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Old thread: >>1110706

Search terms:

Permaculture - Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Vertical Gardening - Square Foot Gardening - Polyculture - Composting - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish

Resources:

https://pastebin.com/4CqXsHFm

Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2005/may05/SecVeget.html

Scans of Classic Herbal Texts:
http://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/index.html

Homegrowmen Archive (WinRAR/WinZip/7Zip etc open rar archive files):

>76.1MB
>Homegrowmen Threads Mar-20-2013 to Sep-29-2017.rar
https://www.mediafire.com/file/lbotds76751ws79/Homegrowmen%20Threads%20Mar-20-2013%20to%20Sep-29-2017.rar
Originally from archive website: https://archived.moe/out/
>>
My relatives have a nice big rural plot that they are letting me plant some shit on - I want to buy some ginseng and sow it in the shaded areas. Anyone able to recommend good sources of seed? I'm in Ontario, Canada.

I was thinking about this site here: http://www.hardingsginsengfarm.com/ginsengseeds.htm

But, I've never actually tried to grow ginseng and don't know whether seed or live plants is the best way to go.
>>
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>>1115667
This is him now, feel old yet?
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>>1115668
>negari-style pepper bonsai training

I bet tomatillo plants would make for some wicked banyan-style bonsai.

>>1115610
The website looks fine. Ginseng seeds take TWO YEARS to stratify. They are almost as tough to germinate as black elderberry seeds. That website should have info on germinating, but I recommend live plants, if you live within a few days mailing of the company. You may want to call them about shipping arrangements and pay extra for speedy deliveries. I find that cool weather shipping is best for plants. They tend to get cooked during summer months and frozen during winter months in transit.

If you get a crop growing, make sure to save your seeds and get those to germinate to spread the crop even more.
>>
>want to put logs in a raised bed like hugelkultur
>want to fill gaps with sand instead of organic material because don't want it to sink down, maybe cover with compost
is this a terrible idea and why?
>>
>>1115684
It will still sink down regardless. Adding a bit of sand means you need to think about the proportions of other materials. Too much sand can be a problem. There should be some compost down inside in the first place to allow deep roots something to use.
>>
>>1115684
One of the best things about hugelkultur beds is that they hold water so well. Adding tons of sand instead of twigs/coarse wood chips would definitely make this less effective. It'd also decrease the other positive stuff--you'd have like 70% of the work of hugelkultur while losing out on a lot of the benefits.
>>
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>>1115683
>negari-style pepper bonsai training
Had to look that up, but yes. Turning em into bonsai was my original reason to grow beppers, and I love those bare root looking ones.
>>
>>1115667
growth well little pepper!

guys i have a severe tick problem in my worm farm!!!!! plsif you guys know a way to get rid ot his little pest PLS TELL ME
>>
>>1115773
Most likely just mites and harmless.
>>
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>>>/an/2499749
>best soil? some people say orchid mix because its chunky and airy, but others say coarse soil blocks airflow

Normal soil works just fine. They are not too picky. Just don't pick a mix that stays soggy after watering.

>peat containing soil or no? some people say as long as its not the main ingredient, others say as minimum as possible

It is fine, just don't over do it.

>best fertilizer? pretty much the only thing they agree on, bone meal and fish fertilizer
>humidity dome or no on the propagator? (will be using a heating mat)

A dome will be better than not having it. They love heat and humidity. If aerial roots start forming in great numbers, let in more air flow. Remember, there should always be airflow to begin with.

>grow light yes or no? if yes are the standard red/blue ones ok or should i get one with uv/ir too?

If it is indoors, yes. The type doesn't matter so long as there's lots of it and it is close to the leaves. For optimal performance, get special grow LEDs based on any of the several online charts. Really though, anything will work in a pinch.

>anything else i should know?

Seed germination needs moisture, heat, and light for best and fastest germination. Pruning is also a thing. Look that up too.
>>
pine bark for veggie garden? good/bad idea? used to shredded palm tree but I ran out
>>
>>1115891
As long as you grow acid-loving plants like tomatoes and blueberries. Squash and beets may have some issues. You could always test your pH and adjust accordingly.
>>
>>1115898
>>1115891
It is fine and has the same problems/benefits that any other mulch has.
>>
>>1115494
you were right, i just changed the pot and the roots were already circling around, the new one is not that bigger either but i did order something off amazon.
>>
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>>1115902
>>1115898
cool
>>
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Hey guys, its been a quick minute.

Outside, all my straw bales are disintegrating, and all the tomatoes have fallen over. They're all about ready for the compost pile. Pill bugs got to my pumpkins about two months ago, so I ripped them out. The pill bugs are also drilling holes in my eggplant, and squirrels are chewing up every available tomato.

Cosmos and Marigolds are about shot, but I did manage to harvest some decorative corn and a sunflower the size of a trash can lid. Planted some wheat in one of the toxic railroad tie planter beds.

It's been getting down into the fifties at night, so I've begin the migration of things indoors. Pictured is my small indoor aquaponics setup. It's just a continuous flow in two tubs filled with gravel. The lettuce on the lower shelf needs a new light, and I think the marigolds are starting to rot instead of root. The tomatoes are trying to root in though!

I mainly didn't want to keep the goldfish outside all winter. Even with a heater they probably would have died. They're pretty cramped in this 10 gallon, so I might be buying another tank or stock tank for them to live in.
>>
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Have a garden with shitty mounded beds. I want to make proper raised beds for next season. I was thinking the best way would be to put up the walls now, fill with compost, wood chips and newspaper, and top up with loam in the spring. Any downsides to this? Would it be better to wait til spring to build the beds? Dangers to beds with really high organic matter?
>>
Whats the most efficient setup to grow potatoes indoors
>>
>>1116090
Seriously, why the hell?
>>
>>1116090
probably NFT like here

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20170005429.pdf#page=11

some of the refs include nutrient management, PPF vs Pn response, etc

assuming no greenhouse/sunlight, these are the most efficient publicly available lights i've seen

https://chilledgrowlights.com/independent-lab-reports/gen2-led-grow-light-module-lab-report

some others are here

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0099010#pone-0099010-t003
>>
>>1116076
wouldnt you want to put loam on the bottom
>>
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>>1116159
This is a gardening thread, not a why the hell thread

>>1116160
Thanks mate
>>
>>1116203
Would I? Would that be better than adding it to the top and using a fork to mix it into the top few inches?
>>
>>1116044
Interesting. Also, next time raise the pumpkin fruit up off the ground. If you have mulch and it is in wet weather, pull the mulch back away from the plants to help prevent problems with isopods and gastropods. When things dry out, put the mulch back. Update with pics of the tomato plant. I don't think the tank looks crowded. How many fish are in it?
>>
>>1116090
In a large pot with lots of light. Like a 5-10 gallon pot. Though, 5 gallon is pushing it.

>>1116076
When I was first making my raised beds they were full of branches, yards waste, grass clippings, manure, and kitchen scraps. On top of that I put a 4-6 inch layer of good soil made from compost, basically a loam. I went ahead and planted in it. Tons of mushrooms popped up, the plants did okay, and the soil was really really warm from all the activity under it. It cooled off as summer arrived and more mushrooms popped up. I didn't have any problems.
>>
>>1116216
well i would think that you put loam on the bottom, because that way the nutrients from the compost would sink down into it. otherwise you're fertilizing the ground underneath the bed where lots of your plants wont reach

t. a novice, im just ruminating
>>
>>1116076
Look up Hugelkultur.

>>1116227
>pumpkin fruit
It didnt even get a chance to set fruit, they ate the vines. No mulch, just regularly watered. Probably should have let it dry out a few times a week.

>crowded
like eight 2" goldfish in 10 gallons of water
>>
>>1116246
That's really odd. I never had trouble with isopods eating the vines. Only vine borer moth larva have ever caused problems with the vines.

>>1116246
>like eight 2" goldfish in 10 gallons of water

Most people have 5 to 10 gallons of water for every pound of fish.
>>
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A bit of an update.

The season is such that the leaves are changing color on the trees and littering the ground. It's been dry and cold, but the latest hurricane has brought constant mist and humidity to kill you. I've been yanking out dead vines and harvesting the last of many of the crops. I made some mistakes this year and I was lazier than I intended to be. All in all, this was the best year, for the farm, on record.

Here's the current carnage of the fall rot.
>>
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>>1116327
This year's compost pile is pretty big and I need to combine another pile of yard waste with it. There's lots of volunteer tomatillo plants, squash plants, and tomato plants popping up in it. The old compost pile "pumpkin hill" it ready to be shoveled into the raised beds as soon as they are cleared. The lower garden is churning out green leafy plants for potherbs and salads. The basil is in full bloom too. Helpfully, it will give a good amount of seeds. I'll be dehydrating tomatillos, peppers, and random stuff today.

One luffa sponge's vine died early and it dried out enough to harvest. I hope all of them end up at least this well off. Last time I grew them, they were all green and had no seeds ready inside. It took forever separating the skins and seeds from those then washing out all the slime. This one was as easy to clean as banging it on something hard, slipping the entire skin off and shaking the seeds out. It only needed washing with a bit of soap to be clean. Less than half its seeds seem to be viable.
>>
I have two questions for anons.

Firstly I am trying to grow trumpet and shiitake mushrooms in a plastic drawers for over a month now but I haven't noticed any growth thus am starting to get worried. I make sure the wood dust is damp and I boiled the wood dust before letting it cool injecting with the spore pellets. I did notice a very faint musty smell besides the smell of the wood itself. Just getting worried because I think I may have screwed up somehow but I don't know how.

Secondly is there anyway to inoculate mycorrhizal fungi into plant containers? I don't know how but would like to do so. I have access to a worm farm and a compost pile will that work?
>>
>>1116341
>shiitake

So long as it doesn't get too hot, too cold, too wet, too dry, or has mold it will do fine, just wait longer. What type of wood are you using?

>mycorrhizal fungi

Yeah, that is pretty easy. You can either buy some online to use or hunt up some strains that are flushing and use those. There are many strains. Some are difficult to get to flush for eating, but that doesn't matter too much if you are only using them to enhance the nutrient and water uptake for your plants.
>>
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Whats this? Oh, just some late season hanging pot watermelons. God bless dfw growing season.
>>
>>1116436
Are those new ones or the same ones from way back? They should be ripe by now I'd think. What color are the spots on their bottoms?
>>
>>1116341
>Secondly is there anyway to inoculate mycorrhizal fungi into plant containers?
You can buy it. It's pretty cheap on Amazon and well worth the purchase.
>>
>>1116265
>Most people have 5 to 10 gallons of water for every pound of fish.


Goldfish are particularly foul. They poop like no other fish
>>
>>1116327
>>1116329
That's still vrey impressive anon, I know how much work all that takes. Which hurricane screwed you?
>>
>>1116580
All of them.
>>
>>1116327
>>1116329
what a goddamn mop of a garden

[spoiler]extremely jelly[/spoiler]
>>
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Guava.
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>>1116643
Dwarf lemon.
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>>1116644
Dwarf valencia.
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>>1116643
>>1116644
>>1116646
Looking good. I wish I had more trees in my orchard. Next season I will be taking cuttings from tons of local fruit trees.

>>1116629
It has been a good year, despite some hiccups.
>>
>>1116656
I have also planted nectarine, louqat, dwarf lime and feijoa trees.

And I don't have a large plot. This will be a challenge.
>>
>>1116659
Nice. I've been running out of large-tree room and have stared using espalier methods to conserve space.
>>
>>1116661
>espalier methods
What's that?
>>
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For the people from last thread asking me why I have mimosas indoors:

>>1115259
>>1115294
Idk man, i think they are pretty and i started having them in my room. Its weird because right now if i expose them to direct sunlight they will close up and curl a bit, they only open up if i roll down a bit my curtains. My climate is mediterranean by the way.
>>
>>1116663
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Espalier
https://www.google.com/search?q=espalier+orchard&tbm=isch
>>
>>1116678
Don't listen to the haters, mimosa are aesthetic af. If its been indoors the whole time, its just sensitive to direct light. This can be fixed by gradually increasing exposure.
>>
>>1116643
>>1116644
I wish I still lived in a place I could grow these outside(of a greenhouse)

>>1116656
This is nice too. Everything I have is crammed into small planters. Oh well, it did well enough last year.
>>
>>1116678

Look into tamarind or lignum vitae
>>
>>1116696
>Don't listen to the haters
You try having that shit grow rapidly and drop dozens of seeds just from a tiny 3" tall plant. I fucking hate mimosa, I hope whatever soulless antperson that introduced it to America is in Hell where they belong.
>>
>>1116771
Maybe it just nostalgia, but I loved having those things when growing up in Houston.
>>
>>1116776
Yeah because you lived in Texas not a humid Southern state. My neighbor let it get out of control in her backyard and now the shit is everywhere and it's hard as fuck to get rid of. I've resorted to boiling water to kill the fucking things because cutting it down or pulling it just spreads more goddamn seeds. I had to solarize every inch of where it was and now it's back in full force creeping into my gardens. Even burning it doesn't kill enough of the seeds. The shit is just everywhere here now and it edges out native plant life because it's virtually uncontrollable. I know very well why they call the shit gripeweed.
>>
>>1116782
I know Houston is probably pretty humid but fuck this shit. The 80 degree plus humidity virtually year round doesn't help at all.
>>
>>1116782
>Yeah because you lived in Texas not a humid Southern state
>south/southeast Texas
>not humid
I hope you're drunk.
>>
>>1116812
I take it back nigger. I've never been further West than Louisiana.
>>
>>1116812
Okay then, I just like mimosas, even though theyre hell on southern landscapes. Like cats, as long as theyre inside, they're ok. go burn your neighbor if you want.
>>
>>1116822
I don't blame you. It's cool watching them react to touch and light but seriously fuck whoever introduced it here. I want to burn my neighbor's yard. I'm just venting because I'm still fighting it. I don't want to resort to herbicide because I plan to use the land its taken over, but I might have to. Boiling that much water is a pain.
>>
>>1116824
The people that moved next to me thought bull thistle was "beautiful and attracted bees". Now I spen $100 every year on rifle-d. Iktf
>>
>>1116833
My neighbor thought the chamberbitter were ferns, I even caught her watering it on more than one occasion. These fucking people drive me up the wall, literally why we can't have nice things.
Is Rifle-D good?
>>
>>1116866
I imagine it's good if you're spending $100/per year but I'm asking in general. I've never had a thistle problem thankfully but I'd honestly take thistle over chamberbitter any day.
>>
>>1116833
See if the thistle is classified as a noxious weed in your state or local municipality. Then you would have legal action with a code enforcer.
>>
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Can cauliflower/broccoli bolt? I've been growing this romanesco broccoli for a couple months and it seems way too tall and thin.
>>
>>1116782
>>1116824
Don't worry about it. Just cut it like you cut everything else. Think of it as decorative grass. That's how I look at bindweed, trumpet vine, and 3-4 terribly invasive grasses here. The rest of the 10-15 weedy invasives are all edible, so I'm chill with them, but other people are not. Nearly all the weeds here have seeds that are viable for 20 years in the soil. Some people have the equivalent of a gardening breakdown because of it, but those are usually autistic pesticide using types who need 100% grass monoculture lawns.

I just mulch and pull weeds when needed. Everything else gets the lawnmower and weedeater. Also, Phyllanthus urinaria has scientifically proven medicinal properties:

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=Phyllanthus+urinaria

>>1116833
Bull thistle is nice though. It is the Canadian thistle that isn't and spreads like wildfire, via root runners and seeds. At least it is easy enough to pull out. It is tasty too, but gives you gas if you eat too much.

>>1116868
>I imagine it's good if you're spending $100/per year

Sounds like a bandaid for a bigger problem. The moment I lay down money, it is for a cure, not a first payment. For that much money, I'd simply just rent a small Bobcat and completely returf the area down to below the level of the roots of the thistles and haul in new topsoil. Then reseed with my choice of cultivars. Either that or plastic and gravel everything.

>>1116883
"Bolting" is the formation of flowers. The main parts of cauliflower and broccoli you find in stores is the immature flower heads themselves. Cauliflower will sprout up out of that tight compacted head as a really showy set of tiny flowers. Romanesco does something that looks a bit different when its flower heads start to get tall. Harvest before they flower. As for your romanesco, that isn't unusual, but I would stake them to give them a bit of support. They also need larger pots now.
>>
>>1116771
Man I live in the city it's not like we have problems with invasive plants.
>>
>>1116711
Any particular reason why other than aesthetics?
They are both trees and my terrace isnt big enough for more than my current wild olive tree
>>
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The final ribening of the bulk jolokia.
>>
>>1116963

They both look similar to mimosa without being invasive. Lignum vitae grows very slowly, and tamarind grows moderately slowly
>>
>>1116966
They look pretty caramel-y to me. At least some.
>>
>>1116966
Are you gonna bring it inside for the winter? I have one in a 5 gallon pot outside I'm going to attempt to overwinter in a south facing window.
>>
>>1117032
Yeah, but they darken to red like those others.
>>1117035
Yes, I'm gonna cut it back a lot and keep it in that big pot, hope to keep it alive through winter. I really like that plant.
>>
>>1115667
Grow well, little pepper
>>
>>1115667
Grow well, little pepper!
>>
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Tips for a way to either plant through, or semi-automate the clearing of, wood chips? Planning a pretty large market garden for future, and I can get truckloads of wood chips almost free (much cheaper than straw or plastic) so they'd be my preference for mulching.
Problem is, I don't want to go along with a rake pulling aside 8 inches of mulch every time I sow seed or transplant.
In straw or similar, I could probably put some kind of hand-pushed row cleaner that would work fine, but I doubt it'd be as effective here. Something on that level would be good though--think wheelhoe, not hand trowel. Tips, resources, insults? Thanks
>>
>>1116981
I dont really mind the invasive part, as i said i live in the city and it literally cant go anywhere
>>
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>>1117142
Unfortunately, cities aren't really immune to invasives from what I've seen. Nearby one of 200k is overrun with that fucking stink tree everywhere
Grows on railroads, under bridges, harbour banks, literally everywhere
>>
>>1117148
Sorry man, but anyway i bought them on the store around the corner. Surely it wont make a difference. If anything it will grow faster and im okay woth that.
>>
>>1117151
Well, if you keep things contained to your indoors (no fine seeds spreading everywhere from balconies) and/or the species in question won't survive outdoor winters, then everything should be fine
>>
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Hi, i'm the blueberry anon from the other thread

i'd like to ask some more details about the pollination of these plants.
Let's assume i have got 2 varieties of Vaccinium Ashei (e.g. V. A. Prince and V. A. Woodard as one anon told me). Are these two sufficient to produce actual blueberries?

Or do i have to own different species of Vaccinium (e.g. V. Ashei and V. Arboreum)?

TL;DR: do i need different species or varieties to obtain blueberries?
>>
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>>1116866
>Is Rifle-D good?
I know it is for thistle. I'm sure you can find a pdf of the manual that lists the weeds it kills. I almost have them eradicated, maybe a year or two.

>>1116880
Already done.

>>1116911
I had canadian thistle too, those fucks didn't do anything to control it.

>Sounds like a bandaid for a bigger problem.
I have about 40 acres of Poderosa forest, I can't just bulldoze it all. I have to use a backpack sprayer and atv, pic related
>>
>>1117069
>Yeah, but they darken to red like those others.
Well, my Peruvian Purples go to red as well when they ripen, so maybe that is working as intended?
Same with the Snow Whites.
>>
>>1117183
Everything I've read talks about varieties, not species, basically the same as apple orchards:

http://www.usefulplants.org/index.php/fruiting-plants/fruiting-shrubs/item/rabbiteye-blueberry
>>
>>1117267
>40 acres of Poderosa forest

Eh, well do what I do for multiflora rose on my 40 acres of forest...nothing. Maybe one day I'll fence it in really well and get goats or something. Otherwise, I'm not wasting my time and money.
>>
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>>1117575
No, these should stay caramel-y. Doesn't matter, they have great taste and pack a punch. Got a chili simmering away at the moment, with a whole pepper in it, first time cooking with it, I wonder how it'll be.
>>
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>>1116327
>>1116329
Some of the fruits of labor for this year's harvest. Canned pumpkin; enough for almost 100 pies.
>>
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And a giveaway for my EU brothers:
Pic related is what I have at the moment. You will receive those 4 on top. Those are from my own harvest, so no guarantees on germination rates or how true they'll grow, they were all together in 1 greenhouse.
BUT! I'll also throw in 4 of the other kinds, your pick, 1~3 seeds each, those seeds have been ordered from fataliiseeds, and should grow true (except for the caramel bhut, lol).
First to react to this post will get them, drop me a mail at pirrezooi at hotmail.com with your choices and full address.
>>
>>1117605
>1 whole pepper

Hahahahahaha
>>
>>1117618
I and many other anons are so very impressed with your vast manliness, that is of such level it can only be proven by eating food that is hotter than what I like.
My hat off to you, sir.
*tips fedora*
>>
>>1117605
Uma delicia
>>
>>1117621
>>1117618
I think it has more to do with flavor than actual spiciness. The two are mutually exclusive. Like a bunch of habanero peppers would ruin the flavor for me entirely and I'm one who chows down on scorpion pepper candy as a regular treat; like right now.

>>1117605
I still have some dehydrate bhut jolokia from a couple years or so ago. I never really liked the flavor.

>>1117613
Very nice selection. Too bad I'm allergic to giving the pertinent information online.
>>
>>1117639
>I still have some dehydrate bhut jolokia from a couple years or so ago. I never really liked the flavor.
This one (caramel bhut) is very fruity, never knew peppers could taste like this. I read standard bhuts are indeed quite bitter.
>>
>>1115602
Hey, what are some things you can grow indoors?
>>
>>1117692
Literally anything, if you've got the right pot.

So I'll go with "peppers", because that's the default suggestion.
>>
>>1117686
Yeah, I have the bitter kind. My scorpions were super fruity too.

>>1117692
Anything. It depends on space and lighting. That can be some herbs or fruit trees. You can use a sun room with lots of windows facing the sun's direction or a closet with no windows lit only by grow lights. Thus, your living conditions and budget are the only real limiting factors here.
>>
>>1117695
>>1117694

My bad, should add more.

I have very limited space and no UV lamps, but I do have large windows pointed towards the sun. I want to grow some hobby stuff like carrots or beans to offset some grocery costs, but I'm not sure how.
>>
>>1117703
You can use regular lights, if you don't have grow lights.

For small spaces and limited budgets, growing your own food is more about being able to grow special cultivars or having very fresh herbs. you won't be able to cut much cost, if any at all, growing staple crops. This is why most people grow herbs on their window sills. I find that salad greens and herbs grow well in regular windows. Sometimes I use a panel of cardboard painted white or with aluminum foil taped to it as a light reflector when days are overcast.
>>
>>1117703
The windows should do just fine.

Depending on how limited space we're talking here, beans might want to grow too much. They're also pretty cheap in most places, I thought. Carrots should be fine but keep in mind you're only getting one per plant, so the savings might not be too much. Honestly, savings in general will not be that great (especially in relation to time put in) without a good-sized plot of land. Your best bet is to look at what kinds of things you use in cooking the most and grow that, or give us a list of things to help you narrow it down. Perennial bush fruits are probably going to be your best bet in terms of productivity per space, but even then, the money thing isn't going to be huge.
>>
>>1117711
>>1117709
I usually garden, but we had a massive drought this year that totally fucked it up. We didn't have a drop of rain for 3 months, and so water was really restricted.

It's fall now, so I want to grow something more. You guys mentioned herbs, so may I request elaboration on that? I'm getting into cooking, so give me the basics.
>>
>>1117719
>We didn't have a drop of rain for 3 months
>tfw my area routinely doesn't get a drop of rain for six months
Are there also no rivers or irrigation systems where you live?
>>
>>1117719
Research, "windowsill herb garden". There's a huge amount of info online for this type of thing since more people do this than people who garden. Essentially, write down the herbs and spices you use most. Then look up what plants those come from and if they are appropriate for a window sill garden. Though, I think most links for this type of thing will have a list you can read to direct you to what you want to do much faster.
>>
>>1117720
We have water reserves, but they were limited. It was really hot and really dry, and seeing as I live in eastern BC that's not a good combo.

>>1117721
I had no idea this was a thing. How interesting, I'll definitely look it up.

Earlier I saw bushes mentioned. Can you really grow berry bushes indoors?
>>
>>1117730
>Can you really grow berry bushes indoors?

Yes. For space, dwarf versions of anything is preferred. Remember, many plants need pollination in order to fruit properly and some need to be cross pollinated with other cultivars. If can be as simple as gently tapping or shaking the plant or as difficult as needing insects to do it for you. Some plants require a cold dormancy period of a couple months or weeks. People who keep such plants indoors normally have a refrigerator setup specifically for the dormancy period. Though, that is normally for things like apple tree bonsai.
>>
>>1117584

thanks
>>
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I had a big bag of really old and random store-type salad greens. I decided to sow them in a few places. I was keeping up with the weeding for a while, but haven't had time lately. Regardless, there's enough salad greens for a few people now. I forgot how different wild greens are to these cultivated varieties. Except for the spicy nasturtium leaves, everything is pretty mild in flavor and texture when compared to the wild stuff I normally eat. Well, chickweed is more like store bought salad fodder I guess. Which is starting to grow now that the weather is cooling down.
>>
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What is the biggest produce you have ever grown and how did you do it?
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>>1117844
Yellow zucchini as big as a man's thigh. Compost.
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>>1117844
I wonder what these massive pumpkins taste like. I also can't imagine processing one. I mean damn, I can only do like 200lbs of pumpkin processing a week by myself. Otherwise, my joints from the tips of my fingers to my shoulders will hurt like hell after all that knife work. Removing the skin is a major time consuming pain. Everything else is pretty simple.
>>
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Thanks to a couple of helpful posters I've managed to avert what would have been a horrible storage plan over the winter
I've got a couple of runner bean seeds that I picked out from their pods this morning and they're now sitting in a bowl out in the garden drying out. Weather's a little chilly but they're getting a bit of sun.

Just wondering - how long should I leave them to dry out before I put them away til spring?
>>
>>1118186
You can dry them inside. They need to be light weight and the pods brown and crispy. If you shell them, the type of legume t hey are will determine what they will look like when dried. Some will shrivel up and look terrible while others are shiny and solid. I estimate how dry they are by how they feel as well. Seeds that still have a good bit of moisture left will feel a bit cooler than normal. Dry ones won't feel as cool.

Regardless, if you are using paper envelopes or paper bags for seed storage, separate them up a bit so that they can continue to dry out. Don't put t hem into metal or plastic for a long while. When you do, keep them in separate packages. That way, if some are too moist and start to mold over, mold won't spread to the rest.
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>>1118186
>I picked out from their pods this morning and they're now sitting in a bowl out in the garden drying out.
Why not just leave them on the vine to dry?
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>>1118412

>why dont you leave them on the vine?

did you see their pic?
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>>1118497
If he's leaving the bowl in the garden anyway, they're still getting wet.
>>
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>plant delonix regia seed
>kept in greenhouse
>watered every other day
>sprouts
>grows ~2cm
>stops growing
>turns yellow

What do I do to save this thing, it's my only one that sprouted
>>
>>1118775
Too wet, probably root rot. There's a chance something ate the roots too. The soil looks like it has way too much organic material, which would also cause root rot since it holds lots of water instead of draining well.
>>
>>1118775
Ahahaha ha . Nice soil
>>
>>1115667
Grow well, little pepper!
>>
>>1118792
>>1118780
So, what, just switch out the potting soil for something more granular like topsoil or sand?
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>>1118821
Loam would be best.
>>
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>pretty shitty weather lately (rain every day, highs of around 15°C)
>first time to go in the back garden for about a week
>expecting everything to be rotten
Still got a pretty nice harvest so late into the season
>>
>>1118964
That's pretty nice. I've been loading up my dehydrator with stuff all week even though there's pretty much nothing left out there.
>>
Any idea what's happening to my manzano peppers? I am trying to get it to bounce back, and I think it's coming right after giving it some seaweed fert. Probs gonna give it another load today.

Still getting a lot of leaves going like pic related. Not sure what's wrong.
>>
>>1118971
>coming right after giving it some seaweed fert
>probs gonna give it another load today

nigger??

you're overfeeding your plants, salt build up in the pot leading to nutrient absorption blockage
>>
Its been a couple weeks since I last feed it, I'm just reading the back of the fucking bottle. It's growing, but I expected much faster growth, as it's in good soil, but it did jack shit for like a month after I transplanted it into that good soil.

Basically I don't know what I'm doing, so I have zero idea how to tell whether it's been fed too much or not enough.
>>
>>1118976
Meant to reply to
>>1118973

And I've only fed it once since transplanting into the good soil.
>>
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>>1118969
Yeah I'm dehydrating most of my peppers too (including the bells - I love using bell pepper powder as chicken leg coating. Also have lots of Cayennes that weren't pictured already dried and powdered, will probably last me a lifetime).
Now that we're about to get some weird "late summer", I'm expecting even more stuff to pick. Sadly most of my tomatoes won't be able to benefit from that any longer as they're super fucked from blight now - something that's almost impossible to avoid here with the small gardens which make it impossible to spatially separate them from potatoes too much and/or to plant them several hundred meters apart in 7 year rotation, so at some point in late summer/early autumn they will get infected unless you use fungicide
>>
>>1118976
>>1118977
>good soil

how good are we talking here? how nutrient loaded?

don't know much about manzano peppers but it's quite normal for a plant to stop growing after a transplant, they stress out and stunt growth, specially if you're not careful enough with roots

are you following those instructions on the back of the bottle? are you sure these nuts are okay for your peppers? seaweed ferts can be pretty loaded
>>
>>1118980
>are you sure these nuts are okay for your peppers?
>>
>>1118980
50:50 mushroom compost coconut coir. Hmm I'll just leave it.
>>
>>1118984
in most cases more nutrients don't equal more growth, nutrients are something a healthy plant can benefit from at the right time in the right proportion, not something you pump into them like steroids, just remember that

do your research on your plants feeding/environmental needs
>>
>>1118979
Mine go blighty simply because of the massive weather change in the fall. The recent hurricanes basically screwed up the weather for this time of year here.
>>
>>1115610
it looks like richters has ginseng seeds:
https://www.richters.com/Web_store/web_store.cgi?searchterm=ginseng&search_catalogue_button=Go
>>
>>1119103
Those guys are a 30 minute drive from me, never realized they sold seeds, I should go check them out.

Thanks anon
>>
>>1118821
I like horticultural pumice
>>
What kind of grinder to I need to make my small pepper harvest into a fine uniform powder?
>>
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>>1119291
If you only have a small amount, you can use a mortar and pestle. The larger the better. Use granite, not porcelain. You can do a pre-grind by using a corn mill. That will reduce a lot of work if you have a lot of pepper. That will grind up seeds too. An electric coffee grinder also works well for a pre-grind, but will get pretty hot if you have a lot of stuff. Even though their grind is course, they also tend to produce a secondary fine powder that will emanate from the cracks for the coffee grinder and choke you too death like a pepper-laced smoke bomb. You can prevent this by doing it outside and by taping over all the cracks and seams on the entire device. A corn mill/grain mill will not have that problem. A mortar and pestle will cause a bit of this fine powder to float through the air, just not as bad as a coffee grinder.

If you use a coffee grinder or a corn/grain mill, the pepper will need to be absolutely cracker crisp. Otherwise, it will cause problems with the devices. This doesn't happen with the mortar and pestle, but it will make it more difficult to grind up quickly. Regardless, a pre-grind is best when you have tons of stuff to go through. I normally do a pre-grind for bulk storage using my corn mill. Then when I need enough to fill a shaker, I'll grind it to fine powder using the mortar and pestle. I keep the bulk stuff in glass canning jars, vacuum sealed, and in the freezer. I let the jar warm up to room temp before opening it to prevent moisture condensation on the powder.

In this image, I'm using a #2 Universal Food Chopper to crush the pepper to normal "crushed pepper" size. Then I use the corn mill to grind everything to a much finer size. It gets stored in those jars then ground to a powder, using the mortar and pestle, when I need powder. The Food Chopper does well for making it pizza seasoning size.
>>
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Cut down my garlic chives and green onions and bring ready to dry in the oven.
>>
>>1119310
Nice! How do you use all those dried peppers?
>>
>>1118821
>>1118775
I agree with >>1118844 , I'd move it into a good loam mixed with 1/4 perlite.
What you got for the moment is an almost non-composted bark, this isn't an adequate substrate, your plant has nothing to "eat"
>>
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It has been a week since I transplanted my pomegranate and it appears to have stopped growing. Not only that but some of the leaves appear SLIGHTLY black.
I damaged the root a little bit and am worried.
Is it fucked?
>>
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>>1119374
The ones cut into rings and dried are for soups.
The ones crushed once are for things like pizza.
The powdered stuff is used for just about everything.

>>1119391
Maintain proper watering and light levels. Wait longer. Keep an eye out for new growth. Remove any leaves that have yellowed or worse. Leaves where only the tip has yellowed, just remove half that side of the leaf. If there's little to no leaves in the first place, just let them self-terminate and fall off. Remove them only if they have circular spots/dots developing. It'll be fine.

>>1119353
I want to do more of this but I have a quart of powdered onion tops and several gallon sized bags of onion top cuttings in the freezer I need to use up.

*munches on roasted salted Dickinson pumpkin seeds*
>>
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What would you guys recommend for a noob who lives in an apartment in a place where there's snow 5 month per year? I just really want to start growing some stuff myself and don't know where to start with this temperature.
>>
>>1119457
>husked pumpkin seeds
disgusting
>>
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>>1116447
New ones. Heres some more plants. My banana beppers
>>
Any tips for germinating caucasian spinach seeds?
>>
My pepper graft failed yet again. Fuck. I made a new graft, but this time tightened the graft in place before wrapping it.

But on the bright side, my mint and thyme are doing well in their new hydroponic home, and I'm even getting some new mint growth already.
>>
>>1119491
They are not husked. They swell up when roasted. Well, these are fried actually. Some also explode during the process, flinging hot seeds and butter everywhere.

>>1119499
Cold stratification is required. 2 months I think, not sure.
>>
>>1119457
Thank you.
Those seeds look good!
>>
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>leaf miners
how fast do these cunts work? can I just squish them inside the leaf or is that pointless since theyd have taken off already
>>
>>1119547
You can squish them.
>>
>>1119482
Start with some spring onions on your windowsill you can cut off the green tops and they will shoot up again.
>>
>>1119587
>muh spring onions
Fuck off.
>>1119482
Have you tried growing scallions? They're delicious and easy to grow on a windowsill.
>>
>The fig is a large deciduous tree. The edible fig itself is actually not a fruit, but the mature ‘infructescence’ of the tree – a hollow, fleshy structure lined on the inside with tiny flowers. A small opening allows the fig wasp to enter and pollinate the flowers. Once pollination has taken place, the seeds develop.

wtf I hate figs now
>>
>>1119615
Spring onions have a stronger flavor than scallions.
>>
>>1119555
cool, i will start doing that

>>1119640
>not mentioning the wasp usually gets trapped and dies inside
>>
>>1119654
A stronger SHIT flavor.
>b-but m-m-m-muh sp-spring o-o-onions...
No! Scallions are much better than """spring""" """onions""" in every single conceivable way. Prove me wrong, oh wait that's right. You literally can't.
>>
>>1119677
I actually prefer garlic tops instead of spring onions, shallots, or scallions, lad.
>>
>>1115667
Grow well little pippa.
>>
Has anyone here ever grown fenugreek? If so, does it really taste like maple syrups?
>>
>>1119757
Please return to your containment board
>>
>>1119779
I don't really care what buzzwords you want to toss around, you just aren't contributing to the thread.
>>
>>1119781
Oh, you mean like you're doing right now? Lmao you haven't made one single helpful post in this entire thread, kiddo. Go back to >>>/an/.
>>
ill try both spring onions and scallions then.
thank you guys.
>>
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rate
>>
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>>1119967
>>1119968
Looks somewhat better. Remove the yellowed stuff. There should be new growth if there's enough light and the watering is correct.
>>
>>1119967
-4/10 protip, plants need light to thrive
>>
I think this is a stupid question.

What do I do with the dirt in pots I used for container gardening?

Dump it out? Reuse it next year (after amending it)? Turn it into mud and build a tiny altar for dark purposes?
>>
>>1120114
Repurpose and rotate. Don't want to grow the same thing in the same soil every year, it's bad for plant health and encourages specific diseases/bugs to thrive in that soil.

Sort by plant family and rotate and amend those together. Toms, peppers, potatoes are all related; so are broccoli and cabbage and the like.
>>
>>1120118
Sounds good. Should I just leave them outside over winter? I'm in Minnesota if that helps at all.
>>
>>1120118
Seconding.

>>1120122
Yes. Actually, having them freeze solid in winter will reduce pest insects. It also reduces beneficial insects and microbes. But, things like vine borer, squash bug, slugs, isopods, etc will die if the containers are well above the ground and it is really cold. Minnesota should surely do that well.
>>
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I'd prefer to have a full dehydrator load, but I really need some new gloves before I try cutting up the hot peppers. I'm currently dehydrating the last crop of yellow pear tomatoes I think. There may be a few more on the vines that need ripening, but they are mostly done. The purple tomatillos are completely done for the year. There's still a fair amount of Cherokee tomatoes left on the vines, but they rot before getting ripe due to the weather. The nights are really cold and condensation, fog, and rain pools up in their top and that's the end of them. The red Italian pear tomatoes are still producing a little it, but are mostly just ripening what was already grown.

Next year I want to do even more dehydrating. I'll probably just dehydrate all the yellow pear tomatoes. That really seems to be the best and tastiest method of preservation. The same goes for the tomatillos. Both are okay for salsa, but I can't eat that much salsa, and I don't like it canned all that much. Dehydrating them and using them over winter in soups is where they really shine.

I'm hoping this run in the dehydrator will be done by Tuesday. There's lots of rain right now and humidity is in the 90% range. That makes for slow dehydration. I can't get it cracker-crisp in this weather. Tuesday, I plan to dehydrate an entire load of pumpkin cubes.
>>
>>1120233
Prepped? What do you do with some much dehydrated stuff? And what sort of meals doyou use it in? Soups and stews and things?
>>
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>>1120238
I'm a farmer. Learning to preserve large crops of food is essential. See pics in >>1119310 >>1117768 >>1117612 >>1116656 >>1116327 >>1116329 I have about 6 months of food on hand, rotated, year-round. The hardest part was learning what ways I can preserve the food and still like the end result in recipes. For instance, canned tomatillos was a failure, but dehydrates ones are amazing. Canned tomatoes is great, but cherry-sized canned tomatoes isn't great. While dehydrated cherry-sized tomatoes are amazing.

I use the dehydrated vegetables in everything from soups & stews to baked breads & pies. It depends on what form it is in. Like chunks of dehydrated pumpkin is great for soups while powdered hot peppers are great for seasoning meats and cheese dishes. Dehydrated veggies are great for winter when you don't have a few greenhouses to grow fresh veggies. Recipes are as simply as adding a few dehydrated veggies and powders to some pasta, egg noodles, or ramen (pic). Their storage doesn't need to be refrigerated for the most part, but vacuum sealing and freezing bulk amounts of spices and herbs helps extend their potency a great deal.
>>
>>1120258
Hmm nice, that's a pretty sweet idea. Thanks for the comprehensive reply
>>
>>1120258
are you a farmer from birth?
>>
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>>1120306
No, but there's always been some sort of agriculture. The info wasn't passed down to me. I had to learn everything from scratch.
>>
>>1120323
hey, that looks great.
>>
>>1120410
Can you stop making inane shitposts and actually post something with substance for once? Thanks.
>>
>>1120419
not liking this post, man
>>
>>1120419
You first, anon.
>>
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Does anyone know what this yellow/orange pepper might be? It smells similar to a habanero, but has very few seeds inside.

I was recently given some peppers to grow for relatives. I have what looks like a habanero, some kind of C. baccatum variety, and then this yellowish one.
>>
>>1120488
We call those pussy pepper here in Brazil.
>>
>>1120488
I just tried them. The orange/yellow one is kind of spicy, the one that looks like a habanero is very spicy, and the possible C. baccatum variety is not spicy at all.

>>1120495
Why?
>>
>>1120488
fatalii pepper?
>>
When's the best time to put compost on the garden beds? I've got a pretty full bin that's ready to go, and most of my stuff is done for the year.
>>
>>1120541
When it is no longer temperature hot. As far as nutrient hot, that really depends on how you use it. It is best when it is black & loamy. If you gardening is done for the season, like over winter, you can put unfinished compost on it. It will finish off during that time.
>>
>>1120323
>The info wasn't passed down to me. I had to learn everything from scratch.
that's what i thought. my dad grew up on a farm and doing this kind of stuff seems repellant to him
>>
>>1120561
Preserving food?
>>
>>1120563
ye, he said it was stereotypical womans work. didnt really like finding that out since it seems like something i really want to do
>>
>>1120570
Why don't you just tell him you want to be a woman? He probably suspects anyway.
>>
>>1120580
if gender roles are a construct then gardening is an obsolete waste of time
>>
Has ANYONE come up with a way to do no-till in the garden instead of in the field? Are there no fucking no-till hand tools out there?
>>
>>1120614
sounds like you want to just plant shit directly into your composter
>>
>>1120618
I'd prefer to amend soil with the least amount of tillage possible--to essentially work on creating an ecosystem out of the garden instead of a monocultural nightmare that I have to machinate in order to get anything productive done.
>>
>>1120419
can you get a life?
>>
>>1120688
Did I touch a nerve, sweetpea?
>>
>>1115602
I want to start growing herbs, vegetables, fruits and whatever I fancy in my small garden in my parents house to learn How To so in the near future I move to a rural area where my grandfathers live and I'm going to inherit a huge warehouse(plan to build a honest, simple house with a gym and live there) and plenty of soil to have animals plus plant whatever I desire(dream would be plant what I eat), and that is my only goal in life but I have no knowledge at all outside throwing seeds into the dirt and hoping it grows, I am that dumb when it comes to this.

Where do I start/How do I learn? I'm really clueless and maybe I'm googling things wrong but can't seem to find proper guides
>>
>>1120725
>throwing seeds into the dirt and hoping it grows
do that; go buy some organic bulk beans, just throw a handful in some dirt, cover with mulch (dried leaves and twigs, or you could buy some) and water them every night. you might be able to get results doing this with squash too though its probably too late to finish them up. pepper plants and tomatoes are easy but youll have to remember that when it gets warm, its definitely too late to start those. lots of plants really arent so picky with soil that they will just deny you growth

t. a fellow gardening retard
>>
>>1120731
thanks my good man

plan to do that and I guess just picking somethign I want to grow and try to lurk online on info on how to, when to, and what do and build a backlog on my mind. Just posted here so I could get a jumpstart

I live in a somewhat tropical weather 70-80% time of the year and then it gets cold for like 3-4months
I have an avocado which seems to be growing but no fruit yet
A banana tree which is actually growing pretty nice but still long to start having fruits
a pomegranate tree which is always filled each every 2 years(this is one of them and theyre delicious)
a lemon tree
spinach and mint, the latter not seeming to be able to keep up with my tea consumption kek
>>
>>1120733
>an avocado which seems to be growing but no fruit yet
Bear in mind that unless you grafted a specific breed onto the rootstock, there's a good chance the fruit it yields will not be as good as the fruit it came from.
All commercial avocado trees are clones of specific trees, because the only way to get a reliable standard of quality is to clone the tree.
>>
>>1120733
tricky bastard, you're less of a novice than i am
>>
>>1120733
Im guessing you don't get a hard freeze If you can grow banana?
If that's true you can grow all kinds of shit. Impressed that you can use enough mint for to run out.
>>
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>>1120570
I totally agree. But, this is something you need to do when you are a bachelor. For the big jobs, I have neighbors, family, and friends who come over and trade work for vegetables. Civilization was built on the principle of strict labor division.

>>1120725
Make a list of the things you want to grow and raise. Then research how to grow/raise them specifically. That includes researching when to plant them. Like some are sown in the ground after the last frost while others need a few weeks or months grown under cover or inside before hardening them off and setting them outside in the ground or uncovering them. Learn how to extend the growing season on both ends using polytunnels, greenhouses, and thermal mass.

Most importantly, talk to local farmers who have been working the land for years. The cultivars and breeds they grow and raise are proven in your area. Either use those or similar ones.
>>
>>1120747
I grow mints too. I need to grow much more peppermint. I use tons of it. Like this morning I made mint with black tea and used that as a base for making hot chocolate. It is super minty which I love, but it requires a fistful of dried mint.

FYI, there are some hardy banana cultivars you can use in the north. They die back every winter and regrow. Just stack some straw bales over them during the winter.
>>
>>1120756
Post more pics please
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>>1120765
This is about as good as it gets really. This stuff is all reposts. I've been taking less and less photos lately simply because it slows things down and taking pics of the same things over and over is monotonous.
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Crap! I guess I know what I'll be doing all day today.
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>>1120786
Where do you live?
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>>1120943
I'm from Oman
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>>1120952
Woah I didn't know it got that cold there.
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>>1120953
Yes I'm from Muscat, Oman.
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>>1120954
Not him but I'm from Muscat too!
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>>1120958
What a coincidence. :)
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>>1120488
These are habaneros, a type of capsaicin peppers.
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>>1120786
Done. At least the unripe peppers won't get zapped.
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>>1120756
>Civilization was built on the principle of strict labor division
this i cant agree with at all, especially being agriculturally oriented there will be times when some specialties are more needed than others. historically when it comes to settling the west, most people were good at most things to some degree
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>>1120621
there's got to be something you top off beds with that will just trickle down for every nutrient imaginable




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