[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k] [s4s] [vip] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/out/ - Outdoors



Thread archived.
You cannot reply anymore.



File: axe.jpg (14 KB, 172x294)
14 KB
14 KB JPG
Looking for a good felling axe to work with. Help me out /out/
>>
Have you tried the hardware store?
>>
>>1074362
These work well
>>
>wetterlings
>gransfors
>helko
>husqvarna
>hults bruks
>hultafors
>prandi

now fuck off
>>
>>1074362
just get a mora and baton the tree down
>>
>>1074362
What trees are you using it on? Most of the Scandinavian stuff is geared more toward softwood felling. There isn't a huge difference AFAIK but a new or vintage axe from an east coast USA manufacturer might be more suitable if you're looking to fell hardwood trees.
>>
>>1074362
Go with double bit
>>
>>1074378
Doesn't even mention Council tool...

Pleb. /out/memeposter
>>
File: smugchinaman.jpg (2 KB, 148x137)
2 KB
2 KB JPG
>>1074511
>tfw some lame coworker has a rusty fiskars on the pioneering rack of his rav4
>tfw he probably posts here
>>
>>1074512
Using an axe is retarded for anything besides limbing. Even then I prefer my parang.. Chainsaw FTW. And if anyone who thinks a chainsaw is loud. Never had their friends find them in a 1 square mile area cutting down a tree with an axe. Because they where at it for so fucking long and it's actually pretty damn loud too.
>>
>>1074511
thanks for adding onto it,
i rushed it so honestly thank you,
>>
>>1074514
Chainsaw for when I actually have to get shit done, ax for when I want to relax/ have fun/ am drunk
>>
>>1074511
Don't even mention;
Fiskars
Bahco
Ochsenkopf
Rinaldi
Stubai
Snow and Neally
Angelo B.
Jauregui

Wow its like you're a littel babby that haven't even formed to a feotus yet.
More like a post sperm undefined mass of cells really.
>>
>>1074591
>Fiskars
>Bahco

Yeah, clearly the other guy is pleb... Totally... :/
>>
>>1074640

Wow literally filtered by the pleb filter.

Sweet babby child, there is reason those two are in front and the proest of pros one be at the bottom.
>>
>>1074591
>>1074640

I was only really mentioning god tier-good tier axes brands dont bring normal tier-shit tier into my

He was right about council but
>b-haha-co
>shitkars
>>
File: 1501951871543.jpg (1.82 MB, 3233x2425)
1.82 MB
1.82 MB JPG
>>1074378
>prandi

well shit hey there
>>
>>1074708
What is wrong with Fiskars?
Go to some random cottage in Finland. They often have a ye olde Fiskars axe. I never thought they were bad, worked just fine for birch, pine, beech, elm, ...
>>
>>1074746
Or did I just misunderstand. Wot
>>
>>1074746
New Fiskars makes garden tools for bored old ladies. Any old manufacturing is going to be better
>>
>>1074362
what would be a bad axe?
i mean, it's just a sharpened slab of metal with a wood handle stuck into it
how exactly would you fuck that up?
>>
>>1074753
X series of axes like X25 are gardening tools for old ladies? Are they bad? Why? Serious question.
>>
Fiskars aren't bad.
They're just not for enthusiasts.

For occasional home use they're more than good enough.
>>
File: perfect.jpg (78 KB, 768x1024)
78 KB
78 KB JPG
>>1074756

lots of ways

>not using a tight grain wood for a handle

will make it so you will have to replace it more frequently
youll want to use hickory or ash for 90% of the axes you see

then there is grain orientation, pic related is perfect, 45 degrees and steeper is acceptable as well, anything lower and it will be more susceptible to breaking on you

then there is:
>weather,
>the shaping of the head of the handle,
>what has the handle been through,
>is there heartwood in the handle?
>is it varnished, raw or coated with a proper oil


then the head, is it made by a reputable and respected company like gransfors or wetterlings?

or are you just getting a Chinese slab or steel that is made of multiple mystery metals that was in a smelter and pounded or cut into a shape of an axe?

there is a very right way to make an axe and exceedingly many wrong ways,

many types and many lengths, for different purposes and jobs to do,
>>
File: j93kno.jpg (36 KB, 594x446)
36 KB
36 KB JPG
>>1074756
then there is shopping for a used head,
when shopping for a used head you want to make sure it has enough of a bit to be used properly , if it's seen so much use it probably isn't worth restoring because the edge has been grind-ed on so much or there is a deep chip so you have to re profile it significantly to the point that it should be retired and put to rest

in pic related there is plenty of bit with this axe to restore it to its once former glory, but if you find something to where the bit of the axe is leaning more near the black lines its probably better to stay away
>>
>>1074782
Axes don't wear out.
>>
>>1074759
this>>1074775
>>
>>1074784
at some point they do, it depends on the person and how skilled they are with an axe, an idiot can halve a axe heads life if they keep missing or striking in dirt or something similar, but other than that they dont really wear if its sharpened to a keen edge and properly maintained/used
>>
>>1074801
I have a beater axe that I always smack with hammer, the eye looks kinda like a retarded bloated leech. the handles come lose again and pretty sure it's not gonna get a new handle once it breaks. probably gonna turn it into a wedge or something.
>>
File: hqdefault.jpg (10 KB, 480x360)
10 KB
10 KB JPG
>>1074810
>retarded bloated leech

i can see it now
>>
File: IMG_0928.jpg (1.37 MB, 3264x2448)
1.37 MB
1.37 MB JPG
Do tomahawks count as a hatchet replacement?
>>
>>1074977
>Not also a peace pipe
Trash/10
>>
>>1074514
This, a splitting maul or a hatchet is actually useful but axes are just a meme in my experience.
>>
>>1074813
If you google images that... Man it's like a /b/ post
>>
>>1074362
You can pay a lot of money for a fancy Swedish ax with a razor sharp edge, or you can get this and find somebody who knows how to use a belt sander to sharpen it.

https://www.harborfreight.com/4-12-lb-hickory-axe-62473.html
>>
>>1075032
Might as well just get one that works out of the box.
>>
>>1075032
Mystery meat metal that came out of a Chinaman's ass won't hold that edge you worked so hard for
>>
File: IMG_8035.jpg (366 KB, 911x1366)
366 KB
366 KB JPG
>>1075283
What if it's decent steel with a good spring temper?

I have a hatchet from the €1 store that I assumed was a piece of shit.

The handle is some bright yellow Chinese semi-hard wood similar to Birch and it came with a terrible grind.

I threw it in the back of my truck where it sat for years, gathering dirt and rust.

I threw it at shit, chopped right into brick, used the poll as a hammer to drive nails, used the bit to pull out said nails, chopped through steel wire and tie-down straps, opened cans, pried open crates, busted pallets, chopped the roof off a car, etc

Then I decided to take an angle grinder to it and give it the narrowest, sharpest edge I could, just to see if it was possible to shave your face with.

And guess what.
It threw a shower of high carbon sparks the second it touched the grinder.
And it took a beautiful edge.

I keep it in my summer house now and it's a joy to use.
It has a better edge than my Wetterlings did from the factory.

That said, it took a lot of work and fine tuning to get there - depending on the person, it may or may not be worth the work.

Pic related. The €1 euro axe.
>>
>tfw nobody you know uses a pruning axe anymore except your 89 year old neighbor who cannot use a chainsaw anymore after falling off a ladder and is too blind to sharpen a regular saw.

>tfw you niggas don't even know what a pruning axe is.
>>
>>1074784
If you've shopped around for vintage heads, you'd know they do wear out. If the blade has been ground back anywhere near the quench line then the axe will be useless, and most axes have between 1-3cm of quenched steel.

There's a whole generation of axes inherited by boomers that have been "restored" on a bench grinder that are completely useless now. Incredibly frustrating finding an axe head you've been looking for for years only to turn it over and find that some axe specialist has removed all of the useful metal from the bit on a wheel.
>>
>>1074784
With the old axes you'd get anywhere from 1,5cm to 4cm of edge before it would get worn out, the reason for that is in the old days, to avoid waste of good tool steel the majority of the head was either mild steel or even further back, regular iron, it was only a small portion of the bit that was forge welded and was high quality tool steel. Today's axes are completely made out of tool steel (save for maybe Hoffman and Autine ones that still have the edge be good steel and the rest of the head a milder one) but the problem still remains as only about 30mm is tempered for a good edge holding.
>>
What's the ideal weight for a general purpose felling axe?
Should I just get the heaviest one I can find and get used to the weight over time?
>>
>>1079096
Whatever you find the most comfortable, for somebody a big heavy burly axe is ideal, to someone else a lighter and more maneuverable axe is preferable.
>>
>>1074362
Transformers Bruks Doublebit Felling Axe!
>>
>>1080022
That sounds obvious but I'm worried that if I pick say a 3lb because it's a safe bet, but I could have got a 4 1/2lb and eventually got used to it.

I mean between 3lb and 4 1/2lb is only a 1 1/2 lb difference.
I can get used to that, right?

Then again it's the same amount from 4 1/2b to 6lb. Might as well get the 6lb.

Do I even need the 6lb though? Who uses 6lbers? It sounds a bit too extreme.
Does the weight make it more efficient to use or just quicker with more tiring?

Is strength or stamina more important?

Should I just go for the middle ground?

This is ruining all my fun.
Maybe I don't need a felling axe in the first place.
>>
>>1080076
Depends what you're felling, if you're doing smaller trees, say under 14 or 15" in diameter, then anything much more than 3lbs and a 32" handle is too much, for genuinely large trees a heavier axe (between 3-4 1/2 pounds) and a 36" or shorter handle is ideal.




Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.