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File: thoreau1.jpg (214 KB, 450x300)
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This post might be more suitable for /diy/. Ah well.
Owing to my dad's brilliance some decades ago, I have 20 acres of land in the Ozarks near a beautiful river. I would like to build a shit shack like pic related to serve as a base for exploring the area. It only has to fit two small beds, a desk, and a fireplace. Needs neither electricity nor plumbing. Just a comfy place to come back to at the end of the day. If any of you have done something like this or have general construction experience to share, it would mean a lot. I don't really know how much money to expect to spend on a project like this and I'd rather not get into all the "tiny house" memery.
>>
Just get a tiny house and stop spending so much time considering what other people will think of you.
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Ive been looking into the same thing
Does this area get snow? And if so how much?
Do you want a foundation or not?
What material do you want it made out of?
Etc etc
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>>1073296
>get
Eh, half the fun is building it. And it's absolutely a tiny house, except for short visits instead of year-round use. Won't even have a lock on the door.
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>>1073271

A good concrete foundation is important. Get something that will resist rain and animal/insect intrusion. Probably a water tank for drinking/washing/cooking. Also, the anchor points for the shackles should be pretty deep in the concrete to prevent escapes.
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>>1073271
How much construction know-how do you have?

A shack consists of:
>foundation
This is the most important part, and what kind you use will depend on the ground. Can be as simple as driving 4 4x4 posts, can be as complicated as pouring footings.
>floor joists
Holds everything up, is piss-easy to assemble
>wall timbers or sections
Built up off the floor joists or pre-assembled with the roof joists and raised. Piss easy.
>floor proper
For a shack, assuming 24" joist spacing you could just use 3/4" plywood. Again, piss easy.
>door/window frame
Somewhat slightly more tricky than the wall joists as you have to be absolutely 100% sure the sides are square and it's exactly the right height.
>roof joists
This is tricky to get everything cut and assembled at the correct angle. Assembled before it goes on the shack.
>exterior layer for walls and roof
Usually OSB. Pretty simple, align the edges and nail it down.
>exterior wrap
For weatherproofing. Cheap option is tarpaper. Slightly less-cheap option is tyvek. I recommend tyvek, it's still less than $90 for the whole thing. You'll still want tarpaper under whatever you put on the roof
>roof
Cheapest option would be corrugated steel or aluminum, but that shit's noisy and looks like ass. A bundle of shingles isn't a whole lot more expensive or complicated.
>siding.cladding
Honestly, shingles are pretty fucking good here too. Depending on whether you used them for the roof or not, you may have enough in 1 bundle to do the whole thing.
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>>1073300
Almost no snow. What region are you looking at?
>>1073308
I'll be sure not to cheap out on the foundation. And I plan to add some facilities outside the actual shack like a firepit with seating and yeah, a water tank.
>>1073311
Very little construction experience, fair amount of woodworking experience. Might be able to get family/friends in construction to help out once I'm ready to build. Thanks for the rundown - was thinking of wood clapboard siding and shingled roof.

How would a stone or brick chimney work with the framing? Mostly want one for comfy points, not because it's a necessity in the area.
Would it be a waste of effort trying to mill lumber onsite for a project like this?
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Just get a shipping container, senpai. Not even meming here, just add some insulation and a couple sturdy windows.
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>>1073271
How big do you want it?

If you don't want to poor a slab, a post frame style of construction is going to be the way to go.

If you want to poor a slab, you could do stud wall construction.

If i was going to build something like a 10x10 or 12x12 shack I would probably do a hybrid post frame type of construction. I would buy 4 2x6 treated laminated columns ( 1 for each corner ). For something this small I would use a 2x6 treated bottom board, 2- 2x6 girts...these boards form a band around the entire outside of the building and are attached to the outside of the columns with 2x 20d nails in each girt at each column (galvanized nails should be used since you are nailing into treated lumber. Then for my top board where the truss or rafter will sit, I would do a 2x6 attached on both the outside ( like the girts) and one on the inside. This inside board only needs to be on both side walls where the truss will be sitting, it does not need to be on the 2 gable ends. You could make your own 2x6 rafters for the roof, or you can buy assembled residential trusses from a place like menards for about 40$ a truss for the 10 or 12 footers. These trusses are designed to be spaced 2ft on center, so you would need 6 for a 10x10 or 7 for a 12x10. After the trusses are up, you would sheet them with osb just like a house. As for the sidewalls, you can either attach steel paneling directly to the girts or you can sheet over the girts with osb and put whatever kind of siding you want on. A building like this can easily be finished off inside by hanging insulation from your top board in between the columns and then girting the inside of the building just like you did on the outside ( 2x4 lumber is sufficient on the inside). It is fairly easy to frame out window openings and walk door openings in a building like this, but you can look into that on your own. All window and door frameouts should be done before siding or sheeting the sidewalls with osb.
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>>1073347
When building a building like this, you first set all your poles. They should be set below the frost line, so probably at least 4 feet. The columns should be set on a pre cast concrete footing ( a cookie). After your poles are set and plum, you need to shoot a level line on all the columns and then you do all your measuring off that line, that way everything is nice and level. If you do steel on the outside, use Grandrib 3 Plus or an equivalent... it is not noisy and it does not look like ass. If you don't want a dirt floor or concrete on the inside, you could put a 2x8 or 2x10 around the inside of the columns however far up off the ground you want to be, and then hang your floor joists from that. Then sheet the joists with osb and put whatever type of flooring you want in.
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>>1073271
just buy a kit. home depot sells them.
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>>1073333
This. Also checked. The military uses them as housing over in the middle east
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>>1073328
Im looking at oregon. I have 10acres there.
5 to 6ft of snow in the winter
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>>1073303
>half the fun is building it.

Is it? Or is the dream of building it fun where the reality is a gigantic pain in the ass?

If you have no construction experience I guarantee you are romanticizing the work involved.

Take a look at Kris Harbour's channel on Youtube if you want a pretty good taste of what it might be. The guy is delightfully naive while a the same time pretty competent on many of the skills involved. Nevertheless, his build is clearly a major grind for ~70% of the time/effort and it should put a realistic (but not negative) perspective to what you are considering.
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check you local stores for prefab sheds as they can be cheap as fuck and with some care and solid spot, foundation, and maintenance they can last very long.
pic related for 1.2k. but without brick floor or concrete etc
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>>1073271
go to the home depot, buy a large shed. insulate the walls.
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>>1073438
so i checked what my local market has to offer.
and i would go for a used construction site office like in the last picture for 6.7. placed on a very good foundation. like 20- 30 cm high on concrete poles in a gravel bed with drainage
and with some maintenance improvement. like tar paint on the roof and bottom side floor to improve corrosion resistance.
but that's more long term shit.

BUT the easiest and cheapest way would be a used caravan. will last a few years. (more if you DIY extra roof and foundation) and you get beds kitchen, toilet, etc ready to go.
this would also be quite mobile so you can move around to test the best place.
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>>1073328
>wood clapboard
>outside, on a cabin that sees AT BEST sporadic maintenance
You'll have a cabin full of possums and wasps within 6 months. Use a siding material animals don't actively like to eat.

I have exactly zero experience with masonry work, sorry. I threw a potbelly stove in mine. I built a hunting shack on my farm.

Unless you're trying to build it out in BFE Nowhere, it quite possibly could be more expensive milling your own with something like a portable sawmill (basically a chainsaw bar guide) than buying commercial and hauling it in, and it is definitely more work. I also like to be able to use treated lumber. But it is an option, especially if you wanna use hardwood or something for the frame (it's kinda pointless, but you can).

My little hunting shack is 8x16 and all the materials for it fit in a single trip with my truck (8 foot bed). It's built on 4x4 posts driven 3 feet with a concrete surround pour.
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>>1073430
Nice channel.

Thanks everyone - you've given me a better sense of the considerations I'll have to make before doing this. I'll be back.
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>not wanting a comfy steel box filled with delicious crabmeat
baka
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>>1073744
I remember that thread. Thank you anon, that was a simpler time.
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Would I be wrong in thinking that a trailer would be a good option here?
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>>1073805
Trailers degrade quickly when not cared for and have poor insulation.
Rodents will rip it apart too.
>>1073744
I wish i could haul that into my property. Roads are far too rough
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>>1073814
Maybe a prefab home of some kind.

I just figure that getting all of the supplies to build it onto location would be harder than building somewhere else and moving onto site.

Also, wood stove > fireplace
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>>1073271
OP, if your land is near the Buffalo, Spring, or Mulberry I'll help you build it in exchange for letting me also use it some weekends.
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>>1073819
Do you have bricks, cement, paint? Tools?
Have you built a house before?
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>>1073955
Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes. Leftovers lying around for the first three, and no special fireplace bricks.
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>>1074358
Heh, that wasn't me but good to know. Sounds like we'll be neighbors.
This thing isn't going up until spring. Look for another thread in a few months with the same OP image - if you're still interested we can set something up.
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OP, if you are still looking have you considered a 4x4 frame with the rest made from pallet boards?

People practically give the damn things away. Check craigslist free section from time to time. Excellent building material! About 120 would build a 14x14 square cabin.
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>>1074650
Yeah, I'm an /out/ regular, still gonna be watching this thread. That's a mighty aesthetic little place you posted. Can anyone weigh in on the long term stability of stone supports like that? I'd imagine not great.
I'm hesitant to use pallets inside the structure because of the risks of chemical fumes, but I guess they could make good cladding. I wonder how they'd hold against animals, see: >>1073504
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>>1074658
>Can anyone weigh in on the long term stability of stone supports like that?
I haven't built anything, really, but I have an old family farm. Boathouse is built on stone and concrete "pillars" with logs resting on top, and there's a small problem with the ground giving way to the sea.

The foundation for the house itself is also a stone and concrete mix (think it's a box of 4.5x10m on uneven ground), and holds up well. Just dig a bit down and make the slabs sizeable, and make sure the house is a bit above ground (and box, if you make one) to get some circulation and minimize moisture and rot. Barn's the same with concrete and stone pillars, and is about a meter above ground.
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My friend built a frankenshed. Bought a cheap sturdy shed kit from Home Depot and then nailed sheet metal all over it, painted the whole thing with multiple layers of rust proof paint and called it a day.

We go out there all the time to party and it's mostly held up for almost 5 years now. At one point it looked like it was thinking if collapsing so we got some 4x4 lengths of lumber and steel ties and ghetto rigged a new frame within it.
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>not insulating the outside of your hut with cob

It's fucking free, man. All you need to do is go dig up some sand, some dry grass, and some mud.
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>>1074658
Stone supports are fine as long as the ground they're on doesn't shift. Even dry-stacked stone supports, when built right, can last hundreds of years.

At the very least rent a ground tamper. Ideally pour a footing, which is as simple as digging down a couple feet with a post hole digger, tamping the bottom, then filling it with concrete.
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>>1076439
>just go dig up sand and get a couple hundred cubic feet of dry grass
Doesn't exist where I live. Nearest appreciable amount of sand is like 5 hours' drive away, and I'd have to buy straw because everywhere that COULD grow wild prairie grasses is covered in cornfields. I'd literally have to buy fill sand, which is admittedly cheap enough, and straw bales, which aren't all that cheap.

While I appreciate both the DIY and the sustainability aspects of it, foam sheeting would be both more effective and about half the price.
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How much do you guys know about passive heating and cooling?

As I understand it, if you have big windows facing where the sunlight tends to come in, and big stone floors underneath the windows to absorb and radiate heat, you can keep a pretty comfy temperature without using fuel.
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>>1076795
Does that actually work when it's not summer?
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>>1076847
I've heard of people building super-engineered earthdomes where the interior temperature is always in between 65 and 75 regardless of outside temperature.

I doubt OP could do that, but maybe he could give the woodstove a little help or make things moderately more bearable in the summer.
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>>1076857
But the domes (literally greenhouses?) are pretty different from having dark floors below a window.

Sod-roofs are a theoretical option, at least.
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>>1076900
As I understand it, the modifications you make are mostly about window placement, flooring, and roofing.

Like, if you have a thick stone slab next to a window where sun beams normally land, it can absorb infrared radiation directly from the sun, and then radiate the heat outward during the night when the sun is no longer shining.

So you want to have the windows aligned with the position of the sun in the sky, and maybe some vents aligned along the prevailing wind for cooling.

Passive thermoregulation is interesting shit, I just don't know much about it.
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>>1073376
Fuck that. They add ~30 degrees to the temp, we use tents. I'm not sleeping in one of those when deployed and on night shifts.
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>>1078846
If you paint it black and close the door, you could make a grilled cheese.
Thanks for the large oven idea.
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>>1078846
>no seal on the door
Wew
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>>1078846
That looks like a bitch to get out of my truck bed
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>>1078951
>not flying it in
what are you, some type of new age faggot?
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>>1078928
What kind of pussy ass nigger fag are you?
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>>1078846
>tfw someone rolls your house into the lake while you are sleeping and you drowned.
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>>1078978
>tfw someone pipes car exhaust into your roof hole
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>>1073271

I guess you have a few options.

>build the small house yourself with either lumber or masonry
>purchase a "tiny house" or just get a tough shed/cabin (Amish, Mennonites, and builders sell these for decent prices)
>get a pre-fabricated steel structure (cheap, easily customized, galvanized steel structures are tough as shit, cheap upkeep, ect)

I'd say that either getting a steel unit is probably the best choice. They're fairly cheap, can be insulated, and are pretty cool. Be sure to do your research on rainfall and flooding in that area.
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>>1073271
Walden Pond! We used to go there many times a week to swim, when we lived in Concord MA. Thoreau built his cabin was built quite cheaply, if I recall correctly.
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>>1079001
Also his mommy brought him tendies every night. Thoreau wasn't exactly a sc/out/
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>>1079001
You should go there and request asylum as a jekistani refugee live your dream
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>>1076449
Stone supports are fine for his locale.
4x8x16 concrete cap blocks are like $3 a piece. Easy to move to the site. 20-30 depending on cabin size. Do not fill under them to level, that will cause uneven settling. Remove dirt by scraping, not digging to get all blocks level.
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>>1073271
Have you seen primitive survival? The guy builds a simple hut using materials in the are
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>>1073308
with the right drugs, there's no need for shackles
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>>1073311
>pouring footings
>complicated
Men these days are in a sad state.
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>>1082105
It's a comparative, not an absolute. It is comparatively significantly more complicated than driving a 4x4 in the ground and calling it good.
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>>1073333
this....

Almost no need for a foundation so long as ground is level.

Strong, almost all weather proof an very fire resistant.

Cheap for the most part, one container(depending on size) is less then 2k.

EZ PZ. All you gotta do is cut out the door frame, windows, an i guess an area for a bricked fireplace but if not that then a small hole for a wood fire stove would work just as good. After that just put some insulation, some walling over that(dont be trashy) an then move your furniture in. hell throw in a solar panel and some wiring and you can even have some light plus charge your phone or laptop or whatever.
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>>1073333

Might be hard to get to the land / homestead via semi.
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>>1073333
Julian did this in Trailer Park Boys and that looked comfy enough




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