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Previous thread: >>1069864

ITT: We discuss gear, ask and answer questions, and post our own stuff.

To start us off, what do you guys think of Kuksas? Are they worth buying over a normal cup? What are the pros and cons?
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Any good multitool in addition to normal knife?
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>>1095855
Kupilka makes a kuksa made from composite material 50/50 wood/plastic. all of the advantages of a kuksa with the lovely holding shape, but you can throw it in the dishwasher
>>1097154
if by multitool you mean one with pliers i would say the Leatherman juice line or perhaps there skeletools but i haven't tried those myself, if you want a "full size multi tool the Wave is king. are you also inquiring about a knife? i would recommend a Mora, any one of them really
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I cant really afford new stuff, but what is a good 45l-65l backpack to buy used.
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>>1097370
I would look into military surplus if there is a store with that kind of stuff near you
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I was at Cabela's today and looking at some compasses.

I've noticed some of them were pointing in very different directions. I don't mean they were a little bit off, I'm talking more than 90° off.

What does this exactly mean? While it would be easy to assume they were defective, that sounds too easy. Is there any reason why they would be like this?
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>>1097547
It means they were sitting on steel peghooks or shelves and they were all pointing at the closest large hunk of ferrous metal.

>>1097370
If you're absolutely needing an okay pack on the cheap, the Field and Stream backpacking packs are pretty mediocre but under $100.
>45L frame pack
https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/field-stream-mountain-scout-45l-internal-frame-pack-15fnsufsmntnsct45ctp/15fnsufsmntnsct45ctp
>65L frame pack
https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/field-stream-mountain-scout-65l-internal-frame-pack-15fnsafsmntnsct65ctp/15fnsafsmntnsct65ctp

Also some of the Kelty packs aren't too bad, and they run $100-150ish.
>44L Redstone AP
https://www.dickssportinggoods.com/p/kelty-redwing-all-purpose-44l-internal-frame-pack-16kelurdwng44lntrctp/16kelurdwng44lntrctp

Also check websites like Sierra Trading Post, Campmor, REI's Garage, etc for deals on last-year's-model or discontinued packs on the super cheap.

You are NOT going to find a decent milsurp backpack (the only one that's actually good as a hiking backpack is the USMC one, and you're not finding it for under $150). You might find decent deals on used name-brand backpacks on Ebay though.
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>>1097570
>It means they were sitting on steel peghooks or shelves and they were all pointing at the closest large hunk of ferrous metal.
I've even considered that possibility, but there were still a good number of other compasses hanging from a similar position and they pointed consistently. I've even removed a "good" one and a "bad" one from the peghooks and held them in my hand one at a time, and the same thing was still happening. What gives?
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>>1097573
eesh. That I don't know.

Maybe they sat long enough they took a set?
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>>1097164
Forgot to mention, I'm looking for multitool that will be useful for /out/ing and as EDC.
For knife I will use something will full tang
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>>1097164
>Kupilka makes a kuksa made from composite material 50/50 wood/plastic.
Uhm…
>all of the advantages of a kuksa
Yeah, no. If I want a plastic cup, there are many better options.
>but you can throw it in the dishwasher
Hows that relevant for some out gear?

>>1097547
Kinda related:
I need a compass, but I'm unsure what to get. I'd love to have a geologists compass, just because, but they suck for navigation.
I used to have a Bezard (pic related), and I quite like that type, but apparently no one does them anymore.
Should I just get some random 30€ Suntoo or other name brand one, or are the more expensive models worth it?
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>>1097675
I have a Leatherman Wave that I carry around, but I leave it behind when I go /out/ because I'm afraid I'll lose it and it has no real use innawoods. Not a lot of wires to strip, screws to drive, etc. Most of a multitool's functions make much more sense when you're surrounded by man made stuff.

For in the city though, the Wave is the tits.
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I got a few hundred for helping my uncle move and id like to finish putting together my camping stuff. ive been slowly putting it together since i moved out of my parents and really just have a few big items left.
i still need a tent, a sleepingbag, and some quality of life stuff like a cookset/gps ect. what should i waste money on first? also where to get topographical maps?
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>>1098890
Get the mandatory stuff so you can start backpacking as soon as possible and then add in the quantity of life stuff later. You'll also appreciate it more this way.
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>>1098897
Any recommendations on a sleeping bag? im in washington state and dont plan to do much winter camping until i get more appropriate stuff. Ive narrowed the tent down to two or three so its whatever rei has in store when i head over.
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>>1098902
What's the coldest nightly low you're willing to be /out/ in? Are you a hot sleeper or a cold sleeper? What's your price range?
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>>1098902
The Marmot Nanowave 35 is a good choice. It packs down real small, weighs about 2lbs, and is under $100. It's a perfect entry level bag that you'll get a lot of use out of. If you end up camping in later or earlier season conditions than it can take then you can add a liner.
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>>1098906
>>1098903
Ive had to sleep in much colder nights but the lowest id want to go down to for regular camping would be 20F give or a take a bit. I like to sleep a bit on the chilly side of things, and i guess price would be $250 some up or down.
Im not a big fan of mummy style sleeping bags either but it doesnt seem like theres a lot of rectangles for backpacking.

Is a sleeping pad important? nearly every review someone mentions them, ive never used one though.
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>>1098890
I would go for a good lightweight sleeping bag. Don't know where you live but I've been eyeing the Kelty cosmic 20* quite light and around 150$, less if on sale. I would look at mountainsmith tents or other tarp tents that can be pitched with a rope or hiking poles, unless bugs are a concern?
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>>1098909
Sleeping pads are vital. The part of the bag between your body and the ground is compressed and provides effectively no insulation. A sleeping pad insulates you from the ground.
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>>1098902
fellow washingtonfag here, id suggest a netted hammock for sleeping, and a tarp for cover if necessary. unless you're sticking to campgrounds, finding a place to dispersed camp is considerably harder with a tent.
as far as sleeping bags go, it rarely gets to be freezing around here, so you don't need to worry too much. just get a cheap sleeping bag or a down quilt and youll be fine
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y/n
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>>1098912
Makes sense i guess, il check them out.
>>1098911
>>1098914
Where at washington bro, im over in cheney. You know any good spots to camp around here? the most extreme my buddies do is car camping.
Ive always used a tent so i guess thats what im comfortable with. I used just a tarp a few times in mass but the bugs killed me, left a bad impression you know. A hammock sounds pretty chill though
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>>1098919
>any cotton
Nope. Go for some poly/merino blend or straight poly by somebody like coldpruf if you can't afford the straight merino.
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>>1098909
Sleeping pads are crucial, yes. A good one will provide much better sleep than a bad one, and a good insulated one is important for anything but summer camping.

Rectangle bags are colder and bulkier/heavier than mummy bags, you're not going to find one appropriate for anything other than summer backpacking and they will always be significantly heavier than a comparably priced mummy. That being said, there are a couple of decent 40-50* semi-mummy (large open hood, wider footbox) bags that are good summer bags that are fairly lightweight. Marmot makes one that's like $60, and I do recommend it if you're also gonna be doing 20*F as any bag good for the cold will be hotter than fuck in the summer.
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>>1098925
Well shit, thats just more stuff on the list. Il do some research on those too i guess.
Whats the best way to carry the sleep system, have the bag in a stuff sack and just roll up the pad on the outside?
Im not convinced about the hammocks yet so im reading up on them.
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>>1098924
I intend to keep it in a waterproof sack with my sleeping bag, so I always have something dry and comfy to get in once camp's up. Can't really see how the cotton would hurt in that situation.
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Whats everyones attitude about quality in regards to price? Do you buy the best* or buy stuff thats good enough.
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i highly recommend pic related they are the la police gear operator tactical pant with elastic waistband for what you pay you get 2 pairs for what 1 pair of 5.11 costs and they last just as long
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>>1098929
A good hammock setup is significantly cheaper than a good tent setup, and lighter than all but the most expensive of UL tents. Unless you intend to do a lot of camping above the treeline they're nice for everything but the dead of winter. However, they take time to learn how to use properly, and they really suck if it's windy and cold unless you fork out for a very well made rainfly, which do get expensive.

My backpack has a sleeping bag compartment (my sleeping bag doesn't come anywhere close to filling it), I've got the sleeping bag in a compression sack that goes in there. I use an uninsulated inflatable pad (I live in the south, the coldest I even could camp at without extensive travel is 50*F) and with work it rolls up to about the size of a tallboy can so it gets thrown in there too. If you want to use a foam mat, they're light enough most people strap them vertically along one side of the backpack, your pack compression straps do a fantastic job of holding it in place. Some of the older or larger self-inflating pads you can do this with too, otherwise roll it and strap it to the top of your pack. Most hiking backpacks have gear tie-down slots or MOLLE along the lid, that's what they're (mainly) for. The all-in-one bedroll idea doesn't really work with modern hiking stuff.

If funds are tight, buy the cold weather bag first and simply sleep with it as a blanket or mostly open in hot weather. Not as comfy as a dedicated warm weather bag, but not bad and definitely cheaper. Being PNW you're pretty much done with real hot weather for the year.

A decent foam pad is cheap. The Thermarest Z-Lite Sol is widely regarded as one of if not the best CCF pads, and it's ~$25-30.
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>>1098930
If it's in a drybag and for sleeping only then it's perfectly fine as a luxury item.
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>>1098931
My goal is to try to find where the curve on the quality to price graph starts to get much sharper. Often times mid-end or upper mid-end gear just makes more sense than high end. A lot of it comes down to how serious you are though and how much time you spend at it. For example, if you're hiking every weekend your boot budget can reasonably go up above $200 or more but if you're going on a hike once every month or two then you'll want something cheaper.
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>>1098944
I've got a zlite sol and can vouch for it. It's surprisingly comfy, lightweight, doesn't try to roll up as much as a traditional pad, it's durable as fuck, and it's cheap.
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>>1098931
Depends on what the gear's for. While I hike/bike/camp/fish/kayak, my big and true love is hunting. I have 10x more money sunk into hunting than all the other hobbies combined, and generally buy at or near "the best" because I use it enough to realize the benefits of it over the mid-range stuff.

Kayaking I tend to buy lower-third to half on the quality/price scale because I simply wouldn't realize many of the benefits of the premium stuff (it's an avenue for fishing for me, and I use it on small/slack water because that's what's around, so I don't need rapids-handling, highest speed, super durability, etc).

Hiking I do on the cheap. I've got a few nice things, but most of it is either "bargain" tier (Merrell, store-brand pants, Osprey, etc) or homemade.

Camping...eh, it's a mix. There's a lot of crossover with hunting since I do backpack hunting, so stuff like my tent, cold-weather sleeping bag, and backpack are gucci-tier. I legit need it where I do that though.

Fishing I do on the cheap as well. Some of my stuff is nice, but the really nice stuff is found/gifted/clearance bin'd/rescued from the defect bin from work and repaired.

Biking I really couldn't say. I've got a mid-tier Cannondale mountain bike, and I think that's the only thing I've paid money for. I'm still using the same helmet my dad bought me when I got my first bike when I was like 11 (I have a really really small head so it still fits), I wear regular clothes and shoes...and I've spent maybe $50 on tubes and tires in the last 6 years. I'm a trail rider, not a racer or technical rider, it's fun but I don't take it too seriously.
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>>1098951
I've got the torso length Zlite Sol and a Big Agnes noninsulated inflatable that's an oversized pad for when comfy>weight. The Zlite is great for what it is, which is a cheap, bulletproof, warm ground pad.
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>>1098931

I try to hunt down stuff actually manufactured in America/Canada/Europe by White people. Willing to pay.

Obviously on disposable shit, it's not worth pursuing, but the crucial pieces like packs, sleeping bags, shoes, etc.
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>>1098931
My top concern is how long a piece of gear will last. To that end I'm willing to pay more and accept detriments like additional weight or fewer flashy features. I also try to buy US-made wherever possible, which adds to cost, often without any tangible benefit.
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>>1098962
>often without any tangible benefit.

That's where you are wrong.

By buying Asian you guarantee the wholesale destruction of industry and employment. When jobs move overseas, so do the taxable incomes that municipalities and states rely on for their budgets, to fix sidewalks, repair shit and generally maintain infrastructure.

The cost of buying cheap imports is extremely tangible, and all around you.

The growing number of people in poverty, the meth epidemic, the decay, these are all costs of buying cheap Asian.

Realizing this requires more active brain cells than the average American creature currently possesses.
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>>1098957
>>1098962
Are you me? Recommend me some companies.
>Thermarest
>Dutchware
>Feathered Friends
>Taiga
>All knives unless you're buying absolute shit tier
>St Croix fishing rods, certain Penn reels
>Soft spot for Irish or Scottish wool sweaters and hats
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>>1098962
>>1098957
Glad im not the only one who overpays for the made in america tag. Id say ablut half of my stuff is us made but something are just tough to find. Us sleeping bags/tents are pretty rare. While US is prefered really anything outside of asia il support.

>>1098954
I get you man. I go pretty much as cheap as possible for fishing but il splurge a bit on hiking and camping. My real money sink is shooting though, some /out/ overlap but theyre somewhat exclusive
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For those looking for an affordable sleeping bag, look at the hammockgear economy line. Cost less than some big name brand stuff, but it's higher quality/down and it's made in USA. Also quilt master race.
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If you buy american expect to buy cottage made and pay more. I bought a grill top and a bushbuddy. I paid way more than chinese junk but it will be the only one i will ever need. Same with a bushbuddy stove vs all the import knock off clones.
http://www.purcelltrench.com/grills.htm
https://bushbuddystove.com/
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>>1098986
>buy cottage made and pay more
Pays for itself pretty fast with that little happy feeling you get every time you use it.
In general: the uglier the site, the better the product.
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>>1098939
I have that exact pair I bought them last week. They're real good pants but now I need a shirt to go with them.
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>>1099002
Yeah they don't advertise and rely on word of mouth mostly. I found them from youtube videos of people using them and not those lame review videos where they just show what it looks like. So far i am pleased.
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This guy makes a nice stove as well as other stuff. I bought some titanium lids for snow peak pots from him. Top notch stuff.
http://fourdog.com/
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>>1099008
>>1099007
>>1098986
You guys take solid fuel stoves backpacking or just camping? Im sure theyre nice to use. I just got a whisperlite universal and i think thsts as big as id want to pack a stove.
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>>1099012
I live in the SC so no shortage of twigs sticks and pinecones. the bush buddy fits inside a snow peak 900 and weighs next to nothing. Mostly camp but if had to walk a long distance it wouldn't matter since no fuel and titanium pot.
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>>1099017
Fair points all around. I forget to count for the weight/size of liquid fuels, and being able to fit inside the pots a bonus.
Its long shot but do you know the guy who makes us titanium sporks, i think he makes knives also.
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>>1097570
Yes, sierra trading post. I got a vaude asymmetric there for under $100 The other day just because it's an old model and they run 150 eurobucks on vaude's own website
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>>1099022
dunno snow peak one is made in Japan for $10. All others I found were chinese.
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>>1099034
Damn, it was linked here a super long time ago. Il figure it out eventually.
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>>1098971

I often buy military issue gear because they fall under the Berry Amendment which stipulates preference for domestically made or sourced materials.

For example, I got this PCU Level 5 soft shell jacket, which is made by Patagonia in the USA, unlike all of their civilian crap which is sourced out to Asian slave factories, so the company can earn a higher profit.

A lot of the items overlap with the civilian lines. For example the Level 6 Goretex hardshell jacket was nearly identical to their popular Torrentshell.

And I can get them for less than retail on the Asian slave factory shit.

Some other good US brands I've gotten gear from:

ZPacks (sleeping bag, pack)
GoLite (not all US made)
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>>1099064
>PCU
That looks excellent! Is ebay the best place for me to look?
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>>1099074
Probably.

Also be warned, they're baggy as SHIIIT. They cut them so a normal soldier can wear his body armor and webbing under it. I normally wear a large, I got a medium PCU and whatever the lvl 7 poofy coat is, and I can literally fit a pony keg in there with me without pulling it tight.
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>>1099074

The PCU range comprises everything from base layers to an extreme weather parka, here's a cool infrographic that might guide you.

I got all my stuff on eBay, yes. Paid $145 for a soft shell jacket, $60 for the soft shell trousers and about $110 for the Level 6 Goretex top and bottom.

Also want to get the gridded fleece. Patagonia sell it as the R1 with an additional chest pocket from Vietnam for $120. I can get one in the $30-40 range.
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>>1099077

Good point. The outer pieces are oversized because they are supposed to be worn over gear as per>>1099078

I wear a civilian L, so Medium-Regular was best for me on the Level 5s.
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>>1099078
Do eet. Grid fleece is fucking awesome, and you can get the PCU lvl 2's fairly cheap (full sets for $60-70 or used tops for $20-25) on ebay, and dirt fucking cheap if you live near an Army or Marine base. I think I got my last 2 tops for $8 each from a pawn shop, and I will very occasionally find them in Goodwill.

Alternatively, Condor (the airshit company) sells a clone of the lvl 2 top for $19.99. It runs small, size up 1 size with it but it's sewn decently well and is Polartec™ brand Polartec™ grid fleece.

The lvl 4 wind shirt is pretty good too, but good luck finding it in anything other than UCP in any size other than 3XL.
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>>1099088
>The lvl 4 wind shirt is pretty good too, but good luck finding it in anything other than UCP in any size other than 3XL.

This piece has always seemed the most questionable to me.. What the fuck is its purpose that the Level 6 shell can't do at approx. the same weight?
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>>1099095
It's insulated and very breathable. Uses Gore Windstopper fabric. The Lvl 6 is the Gore Tex waterproof/breathable and isn't anywhere near as breathable.

Also the lvl 4 keeps your belt line clear, cut somewhere between tee shirt and bomber jacket. Plays much nicer with load bearing gear or backpack waist belts.
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>>1099099

Shit, that sounds pretty useful, tbph. I think I saw a nice one from Beyond Clothing in the coyote brown colour..

I'm sourcing out some gear for a mountain trek in Peru.
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>>1099106
It's pretty nice. Basically the American military version of Pile and Pertex. Not as heavily insulated though, it's hoodie-tier at best but enough for sedentary activity to ~50*F or active down to freezing.
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>>1098391
>Uhm…
taken directly from their website "Eco-friendly cellulose fibres from certified Finnish forests reinforce the material with FDA approved polypropylene used as an adhesive. (Ratio: 50% wood-based cellulose fibres + 50% thermoplastic)."
>Yeah, no. If I want a plastic cup, there are many better options.
but there are no better kuksa shaped options that also have some of the heat propperties as wood as fas as i know, but please post.
>Hows that relevant for some out gear?
its just nice and convenient for thorough cleaning when you get home also means its completely water proof/resistant, wont have to worry about what you drink out of it or let it dry after use
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XGO makes good USA made mil stuff that is available from their site. Lots of layers to choose from.
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>>1095855
>what do you guys think of Kuksas?
love mine, thats for sure
>Are they worth buying over a normal cup?
bought mine from the Sami whilst walking in Lappland, so it is a cherished souvenir.
>What are the pros and cons?
keeps cool things cool and hot things hot, the wood is the ideal thermal barrier. the cup itself never gets hot, no burning your lips whatsoever. also haptics are superior in every which way. carry it on your pack or belt all day, and just scoop fresh water directly from the creek or spring whenever you are thirsty. Also, it is one of this things that you buy once in your life, and it will serve you faithfully for the remainder of it. And it only looks better with age.
cons, you gotta wash them by hand and oil them every now and then and the initial price is often prohibitive.
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>>1099122
How are things in Straya?
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Should i just order all the stuff i want off rei or go in person? im not sure if they have everything in stock but i like to browse around and usually end up picking up something i didnt want or need. Thats always fun.
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>>1100510
Sales tax is high enough here and REI does free shipping frequently enough I always end up ordering online. Between the tax and the gas to get there and back (the closest REI is ~40 minutes away in light traffic and over 2 hours away in shitty traffic because it's naturally in the heart of downtown) I save a LOT of money ordering online.
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>>1100531
its about 25 minutes to the one in spokane for me and its not like i miss sales tax ordering online. I got a whisperlite universal for my birthday and ive ony ran it with canisters, i went in there for some more and came out with a fuel bottle, a guidebook for eastern washington/idaho and a two person cookset. Im super bad about window shopping
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>>1100544
>order online
>still pay sales tax
wut?
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>>1100545
Its a super gay thing washington does with some websites, if they have a brick and mortar store in the state sales tax must be collected even if its ordered online.
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>>1100549
Damn man, that sucks.
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>>1100550
No kidding. Even a lot of stuff off amazon has sales tax applied. I blame seattle but i cant prove it.
This might be a long shot but you have anyadvice using the fuel bottle with the whisperlite, ive got no idea. The instructions say use like 20 pumps but reading online im seeing people say stuff like only use 10 pumps or just fill the bottle half way ect. I could always just play with it but i dont want to set it on fire because im an idiot
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>>1100553
I have a universal, but I've only ever used it with canister.
>tfw flatlander, literally no reason not to

Now having used other white gas stoves in the past, I've always had to pump those more than what the instructions say. Like 150% more, so if the instructions say 20 I usually needed 30. Priming it was always the critical part.

As far as bottle fill, with previous stoves starting them ~80% full seemed to be the sweet spot. A completely, to-the-brim full bottle was a pain to pressurize, anything under ~60% and you had shit burn time.
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>>1097154
leatherman wave is GOAT
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>>1100563
Guess il just keep messing with different fuel amounts and pressure until i get good. Theyve been around since like tge 80s, cant be that hard to figure it out right
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>>1098969
It's too late to fix all that. This whole fucking world is a sinking ship...
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My packs got a hole in it and is over all a cheap piece of crap that lasted me a year so I'm looking for a Cheap durable 40L pack but don't really know any good ones I don't need anything bigger then 40L
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>>1101065
Kelty Redwing
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>>1100510
It's way more fun to go to the store. Plus, you get to scope qts.
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>>1101071
Checked them out all pretty expensive for my taste I'm upgrading from a 26L outdoor products cheap $20 Walmart pack I don't need anything crazy just bigger and more durable
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>>1101085
>$90
>pretty expensive for my taste
I'm sorry your taste is shit and you're literally homeless-tier destitute.

No, you're not finding a good 40+L backpack cheaper than that.
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>>1101094
I make minimum wage at a part time job making about $200 a week $100 of which goes to rent the rest usually goes to food or savings a Kelty 32L pack is $99.95 I'm not gonna spend that much on a pack
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>>1101107
You are shit at researching then.

No, I'm not going to spoonfeed your retarded ass, find it yourself or suffer with a total shit bottom of the barrel pack.
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>>1101107
> what are yard sales
kek
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>>1097154
Leatherman Wave is a great option.
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>>1097547
Could possibly be pointing to something magnetic inside the store. Make sure you test a compass before you use it and make sure nothing interferes.

My worst experience navigating came from measuring bearings too close to a wire fence and holding it too close to my rifle. Throws you 200 to 600 mills sometimes.
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>>1101079
youre not wrong anon. Id like to make some qt3.14 outdoor friends but i think its weird to ask someone out at their work
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I want to wear a mask while I'm /out/, partly for urbex, partly because I enjoy wearing masks, partly because people will leave you alone if you're wearing a mask.

I want something that covers my face but I won't get overheated in. Any suggestions? I was considering a mummy-bandage mask since I have a lot of leftover mummy bandages from taxidermy.
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>>1101403
Yeah, you gotta be real careful that you're reading her cues right. No harm in appreciating and talking to the qts though.
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Looking for decent and affordable cookware set, and found these for sale locally:
Trangia Tundra 1, 55usd, 560gr, 2pot 1skillet
Trangia Tundra 2, 38usd, 620gr, 2pot 1skillet
GSI bugaboo backpacker, 55usd, 790gr, 1 pot, 1skillet, 2 bowls, 2 cups, sink
Optimus Terra HE, 42usd, 720gr, 2pot, 1skillet

Any thoughts? The GSI is heavy compared to Trangia, but with more contents, some can be skipped to keep weight down if needed. Snow peak titanium multi compact looks interesting, but can't be found locally, and with shipping it will be much more expensive than my options above.
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>>1102262
Are you that guy from the confession thread who wears a carved wooden mask?
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Last night i had a dream that took place during the apocalypse and i was scavenging around for food n gear. Came upon a semi full of cardboard boxes of /out/ gear. I spent the entire dream sorting through them and got really angry when i woke up cuz there was one box left.
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>>1100630
>I think everything sucks so I'm going to make it worse
It's because of people like you fuckwit
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>>1102326

>you gotta be real careful

Yeah be a giant pussy, that makes the sluts so wet
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>>1102462
No it's because if faggots like you. That other faggot is right it's way too late to care about anything but your own personal wants otherwise you are just a cuckold and it won't even make a difference.
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>>1102487
Out of all the despicable shit I read on here this has to be a new low.
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>>1100630
Read some history. Dumb bastards have been saying the same thing for literal millenia yet it has only ever gotten better.
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>>1102427

No but that gave me the idea of doing it

I already have a Tusken Raider mask but it has the visibility of a sphincter
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>>1102486
I was trying to think of a nicer way to say not to have autism.
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>>1102568
But the autism is hurr durr what do I do as I fidget and look uncomfortable and then by the time a few weeks or years later you act the girl has written you off. Better to sperg out going for it at least you have a chance and possibly be able to get somewhere. Most girls are waiting to some dude to come along ( not you ) and will never make the first move
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this thing can turn 50 pounds into 5
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Who /berghausboy/ here?
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How heavy is everyone's pack? Any tips for cutting down without spending hundreds of UL gear? Mine is currently 13kg.
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>check up some gear
>mmhh, it costs some money, idk if I want to spend it
>check my account
>got jewed of around that amount and I will probably won't get it back

>tfw no money and no gear
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>>1103087

Learn from the niggers how to get everything for free

https://www.meetup.com/Outdoor-Afro-Seattle/messages/boards/thread/50438853
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Is it fucking autistic for me to bring like 5kg worth of camera gear while hiking long distances? I want to take some pics of birds and shit
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>>1098912
What about using some hay and shit
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>>1104203
If youre not worried about breaking it and youve got enough room in your pack i dont see why not. What type of stuff were you planning on packing in?
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>>1104203
>is it autistic to good camera gear hiking
You've spent too long on 4chan m8

Having said that a digital body, good zoom/tele and lightweight tripod shouldn't be 5kg.
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>>1102820
Berghaus a shit, unaesthetic walmart tier

Scratches off logos and unpicks branding masterrace reporting in, my items are unidentifiable as if they simply came into being to serve me, not to promote a corporate brand in the middle of the outdoors
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>>1104327
This.
>tfw the bastards poke holes through waterproof material to tack their name on
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>>1104327
>unaesthetic
Yeah, fuck off back to /fa/, I don't need you giving me fashion tips.
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>>1104500
Spotted the incel.
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>>1104500
lmao
logocuck

labels = labias, no wonder you keep them on your gear
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>>1104501
As I was replying to someone who cares about logos that aren't even obvious?

>>1104502
I grew out of the "fuck logos!" phase a while ago. It's about getting shit that works and the cornice jacket is a classic for a reason. Also goretex > your milarping.
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>>1104525
Guys guys how about in between - remove the logos from shitty pleb brands like Patagonia or Berghaus, and keep them on cool and interesting quality gear you've acquired
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>>1104525
>I grew out of the "fuck logos!" phase a while ago. It's about getting shit that works
I really really don't want to be a walking billboard. I don't mind small logos, but when the company logo covers more than a quarter of the whole garment (looking at you Polo, TNF, Marmot, Eddie Bauer, and others) it's actually actively detracting from the function of the garment.
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I am looking for an Arcteryx rain jacket. I want the quality and material of the high end Alpha or Beta but I tried one on and I did not like the high pockets. I like resting my hands in them and it feels unatural so high up. I know they are designed to be accessed while wearing a pack but I much prefer low pockets. Are their any jackets with the same protection and breathabilty?
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>>1104567
I agree with you there, but the berghaus logo is barely intelligible from a metre distance. It ain't walmart tier either. Give me a break, negro.
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>>1104540
Berghaus isn't pleb...
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best 60-65l hiking backpack?
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>>1102924
20lb base weight. Just buy decently light midrange gear and don't pack shit you don't need and you'll be fine on weight.
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>>1104573
Gregory Baltoro for big loads, Osprey Atmos for lighter loads, Arcetryx Bora if you got the bucks, and UL shit if you're a gay.
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>>1102924
Fully loaded and ready to go, between 30 and 40 pounds depending on weather and how much water I need to take with me.

Usually about half that weight is water.
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Want to make or buy a backpacking woodstove/chimney tent system, all ones I've found that are collapsible or backpacker friendly are 300+, any ideas?
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Need a new jacket, hiking in UK so looking for something to fend off lots of rain. Am I better going with a gore-tex off the shelf brand or a military issue jacket?
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>>1104232
>>1104209
Digital camera
Something wide angle
Big tele for birds maybe 150-600
Tripod

Probably more than 5kg. Yea I guess space will be a bigger issue.
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>>1104936
A civilian goretex jacket is the best available to you. They range in quality but a simple $200 paclite shell is bulletproof.
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So I bought a beat up one of these for $18 at a milsurp store in Maine. I saw that it was somewhat popular amongst bushcraft guys so I gave it a whirl. Fixed it up with some brass rivets to resecure all the straps and took it camping.

I liked it overall, and for $18 I'm not sure I could find something more accessible, but as everyone already knew it's a shitty backpack. It's pretty well designed for carrying bricks, and it's cheap as fuck, but it's probably more comfortableto just carry your gear in your hands. Top tier in terms of poverty level backpacks.
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>>1104973
Cheers, don't suppose you know if the patagonia torrentshell is any good? I've got a low budget but my current jacket can only survive mild showers so I want something decent
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>>1104988
add an alice waistband, that improves it a lot
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>>1104998
It's acceptable but don't pay more than 60 bong bucks for one. They're good about doing repairs and will replace it down the road if you have high enough charisma.
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>>1104998
Not goretex but their own proprietary membrane. Paclite feels WAY better against the skin than patagonia's h2no. They've got great customer service though and it's not a bad jacket.
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>>1104988
Looks fucking great desu, would use it.
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>>1098971
But what about nz merino wool m9? Support us little peoples at the bottom of the world
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>>1105585
Not him but il support you guys. Il pretty much pay extra for anything from the anglosphere over most asian makes. Preference would be US>Canada>rest of you guys but you're all above china and thailand by mile
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>>1104988
Hey anon what is this pack, details please?
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>>1105601
Mate, swazi, norsewear and macpac are nz made. Sadly the trusty old swandri is made in fucking china now.

Makes me sad that, that kiwi icon has gone overseas.
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>>1105617
Friend it breaks my heart seeing all these iconic businesses moving from their homelands.
I shouldnt have to go out of my way to find common goods made in my own country. I dont know how it is over there but it can be downright painful trying to find things not made in china.
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>>1105619
I just did some scrambling on google. Alot of awesome kiwi brands have moved manufacturing to china, like Macpac, Skellerup. Real iconic kiwi brands. Swazi and norsewear are still made here for sure.
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best 2 man tent around the £100 mark?
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>>1105617
I've never heard anyone cop to owning a Swanndri. Maybe you cunts should have bought some of them if you wanted to keep the jerbs.
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>>1105664
currently looking at the naturehike cloud up 2, can't decide if I should get it with a skirt for £10 extra
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>>1105615
Swedish Lk35.
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>>1105668
This is true.

Swandri sort of shitted themselves by making stuff thats too good. I have my dads old one and its probably getting near 40 years old and its still mint.

You dont really buy them, you inherit them haha
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>>1105664
Haven't used it personally but from what I've heard the Zephyros 2 is good and very lightweight for the price.
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>>1101065
Brand new probably nothing will exist in your price range however second hand items are your best bet...craigslist ebay goodwill salvation army garage sales surplus stores
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>>1102262
buff
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSvRm4CHmvE
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>>1104573
i can vouch for the osprey atmos
i specifically picked it because i sweat alot on my back way more than most

downside is no rain it has to be bought separately
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>>1098930
its fine as long as it doesnt get wet
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>>1098931
personally i buy the best because i can
could i do without....definately

a jansport with a trash bag is just as waterproof as my osprey with a rain cover
however i like the extra comfort and adjustability and ventilation of osprey

so it comes down to do you have the money and are the extra little perks worth it to you? its a personal choice
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>>1104568
yes...outdoor research foray is really good little pricey though but ive used it and been really happy

if you want a more warmer actual jacket and not a shell costco has a great jacket made by weatherproof it looks great protects from elements cost like $30
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whats a good non homemade stick stove? (one you burn little bits of wood in)
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>>1106538
>good
>stick stove
Those are mutually exclusive statements. You can have a stick stove...or you can have a good stove. You can't have both.
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>>1106610
I disagree. My friend bought a steel toothbrush holder and turned it into a twig stove and that thing is gr8.
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>>1106610
wish I checked the thread before buying this ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07475PFZ2/ ) it also does fuel tablets and alcohol fuel
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>>1106638
pic related, think it's a clone of some other one but reviews are good
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>>1098925

What brand of pad would you recommend? I've never used longer before? Also is there one that would fit well inside a hammock?
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>>1106691
unless you're scaling a cliff face it isn't worth it to combine a hammock and sleeping pad
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what's the best mora?
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>>1099005
Where did you buy them? They're out of stock on amazon, and their site appears to be down.
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>>1107469

I like the bushcraft black more than any i've tried but i also wear a little eldris around my neck for menial cutting activities. It's very handy.
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>>1107523
I picked this up on sale from amazon. Very pleased with it.
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>>1106691
Thermarest Z Lite Sol. Excellent, cheap, available in full or half length.

Hammocks and pads don't really mix that well, but if you insist then pretty much anybody's half length or torso length pad will do okay.
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on the Foretrex 401 can I make it point me in a direction, like walk to a place, set a marker then walk off and have it point towards that spot?
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>>1098391
I was looking at the compasses lately also and i agree with you. Those ones with mirrors are the best. If you go for Suunto, i strongly suggest A series (the ones you can actually place on a map and do navigation), instead of the wrist strapped models.
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how long can I tent be wet for (not pisswet but damp after hand toweling it) I've heard never put it away wet but what do you do on multi day hikes then?
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>>1106538
1,79€ IKEA ORDNING cutlery drying basket
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>>1108938
use tent pegs like this if you have a small pot. if you need distance to the ground a steaming insert for pots is good as reflector / wind shield


otherwise bushbox clones like >>1106663
work well to and might come with multi fuel option like a alcohol bowl are nice to. you can get at online from cheap to titanium.
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>>1099078
I was issued this or something similar but it only went up to what looks like lvl 6. It sat unused in my closet with my three other duffle bags full of gear and a couple rucks. Not that I couldnt of used some of the light wind/rain resistant jacket pieces but if I showed up to drill wearing it I would have made a slight spectacle of myself since no one else wore it. What a waste moving all my gear from apt to apt for eight years only to be returned unused. The only thing I ever wore was the big marshmallowy jacket, even then I was subject to criticism. Thanks u.s. Taxpayer.
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will a 75l pack look ridiculous on me, 5'7" also best 75l pack?
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so, what's up with lumbar packs ?

why not just use a light backpack ?
I'm mostly interested in them because I am a very sweaty guy and I get serious bacne every summer.

any expericene with those ?
don't they slip when only used with a waist band ?
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Someone convince me why I shouldn't spend $160 on a titanium canteen and mess kit.

http://www.heavycoverinc.com/heavy-cover-us-gi-style-titanium-canteen-mess-kit-37oz-includes-tritan-plastic-and-titanium-canteen-cap/

I've been using a surplus Bundeswehr mess kit for a while but it's getting really beat up. This thing is lighter, stronger, and does more but is also like 10 times as expensive
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>>1109042
They carry the weight on your lumbar so the center of gravity of your pack is located at the center of gravity of your body. A light pack might be lightweight but it still isn't centered on your body, this isn't a difficult concept to grasp.
>>1108960
Everything looks ridiculous on you, you're a fucking manlet. Just kys desu senpai
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>>1109043
>Someone convince me why I shouldn't...
Because that's fucking stupid.
>$160 for a thin chinese-made autism bottle
It's one thing to shell out for nice gear. It's another thing to get scammed out of $160 for five bucks' worth of chink metal.
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>>1104988
Changing straps and waist belt is mandatory with this.
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>>1109042
It reminds me of the u.s. Lbv but with an oversized butt pack. They're used in conjunction with a ruck or smaller pack. You drop the ruck or sack when you don't need it. I liked it, I kept big spray/sunscreen/ and snacks in the ammo pouches.
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>>1109137
There's literally nothing wrong with those straps you fucking faggot. God I can't stand all of the lanklets on this board who cringe at the thought of any kind of strap that's not some trademarked air-cell polyethylpropylstyremenilol webbing or something.
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>>1109233
>there's literally nothing wrong with those straps
Except all the shit that's wrong with them. Like being set too close together, being set at shit-tier angles so not only do they dig into you but one side wears faster than the other, the fact that they're PINNED on so they squeak incessantly, and that the waist belt is literally just a piece of half-inch COTTON webbing TIED to the frame so it does ABSOLUTELY NOTHING as far as carrying the load.
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>>1109053
You don't know fuck all about this, because you've obviously never owned one. It's Titanium, not chink metal - most titanium products are manufactured in coastal China, Japan or Russia because that is where it's frequently mined - other manufacturing companies order their ti from these areas and charge a premium. High grade Titanium is expensive, milling is even more expensive to end up with a large piece of kit, so the price is justified for the actual material and manufacturing. This bottle was commissioned and designed by some ex serviceman yank, there is only one factory producing these bottles - Heavy Cover is the US company who sticks their logo on the Keith Titanium bottle, which is the exact same product from the same factory
>>1109043
I reccomend them, probably my most used and favourite piece of gear. I'll list some benefits:
Bomb proof. Seriously, like most metal you can scratch Titanium a little, but I've thrown mine out trees, down a rock face, dropped it from 6ft and no dents or dings.
Freeze proof. If you loosen the lid, the air won't expand and you can just throw the whole thing in the fire to defrost, but I once forgot to loosen the lid and it just "expanded" a little with the air on the curved side, popped right back once the pressure was relieved
Memory. This metal is like some kind of UFO Roswell material - I swear the Titanium gear I've owned pops back into its original shape if you somehow dent it. I've hammered kleen kanteens back into shape, but they look dinged as fuck, whereas the one time I dented this (someone accidentally literally kicked it off a cliff, I put it there precariously and foolishly), I took it home, inserted a hammer and popped the dent right back out.
Weight - 140grams with the Titanium bottle top, ~300 with the cup and lid. Pretty fuggin featherweight for a low profile, minimalist, bombproof, anti-microbial tank of a bottle you can boil in, I carry the cup with me most places

Solid gear, better than a steelie
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>>1109328
Forgot to add, that pic's scales shows 148 grams, i just that second quickly dumped the water so it's less when dry. Mine also came with a pouch and strap, decent quality but too overconstructed, not quick release enough and desert marpat camo, fine for hunting but not the best. Warning tho, Most military canteen covers are designed for 1 litres, the bottle is 1.1 and even bigger with the cup, so you're better off making your own pouch/strap carrier or putting it in a pack sidepouch
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>>1098919

>cotton
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>>1109328
Ok I take it back, after reading this post it's clear that nobody with autism would wish to purchase this product.
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>>1097675
get a gerber. cheap enough to lose and nice enough to get everything u need done.
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>>1098391
why not just get a military surplus compass?
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>>1105983
>>>1104568
>yes...outdoor research foray is really good little pricey though but ive used it and been really happy
>if you want a more warmer actual jacket and not a shell costco has a great jacket made by weatherproof it looks great protects from elements cost like $30

I grabbed one a few years back on Black Friday off Backcountry. I fucking love the thing. The side zippers can turn the entire jacket into a poncho if you like. The seams have all held up. I just need to re seal it this year.
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>>1109464
Fine, I'll admit, I bought an overspecced autism bottle when a $10 nalgene would have done
It's still a great bottle
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>>1105617
>macpac are nz made
not any more fella
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>>1108927
You do what you can. I like to put my rain fly on the stretchy outer pocket of my pack for example and rotate it inside there every time i take a break. Or, if you arrive early at wherever you're going to be camping you can line dry it.
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>>1109043
>>1109328
Still heavier than any plastic bottle and it's easier to cook in a proper pot.
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>>1095855
Anyone use a hennessy explorer hammock? If so how would you rate it?
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>>1104568
okokokok. before i get into it, i just felt the need to say i have the exact same jacket in your pic and just brought it back from it's first outing. it's pretty rad. but back to the matter at hand.
>quality and material of the high end Alpha or Beta.
These jackets are just as high quality as every other piece of arc'teryx outerwear. You pay for more material. example: alpha sv 100 denier $900; beta sv 80 denier $800. also you're not just paying for quality and features. it takes several years to get an arc'teryx manufacturing license so you pay for that.
>I did not like the high pockets
They're functional. if you don't like function, arc'teryx isn't worth the money for you.
>Are their any jackets with the same protection and breathability?
Yes. Thousands. Gore-tex's patent expired several years ago so now all these big companies are pulling waterproofing out of their asses. It's really difficult to fuck up.
>breathability
don't listen to what the manufacturers tell you. when you're working up a sweat, breathability doesn't make shit difference. trust me. i just got back from a trip with that jacket in the pic and "gore-tex pro"(which i might add is one of the most "breathable" membranes on the market) didn't do balls for me. Ventilation matters. Companies throw the word "breathable" out there attaching it to some fancy cgi diagram on a label and hope people don't ask questions. Is the membrane breathable? In the loosest sense of the term, yes. you're probably not gonna notice it though.

With all that said, you might still wanna go for something with gore-tex since the jackets that use it have strong face fabrics. Marmot Minimalist. Great pricepoint, great jacket.
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>>1099206
But it's not plastizied, so you are not a real bushcrafter. MODS!

>>1102820
Berghaus Stormcloud Jacket, great.
Berghaus Flexlite 50l backpack (last one with what they call bioflex or something, a hinged hipbelt), great.
Berghaus Navigator zipoff pant, great.
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is the Therm-a-Rest Z-Lite SOL good for sleeping on your side on frozen ground?
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>>1112335
I side sleep with it on fair weather and like it. I'm not sure the R value is high enough for subfreezing though. You might need to double up on pads.
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>>1112336
would it just be worth spending a bit more and getting an inflatable thermarest you think?
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Which of these seemingly two different versions of the atmos AG 65 should I get? what're the differences?
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>>1112358
>atmos 65
>not 50
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>>1112337
They're different pads for different purposes. Neither is a bad choice. Thermarest is a great company. Go to a store and lay on em.
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>>1112361
I don't externally mount any gear so need to put tent and othe stuff most people mount on the outside inside the pack
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>>1112364
The only thing I keep outside of my atmos 50 is my zlite and I can still fit a fucking bear can in there too. I have no idea what people take backpacking that they're filling some of these packs.
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>>1112366
I don't fill up my current 65L but the spare room is nice to have
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>>1112367
Fair enough.

To answer your question about the different packs: it's either a revision or weird photography to account for the difference. They look like the same version to me and I'd bet it's just the photography and stuffing.
>>
Ok
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>>1097154
Leatherman Surge. The scissors are actually usable, you can sharpen the knife with the included file, and the blade exchanger can accept Jigsaw blades.
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>>1097370
Just make one. All you need is some thin natural wooden boards or driveway markers (wear a mask if using the latter), some leather belts, a saw, an awl, and a tarp or thick sack, like a pillowcase or trash bag.

Hell, if you're going light, you don't even need a frame, just the belts.
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>>1098919
Go for it. Wool doesn't dry very fast.
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>>1109043
BUY IT.
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>>1112335
Only if you are hardcore. It will not be the sweetest night. If you are really a sidesleeper, spend the money for a Prolite Plus and call it a day. Frozen ground would be ok in either case (assuming it's only at freezing, not far below, the Prolite Plus is good far below freezing).
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>>1110655
>Berghaus Stormcloud jacket
>Great

As a person who works in a retail store, this is one of the worst shell-layers we carry. The rubber lining will boil you alive - and their concept of no ventilation zips doesn't add to that factor. You don't want to be wearing that unless you're sitting still.
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>>1112414
Yeah, but it's 50 bucks. Jackets with the features you mention go for 250.
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What is a good hatchet or medium sized axe that isn't fucking expensive? I was at the cold steel axe but saw that a lot of them where breaking at the handles, what do you guys recommend? I would like for it to have a wooden handle
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>>1112419
>tfw when my store is cheapest on the national market and sells the jacket for $160

It's not worth that much, but makes you think
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>>1112424
I was talking about 50 euro bucks. I actually bought mine for 30€ at amazon.de.

$160? WTF! It's a cheap rain jacket that protect you against rain. Why would anyone pay more than 50 bucks for it, it doesn't even have pit zippers.
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>>1112459
Yeah, I can find it all over ebay for under €40 - honestly I have no idea. I've never recommended it mind you, unless on sale
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>>1112419
Marmot precip is a solid backpacking jacket and can be found online for under $80.
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>>1112508
For the price it looks to be okay - although sportswear seems to be cheap as fuck in the US?
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>>1112510
We're the primary market for it, of course it's cheaper.
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>>1098971
Feathered Friends has a store downtown. They worth checking out?
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>>1099064
Link for pic?
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Looking for a new hatchet. I'm not savvy enough to put a new edge and handle on my dad's old ones and I wouldn't be surprised if they're rusted through

Should I fall for the Husqvarna meme? The price point seems far too good to be true

Help us>>1112421
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>>1101108
You're a real pie e of shit, anon
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>>1112649
Not a meme at all, anon. I've had hands on experience with these things and you seriously cannot find a better hatchet for the money. The handle needs a bit of sanding right out of the box, but the build is bomb-proof, the steel is good, and the profile of the head makes it great both at chopping/hewing and splitting.
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>>1112678
I saw a lot of pictures of that hatchet on amazon with the tip broken, where the metal has a different finished completely broken off, what gives?
>>
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How well will my make shift wool blanket sleeping bag (WBSB™) work for camping? I was thinking 3 wool blankets since they are only 80% wool folded halfway and Harbor freight has them for cheap.

The foot end will be stiched and part of the open end will be stiched too, like pic related, the swirls meaning stiching. Once this is done, I can choose if I want 3 blankets on both sides or 4 to the ground and 2 over me.

For now, I don't know if I'lll be using some kind of foam padding for isulation to the ground, but I really like this idea, do you guys have any constructive critisism for this project? Any flaws you see? Anything I can do to improve it? This should cost less than a sleeping bag meant for about 32 F, but I think mine could stand colder weather, maybe not by much, but who knows.
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>>1112727
Fuck, should mention that original size of one is 60x80 inches
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>>1112729
won't that be itchy as fuck? a cheap bag is $40 on stp
>>
Looking for a rugged light-wight lantern to take camping. Any suggestions?
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>>1112724
That's the carpenters axe iirc. They made the blade too thin and put a hot stamp right where it tapers down a lot. I think they also temper the carpenters axe to a harder edge which makes it more brittle. Overall just a bad design there, but the hatchets really are solid.
>>
>>1112742
Well, wool is already itchy, I don't see why that would be a higher factor with this design.

I think I heard washing it helps, but I could be wrong.
>>
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>>1112880
Chalwyn are godtier
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>>1112880
Feuerhand makes a good lantern.
>>
>>1112727
I'm sure it would work, but it would be heavy and maybe more work than it's worth.

Look, a sleeping bag can be had new for $40 that is useable in sub freezing temps. You can buy stuff that is lighter or stuff that has better quality, for a price, but temperature is generally not a problem.

Make sure it's large enough and make sure the first (not the second, not the third, only the first counts) value from the EN rating is the coldest temperature you expect.

Check out the pic here:
>>1110657
>>
>>1112916
It would be a bit heavy, but I shouldn't be carrying too much so it wont be burdensome. I was looking at sleeping bags but its just something about the plastic that makes me think it wont last long, im sure the more expensive ones have thick material outside to prevent tears and such.

The MSS sleeping bags/bivvys where an option but the surplus ones are out of stock and the newer ones are costly.

How heavy must a bag be to be too heavy? I think I weigh about 165, I workout but it's mostly compound lifts.
>>
What should I buy as far as gear goes, /out/? I'm a beginner /out/doorsman.
>>
>>1112964
A biolite and a tears supply of pemmican is all you need
>>
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Bought this today with some Birthday cash, so far it's toasty as fuck! just waiting on some rain to see how it holds up
>>
>>1112964
What do you plan on doing?
>>
>>1112993
>hoping for bad weather so you can wear your favorite layer.


i know that feel.

sick jacket btw.
>>
>>1112995
Buying gear. Did you miss that part? Read it again it's only 14 words
>>
>>1113017
Gear for what? I could recommend waterproof gear but you might live in a desert or perhaps I can recommend kayaking gear but it'd be useless if you wanted to go rock climbing.

The fact you can't ascertain the basics you need for your area or what you want to do makes you the retard in this situation.
>>
>>1113017
All right you smarmy shit, just buy several crates of pic related. Well done, you now have gear.
>>
>>1110657
>>
>>1112961
As a rule of thumb, a sleeping bag that weighs 2kgs or more will probably be warmer than your wool setup.
>>
>>1113116
Well, i'm too comitted now, so i'll pass on the sleeping bag for the time being, but thanks for the advice.

Would 2 80% wool blankets for about 28 F be enough? Or would I need 3? More than likely I'll have a fire going, and may or may not get the thermarest $20 one, I forget the name.
>>
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>>1113214
Ridgerest? It's a good value mat, bot in money as well as R-value, albeit bulky.

Nobody can tell you if wool blankets are good enough for a certain temperature, too much variables. That's why sleeping bags have EN ratings, these are taken in a controlled environment and be compared.

The decision to make a sleeping bag yourself, wehn you can buy one for $40 that goes down to 0F is really beyond me. Are you some kind of bushcraft larper?
>>
will the Marmot Men's PreCip be good enough for winter in the UK assuming I'm wearing
>base layer
>wool socks
>boots
>gloves
>hat
>regular clothes
>>
>>1113391
My friend has one and says it's not breathable at all, if they were cheaper I'd go for it but £60 is a lot for a sweat bag
>>
>>1113391
You need an insulating layer in there. The precip will work as a wind break though.
>>1113425
Mine is fine unless I'm sweating and then i just open up the pit vents.
>>
>>1113440
>You need an insulating layer in there.
new to this, will a bog standard fleece be good enough?
>>
>>1113443
Not sure how cold it gets where you are but I'll run you through my New England layering system for winter temps near zero Fahrenheit and wind
>baselayers
>nylon pants (more softshell style than parachute like material but uninsulated)
>lightweight quarterzip fleece top
>lightweight down midlayer
>wind and water outer layer (the precip for you but I use a lightly insulated Patagonia softshell with polartec windbloc)
Sometimes I'll also slip a fleece vest in between layers if it's exceptionally cold. Then you've got your hats and gloves and socks and boots. Hope that gives you a good idea how it works. The idea is to have each layer as singular in purpose as possible so that you can fully adapt while out by shedding and donning layers. For the most part you'll warm up once you get moving. The rule of thumb is to start an activity a little bit cold so you're not stopping to ditch layers once you get in gear. If you have anymore questions these articles are excellent guides.

https://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/layering-basics.html
https://m.outdoorgearlab.com/expert-advice/how-to-layer-clothing-for-each-season

t. outfitter
>>
>>1113448
thanks a lot
>>
>>1104568
These are not casual wear jackets, they are equipment. The high pockets are so you can access them while wearing a waist belt or a climbing harness. If you want something cozy to wear around town then that jacket costs about 3x more than what you need to pay. It is a piece of high end, hard use equipment. Not something to walk around with your hands in your pockets.
>>
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>>1113358
It just hapened to be cheaper in my situation, plus i've been reading up in a book I got which said that 2 wool blankets of 100% should be fine to 0 F, since mine are 80% and it should only drop to 28 F, I thought that it would be fine.
>>
>>1113448
Quarter zips are gay as shit, get a full zip
>>
>>1113513
most say to not fuck with wool in freezing conditions, especially if you expect freezing conditions. youd be prudent to test in your backyard first
>>
>>1113532
Good point, the temps would have to be similar, and there would be no fire going, but i'll just have to see how it feels. Where have you seen 0 F sleeping bags for $40? I've only seen some rated to 32 F or 35 F for that price.
>>
>>1113538

you wrote this:

>it should only drop to 28 F

Amazon, almost the first hit:

goddammit://www.amazon.de/EXPLORER-Schlafsack-230x82cm-Mumienschlafsack-Kompressionspacksack/dp/B000SE3KG4/ref=lp_3024236031_1_6?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1507151847&sr=1-6

Protip: you can combine sleeping bags if it is very cold.
>>
I made a post in a different thread a couple of days ago:

>Wear a light wool baselayer when you sleep - it'll keep you warm and dry. You don't want to wear too much though, or you'll sweat and destroy the heat-distribution.
>Get a sleeping bag liner - this will easily raise the temperature in your bag by a 8-10 degrees fahrenheit.
>Own a down jacket? Or something warm? Use it as a blanket over your bag.
>Boil water and fill a bottle to keep in your bag. (Make sure it doesn't leak, or you'll have a bad time)
>Remember to eat and drink enough
>Get a thicker mattress, preferably 2-layered
>Sleep with a hat, neck, mittens, etc - cover anything that will be exposed to the cold
>Last but not least, get a better sleeping bag

If you disregard the parts about sleeping bags and replace it with your blankets you might get something out of it.

Also, you want to make sure you're not cold when going to sleep. Do some pushups, squats, burpees etc before going to bed. If you're already warm it will be easier to stay warm. If your feet are cold when you go to sleep you'll still be cold when you wake up - and face a greater risk of frost-damages.

You say that your blankets are 80% wool. What are the other 20%? This could have an effect on your comfort, especially if it's cold.
>>
>>1095855
Recently got a Slumberjack Railhauler. Love it and was wondering what pouches (surplus or commercial) would go well with it. Preferably something with a fair amount of volume.
>>
what flask do you guys use? I can only find 237ml ones and no way I can get pissed off that
>>
>>1113941https://www.kleankanteen.com.au/collections/insulated-bottles/products/insulated-coffee-mug-20oz?variant=38226161297

just happened to be looking at the site when I came back to this thread anon, I have one of their insulated bottles that I use on the trail for keeping a hot brew on my pouch. My wife bought it for me for a birthday present and I was just looking at the larger sizes. The small one four hundred and something millilitres is just right for a cuppa. I was in Broome a couple of weeks ago and it kept iced coffee cold til lunchtime. Can recommend, not even shilling
>>
>>1113729
8% polyester, 6% acrylic, 3% viscose, 3% nylon

Something like a liner i'll definately look into.
>>
>alcohol stove arrives
>too big for my pot
>pot suffocates the flame
new gear but I can't use it until a piece of stainless steel mesh arrives from china, anyone else know this feel?
>>
Made my own kuksa out of burly wood, i never use it, because a 0.25€ tin cup with handle is:
- lighter
- sturdier
- stupid easy to clean with sand and water
- waterproof

don't fall for the cucksa meme.
>>
>>1114084
>polyester
Quite common mix for wool, not a problem
>acryclic
This is a terrible /out/ textile, and should be avoided. It won't warm you if it gets wet, may cause bumps and is generally not very durable. Will also be clammy.
>Viscose
This fabric actually draws moisture, and is hard to dry. Doesn't deal with washing very well, as it might shrink and curl.
>Nylon
This is probably here to make the blanket sturdier. Totally fine.

Since it's still 80% wool you'll probably be fine, so it doesn't matter as much for a carpet as long as you're under shelter. Perhaps something to keep in mind for next time, though? Fabrics like nylon, elastane/lycra and polyester, bamboo are commonly mixed with wool with good purpose, depending on what outcome you're after. Clean 100% wool is obviously also good, but it's not always as sturdy and may lose its shape easily.

Will you post pictures of the "bag" when you're done with it?
>>
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Should I buy a Foretrex 601?

I have never had a standalone GPS before.

I am mainly considering the 601 over the 401 ($100 difference) for the increased battery life, durability, and screen resolution.

The idea for how I want to use it is to enter my waypoints manually before a trip using public GPS data. Just to give me a general idea of where I'm at, in conjunction with an actual map. And then I can also enter any POIs I discover along the way, such as water sources.

Will I regret getting a minimalist GPS like this, over a more full-fledged GPS that can use topo maps?
>>
Looking for a, fall into winter kinda jacket. something warm into low 40'sF for around $100
>>
>>1114799
Get a marmot or Patagonia softshell
>>
>>1114799
https://www.taigaworks.ca/Fleece-Clothing-c15
Prices are in leaf dollars, so subtract 20% for USD prices
>>
>>1114799
http://www.summiticeapparel.com

Try these
>>
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>>1114788

digital maps were never my thing. I always get physical copies. something about a flimsy paper with small tears, fold marks, and smudges is just a e s t h e t i c as fuck.
>>
>>1114902
Lel fuck off Nathan
>>
Could anyone recomend a good E-tool preferably one with a solid wood handle and isn't collapsible
>>
>>1114970
Couldnt you just buy a smaller spade and cut the handle down? It would probably be the cheapest option, i think a shovel is like 10 or 15 bucks.
>>
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What headlamp do you use? Need something that has red and white light but can get to red without turning on white (for army shit).
>>
>>1115170
Tõmba oksa tont
>>
>>1115170
I used an Eveready headlamp in Iraq. It had a red filter on a hinge. It snapped in place. I never failed to show light discipline because of those features. Pentzel makes a good headlamp too but why pay more?
>>
>>1114788
Looks cool man. If you can afford it go for it. I personally wouldn't get a minimalist gps though.
>>
Guys can you help a newie here?

I need to buy a new backpack but it need to meet some criteria:
-I will use it every day to the uni, to the work, to de gym, so it must be confortable to use.
-My work consist in walking all moring form one building to another, buildings that are so crowld with people that they make a line in order to take the elevator (wich means that I need to go to a 5th floor by stairs I want to finnish my work in time).
-I will not carry to much weight but the amount of things that I am carrying nowadays make my back hurt at the end of the day. I almost sure that is my current backpack fault because it only have two stripes and that make carry all the weight on the shoulders, so I want one with chest and waist strips. Also, any tips to avoid backache is welcome.
-I planning go hiking next winter to the mountains and I want to use it. I am not camping (because gf does not want to) but I going to do some medium/hard trails.
-It need to be durable.
-In the same order of things, I dont want and I dont need something autistic big nor extremely camping oriented. Also I dont want it to be to much flashy or "out of urban context".

I was thinking something like pick related. What do guys can recommend?
Also general tips, dos and donts, "must have", etc about hiking is welcome. Thanks in advance.
>>
>>1115285
The other side. Someone pls?
>>
>>1115285
Deadlifts and barbell rows
>>
>>1113528
Hey dude you're gay.
>>
>>1097154
People always recommend leatherman wave, but I've had the same cheap multi I got from the PX for 5 years and it's held up fine with heavy use.
>>
>>1097154
I just coped a leatherman kick from a garage sale for $18 new

It isn't fuck huge and its got the main tools, came with a leather sheath which isn't too bad
>>
why would you use a multitool out in the woods anyway, autistic buyfags?
>>
>>1112880
UCO. Primus Micron. Coleman Northstar.

Alternatively, get one of those Tiki burner cans and make a housing for it from a large can, chicken wire, and tinfoil.
>>
Will a 40 F sleeping bag + blanket be good enough for 30 degrees?

I want to get a 40 F because:

1. It's only this cold like 1 day a year here, so after that I wouldn't need the blanket

2. The sleeping bag is compact, so it saves space

I can roll the blanket inside my tarp
>>
>>1115170
Black Diamond Revolt
>decent quality lense for an uncluttered beam
>good distance
>flood and spotlight modes
>red light mode you can turn on without first cycling through white
>rechargeable
>also accepts normal batteries
I've been very happy with it
>>
>>1115285
Osprey talon or escapist are your best bets. If you want to bear weight on your hips then make sure the pack comes with a real hip belt. The simple webbing design like in your pic is just for stability, not for spreading the load.
>>
>>1112366
oh look its the everyone lives in the same climate as me anon!
>>
>>1112727
you don't need to stitch blankets ffs, you just tuck them properly, look it up.
>>
>>1116469
I actually just found a video that really showed you how to tuck it in nicely around you, so now im reconcidering just doing that
>>
>>1116553
Only thing with that is that it'll loosen up if you shift around while you sleep. Having an insulated bag you can just climb into is a lot more convenient.
>>
>>1116467
You are both basement dwellers obviously
>>
>>1100549
I thought that was universal now for the states, minus AK and one other. In GA it's the same way. Lots of Amazon stuff has tax and anyplace that has a store in the state has tax too.
>>
>>1102531
Oh Lord my sides
>>
>>1104540
Patagonia makes good gear and the company itself is pretty fantastic. If your salty because the kids at your community college wear their basic fleeces and rain jackets that's your own issue. Quit being an appearance obsessed wienie.
>>
>>1104567
What? TNF, Marmot, and Eddie Bauer generally have pretty subtle or average logos on their actual gear. Small right chest, maybe a sleeve cuff, and maybe the upper sleeve. How does that take away from the function, especially when most of them aren't sewn in, it's more like a stamp or sticker.
>>
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Rate my gear lads.
>>
>>1112892
>>1112901
>the current year
>oil lanturns
ISHYGDDT.
>>
>>1116821
Oooooh is that one of those amazon survival knives i seent on a wranglerstar video?

Also fellow /out/ists i just ordered me one of these- a german army poncho, howd i do?
>>
>>1116825
Yup. Found it at Harbor Freight for cheap. It has a compass, fishing line, matches and a match striking paper.
>>
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>that one guy who bought Coleman
>>
>>1116826
I reckon it was suprisingly good for how cheap it was haha
>>
>>1116825
They seem nice to me, don't have one but I've just bought an East German strichtarn half shelter which works as a poncho (pic related), sleeping bag thingo, and whatever else you can invent with them, would recommend
>>
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Bought a backpackers' cache bear container from Amazon.com today. I heard that bears can break BearVaults in some NY mountain range so I chose this one instead. Also fuck hanging food. Sometimes I want to drunkardy stumble into some bagles and almond butter at night.
>>
>>1116830
Yeah i was looking at rain jackets and stumbled across it, 45 new zealand dollars haha I reckon itd be great in my hunting kit. Shes gets pretty wet over here in new zealand.

Waterproof cover, bag cover, small shelter, improv meat sling. Should be good. Looking forward to its many uses for its low cost haha
>>
>>1116834
Haven't properly used mine yet, just for dicking around around fires while drunk. I'm heading to Tassie in like a month for a week of hiking, I'll probably buy a couple extra and throw them around wherever they're needed. They're not totally waterproof but good enough for most uses even in bad weather as far as I can tell
>>
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>>1105983
>>1110021
>>1110554
Thanks guys. I have looked at some of the Outdoor Research stuff and it all looks great. I tried on the Marmot Minimalist as well and was pretty impressed. I'm leaning towards one of those or the Arcteryx Beta SL.

>>1113471
I understand but I work in torrential rain and snow in Alaska and would like a hard use jacket. Protection comes first so pockets aren't a deal breaker but if i'm trying to find a perfect jacket for me I would prefer lower pockets.
>>
>>1116827
I have the coleman biker sleeping bag, what wrong with it?
>>
>>1117095
They're a shit-quality brand
>>
>>1114522
>drinks from a tin cup
Kek
>>
>>1117463
Literally nothing wrong with a good tin cup, anon.
>>
>>1117596
Alzheimers
>>
>>1117735
That's aluminum and that whole theory is shaky at best.
>>
>>1097370
REI garage sale. Get an Osprey Atmos AG 65
>>
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Got a bear container today. Backpackers' cache
>BearVault fags jelly
>>
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Picked up a carenthia defence 4. A ulvang will sweater and some surplus flecktarn pants
>>
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>>1118278
Meant wool. Not will.

Very comfy bag. Larger then my old one but also way warmer
>>
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>>1118279
Rough size comparison with my Mammut Alpine UL bag
>>
>>1118278
>>1118279
>>1118280
Looks nice. What's the temperature rating on that?
>>
>>1118287
>>1118287
>>1118287
NEW THREAD
>>1118287
>>1118287
>>1118287




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