thick Pendleton wool blanket and portuguese flannel sheets on my bed at home. It's the coziest setup in the world. But that shit is way too heavy to be lugging around. You'd have to compromise a lot of warmth and size to get a packable wool blanket. How much are you willing to carry? Just upgrade your /in/ setup mate
>>
>>1054612
Duct tape and old towels wrapped around shitty current straps might help, but that's just my two cents.
>>
>>1060193
In all seriousness, apart from chopping cheese, a job that I could do with my teeth, most of what I use a knife for could be done with a pair of decent scissors.
>>
>>1059508
You don't have to spend loads to get a base weight of <9lb. Your biggest expense will probably be your sleeping system. At least that was mine. I went with a down quilt which cost me ~£250 but IMO was worth every penny. My shelter is a glorified tarp which new costs around £180 but I got second hand for half price, it's simple and so far has stood up to some pretty bad weather. In total my kit definitely cost me <£1000. https://lighterpack.com/r/2gg0as
>>
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>>1060374
>Where are all these people memeing about wool blankets?
Guilty as charged.
>>
What is an absolute cheapo pack I can get for 2-3 day backpacking trips?
>>
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>>1060600
>>
>>1060374
I gotcha. I might just repurpose a fleece blanket. Super warm, light, big, and only 9.99 for a replacement. If I had a decent bivvy it would be viable for anything but the dead of winter. Right now I use a woodland camo one that the US army issues, was free when supply cage got cleaned out.

It's nice, but heavy and bulky. Are there lightweight replacements that can come close to the low low price of free?
>>
>>1060606
pls
>>
>>1060638
How cheap is cheap? 100 dollars is cheap to me, for instance.
>>
>>1060639
I'd prefer a pack in the $60-$80 range, although $100 is tolerable for something that'll last me a long time.
>>
>>1060641
OK, we've got the price range, now what style do you want? Modern daypack? Tactical daypack? Milsurp? Backpack?
>>
>>1060641
I've heard good things about the Teton Sports backpacks, though I tend to be wary of anything cheaper than around $80.

https://www.amazon.com/Sports-Internal-Backpack-Backpacking-Camping/dp/B000F34ZKS/ref=sr_1_1?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1487455884&sr=1-1&keywords=teton+backpack
>>
>>1060643
Not entirely sure. I'm assuming milsurp is going to be heavy but last forever. If that's the case, probably not. I'm not sure of the difference between tactical or modern daypack. Most likely just looking for a backpack to hold the standard shit needed for a single person for 3 days at a price intersection that I can use it a decent number of times and it isn't complete trash.
>>1060648
That looks pretty nice. I'll look into it more, thanks.
>>
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>>1060651
In addition to that, I'd recommend the army assault pack. It's medium weight, very robust construction, super comfy straps and belt, nigh infinite storage, expandable via pouches, customizable with molle, the only downside is the camo. I'd never bring it to school or work outside the army
>>
>>1060681
Bummer that you can only get it in camo. Would be awesome in olive drab or black. Remarkably cheap for what it is, though.
>>
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>>1060740
A-A-Aflie? Is that you, you wannabe smart cunt?
>>
>>1060722
Many people have had success dying them, I just haven't bothered. Theoretically, 40 dollars for an acu bag shipped, maybe 30 dollars for the stuff to dye it, so the question is simply if you'd pay 70ish dollars for a black/od/tan assault pack.
>>
>>1060742
Isn't Alfie's bag black? Just to be safe though,

>>1060740
ALFIE MAKE MORE VIDEOS YOU LAZY SUBHUMAN.
>>
>>1060746
Yeah I think you're right. Last thing I heard about him was that he's joining the UK Air Force.
>>
>>1060749
Really? That would explain why he went missing.
>>
>>1060742
>>1060746
Not alfie, just another britbong, sorry dudes
>>
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>>1056445
I use a Trangia system, works real nice. I can fit extra foldable cutlery and shit inside and the trap is a really nice touch because I can strap it to the outside of my pack
>>
>>1054928
Norway's version of the BW Alpine rucksack

Its not anything like the ALICE
>>
>>1060606
I bought one of these for the lols

Its even worse than described
>>
>>1061014
Not in design, but in practice it's basically the same. Fun fact: the Norwegian army pack was the first mass produced backpack with an external frame.

>>1061017
Tell me, anon. Regale me with your stories.
>>
>>1060643
Medium Alice Pack with frame, an LK35, or a used Kelty bag.

All of the above are $20-60 and will last longer than your lifetime.
>>
>>1061017
Varusteleka mentioned that the quick-release buckles like to just fall off, but they actually have no tension in them and won't stay on unless you pick the bag up upside down before putting it on.

The 'drawstring' is an actual string and the gromets are almost completely rusted out

And worst of all: it doesn't smell bad like they promised it would >:(
>>
>>1061022
>>1061025
I replied to myself by mistake
>>
>>1056260
Just find a stick in nature and customize it gear queer faggot
>>
>>1060606
>potato sack with a strap $8 lol
>>
>>1056260
I got a pair of gram counter carbon poles for ~£50. They are great. I use them to pitch my tent as well and they have held up.
>>
>>1060641
Find out your size and then buy a used Osprey off ebay.
>>
>>1061025
>>1061027
Huh. Still seems like a pretty good meme purchase for 8 bucks. Too bad about the lack of stink tho.
>>
Osprey Talon 22 or Rush 12 for daypack?

The Talon sounds nice and lightweight for scrambling but the Rush fulfills my inawoods fantasies. Ty in advance.
>>
>>1061389
Osprey by a mile.
>>
>>1061396
Any particular reason why?
>>
Any recommendations for a good pair of shorts for fishing/kayaking?
>>
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>>1058815
>>
>>1061398
Better warranty, lighter, more comfortable, and better suited for hiking.
>>
>>1061363
Oh I'm happy with it: its everything I was hoping for it to be, and even worse!

It'd be great for yardwork though: could put bush clippings/sticks/mulch in it and not give a damn about if it gets dirty
>>
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>thanks to /out/'s advice I get my 3day pack weight down from 20kg to 17Kg (including 3litres of water)
>recently go on trip with tramping club members
>their packs only weight 12kgs
>everyone is my /fit/ness level or higher
>I lag behind everyone
>Measure my pack after trip
>14kgs (2litres of water)
>I somehow packed and ate 2kgs of food!
>cheese 250g, salami 300g, pita bread 8*50g =400g, energy bars 7*40 = 280g, can of tuna 2*185g = 370g, Mac and Cheese 4*70 = 280g, porridge packets 4*40g = 160g, drink packets 2* 50 = 100g
>TOTAL: 2.14KG
>I ACTUALLY ATE 2KG'S OF FOOD!

How to reduce food weight?
>>
So I have a framed bivy tent (like a regular bivy but some poles keep the fabric off your skin, I've tried sleeping just in that but not having anything pressed against my skin make it hard to sleep so my question is sleeping bag vs 100% wool blanket? I prefer being too cold to too hot currently leaning towards a 100% wool blanket but I'm unsure
>>
>>1061979
dehydrated food, then get water from a river mix with food and boil
>>
looking for a budget day backpack. must fit in bigger one if necessary
>>
Change in food:
>2 tuna cans removed - 370g
>8 pita breads removed - 400g
>4 mac and cheese removed - 280g
>6 slices of cheese removed - 125g
>6 tortillas added + 276g
>2 packs of different mac and cheese + 170g
New Total: 1.41KG
>>1061990
I don't see how it would make much of a difference as it would only affect my breakfast and dinner which are already dried foods (porridge and mac and cheese)
>>
>>1061991
Get yourself an Outdoor Products™ Quest® Daypack from Walmart. Been using one for about a year and a half and for the price it's great.
>>
>>1061988
Wool is great, but only if you can carry and afford it. Compared to a sleeping, wool is super expensive and super heavy.
>>
I want to get a cheap flashlight (in Europe, if anyone interested) that would be useful in general wild camping/fucking around in the wilds/urban territories at night. I'm pretty sure I should be looking for LED one with changeable batteries, may consider a headlamp.
Any ideas?
>>
>>1061979
Get more /fit/
git gud faget

Or just eat before you go out or something.
>>
>>1055976

>folding stove
>with PLASTIC canteen
>>
>>1062037
>hat would be useful in general wild camping/fucking around in the wilds/urban territories at night. I'm pretty sure I should be looking for LED one with changeable batteries
Yes
>may consider a headlamp.
Yes
unless you have very specific needs, non-headlamp lamps are just a waste of money when out.
And cheap depends on what you deem cheap.
>>
Whats an acceptable weight range for an overnight hike pack?
>>
>>1062059
Depends what Western Europe/USA considers cheap, I live in Poland and I have seen some cheapo headlamps for about 20 PLNs (five dollars?) in local shop. I guess it should be enough for few days as I see if wild camping is for me.
>>
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Hi There! Could you please tell me the exact model of these? They have a Vibram sole and gore-tex
>>
>>1061979
Get more calorie dense food.

Dehydrate the food.

Get rid of unnecessary packaging.

Go /out/ in areas where water is readily available, so you dont have to carry it.
>>
>>1061979
Freeze dried lunch and dinner and breakfast x 3 days: each pack ca. 120 grams. That is 1.08 kg. Add some nuts and chocolate raisins and you'll be at 1.4kg and will eat way better than with your tortillas and cheese.

Methinks your bag has additional heavy stuff. What else do you carry,?
>>
>>1055976
Condor bottle bag
>>
Anyone know of a 50L to 65L pack with a rifle mount, and molle? I'm looking for a hiking/hunting pack for this fall and winter.
>>
>>1062127
>>>/k/34570605
>>
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Just got one of these, now I'm shopping for a sleeping bag and a bear canister.

Anyone here have experience with using bear canisters in the Sierra Nevadas?

The Garcia seems to be the better choice, as I've heard a few stories of the black bears here getting into the BV500.
>>
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>>1062098
I guess you're right. Freeze dried food is kinda expensive here though.
>>1062111
My bag is 3kg with a roll of tp, mini toothbrush and hip pocket.
>>1062040
yeah, I think I should stop being a bitch and get more /fit/.
>>
>>1062250
That's the same price it is anywhere in the US if you aren't buying it in bigger quantities. Look for Mountain House stuff at Wal mart, Amazing, Costco, etc. You can get it down to 6 bucks for 500-550 calories
>>
Is it possible to get a 20f sleeping bag that doesn't weigh as much as an anchor or cost $200+?
>>
>>1062265
No
>>
>>1062273
rats
>>
>>1061995
Then start focusing on finding good calorie dense food to dehydrate rather than KD.
>>
I need a cheap backpack that can carry 45 lbs of water or something for weight training. Any suggestions?
>>
>>1062282
I'm literally looking at buying two bags asap and I'm just gonna spend the 250-300 on either a REI Igneo or Big Agnes Lost Ranger
>>
>>1062265
>tfw i have a -9C Marmot sleeping bag I picked up for a bargain at a second-hand store
>weighs 1.7kg
>have to strip down naked have all zippers open to sleep in it.
>>
>>1062127
if it has molle, you can put a rifle mount on it.
>>
lol you all buy gear.. try making your own you fucking modernised good for nothing idiots..
>>
>>1062410
Post your home-made backpack, knife, boots, and sleeping bag then, mister /diy/.
>>
>>1062097
https://www.exploreoutdoors.co.uk/the-north-face-men-s-hedgehog-fastpack-lite-gtx-t0cdg3-6086.html

google is your friend, anon.
>>
got an entire sleep system from a carboot for £30, good as new anyway gave the tent an overnight test and it either filled with condensation or it isn't rainproof really don't want to ditchs the tent so what're my options?

plan on getting waterproofing spray and a tarp
>>
>>1062470
What
>>
>>1062481
if my tent isn't rainproof and I don't want to get a new tent what are my options in terms of making my current tent rainproof
>>
>>1062483
Tarp over it or new tent. No other magic.
>>
>>1062518
ah tarp it is nice one
>>
WTF is my 5 ft tall wife supposed to buy for a bag? Why are all the smallest hi-tier bags meant for women 3-4 inches over the average height for a woman in the US?
>>
>>1062562
Talking sleeping bags here
>>
>>1059498
MLD make some awesome ponchos
>>
>>1062562
Look at enlightened equipment or one of the smaller companies they tend to have a pretty wide range of sizes available. The prices tend to reflect the smaller amount of material used as well.
>>
so im going to go backpacking soon and i was looking at sleeping pads but they all seem to big or heavy. should i just suck it up and use a cheap foam pad.
>>
>>1062782
Get a thermarest Z light sol. It's reasonably priced, bomb proof, and the accordion fold means it won't roll up on you while you sleep.
>>
>>1060648
I have this exact pack. It's not bad at all honestly. I don't expect it to last forever, but it's done a good 4 trips with about 80lbs of gear no problem.
>>
Why the fuck has this pack disappeared? It's almost impossible to find for sale and I think Fjallraven stopped making them. It's such a nice pack with every feature I need for a decent price, where did it go /out/, and where can I find one?
>>
>>1063813
well, Varusteleka has the similar Finnish military Savotta Border Patrol 35L pack, if you can't scrounge up one of those. Basically the same,minus the fox on the top
>>
are those decathlon quechua tents a shit?
Was gifted one and i plan to use it soon, but i have no idea how it works

Does it need one of those mats to lay under?
It doesn't seem to come with one
Will it stay up by itself or do i need dowels?
>>
>>1063875
Why not just try setting it up now before you need to use it?
>>
Hey /gear/, what is the best overall waterproof boot. I'm asking for something that's lightweight, comfortable, waterproof (duh), and potentially insulated. So far, I've found a few Gore-Tex ones that might be worth the buy, but I can't find any on my budget. I'd consider dishing out the money if it has the /out/ stamp of approval, but obviously I don't want to drop 250+ dollars on a leap of faith.
>>
I have a pair of boots with gore tex and insulation. Worn them through about six winters. Anyway, I also got a pair of waterproof, insulated socks from "HANZ." Is it a bad idea to wear both together? Will I be creating a sandwich of cold/moisture outside of the sock but inside of the boot, or something?
>>
>>1063897
Read some professional reviews and pay attention to things that they talk about in general about shoes. Go to a reputable outfitter and try shit on to decide.
>>1063935
Wearing two membranes together like that is going to turn your poor feet into sweaty little clams. They won't be able to breathe. Better to use one or the other but both at once will be trading wet from the outside for wet from the inside.
>>
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Bike Trailer, I've got one.

Sometimes backpacks alone just don't cut it.
>>
Can I hear the story behind the OP pic?
>>
>>1063987
Anon from previous thread posted his /out/ bag. The contents of which included like 6 ponchos, so some other anon got all huffy and told him to stop carrying so many ponchos. The idea is that I take a notable thing from every thread to base a new OP image on.
>>
>>1063979
The heck do you use this for? Bikepacking?
>>
>>1063994
If possible, I rather go by bike than walk. The trailer is usually loaded with tent, sleeping bag, clothes, chair+table, food containers, tools, water etc.
>>
>>1062518
>>1062519

Also what I do. Get a large enough tarp to lay down first, pitch tent on tarp then fold the rest of the tarp over the tent to rain proofing. Then the bottom of your tent doesn't get muddy or shit on it.
>>
In need of gear suggestions that are around 50'ish USD each for a good axe and knife that are sturdy enough to survive extended periods of daily wilderness survival tasks. Had my eye on the Mora Bushcraft, but I wasn't sure if there were something more appropriate for my circumstances. Don't plan on batoning with it, mostly just intend to whittle, process calorie vectors, and do normal appropriate knife cutting type things.
>>
what gear do I need for day hiking in southern california, specifically orange county
>>
>>1063875
this: >>1063888
and yes, you will need "one of those mats", but you won't need "dowels", unless you have to pitch it under very specific conditions.

Seems like you are really clueless. What are you planning to do? Wouldn't want you to turn into an accident report.
>French teen starves in shrubbery outside a banlieu.
>a thread about foraging on a szechuan-sock-puppeting enthusiast webiste was the last thing authorities recovered from his phone
>>
>>1063897
>'m asking for something that's lightweight, comfortable, waterproof (duh), and potentially insulated. So far, I've found a few Gore-Tex ones that might be worth the buy,
Gore-Tex is nice and really works, but it is not really durable. After a few years, the membrane will be fucked.
If the boot has leather uppers, you can just treat it like a normal leather boot, and still get it water proof the ordinary way, but if you got artificial stuff (lightweight!), you are going to get wet.
>>
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>>1064077
Going campind with friends on the alps
In a campground
Just never used a tent before

I have pic related, is it good enough?

Gonna go out on the hills and try to open and close the tent a few times to familiarize myself with it
>>
>>1064084
>In a campground
So you probably wont die…

What you posted is supposed to be used as a (heavy) groundsheet to protect your fancy (or leaky) tent floor from wear and dirt, or tarp to have a roofed "social area" between tents.
It'll provide zero insulation or comfort.
In summer you can skip the matress, but it'll likely be a shitty night. Your sleeping bag won't do anything for your ground contact, since its insulation will be compressed by your wheight.
A 5€ foam mat will easily give enough insulation for summer. Those aren't really comfy, but until the advent of self-inflatable mats, that used to be the standard and good enough.
>>
>>1064135
I have a comfy bag with self inflatable mattress
Can you show me what i should use for insulation?
>>
>>1064136
>Can you show me what i should use for insul
Just use your self inflatable matress.
Your posts made it sound like you had none and are wondering if that is OK.
It's probably going to some random decathlon thing too?
If so, you are fine. Those suck for things where wheight is crucial and some really cold winter situations (slept on one of those in a glacier once - never had I such a cold back before), but for general campsite use they are perfectly fine.
>>
>>1064001
Why do you do this to youself? I have done long biking trips and if youre going somewhere with roads to ride that thing on you wont need all the shit you pile in it. For me a trailer sucks all the fun out of biking, even more so than 4 bags mounted on the bike. Why would you sacrifice all your manoeuverability just to have a table everywhere you go?
>>
Im looking for outdoor pants on a budget in europe. Is there something like current meme pants most people like?
I need them for hiking, festivals and cycling short distances in shoddy weather to have a drink with the lads. I lift and have big short legs, so something flexible or wide would be good. They dont need to be full on waterproof but they should be able to withstand light rain or like 15mins of real rain.
Is there something like this for under 60 euros? thanks a lot
>>
>>1064143
>why?
Because I can! Actually it's not really different to hiking, just faster, more comfy and I can have double to tripple the load.

>manoeuverability
yeah, there are downs to it too but I'm still okay with it so no problems there.
>>
>>1064146
Ok, if you see it as an alternative to hiking and dont compare it to biking without a trailer I can see the appeal. Could you help me with this>>1064144
>>
>>1064144
I think any of the following will do:
https://www.asmc.com/Clothing/Men/3-Line-clothing/Wet-weather-trousers

The cheapest I found is:
https://www.asmc.com/Clothing/Men/3-Line-clothing/Wet-weather-jackets/Rain-Suit-Nylon-olive-green-p.html

However I just planed on buying some myself and didn't test anything yet. However, there are often reviews that at least give some assistance.
>>
>>1064149
>https://www.asmc.com/Clothing/Men/3-Line-clothing/Wet-weather-jackets/Rain-Suit-Nylon-olive-green-p.html

Yeah I suspected I'd have to go with milsurp stuff. Im a bit unsure about which exact ones to get however, as the reviews are kinda short and unhelpful plus I already once tried getting some bundeswehr pants and the fit was just awful, like skinny jeans and hella stiff.
>>
>>1064144
Depending on where you live, you might want to take a look at the Bundeswehr-style pants by Leo Köhler. They cost 40-50€ if I recall correctly, are made from cotton moleskin and while not completely waterproof out of the box, they are pretty hard to get wet - and a little Wax will get them completely waterproof. The are cut rather loosely (I'm 1,75m 95kg, muscular, and they are actually to loose around my thighs and groin - all other pants I've got are to tight there even if the waistband is already loose enough to slip of).
Problem is that they are rather warm (only comfortable until 20°C in the woods or 10°C in the sun for me, but I sweat rather quickly) and have a weird sizing system (modified BW sizes, which are different from any other sizing system - definitely try them on first or get a reliable size table. BW size 8 is LK 7, but I'm not sure about the others).
>>
>>1064078
Goretex is warrantied for life.
>>
>>1064163
thanks, gonna have a look at those. Any recommendations for not as warm pants? Im in Germany btw
>>
>>1062186
lmao your pack must be so heavy.
>>
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>>1058815
found a better pic. on blood mountain, around Easter this year
>>
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>>1064176
bottom left. here's my stuff. total weight is 7 pounds
>>
>>1055976
Probably >>1062120, but you can find made in china versions of those reasonably cheap (~US$10) on ebay.
Search for "water bottle pouch", maybe add "tactical" somewhere.

>>1062041
If it's the set, the plastic canteen comes with an aluminium cup.
Just like the american version with the green canteen and the cup with the butterfly handle.
>>
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I want to get some military surplus gear to carry /out/

Right now I have a russian gas mask since I go into abandoned buildings occasionally. I wear it normally anyway because it freaks people out.

Any other suggestions for military surplus items that'd be good to have? There's a store near me that carries a lot of old WW2-era shit for cheap.
>>
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>>1064461
Buy a helmet and make soup in it
>>
>>1064177
I just can't understand how you get such low weights
>>
>>1062562
>WTF is my 5 ft tall wife supposed to buy for a bag?
a childs sleeping bag perhaps?
>>
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>tfw stopped caring about the ultralight meme
I don't care that my pack weighs 19kg full anymore.
>>
>>1064479
well none of the main things weigh just at a pound or so. Tent is 16 ounces, sleeping bag is 18 ounces
>>
>>1064719
Good lad. Spread the gospel.
>>
Is buying an army surplus tarp worth it as a beginning UL camper? Or should I get an entry level consumer tarp?
>>
>>1064461
>Right now I have a russian gas mask since I go into abandoned buildings occasionally.

Be careful nigga I read somewhere that old russian shit is uselss now and do not protect you if it's past expiration date.
>>
>>1064719
>40lb
I'm not aiming for ultralight but my pack is 20lb with water and food - is this good for camping in the UK? what's the average?
>>
>>1064722
*all of
>>
>>1064719
you would after a month or so. what's the longest you've hiked nonstop? UL is taking over long distance trails. If you're doing a lazy fatass 1week trip then sure, have a heavy pack and bring lots of camp crap because you sure as hell aren't hiking, might as well have fun sitting around
>>
>>1064461

Surplus gasmasks are only good for LARPing and kinky sex with your boyfriend, if you're concerned about abandoned buildings sperg out for a 3M respirator.
>>
>>1064880
The general rule with milsurp is that you get increased quality at a lower price, but with increased weight. Army stuff isn't usually designed to be carried for longer than maybe an hour or two, so not good for ultralighters.
>>
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Hey /out/, any experience with Danner East Ridge boots? The sole looks thinner than that on my Danner Acadias. Are they as tight in the toes as the Acadias seem to be?
>>
>>1065042
Thanks for the advice anon!
>>
>>1061979
Anyone know where in the world that feelguy is backpacking?
>>
>>1065049
do these run big/small? how do you ike em?
>>
>>1064265
>>1055976

Don't buy these

reuse smart water or powerade water bottles
>>
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Bought a Rain jacket at Kathmandu. It was on """sale""" for $200NZD. It will replace my Ridgeland rainjacket which isn't breatheable. I picked this jacket because of its colours.
>>
>>1054933

They won't help with the weight, but they'll alleviate some of the sensation of the straps 'cutting' into your shoulders that leather tends to bring with it.
>>
>>1064894
Gas masks with expired filters do NOTHING to protect you from whatever is in the air.

Many people have no clue how to use a gas mask. They'll use it with a full beard and so on.
>>
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Hey guys, any advice for my gear? I want to try my first 1 night hike with my wife during our holiday vacation which is coming up in the Ardeche, France.

I dont want to spend a ton of cash until we tried this and enjoyed it. I will bring some food which wont require heating. If we are allowed to make a fire i will bring some petrol-fire-starter blocks and some firestarters. I will only bring 3 headlights.1st aid kit pills are paracetamol and anti-shit pills. I am also bringing a dog along if that factors into anything.

Unsure what to do for a shelter.
>>
>>1066366
I'd recommend just buying a cheap 3 or 4 man tent depending on how big the dog is. I've heard good things about the Coleman Hooligan, though I don't have any personal experience with it.
>>
>>1066327
>>1064959
>>1064894

Don't worry, I don't use the original filters for it. I fitted modern filters to it
>>
>>1066587
>using Coleman for backpacking

oh lawd
>>
>>1066769
>1 night
I'm sure he drinks milk, does squats, and doesn't need a fuckin ultralight tent for a one night trip.
>>
>>1056447

Hidden taxes to support the welfare state. Not saying that's a bad thing, but if you want all that free healthcare, you have to pay for it somehow.
>>
>>1056686

Ever see German porn? That's like their national sport.
>>
>>1060363

A lot of things that are memes are memes for a reason. Don't dismiss something just because it's widely recommended.
>>
>>1065524
looks nice.
>>
>>1062562

These are high tier, which means low volume. So they try to get as much volume as they can to keep prices affordable by sizing it to fit 95% of their target market. That means average plus two standard deviations. Which is about what you found.

If you want smaller, prices go up considerably. At that point you might as well order custom.
>>
>>1061979
How the fuck you eat 7 energy bars? I eat one and I'm set for 4 hours. You need to train your body for endurance
>>
Is the DSCHX90 any good? looking for a hiking camera so things influencing my choice are
>compact
>zoom
>mini sun proof lens thing (viewfinder?)
>price (under £350)

planning on nature shots and some astro shots also can you turn off metadata in the options is that standard or will I have to strip it myself before uploading and archiving?
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>>1066825
Thanks anon. I really liked the colours, and I think more retailers should use natural tones.

But now I'm a little afraid about the fabric it uses; Pertex Shield+ and it's a 2.5 layer construction. I keep hearing it's not as durable as GoreTex and I am considering returning it and buying a Goretex Jacket.

Any anon's with rain jackets that use Pertex Shield+ and how their jacket's are holding up?
>>1065524
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>>1066855
They are not really energy bars, they are "muffin bars" which weigh 40grams each and have 600kJ ( 143 Calories) of energy.
Compare this to something like a Clif Bar which weighs 68grams and has 1040kJ (250 Calories) of energy. Also I ate the 7 bars over the course of three days; three on the first day, two on the second and two on the last day.
I buy muffin bars because they are usually cheaper, they have flavours I like such as pic and I don't like bars that have nuts.
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>>1067090
The membrane has little to do with durability. Durability depends most on construction type (2.5 vs 3 layer) and the denier count of the face fabric.
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>>1056222
Why not just use softshell
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Anyone got experience with Gorka field jackets? I like semi-milsurp stuff for /out/ing (durable and comfy as fuck) and I've been struggling to find a field jacket that suits my needs.

Main issue is I'm 5'8 and also 60kg (semi-pro cyclist so lolbodyfat) so most styles are massive on me.
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>>1064177
currently drooling
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>>1067397

The original Gorka 1 in OD/khaki + overalls. Apparently it is not well suited for hot weather (http://www.soviet-propaganda.com/index.php/gorka-od-ana-1158.html
+
http://www.soviet-propaganda.com/index.php/sizing-chart/)

You could always look into Hill People Gear's 'Wind Cheater' (https://www.hillpeoplegear.com/Products/CategoryID/4/ProductID/57)

or the First Spear's version (http://www.first-spear.com/product.php?productid=17899&cat=282&page=1)
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>>1067734
Hill People Gear's Windcheater
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>>1067734
and First Spear's Windcheater
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my sleeping bag stuff sack ripped because it is cheap. what is a good replacement stuff sack?
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>>1067090
>Thanks anon. I really liked the colours, and I think more retailers should use natural tones
You're welcome and yes I totally agree with you. There's a place for bright colors but I like natural ones the best.
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>>1067737
>>1067736
>>1067734
Thanks, will have a think about these.

The Gorka ones are a bit cheaper but I'm skeptical about ordering from places like that so maybe the First Spear one will be a better bet.
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>>1067776
ANA is actually a russian manufacturer that's very well known amongst russian reproductions enthusiasts, it seems.

Gear that comes from Russia is usually cheaper. For instance, pic related which is a softshell made by Gruppa99 is only ~130USD. If it was made in the US/EU it would probably cost twice that price.

http://www.gruppa99.com/collection/l5-softshelly/product/kurtka-l5
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>>1067759
Depends how big you need it. I've heard nothing but good things about the Sea to Summit stuff sacks, but they're getting a little bit hard to find these days.
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>>1067776
Also try the Outdoor Reasearch ferrosi. I have one in coyote brown and it's Ann awesome jacket.
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http://www.kathmandu.co.nz/mens/footwear/boots-and-gaiters/straven-men-s-ngx-leather-boots.html

Is this a good pair of hiking boots? They v are currently going for 160NZD which is a really good price here in kiwiland. I tried them on in the store and I don't really like how they look. Also they leather odds filled to the sole and the gule line is quite pronounced, especially compared to other boots. But they have the features off a 300 dollar boots so can someone help me decide?
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>>1056260
>Aluminum ski poles from goodwill
$2
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>>1057362
It clogs quickly and is impossible to clean. Backflowing is all you can do and it doesn't work very well. Also, the bags that come with it wear out quickly and it's a huge pain to squeeze a bag instead of using a pumping action. Lastly, since the filter only has ~ 1 inch surface area the clogging issue is exasperated compared to better filters.

That said, if you're only going out for a day or two it'll be fine.
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>>1068066
Oops.
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>>1067762
>>Thanks anon. I really liked the colours, and I think more retailers should use natural tones
>You're welcome and yes I totally agree with you. There's a place for bright colors but I like natural ones the best.
I have the opposite problem.
For climbing and mountaineering I prefer highly visible colors, but most stuff that fits me is either black or natural colors.
Or totally garish, bright yellows that will like shit (=natural colors…) after one use, because it just is a magnet to all kinds of dirt.

But the colors are the least of my problems. Just look at pic related. That's what I call an OK color. Bright enough to be visible, yet "normal" and dark enough for daily use without washing it daily.
And somewhat affordable and my most robust jacket so far was a blue mountain hardwear one, so I felt confident ordering it, after I only found crap in all the shops I went too. Everything is either ultralight and will start leaking after a year or two (but still costs €300+) or has the color issue mentioned above or is €500+ with a 3layer membrane, combined with 20 pockets, that are all fully membrane, leading to at least two full 3layer layers of fabric on the front of the jacket, which results in zero breathability. Also, the pockets are always placed such that they don'T work with a harness OR a backpack.
So when I looked at this thing and saw some mesh on the inside, I hoped that they'd done the pockets in the proper way. Still there for those that need them, but won't overheat me when I don't fucking need them.
But no…
That thing has additional mesh pockets only accessible from the inside AND the useless double membrane pockets on top. also, both pockets, outside and inside are virtually unusable with a harness or backpack.
And I specifically ordered it because it has vents on the arms. Turns out they placed them under the bicep, instead of the fucking armpits where you need them the most.
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>>1068425
The fact that it is comically oversized is just icing on the cake.
Ordered it the same size as my 2007 MH jacket, which was a tad big (need to fit a down jacket under it for winter use, so there is no way around it) and I need size L in most anyways since I have monkey arms, expecting it to be the same.
But nope. I can wear that thing with 3 down jackets and a backpack and still have space left over.
Fabric felt really robust at least…

So is there any fucking thing with OK colors, that will stay waterproof for at least 5 years and won't rip to pieces when I use it on rock and stuff it in a full pack and does not weight 1kg plus and is below €400?

All the big brands only care for the normie market that needs to look extreme while shopping at the indoor mall and even the "enthusiast" microbrands tend to fuck up.

Currently have a directalpine jacket (small czech brand) and it's crap.
Dirt magnet, the membrane failed after 3 years and it's asymetric zip is the worst zip I ever had. But it was only €350 and I have never seen one in the wild, so I guess it's exclusive…
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>>1068327
>It clogs quickly and is impossible to clean. Backflowing is all you can do and it doesn't work very well.
All the reviews I have read so far never see this as an issue. Only negative seems to be that you can't dry it.
Is that really an issue when you use it on "clean" (low turbidity) water where you just want to get rid of bacteria and not sediment?

>Also, the bags that come with it wear out quickly and it's a huge pain to squeeze a bag instead of using a pumping action.
Yeah, those are supposed to be shit, but that can be cheaply rectified. Apparently you can gravity operate it.

I'm not totally convinced, but it seems for my situation (only would need a filter once or twice a year) this is a better option than the much more expensive pumping fitlers.
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>>1068429
>So is there any fucking thing with OK colors, that will stay waterproof for at least 5 years
Something GoreTex with 3 Layers of construction like this kathmandu jacket.
http://www.kathmandu.co.nz/mens/clothing/jackets-and-vests/blackburn-gore-texr-jacket-men.html

I am still considering returning my jacket and getting it >>1065524
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>>1056709
You know I sorta remember seeing a thing about plain living russians that had machetes from south America, maybe look into how they got ahold of them.
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>>1068433
But the jacket you pictured suffers from most of the issues I just described.

>huge useless pockets, which according to their website are probably also lined
>mud color
and it's got one of those useless removable hoods
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>>1068369
Dammit the laces aren't the same length. Should I return the boots for laces of the same length?
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>>1061024
>Medium Alice Pack with frame
>$20-60
Am I in a time warp? Was the prepper meme just a dream? Because online this shit is more like $80-100 minimum in 2017.
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>>1061991
>looking for a budget day backpack. must fit in bigger one if necessary
REI Co-op Flash 18
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>>1068516

Learn to shop around outside the internet, homie. Used alice pack w/ frame is about 60 bones USD at basically any brick and mortar surplus joint. Picked up a used one with straps and no frame for 40 bones plus tax last week.
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>>1067090
I have a Cintamani Steinar (Icelandic) rain jacket and works fine after many years. It uses Gelanots and has two way zippers in the arm pits. Two pockets on the chest.

Breathes just fine in my opinion. On warmer weather it is a bit too hot. I've used it as a wind stopping layer and rain layer in one during predominantly wettish and cold spring days with changing weather and wind gusts.
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>>1068429
I am happy with Cintamani but I don't climb. No durability issues.
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Stratos 36 or Kestrel 38?
I'm looking for a backpack for hikes around one week in length, mostly through the alpes.
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>>1065180
From some research these should be more of an athletic fit. The Acadias I have are made on a "650 Last" and are very narrow, meant to be tight. East Ridges are on an "851 Last"
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>>1068537
I've had a kestrel 38 for a couple of years. It's a bombproof, lightweight, basic bag. I highly recommend it. The side pockets suck ass though but maybe they fixed that. And I'm not sure about the stratos 36 but the kestrel 38 definitely has loops for a sleeping pad which is nearly mandatory for such a small bag.
>>
Quick question, are pants like the fjällräven keb worth it? I normally use milsurp field pants.




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