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Anyone go camping in a non designated camping area? What was it like? Did you get caught? Tell me so I don't make the same mistakes you guys did.
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i got caught eating your ass in a forest and couldn't get my tongue /out/ in time so i was arrested for sodomy
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>>1117037
No tent, no fire, no problem.
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Stealth camp tips:

Camp above any nearby roads or trails. People tend to look down more than they look up… and climbing uphill is difficult, so it is less likely that others will come looking for you if you are up high. Plus, from up high, you can look down on others who might be approaching your camp.

Use a brown, green or earth-toned tent to blend in with your surroundings. Camouflage works wonders when it comes to stealth camping.

Cover your tracks. Be sure to cover up or hide any foot prints or bicycle tracks that might lead people to your campsite. Even broken branches can lead a person to your camp, so try not to disturb the nature surrounding your stealth campsite.

Don’t make a fire unless you absolutely have to. Smoke and light from a campfire attracts attention.

Don’t make camp on the other side of a river, estuary or canal. These sources of water may flood overnight and cause you to get stuck.

A dirt road will turn to mud overnight in a rainstorm. Be sure you have an exit strategy for the following morning.

Be quiet.

Don’t camp in an area where you might easily be discovered by dogs. A dog on a walk with their owner will quickly give away your location.

Know how to set up and break down your camp quickly. Sometimes speed is your best ally.

You are your own source of rescue. If no one knows where you are and you get sick, hurt yourself, or otherwise get into trouble, you are the only one who can get you out of the situation.

Know what the law is. Each country treats stealth camping differently. It’s totally common and acceptable in some parts of the world, and totally illegal in other parts.
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>>1117217
The best time to find and set up a stealth campsite is just before it gets dark. If you set up camp too early you might be discovered by people who are still out for the day. If you set up too late, on the other hand, you could find yourself trying to pitch your tent in the dark.

Avoid pitching your tent in the dark. Not only can you not scout out the location of your campsite as well when it is dark, but any flashlights or headlamps you might use will give away your location.

Break camp early. Wake up, pack your gear and hit the road before most people are even awake or outside.

The harder it is for you to get to your campsite, the less likely it is that other people will find you. People are generally lazy and will usually give up before navigating to difficult locations.

Don’t camp on the other side of large fences or gates. Even though it's open now, it might be locked in the morning. You don’t want to get trapped inside a fence or gate and then be unable to escape.

The best stealth campgrounds aren’t always the most scenic. The goal is to blend in – not to stand out.

Don’t use lights at night unless you absolutely have to. If you must use your light, use it for only short periods of time and in short bursts (like a firefly).

Sometimes (but very rarely) the best hiding spot is right out in the open where people passing by will think, “I guess you are allowed to camp there?”

If you do get caught, play dumb and/or if necessary, offer to leave. There is no need to get in trouble for stealth camping. Simply pack up your campsite, move on and find somewhere else to spend the night.

Be willing to change camping spots if after a short while you realize the campsite you picked out initially is unsafe or in a location where you might be discovered.

Don’t camp in areas where there are “Private Property” and “No Trespassing” signs. You won't have the excuse of saying you didn’t know you were allowed to be there.
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>>1117220
Remove all lights, reflectors and white, light or flashy material from your tent, bicycle, backpack or other gear so as not to be detected by flashlights or passing automobile headlights.

Keep an eye out for hunters. Know when hunting season is and stay out of areas where you might be mistaken for a deer, bear, bigfoot or other such animal.

All the regular camping rules still apply. Avoid camping in the wind. Don’t camp under anything that could fall on you in the middle of the night. Sleep on flat ground. Hang your food if animals are in the area, leave no trace.
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>>1117224
Wow anon thanks for the response
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>>1117207
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>>1117217
>>1117220
>>1117224
awesome read anon, thank you
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I spent a while vagabonding around in Texas. I was cowboy camping with a sleeping pad and a blanket bc it wasn't cold at night. Stayed lowkey and I would just sleep a little into the forest on the side of a FM or logging road. Makes it all a lot easier when the road is blocked off too. Feel free to ask any questions.
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>>1117389
I am also in texas, I camp in greenbelts in a hammock with a built in mosquito net. Mosquitos are the god damned devil down here.

pic unrelated
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I don't feel like typing as much as the other guy.

I've spent quite a bit of time stealth camping in Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia, while bike touring.

I've never been caught by anyone official; only teenagers in a cemetery at night. I've asked people to use their land before, while chatting about my travelling, destination, etc.

I check the weather often, every couple of hours, and pay attention to temps, precipitation, wind, and sunset time. If it's going to rain, I might make camp early, or just stop and throw up my tarp & wait out the rain.

Quick set up & tear down is important. I think a hammock setup makes that 3x easier. Takes maybe five minutes, from choosing a pair of trees, to having my hammock hung and tarp staked.

Unless I'm in a town/city, I make probably two fires each day. I have a little Emberlit stove, and it lets me eat hot foods, drink coffee in the morning. Visually, it's not obtrusive, it just makes a tiny fire for cooking.

For using a light at night, I have a headlamp with a separate red LED. It's much less visible at a distance. There's also flashlights, usually milsurp ones, that can have an accessory red filter. You could probably diy something similar.

I'll usually dig a cat hole before it gets real dark, just because I don't want to fuck around if I'm tired, and it's dark, and I need to poop.

...That's about all I can think of.
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>>1118127
thanks anon, red LED was an interesting thought
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>>1117217
>>1117220
>>1117224
Be polite.
Be efficient.
Have a plan to kill everyone you meet.
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>>1117037
There's so much conservation land in Massachusetts that you can't camp on but I do it all the time. Most of these places are on main roads so you just can't bring a car with you. Hike in late at night and hide your shit in the forest during the day. Nobody will know.

The cops in Lincoln MA are bored fucking pigs with nothing to do in a sleepy affluent town so if they catch wind of you poaching a site they'll be on you like dogs.

Pic related. One of my favorite spots.
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Why do this? Is it because youre in the uk and cant get far away from anyone?
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>>1118531
Red also doesn't ruin your night vision when you use it.
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On a recent adventure in Montana I did it because I had no choice--it was dark, all the campground were booked solid, and I sure as hell wasn't about to drive a hundred miles to a city and buy a hotel room.

The noise is the most unnerving part. I have to wear earplugs or I'll never get to sleep. That said, as long as you get up early you should be fine. Most people are simply not going to be out and about at 6am.
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>>1117037
Srrs question, why stealth camp?

The only explanations that are somewhat reasonable are:
>Living in a country where it's illegal to camp outside campsites; could be a pain if you're road tripping and 5 hours from even a small town
>Really enjoy your privacy to a high degree
>Want to LARP as a survivalist or something (not even taking the piss with this one, seems fun)
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Aren't you afraid some crazy ass hobo with come in the middle of the night and steal your gear, and slit your throat? I sometimes have nightmare about this shit.
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>>1118660
I would advise bringing a gun then
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>>1118588
No I’m in Canada and live farther from crown land that id like
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At least in the US, National Forest lands are open for what is called "Dispersed Camping." It's a great "guilt-free" way to stealth camp. If the main reason you stealth camp is the thrill of trying to not get caught, you can disregard the rest of this.

The general guidelines for dispersed camping are that you are absolutely sure you're in national forest boundaries, you're at least 100 feet away from water sources, and you dig a shit-hole at least 6 inches deep to dispose of waste.

As with all good camping, leave no trace! Pack out any garbage you take, because fines for leaving waste in a National Forest can be HEFTY if you get caught by a ranger.

Also, be sure that fires are allowed before you start an open flames. Stoves are great if you want to avoid being seen (and therefore unwanted company from both humans and otherwise).

Be careful how you choose to access your selected spot as well. If you're walking, there's less of an issue. However, there is a lot of agricultural and livestock land that butts up against many national forests, and the private roads owned by farmers and ranchers are just that -- private.

National Forest camping is a personal favorite, and if you have a National Forest close enough, you may want to give it a try!
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>>1118644
Where I live you aren't allowed to overnight in most forrests, and half of them are private (not as in peoples back yards, just privately owned and managed). I tend to do hiking and plan my routes so that I have forrested areas to sleep in. Often I don't know weather they are private or not but I camp there anyways, so I allways try to stealth camp unless I specifically find a designated camp site or shelter
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>>1118700
That seems pretty reasonable senpai. Seems like stealth camping is a good idea. Even if something isn't private, it's probably best not to poke the bear when it comes to potential fines.
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>>1118672
>Digging holes
>Driving
>Erecting shelters
>Breathing
>Buying chinkshit
>Making firepits
>Burning carbon

LNT is serious business you cunt. Try harder
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>>1117220
This should be screencapped and posted every time someone asks about this.
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>>1117037
I feel like some forests have rules against camping just so people don't go ham with it or camp in the same spot as everyone else. It's one of those things where if a ranger caught you, and you weren't being a shit head and practicing good LNT, they'd prolly leave you alone with a warning to pack out early in the morning and "don't do it again".

Here in Maryland there's not alcohol allowed on state campgrounds, but I was camping with my out-virgin gf (wanted to start her off easy with car-glamping) and we were drinking some wine. The ranger rolls around on her nightly patrol, and so we start to chat and she tells us that the rule is pretty much only in place to keep college kids from rolling in a keg and getting shitfaced Nobody cares if people are being respectful and responsible.
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>>1117220
Good post. Someone screencap this.
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>>1118127
>>1118531
http://stlplaces.com/night_vision_red_myth/
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>>1118796
>>1118802
delivered
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>>1118644
Stealth camping is most popular with the bicycle touring crowd, I think. You're not always in pure wilderness like most hikes, so you often just gotta pull off the road into a small wooded area that may or may not be private land.
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>>1118946
good fella
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>>1118946
missed one >>1117224
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>>1118791
Lnt is for normie fags camping in highly travelled areas. I leave a trace because im the only person who knows my spots.
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>>1117037
I stealth-camped a bunch on the side of the road when I was walking and hitchhiking from Phoenix to Denver. It sucks ass because you have to constantly hide, and the ever-present risk of being caught by the police or an angry landowner and charged a hefty fine, is something that wears down on you after a while. It's "easy" to not get caught, but it requires constant vigilance and being self-conscious about whatever you're doing. Not fun when all you're trying to do is heat up some soup and go to sleep.
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I recommend using a bivvy bag or a bedroll anon. Tents stick out like a sore thumb and if you are caught you can't bugout as fast. If you need more shelter use a tarp along with it. But keep it low to the ground to not give you a too big profile
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>>1117217
Only thing you are missing is to get up and break camp very early.




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