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File: 109.jpg (43 KB, 512x512)
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Old thread: >>1123828

Search terms:

Permaculture - Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Rooftop Gardening - Vertical Gardening - Subsistence Agriculture - Square Foot Gardening - Shifting Cultivation - Polyculture - Composting - Ley Farming - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Co-operative Farming - Orchard - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish

Resources:

https://pastebin.com/4CqXsHFm

Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2005/may05/SecVeget.html

Scans of Classic Herbal Texts:
http://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/index.html

Homegrowmen Archive (WinRAR/WinZip/7Zip etc open rar archive files):

>76.1MB
>Homegrowmen Threads Mar-20-2013 to Sep-29-2017.rar
https://www.mediafire.com/file/lbotds76751ws79/Homegrowmen%20Threads%20Mar-20-2013%20to%20Sep-29-2017.rar
Originally from archive website: https://archived.moe/out/
>>
>>1132889
>>1132891
I'm going to try my first garden next season but in the mean time is there anything on the cheap I can do indoors during the winter?
>>
>>1132786
Are the other plants even susceptible to those diseases?

>>1132868
I'm procrastinating building cold boxes, greenhouse, etc. Its raining ice on my window right now too.

>>1132889
>>1133052
Plant cole crops under polytunnels or in cold frames/boxes. Indoors you can start most of your seeds about 2 months before your area's last frost. If you have polytunnels you can start them much earlier then set them out under the polytunnels a good bit before the last frost if temps are good in the tunnels. For regular growing indoors, herbs are always a go to thing for most people. I grow microgreens, sprouts, and garlic tops. Some years I overwinter pepper plants, but not this year, they are still under polytunnels.

Keep your cats away from plants you'll be eating. That's a health hazard to you too.

>>1133040
I use,

http://sustainableseedco.com/
https://www.rareseeds.com/

For things I can't find in stores or trade for locally. I rarely buy from stores though. I can order from just about any online company if they have what I want and no one else has it.
>>
>>1133056
>Are the other plants even susceptible to those diseases?
Citrus, perhaps kitchen herbs?
>>
Going to be planting in Maine. Advice?
>>
>>1133222
Wait until spring
>>
>>1133222
2-layer polytunnel filled with a massive pile of fresh horse manure at one end. Replenish manure when its temps start to drop. Plant whatever you want inside.
>>
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What's the right time to transplant a sage seedling? After it grows 4 sets of leaves or something? It's my first time taking care of sage.

The one in the picture's 2 1/2 weeks old that I placed on a small yogurt cup after it germinated early from using the baggie method I placed on the fridge.
>>
>>1133538
3-4 true leaves, not counting the cotyledon.
>>
Hey all,

This year I would like to pre-seed or pre-plant as many plants as I can for the winter. I have planted some ramp seeds and garlic bulbs, but I am wondering if other cold weather-hardy crops could be sown in the fall. I have kale, collards, carrots, and chard. Would any of these plants survive the winter under the soil and grow well in the next season? I figure natural style cold stratification should lead to vigorous growth next year.

If anyone has experience with this let me know.
>>
>>1133717
Many tubers can be overwintered under piles of straw. So long as they don't freeze they should make it. Of course some stuff like whole carrots and burdock just become woody in the second year and produce flowers and seed. Their seeds are fine to plant. The main thing to worry about is frost zapping them if they sprout up before the last frost.
>>
>>1133263
So basically a greenhouse is the only proper way? Or do you just mean in the Fall and Winter?
>>
>>1133720
It is called a "hotbed" or "hotbox". Basically, a cold frame with hot manure in it for warmth. Yes, that is for cold months. I mean Maine is cold right now and getting colder. Otherwise, specify when you'll be planting for better info.
>>
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>fungus gnats
>>
>>1133546
Thanks, anon.

>>1133734
Had those once. Fungus gnat larvae freaked me out. Have you tried using yellow sticky traps and changed the way you water your plants?
>>
>>1133050
My Barbados Cherry tree is in trouble and I don't know why. It used to be doing so well until I moved it in so the cold wouldn't kill it. Now the leaves tips started to turn brown, brown spots started to appear, and leaves fell off.

I can't figure out what's wrong with it. I fed it fertilizer monthly as per usual, I water it, and it gets plenty of sun.

Any idea on what I am missing?
>>
>>1133810
Take pics please.
>>
>>1133723
okay. sorry and thank you
>>
>>1133717
You could set onions for a May/June harvest (works at least here in 8a)
>>
>>1133810
Maybe drier air indoors or it is near a vent that's blowing on it or other heat source. Sudden changes do that to plant. Monitor it for new growth and new browning on things not previously so.
>>
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First one is done, thanks to y'all that helped this noob growing his first shit.
>>
>>1133906
That sure has a nice arrangement. What's it called?
>>
>>1133906
That's pretty cool man

Run a choo choo under it
>>
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>>1133906
Very nice, anon.
>>
>>1133930
Looks like a neagari style.
>>
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>>1133930
>>1133935
>>1133941
Thanks bruhs. I'm pretty glad with how it turned out, I had no idea what to expect half a year ago.
It's a Numex Twilight pepper.

>>1133942
I have no idea, I watched 1 short video on how to repot a bonsai, and just went to town with it. All I did was try to make it look good.
>>
>>1133943
Quite a good start. If you were ever to use a shrub or tree instead of a pepper plant, you'd need to allow it to grow in a full sized, normal pot or in open ground until the top is fully formed and no longer needed to be shaped.
>>
>>1133906
It's bootiful
>>
Hey everyone, ive got a little predicament right now - I've fallen into the ownership of a 7 foot tall 21 year old hibiscus plant, and I really dont know how im supposed to care for it. It recently had 4 blooms, but it kind of looks like its starting to wilt. It still very very green, maybe 6ish yellow leaves, but im getting worried about it

How often should It be watered? its indoor right now because its getting very cold and i know when it goes out in the summer you have to water it more frequently, but how frequent is that to begin with? and should I be watering it every day or once a week right now?

thanks
>>
>>1134028
Needs more light. Water when dry.
>>
>>1134037
how much should I water it? sorry im very clueless about this type of stuff. sites online give different info
>>
>>1134041
Just give it a good soaking. Make sure the water drains out of the container properly. Water again when it is drive about 4-5 inches down. They are susceptible to root rot. Move thing from one part of a room to another, having a window draft, vent draft, etc can make them suddenly drop their leaves.
>>
>>1134048
alright thanks. i just felt the soil and its still very slightly moist. Its definitely more dry than it is wet. Is it safe to water it right now or should I maybe wait till tomorrow.

Also I put it near my sliding glass doors, so it should have a good amount of daylight
>>
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>>1133962
I'll keep that in mind, thanks!
>>1134013
Cheers
>>
>>1134028
What kind of hibiscus though? I'm strongly assuming it's one of those frost-intolerant ones (rosa-sinensis), but in the rare chance it's H. syriacus, you're doing it a better favour by planting in the garden soil
>>
anyone here got any experience in making tea?

I'm planning to follow pic related, but does anyone have any tips about rookie mistakes etc.?
>>
>>1134301
I make poppy, and hyssop tea. Is you ambient air dry or humid?
>>
>>1134301
If it drys to fast or too cold chlorophyll will remain in the leaves
>>
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Sunflower root,
harvest from 3 tubers massive gains.
>>
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the plants outside.
>>
>>1134343
>Helianthus tuberosus
It's a jerusalem artichoike in English. Sunflowers are only the big ones.
>>
>>1134343
What can you do with it? Similar to a potato?
>>
So how do you go about growing venus fly traps from seeds?

I'm in the tropics so I'm a bit worried about how to handle the dormancy stage of this plant.

Also, some sources say not so much water while other say use the water tray method. Which is correct?
>>
>>1134357
Try both
>>
>>1134354
eat it raw or cook. boiling makes them turn grey.
>>
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>>1134343
>>1134350
>>1134354
aka "Sunchoke" and "Fartichoke". I've grown them before, but until I get pigs or goats, they are useless too me. They cause me way WAY too much gas and bloating.
>>
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G-G-G-G-Great succes.

I don't know if any of you guys remember me. I'm the lad with the tiny raised bed. (see pic)

Recently quit my job in IT because I want to live closer to nature and the essence of life. So I'm starting a job being a "foreman" in a bell pepper greenhouse over here. Growing non-gmo, biological bell peppers year around without artifical lighting. Looking forward to it.

In other news, just planted "Aguadulce" broad beans. A type of broad bean that you sow in oktober/november and harvest in june/july. I planted 9 plants in the raised bed and like 12 in the little cold frame because I think the rain is going to fuck me over. Looking forward to the results.

Also started buying bigger bags of seed (see pic) of 5oz/250gr. Should be more economical.

Life is grand.
>>
>>1134572
That job sounds comfy as fuck.
>>
>>1134610
I hope I get hired man. It's like 80% right now, but I still have to meet the guy that is the growing expert or something like that. If we hit it off, I'm golden for the next couple of years.

I basically oversee the harvest process. Making sure the right amounts of peppers are being harvested and at the right color/stage. I'll be picking peppers myself but mostly making sure the cheaper employees can keep going.

Also, they are opening another greenhouse across the road next month for which I will also be responible. I'll have to use the forklift to transport bell peppers from the new greenhouse to the current one so they can be washed and packages. That should be fun too.

Really looking forward to it. If everything works out I can start a bachelor in agriculture in august too.

It turns out all those pussies were'nt kidding, it does get better.
>>
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Finally have the first shoot from my gojiberry seed!

I just hydrated a dried berry from a bag i got on amazon and broke it up into a small pot.

Now lets see if it survives here in AZ
>>
>>1134536
I think i'ts because they're not really for you. Giving them to non-native americans is like giving aged cheese to non-caucasians.
>>
>>1134677
I'm actually part Native American. It is the starch "inulin" which isn't properly digested, leaving more for microbes to ferment into gas. I can't eat cheese of any kind at all, but I can eat any other dairy product.
>>
MUSHROOMS
I want to talk about growing mushrooms
I have never tried it and I don't know very much about it
I pick a lot of wild mushrooms

how do you "plant" mushrooms? is plant even the right word?
I am going to assume wet hay is the best for growing them

how would someone even get started?
could I just put some hay in a shoebox for a container?
I know it wouldn't last long
I have big feet and a big shoebox from boots
>>
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>start some mystery pepper seeds (the pepper looked like a Fatalii or Devil's Tongue) in a moist paper towel, sealed in a bag
>notice slight fungal growth on the seeds - FUCK
>put some peroxide on the seeds and put them back in the bag
>fuck it, maybe the seeds are done for...
>put bag away and forget about it
>decide to put a bunch more seeds, which were all pre-soaked in peroxide as a precaution, in another paper towel and sealed bag
>couple weeks pass
>no germination yet
>just 15 minutes ago, notice the original bag with moist paper towel
>see glint of green in the light
>one of the original pepper seeds germinated and the sprout is struggling to survive
>carefully planted it and put it under my desk grow light

MOTHERFUCK
>>
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>>1134773
Here's the yellow mystery pepper I took the seeds from.
>>
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>>1134773
I often use Stone Cold Steve Austin pics
#saved

mushroom talk please>>1134769
>>
Living in the DFW, Texas area as of late, I've realized there is an opportunity right in front of me to make money.

>Multiple high end restaurants are popping up with the booming neighborhoods.
>All of the cooks love organics so gosh dang much.
>Suburban land is never used for local agriculture around here and chefs have to pay for high shipping costs to get the good stuff.

What way should I start this venture?

Microgreens in the backyard greenhouse?

In the garage?
>>
>>1134798
try to find out what the restaurants want
what would be most popular?
>>
>>1134802
That's the plan. Are microgreen herbs like lemon basil interchangeable with the potted kind? I feel having a uniform growing method would ease production.
>>
>>1134807
sorry not familiar with basil
>>
>>1134808
fug
it'll be something I ask about, then.
>>
>a branch on my anaheims* is down
>three good ripe enough peppers on it
>normally only pick things when I'm ready to use them
>no immediate use for these
>hm, they're not that spicy when I put them in chili so I can probably eat them straight
>nope
What can I do with two and a half fresh-picked peppers?

*I live somewhere it's warm enough that they've been bearing still, although I'm probably on the last harvest of the season
>>
>>1134802
My experience with microgreens is indoors in a climate controlled sterile environment. This allows you to control lighting humidity and temperature and keep pests out. My boss tried it in the greenhouse and ended up with many problems. Basically do it like someone growing marijuana indoors. That's how the co-op I worked at did it. Sunflower sprouts are one of my favorite foods now.
>>
>>1134769
>>1134775
Save the spores (make a spore print by laying out the mature mushroom cap on some aluminum foil for at least a few hours), inoculate some growing medium (the medium will depend on what mushrooms you want to grow), keep it in a moist and warm environment, and that is about 80% of the job. Also, make sure your growing medium is sterilized before you use it, so that competing fungi don't overtake it.

Some mushrooms are very hard to cultivate, though. I'd probably look up some mushroom growing kits to get a better idea.
>>
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>>1133050
You probably know about it already but I still feel like posting it, since I just found out about it myself.

>Cañihua
>Quinoa

Those should be on your list of things to grow. It can basically grow anywhere and it can handle rather cold climate, hight altitude. The whole plant can be eaten raw or cooked/roasted and the seed can be made into flour to bake bread, can be roasted, popped, eaten raw.
>>
>>1134854
thanks
keep the info coming guys
anyone have a lot of experience?
can you even see the spores?
how do you know you are getting spores?
i am a little interested i think i am going to research this a little and maybe i will try it if it don't sound too hard
>>
>>1134860
Yeah but it's not yummy.
>>
>>1134863
>can you even see the spores?
>how do you know you are getting spores?

You need a microscope to see individual spores, but if you leave the mushroom cap long enough, it will deposit a lot of spores, which look like fine powder. Pic is an example of an oyster mushroom spore print. Spores might be light, dark, or different colours.
>>
>>1134863
http://www.mediafire.com/file/vqw7b8ee59q98g7/PSILOCYBIN+MUSHROOMS.rar
>>
>>1134900
it says psilocybin mushrooms but there are a few books in general cultivation, and you can apply cubensis basic techniques to almost everything mushroom related anyway
>>
>>1134863
I saw a guy just put some mushrooms in a blender with water until it was a milkshake-like consistency to use as the inoculant.
>>
>>1134536
>>1134677
there is only 1 race the human race. it is a myth that some "races" can't eat certain foods. eat enough of something and your body will learn to digest it

also BRAAAAP!
>>
>>1134924
It's true, I ate a lot of cyanide and now it's super nutritious.
>>
>>1134798
Don't know if you have seen his vids yet, but this guy does urban farming in canada and has some great content.
https://m.youtube.com/user/urbanfarmercstone
>>
>>1134925
there is a difference between food items and poisons.
>>
>>1134931
Yeah, the difference is whether you can metabolize them. Which depends on whether you have evolved that ability, which depends on your genome.
>>
How the fuck am I to compete with grocery stores?

100 grams of alfalfa for a buck

Seriously.. wtf
>>
>>1134934
wrong
>>
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Anyone ever grown paw paw trees or eaten paw paw? Native to north american eastern forests. Cultivated by native americans. Great taste, has cult following and even a festival based around the tree and fruit. The only reason it is not more widespread is it cannot be kept more than a couple days on a store shelf. You also need 2 trees as it is not self pollinating. They are small trees and can fit in almost any yard. Tried it years ago and it was great, like a vanilla banana! I planted a whole hedge of trees but they aren't large enough to fruit yet, should be fruiting next year or in 2019 though.
>>
>>1134939
t. Doesn't know physiology
>>
>>1134940
I've thought about growing paw paw before because they're indigenous here I just don't know where I'd get them to plant.
>>
>>1134938
Its all about how to market and package it.

Basically hipsterize the fuck out of the packaging with some recycled ecoplastic fuckery, and say some dumb shit like gluten free organically grown sustainably harvested alfalfa. Then you can charge 25% more than your competitors and still make sales.

Also you can do some hippy bullshit like planting trees for every dollar earned or something. You could even attach a cause onto your business like "a portion of each sale goes to the down syndrome blind clown school foundation"

People are so gullible its literally impossible not to make money in the current market. Its all about hoe you market it.
>>
>finally decide to build some raised beds
>lumber prices are fucking insane because of weird trade agreements/tariffs with canada and because of those fucking hurricanes
m-maybe next fall...
>>
>>1134959
Use stone, bricks, blocks, etc. You can also do a hugelkultur then line it with a border later.
>>
>>1134943
I got mine from a local nursery, they were about 3 feet tall. Didn't lose any but heard they don't transplant well. They are way fucking cheaper than the 30 bucks a piece I paid online. Like 6 bucks for a 3 footer.
>>
>>1135128
I just read up on them and apparently they do well from seed.
Any tips for growing them? How fast do they grow?
>>
>>1135138
They are an understory tree, mine are shaded for half of the day by a couple linden trees. They said I should have fruit in 3-4 years from the 3 foot tree I bought, not sure how long it takes to get one to 3 feet, probably 2 years, at least 1. So I'd guestimate 4-6 years from seed to fruiting. Best time to plant a tree is yesterday.
>>
Anyone else just grab single flowers or little shoots of shrubs and other plants you like from parks and other nicely landscaped public places?

Got a palmetto, a bunch of different flowers, an elephant ear, a boston fern, and some kind of tropical looking shrubs from the big downtown park here. Saw a banana plant with a bunch of perfect little shoots next to a bike trail and a bunch of longleaf pine seedlings in the state forest outside of town, gonna go back for those soon.

Of course I make sure to disturb the plants as little as possible and only take them if there's enough of them for it not to make a difference.
>>
>>1135267
Illegal as fuck where I live in the USA. all the parks have signs up not to do it and everything else is privately owned. Only the latter, you can ask permission. Otherwise, it is theft or federal and state offense here. The parks really crack down on that here too. There's been more than a few people arrested and/or fined heavily in recent memory. The reason is because the parks see 1000s of people a day and people keep trying to do that sort of thing. One group of guys chopped down about 50 trees just to take the massive burl knots from them for selling. They got caught and sentenced to prison for I don't remember how long. That was pretty extreme though. That was back in the 1980s.
>>
>>1135294
Weird. Where I live it's not even particularly frowned upon if you don't do it in excess.
>50 trees
Are you talking about a landscaped place? What has that many trees? That sounds more like a national or state park.
>>
>>1135294
What a faggot, there is a big difference between taking a snip off a plant and cutting down 50 100 year old trees. Yeah they will prosecute people who do it for commercial reasons but not otherwise. Remember folks these are public lands to be used by the public
>>
>>1135316
Of course there is a difference. That's why flower pickers just get a $500 fine.

>>1135309
>That sounds more like a national or state park.

Of course. Everything else is privately owned and subject to the landowner's will. If you ask for permission from them and they grant it, you are good to go. Otherwise, if you get caught you can get in some serious trouble. If just depends on how big of a dick you are and they are.

https://www.google.com/search?q=fined+picking+flowers+park

Lots of historical data there.
>>
>>1135320
>there are no city parks where you live
That's kind of bizarre.
>>
>>1135322
All land is owned. Even "public" land. It is all subject to laws and rules of whatever governing body owns it and/or zones it. City parks can be owned jointly, privately, by the city government itself, by the state, and/or federally. The term "city park" isn't well defined for the ownership part, but is always designated as a "city park" in reference if not by actual name.

I'm not really sure why everyone has a problem with this and >>1135294 It is merely information you need to look into before doing something like >>1135267 otherwise, if you get caught you can end up in serious trouble.
>>
>>1135331
>All land is owned. Even "public" land.
Yeah but it's not privately owned, man.

>I'm not really sure why everyone has a problem
I don't think anyone does. Saying your situation doesn't match their own isn't the same as saying that your point is wrong.
>>
>>1135320
Those jewgle results are from the UK, a country that arrests kids for reporting that they were gang raped by terrorists.
>>
>>1134834
cut into rings, then chuck in the freezer. Not the best method to save them long term, but they'll do well for a good couple months
>>
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Does anyone else start to have irrational concerns about your garden after you've planted?

A squirrel dug a few holes in my garlic patch and ramp patch (the parts covered in leaves) and now I have this irrational worry that everything is fucked up and I need to buy new seeds/bulbs and start again. Maybe it's just the OCD meds not working.
>>
>>1135387
The problems with your garden aren't limited to shit a squirrel did. Why is everything so close together?
>>
>>1135395
Trying to get as much bang for my buck as possible with a 12x12 suburban plot. Next year I'm gonna probably just plant 2-3 kale and chard and spread them out more.
>>
>>1135395
Close planting helps confuse would be insect pests. Besides flowers all they see is the green when looking for a place to land, and if they land 2-3 times on something they don't want to eat they generally fuck off.
>>
>>1135407
Do you have a source on that? Best I've got is Letourneau et al (2011) which implies that it doesn't actually do enough to counteract reduced yield, but it's not addressing density of planting specifically.
>>
>>1135334
>>1135343
There are US links too. Everything is a location to location basis. That is the whole point. This is a warning to you, don't do shit until you've found out what is legal in your area. How can that be misconstrued? Calm yourself down right now before you have a heart attack, gramps.
>>
>>1135412
Why are you assuming everyone's misconstruing and getting heart attacks? Chill the fuck out and have a normal conversation.
>>
>>1135387
>Karl_the_Kale_led_a_lonely_life.jpg

>>1135410
I've read the same thing as >>1135407 in a laundry list of science papers, back when I was researching this type of thing. I'm sure google scholar can help you out. Try something like, "companion plants influencing behaviour pests"
>>
>>1135414
>>
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>tfw two planted pineapple tops rotted within days of each other
>>
>>1135421
When I select the tops, I make sure to but the ones that don't have the plastic tag holder shoved through too many leaves. Those that get speared pretty good nearly always die. I remove as many of the outer leaves as possible until there are no more root nubs higher up. I make sure to cut the bottom off all the way up to the lowest root nub. I let it dry out for 2-3 days. I put it in water up to the bottom of the first leaf. I change the water every single day. When the roots are 2 inches long, I plant it.

Sometimes, the center leaves will rot out. You can test tug on them very gently to see if they get loose. Just pull them out if they detach. Repeat with any others near the center. Just don't forcefully yank them out. About half the time these will heal over and a new center will grow up.
>>
>>1135410
I read it a few times a while back so I don't have the sources I first read it but like the other anon said look up companion planting guides.
It's anecdotal coming from me but I noticed a drastic decrease of insect predation on my plants when I started planting them closer together. I used to line them up in even rows and now I fill in the spaces with clover or a good companion plant like borage.
From what I remember you can even just use anything green colored, like a tarp, to confuse and dissuade insects. I think it was actually 3-4 landing attempts that was their limit. It makes sense from an evolutionary standpoint that they wouldn't bother going to similar plants surrounding the ones that they deem inedible.
>>
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>>1135428
Wait, they can sometimes regrow? Shit, I already dumped them in the compost. Thanks for the advice, though.
>>
i think this is the right thread , might not be
ive read that garlic and ginger have a hemostatic effect , but do they kick in by eating it or by applying it to the wound ? do i need to prepare them in anyway ? cayenne works by applying and drinking in a dilluted form , so i dont know
>>
>>1135457
Uh. If you need to stop bleeding you should probably use pressure and elevation. There is also a herbalism thread where this belongs
>>
>>1134959
Personally I like brick better just because it won't warp. I also like watching little lizards sunning on them in the morning.
>>
>>1135458
sorry i havent been in out in months
>>
>>1135457
When you eat them, they thin your blood and you shouldn't eat a bunch of them if you are taking blood thinners. Externally it inhibits platelet aggregation by reducing their adhesion properties. Eating way too much or too much of extracts can cause gastrointestinal bleeding. This is contrary to folk medicine ideas of what garlic does.
>>
>>1135412
Who cares what is legal????? We live in a lawless country where everything is corrupt and you think anyone cares about a twig?
>>
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>>1135294
>>1135320
I mean I'm sure it's technically illegal, but that's more for making sure nobody digs up a whole flower garden or is chopping down 200 year old trees.

Nobody cares if I bend down and pick a single flower or pinch a babby shoot off a big healthy plant. It's not any more hardcore than speeding, pirating media, or smoking weed.

Don't be a pussy, live your life and have some fun.
>>
>>1135421
I neglect the shit out of my cut top and leave it to dry for 2-5 days. Then I just plant and water in shit soil. I've had 4 live and 1 give me fruit-- It died and its babby bud gave me a fruit this year too. Smol but delicious.
>>
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>>1134940
that's not a paw paw
>>
>>1135810
Not him but, yes it is a pawpaw fruit.
>>
>>1134940

Found a pawpaw grove in the woods house as a child. Brought a bunch of fruit back, threw a bunch of the over ripe ones out of our yard into the woodland.

15 years later, there is now a grove of mature fruiting trees right behind the house. Racoons love them
>>
>>1135830
I live in a pawpaw area and haven't once been able to harvest a single pawpaw. I don't grow them, but they grow on the property. The reason is that raccoons and opossums eat them pretty quickly. Next season, I'll try some cuttings and have them in my orchard.
>>
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>>1136006

The old pop cans on the trunk trick works around here for larger trees. When they make a loud noise it removes their stealth and makes them feel very unsafe.

Nothing beats a Tibetan mastiff though, the ultimate night guard for a farmer. Their scent marking and barking alone will protect your property. They are nocturnal and prefer to be left outside all night to roam. They also live much longer than comparably sized dogs, up to 14 years. I got one after some coywolves were interested in my chickens and they were bigger than my beagle and rat dog. Worth the cost, now my only pests to deal with are birds and insects.
>>
>>1136077
Once I have them in my orchard, all I need to do is put a seasonal collar on them. I did it for one of my peach trees this year using a section of aluminum flashing. It worked well. It was the only tree to keep its fruit safe from the raccoons and opossums. However, the bees and wasps still got the fruit.
>>
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>>1134637
Just a few days later, and i have 2 leaves and a second stem sprouting up.

truly am bless
>>
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>>1133810
Here's a pic of it from phone
>>
>>1135810
That's a North American paw paw, not a papaya (which is also called a paw paw in some places).
>>
>transplant peppers indoors
>two of them have wilting leaves and the peppers quickly wrinkled and dried up within days

What happened? Was it transplant shock? Were they out in the cold for too long and had some kind of temperature shock? Or did I fuck up the roots? I pruned both peppers back for new growth over the winter.
>>
>>1136174
Pretty hard to tell without a before and after pic. Are they getting adequate light and ventilation?
>>
>>1133050
/out/

I have a weird fucking phobia to snails and slugs. Do you always deal with these motherfuckers? Indoor is the solution for me? How can I minimize their appearances (I prefer not seeing them than dealing with them) on crops?.

No gastropods pics please.
>>
>>1136187
>Are they getting adequate light and ventilation?
Yes, and more than enough water. I already pruned them and the leaves seem to be doing better now.
>>
>>1136199
I've never seen a snail in my garden. Slugs are rarely out and about during the day, they're nocturnal.
You can prevent gastropods from getting into your garden by bordering it with a good amount of rough, dry material, such as bricks, sand, or diatomaceous earth.
>>
>>1136199
Beer traps.
Plastic sheet mulch.
Diatomaceous Earth and/or sand as mulch.

Keep the area free of places to hide during the day. Things like blocks/stones for raised beds, wood chip mulch, and heavy thick vegetation are the best places for them to live.
>>
>>1136157
Has it worsened?
>>
>>1136210
Afraid so. I can't figure out what's wrong.
>>
>>1136242
Is it possible the tree is just naturally losing its leaves for winter?
>>
>>1134769
I have some mushrooms going through some plastic drawers. Their growth finally showed up on the surface. I think I fed them too much sawdust which is why it took so long and I lost half because the innoculation failed. Forcing me to start over once I realized it.

A lot of waiting. They don't need nearly as much care as my plants and the fact that many of them don't care about the sun is handy.

Need to figure out a better means of keeping the moisture level perfect.

I am still a complete noob though so I stuck with oysters and shiitake. I don't even know how the innoculation failed. As I put in two of them just in case. Seeing how I screwed up with oysters and shiitake I still got a very long way to go to not being a complete noob.
>>
>>1136245
Its inside and it's a tropical plant. The only one I may add that is having problems. I moved it inside to protect it from the cold. It's hanging out with a bunch of other tropicals that are doing great so the environment outside the container is fine. I fed it the regularly monthly organic tropical fertilizer and I used compost with worm castings to pot them.

Supposedly an 'easy' tree to grow but goddamn its literally the only 1 of my collection that is giving me problems. The rest of them are doing great, but not that one.

>>1133862
I keep a moisturizer running because of most of my tropicals like it wet and I don't keep the heater close to my plants if it gets too cold inside.

Even my bitchy banana tree is doing great and it's picky.

Now its dropping leaves again even with its new growths. Last time it had to do with intense sunlight and lacking nutrients but I was able to fix that. Now I am using a heavy duty industrial sunlight that the other ones just love and the things I tried last time aren't working.
>>
>>1136258
The only thing I can think of is root burn, if it is being watered properly that is. It doesn't sound like a heating/draft issue.
>>
>>1136157
>Photograph taken by Michael J. Fox (2017)
>>
I've been mulling over planting some vegetables for a while now but I have a question, what is the primary purpose of a greenhouse and are there any plants you would not want to put in them? I always thought they were just to protect from the elements but they're quite humid inside aren't they? Should I even be thinking about a greenhouse before a regular old vegetable planter?
>>
>>1136467
>what is the primary purpose of a greenhouse
Environment stabilization.
Depending on how the greenhouse is constructed and equipped, it can be used to shield plants from external heat or cold, keep them moist in a dry environment or keep them dry in a wet environment. Usually greenhouses are used to protect plants from cold during the winter months.

>are there any plants you would not want to put in them?
It'd depend on the conditions within the individual greenhouse.

>they're quite humid inside aren't they?
It depends on the greenhouse. Using vents or fans to keep the air moving will reduce humidity, for example.

>Should I even be thinking about a greenhouse before a regular old vegetable planter?
A greenhouse is not an insignificant investment. I think it'd be better for you to start with a few potted plants or shoveling out a garden plot before building a structure in your yard just for plants.
>>
>>1136486

Thanks anon, guess I'll just try to start with something easy for my climate, tons of room in the backyard to stick a patch.
>>
>>1136492
Look into polytunnels and row covers.
>>
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>coworker shows me a weird hollow tomato plant at work
>Tell him I'm gonna take a cutting and grow one and I could do one for him too
>Get them set up got good growth on them
>While trying to catch him it falls over and spills no less than 5 times
What a pita
>>
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>>1136564
>hollow tomato plant
>While trying to catch him

what did he mean by this
>>
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Here's the nasturtium, from my garden starting from seedling indoors in March all the way to today, where they've been turned into, "Poorman's Capers." I used cayenne peppers grown in my garden too. The bay leaves are from the store. I used 4oz jars so that when I open a jar, it won't sit in the fridge for very long.

Recipe:

1 Pint Nasturtium Pods

Sauce,
1 Pint Vinegar
1.5 Tablespoons Canning Salt (I used PHS.)
2 Tablespoons Sugar
1 Bay Leaf per Jar
1 Slice of Hot Pepper per Jar

Mix all sauce ingredients, including bay leaves & hot pepper slices together and bring to a boil.
Place 1 bay leaf and 1 hot pepper slice into each jar.
Fill jars with nasturtium pods, leaving 1/2 inch head space.
Pour hot vinegar mixture into jars, leaving 1/2 inch head space.
Water bath can for 10 mins.

Some recipes use a 1.5 inch long sprig of fresh thyme per jar.
>>
>>1136643

>jars only half packed

Theres more brine in there than pods
>>
>>1136686
That happens with all canning. It is just much more pronounced with nasturtium. They were tightly packed before canning. Another thing is that they float really well while still hot, so the head space is packed with them. Once the jars cool, the pods come back down and it looks more normal.
>>
>>1136603
The tomatoes on the plant were hollow, it was a strange plant

I have to find him because our job is mobile and not timed consistently
>>
>>1136643
So is that all there really is to canning? Boiling them under water till the contents in the jar are at boiling temps? Will this work without brine for say If I want to preserve tomatos or squash without pickling?
>>
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Hi I was directed to this thread, can you help me save my plant please?
>>
>>1136727
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/tomatoes-hollow-inside.htm
It wasn't pollinated properly or it had adverse growing conditions.
>>
>>1136765
Looks like it needs more light and might have too much water. Is the soil well draining and the pot have good holes to let water out so it doesn't pool up?

>>1136731
For water bath canning, yes. Pressure canning is completely different. For water bath canning you need to know the acidity level/pH of the vegetables/fruit and the brine you'll be using. The pH needs to be low, or it won't work and you'll end up with bulging lids, popped lids, and/or botulism.

For tomatoes you can use their own juice to pickle them with in a water bath. Squash would need to be pickled with vinegar/lactic acid fermentation or be pressure canned, however, I'm not too familiar with canning squash, so make sure you look up how to do it properly. Everything usually has a different method for how you need to prepare the fruit/veggies and how to preserve them. There are many good online sources:

http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html
>>
>>1136770
The drainage is not good. It was outside before getting great decent light. I have a small grow light I can use inside tho. Thanks. Can I safely transport it to another pot?
>>
>>1136781
Yeah, get it into a new pot asap. Give it as much light as possible, as close to the leaves as you can without burning it. Any light will work, not just grow lights.
>>
>>1136783
Thank you very much
>>
I propagated some Dracaena braunii roughly 5 months ago from a parent plant. After letting them sprout roots in a jar of water, I transplanted them to some potting soil.

They've taken root in their new home, but they haven't grown. They don't seem to be suffering or having a hard time, but they're not growing at all. No new growth, no height, and they're definitely not growing a woody stem like the parent plant has.

what gives?
>>
>>1136770
Thank you
>>
>>1136765
M8 that container is waaaaay too small.
>>
>>1136788
The seasons have changed, are they in a location where they are colder now than before? That can halt growth up top. They are most likely growing roots. If they are in a pot, check that they have not become root bound already. If so, repot into something larger. Woody stem will probably show up next year. Have you been feeding them?
>>
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>>1136765

1) take the foil off the bottom, let it drain
2) give it more light
3) Stop letting birds lay eggs in your pot
4) Repot once the plant has stabilized and is beginning to grow healthy
>>
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>Plan to harvest all my stevia and lemonbalm since it is starting to get cold out
>Have to delay by a day because I got called in to work in order to cover for someone
>That night it snows in the middle of november and all my non cold-hardy herbs shrivel up and die

I had enough out there to last me through the winter. Fuck me.
>>
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>growing some Amigo Inferno chillis
>flowers grow down
>peppers grow upwards

I know it's a hybrid but what kind of Sorcery is this?
>>
Guy with the diseased Nectarine plant here.

I just wanted its pretty pink flowers but it was getting too much and maintenance was costing me. I had no idea nectarines would be susceptible to so many diseases.

So I just removed it, chucked it away and planted Salvia Greggii instead.
>>
>>1136982
http://www.salviaspecialist.com/catalog/salvias-g/greggii/
>>
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How do I remove glochids from my hands?
>>
>>1137006
wax?
>>
>>1136950
A lot of peppers do that. It's just the stem bending?
>>
>>1137006
Duct tape. Then tweezers and magnifying glass in strong light. If you are handling the fruits, use fire to burn off all the spines.
>>
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Ideas how to make my apartment mini farm better? I haven't started with the plants, yet.
>>
>>1137099
That looks cool. Is that an ultraviolet light?
>>
>>1137099
•Air flow control
•Humidity control
•Temp control
•Thermometer & Hygrometer
•Drip tray under everything(shower pan liner would probably work & you can cut to fit; see pic) Catches spills and humidity drips
•Casters (I can't tell if it has casters under it or not, but rolling it around on some big smooth casters would be nice.)
•Raise it up 1.5 feet/0.45m and put a storage space under it.
•Water your onions
>>
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Found this in my worm bin.
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>>1136950
Lol. All good Amiga.
>>
>>1137174
looks like a worm
>>
>>1137174
Shove it up your ass namefag
>>
>>1135505
Enjoy prison, felon
>>
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Found these in my chicken coop
>>
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Found these in my breadbox
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Found these in my luffa garden
>>
Found these on my computer.
>>
>>1133734
Iktfb I came back to my room swarmed with them and infested in my lemon, avocado and lime, I just sprayed them with pyrethrin hopefully I've killed those fucks
>>
>>1137019
I have 5 different varieties and this is the only one that does that, weird.
>>
>>1137151
No, blue and red waves, which makes it purple :)
>>
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Are these memes or do these actually taste good? Does anyone here have experience growing them in calgary or any zone 3 area?
>>
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>>1134940
I've been hunting and growing pawpaws for two years now. I have some one year old seedlings and 100-150 seeds stratifying in peat moss in the fridge over winter. I think the solution to marketing these things is to make pulp out of them and freeze it. I made some pawpaw bread that was essentially banana bread with pawpaw pulp used in lieu of bananas. Really good shit, tasted like mangoey bread. I have another 5-6 cups of pulp in the freezer. I'm hoping to make pawpaw cheesecake with some of it.
>>
>>1137608
I don't have experiences growing them, but you should do fine in zone 3, although they are naturally much more common in zones 1-2. It seems beyond zone 4 is where you run into more problems.
There is a haskap breeding program at the University of Saskatchewan, and they have some good information about it:
http://www.fruit.usask.ca/haskap.html#Releases

In particular, they have an article about how far south you can grow them, and the typical problems plants face as they're grown farther south of their optimal range:
http://www.fruit.usask.ca/Documents/Haskap/How%20far%20south%20can%20Haskap%20be%20grown.pdf
>>
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>watch video of the effect of pot size on pepper plant size
>bushy, superproductive plants
>literally filled with fucking peppers
>notice woman is speaking with a British accent
>all she's doing is putting them in a greenhouse and literally fertilizing them with chickenshit
>tfw Brits get less light and heat, yet still grow superior chili peppers

REEEEEEEEEEEE, IT'S NOT FAIR

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URPPQi903ZY
>>
>>1137819
It's not because she's British it's because she's old. She's been doing it for quite a while and knows what she's doing very well.
>>
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>>1133906
Moved the second one to a bonsai pot today, this one is an Explosive Ember.
>>
my chilis just keeps making shit tons of flowers but no fruit REEEEE
>>
>>1137841
They normally do it the first time they flower. Super hot chilli plants are fussy little bitches though.
>>
>>1137810
Thank you
>>
>>1133906
>>1137839
Neat. Your plant pictures make soothing wallpapers.
>>
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>>1137968
Well, that's a first, glad you like em!
>>
>>1137991
>>1137839
Your peppers are a blessing. Have a pepe.
>>
>>1137611
I will have to try this. I could easily take the frozen pulp to farmers market. Cheesecake also sounds so fucking good holy shit
>>
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There's been freezing weather every night for a week now. Overcast skies too. The temps have been in the lower 20Fs and upper 10Fs. Yesterday and today have been warm so I've been getting lots of stuff done. I pulled all the polytunnels down since the cold is now starting to affect them. I picked the last of the peppers from all the plants, 15.5lbs worth. I'll be dehydrating these I think. I have a massive amount of catnip too.
>>
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I'm attempting something. I installed a trashcan root cellar on the shady south side of a storage building. I didn't give the uphill side enough backfill room to prevent hydrostatic pressures from causing trouble. That would have meant 2 feet of extra digging. I just installed an open ditch above it to divert some of the water. I'll fill the ditch up with gravel tomorrow. The trashcan has some drainage holes inside in case there's a build up of moisture from high humidity when opening the lid. It is sitting on 8-10 inches of gravel which has a drainage pipe under it. I think this spot gets like 2 hours of direct sunlight per day, mostly in the late evening and a bit in the early morning.

I filled it up with only two and a half 5-gallon buckets of potatoes.I put straw in the bottom, placed a layer of potatoes, added a layer of straw, repeated until it was full. The stray on top is to help protect it from freezing temps over the winter.

The main goal is to keep the seed potatoes from rotting, drying out, or sprouting too death over the winter. I still have other potatoes in the garden ground, both for overwintering seed potatoes and that I need to dig up for eating.
>>
Never too early to start thinking about the next warm season, and I've been thinking I'd expand my horizons. How would sweet potato plants fare in Phoenix's climate?
>>
>>1138088
Easily. Just get cultivars for your area's climate.
>>
>>1137993
You mean
>peper
>>
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What kind of tree is this? I feel like this should be easy but I don't know what it is.

I live in North Florida
>>
>>1138295
Whole tree

Florida Capitol happens to be in the background
>>
>>1137611
Is pawpaw safe to eat? Wikipedia says they contain annonacin.
>>
>>1138295
>>1138297
Those little dots on the skin make me think oleaceae. The leaves don't fit anything in that family that I know, though.

>>1138310
Just because something contains a poison doesn't mean it contains anywhere near enough to harm you. Lots of vegetables have some kind of poison.
>>
>>1138320
True, but I can't find any information on exactly how much needs to be ingested in order to cause adverse effects.
Apparently one per day for a year would yield the same relative dosage as that taken by rodents in a study which resulted in their developing brain lesions, but that doesn't mean that eating less than that could not still cause less severe damage.
>>
>>1138322
That's not necessarily meaningful information without knowing how long it takes the body to purge though. If it's all gone by the end of the day, then it doesn't matter very much the total amount you consumed over a year.
>>
>>1138310
Annonacin is only harmful with prolonged ingestion of relatively absurd amounts of the fruit. The annonacin can stop a cell's ability to make energy but the amounts you'd need for that to kill you isn't likely to happen just from consumption of some pawpaws.
>>
>>1138348
I'm not worried about it killing me, more about the vague "damage to neurons" listed as an effect.
>>
>>1138350
If you're worried about developing degenerative neurological disorders from it then just don't eat it. I still stand by my statement that you'd have to consume a lot to have that effect.
>>
>>1138350
Do you drink fluoridated tap water?
>>
>>1138366
No, I've got a big filter hooked up to my house's water supply pipe.
In any case, there's no evidence of water fluoridation being harmful at recommended fluoridation levels.
>>
Anyone ever try the split crown method of propagating pineapples? I just quartered a crown and was wondering if anyone had any success.
>>
>>1138310
>>1138320
>>1138322
>>1138323
>>1138348
>>1138350
>>1138351
>>1138366
>>1138372
This is the citation given for the wiki article,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22130466

>The average concentration of annonacin in the fruit pulp was 0.0701±0.0305mg/g. Purified annonacin (30.07μg/ml) and crude EtOAc extract (47.96μg/ml) induced 50% death of cortical neurons 48h post treatment. Annonacin toxicity was enhanced in the presence of crude extract.

As always, it is a fucktarded amount of toxin extracts poured on primary rat cortical neurons in a dish. So long as you are not making pawpaw extract and pouring it into your brain hatch, I'm sure you'll be fine, even if you eat them for days on end like a tard. You'll have a lot of other problems from eating something in massive quantities before that is a problem. Don't get started on fluoride shit, that that to >>>/sci/ >>>/b/ >>>/x/
>>
>>1138422
http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380096403_Agogbua%20and%20Osuji.pdf

That's pretty interesting. I've only done the whole crown method, but did notice that sometimes a new shoot would emerge if the center was damaged.
>>
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Haven't posted in quite a while, pretty busy which was in part caused by my peppers. Blog post incoming.

Some might remember my weekly posts about my comically amount of pepper plants and the completely overgrown bed. Well, season is finally over, the peppers have been harvested and the Anons pointing out I will end up with "a shitload of peppers" where right, so right....

>>1137839
>>1137991
Beautiful start man. Hope they keep it up.

>>1137819
It's very simple actually, Anon:

Learn about snibbing aka topping. The Belgian pepper Anon here could tell you quite a bit about it i guess.

Rufe of thumb for pot size for the two most popular pepper cultivars, C.Annuum and C.Chinense: C.Annuum tends to thrive well even in confined pots while C.Chinense loves space more than anything. Exceptions exist though. Jalapenos prefer bit more Space than your average C.Annuum.

Fertilize. Fertilize regularly. This isn't rocket science. Find a good vegetable fertilizer that works for peppers. Follow instructions.

Also the the peppers in the video are in a greenhouse, so I would assume that the large ones are older than a year. Although some C.Chinense grow ridiculously large in a single season. Same applies to C.Pubescens.
>>
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>>1138542
I was a bit lazy with recording my harvests though, so the pictures are just a sample of the whole thing.
The whole harvest would have filled the large green bowl in the lower right corner around... 12-13 times? I know my fridge was always full of peppers for the last two months.
>>
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>>1138544
This is what most of it looks like now processed.
The finally tally is
31 jars of pickled peppers
20 bottles of hot sauce
2 bottles/jars of chili vodka
3 bags frozen chopped peppers
1 jar (5l) dried peppers
11 bags given away.

Again not everything is pictured, as some stuff has already been eaten and I didn't bother to record the gift bags. Kinda regret it not having a picture of everything in one large pile though.

Also plenty of milder peppers have been eaten fresh. I still have 3 containers of leftover stuffed peppers in the freezer too.
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>>1138542
>>1138544
lol Great pics and great gardening!
>>
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>>1138547
And this is all that is left now. 3 peppers that came late to the party and 4 lemons. Thought i gave them a try since a friend wanted one and had no luck growing one. Also why not check another box on the meme gardener checklist?
I also try to overwinter my cranberry and wasabi.
Kinda bummed by the end of the season. But there will always be another season.
>>
>>1138548
Thanks man

>>1138549
And speaking of next season: I have more seeds that I could ever use.
If someone wants to trade some seeds, leave a throwaway email for contact reasons. Can only trade with Euroanons though, sorry Ameribros, but laws and stuff.

I can offer:

Aji Pineapple
Goronong
Habanero El Remo
Habanero Mustard
Peruvian Purple
Anaheim
Apache F1
Yellow Cayenne
Trinidad Perfume

The offered varietes should grow true but I will not guarantee that they will do so though since I don't extract seeds professionally.
>>
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>>1138562
>too many seeds

PLANT THEM ALL!!!

Be the All High Pepper King of Europe.
>>
>>1138576
>Be the All High Pepper King of Europe
Kek.
I thought i already am.
>>
>>1134924

Except most native Africans and Asians can't digest dairy. Try again.
>>
>>1134572
>non gmo
>Not realizing that selective breeding is genetic modification by humans
>Not saying non GE
Also who the fuck cares, there are no adverse health effects of gmos, in fact they can be more nutritious, use less pesticides, have more yield, can grow in harsher conditions, and taste better.
>>
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>>1138677
>>1138671
Fuck off back to >>>/sci/ or >>>/pol/ with this shit.
>>
>>1138686
>>1138686
How dare they have a discussion about GMO foods in a snail-pace borderline dead general about growing foods.
>>
>>1138671
Actually there is dairy in Asia and Africa. The steppe peoples would drink fermented horse milk, which turned most of the lactose into alcohol and make it digestible. Similar fermented dairy drinks are prepared in Africa.
>>
>>1138690
I don't really want to get in to gmo here but you got me

genetically modified includes inbreeding
that means pollinating the best yellow corns together and not some weak and multi colored kernel corn is called gmo

reminder to this day there has been ZERO gmo pumpkins
I guess pumpkins are something special

I have pumpkins I make into pies and breads
step 1 cut pumpkin in half
2 remove seeds
3 put it on wire rack on top of baking sheet
4 put the halves in the oven
5 scrape out the insides of the pumpkin. I normally put it in the blender
6 it is ready to use. can or freeze
I see extremely few people who do their own pumpkin
>>
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I made my fish a tree house today.

What did you get done today /out/?
>>
>>1138838
I presented a program for optimizing distribution of labor across different sampling methodologies to people who will likely never have the requisite preliminary data to make proper use of it. It wasn't even my program.
>>
>>1138894
This is not your blog faggot.
>>
>>1138899
What's the matter, got some sour grapes?
>>
>>1138900
He was asking about /out/ related things you autist. Go write about it in your diary.
>>
Any idea what could stop a seedling from developing true leaves? I've recently transplanted a few germinated sage seedlings that sprouted from the baggie method. Out of the five, there's this one odd duck that refused to sprout its true leaves. Meanwhile the others are on their way to their second set of true leaves.
>>
>>1138838
How do you fertilize your hydroponic plants with the goldfish in the same aquarium, if at all?
>>
>>1139592
The idea is that the goldfish are doing the fertilizing.
>>
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>>1137993
>>1137968
Final one has been moved to its bonsai pot.
>>
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>>1139712
>>
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should I prune the damaged leaves, or let them be?
>>
>>1133050
Greetings, gentlemen, first time on /out/.

Can I put sweet potato peelings in my tomato pots ?
>>
>>1139592

F I S H P O O P
>>
>>1139754
Prune them so they don't inadvertently start to rot and cause problems.

>>1139790
You really should compost all organic matter before adding it to your soils. Allowing stuff like peelings to decompose with your plants can attract pests, cause various diseases, and/or aliments.

>>1139712
Nice pot.
>>
>>1134924
>there is only 1 race the human race
Move to Africa or Detroit then :)
>>
>>1139754
Do the tug test.

Grab each of them, one by one, between your fingers and tug LIGHTLY.

if it falls it falls.
>>
Some snap peas started sprouting in my fridge so I just put them out in a pot.
What should I do now? They're growing. 1cm high.
I feel like an unexpecting mother.
>>
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I have an indoor garden of herbs and strawberries.

I've noticed I have an aphid problem -- especially on my chives, parsley, and mammoth dill. I'm thinking about rearranging which plants are in which pots anyway, so can someone tell me if this is a good idea or not?

What I want to do is wash out all the dirt in every pot so I can safely remove the plants, then I want to soak them in water for like five minutes (will this kill them?) or at least spray them down to kill every last fucking aphid, then re-pot them in new miracle grow.

I've tried fighting them with nicotine spray and they just keep coming back. I want these fucking things out of my house. It's winter and I never thought I'd have to deal with this.
>>
>>1140108
Can't you buy ladybugs online?
>>
>>1140111
You want me to release ladybugs in my house? No. Besides, from what I read online they usually just fly away anyway.
>>
>>1140108

Don't repot them, just spray them all with permethrin and wash them lightly before use.

Easy peasy.
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>>1140115
>You want me to release ladybugs in my house?
Sounds kinda cool

You know I never thought I had an aphid problem. I wondered why i kept getting so many ants all over my plants and I just read ants feed off aphid nectar. Checking the stems of my plants now, and they're all bumpy.
I think I have an aphid problem too, but I can't tell if it's doing much damage

the ants keep the caterpillars away which already destroyed two plants so far

is this a decent trade?
>>
>>1140119
>permethrin

I'm going to have to read up on this. I'm reticent to put any sort of chemical insecticide on my plants for safety reasons (I'm was only willing to use nicotine because it's literally tobacco, another plant, and I know it washes right off). Are you sure it would work better than nicotine, though?

>>1140120
Look real close. They're tiny little faggots. They also blend in - they're generally a very light green in color and they're often smart enough to hide on the underside of leaves.

Those "bumps" are probably aphids. Touch them with a q-tip and you'll see them start moving around.

As for damage, I don't know, but I thought it would be pretty easy to keep an indoor grow-light garden bug-free. I am new at this so maybe that was naive of me.
>>
>>1140123

Permethrin is my go-to for pest control on indoor and outdoor plants. Just dont get it in your aquarium.
>>
>>1140131
Well, be that as it may, I would like to avoid insecticides if I can. I'm not even 100% comfortable with the homemade soap-water-nicotine spray I've been using, frankly.

So... would soaking living plants in water for like 5 minutes kill them, or no?
>>
>>1140150

No it wouldn't, they have their heads stuck in plants most of the day. 5 minutes submerged won't do anything.
>>
>>1136171
Cool, thanks for the info
>>
>>1136643
I like to make these too, do you prefer the harder almost nutty ones, or do you pick the while young and softer?
>>
>>1140104
Give them enough light to grow. Is the weather in your area going into winter or ...?

>>1140111
>>1140108
>>1140120
Where I live, I can keep a window cracked open and gather as many Asiatic multicolored ladybugs as I need for indoor aphid control. They come indoors for the winter.

You can simply hose off the aphids in the shower. Put plastic over your pot's soil before you do it. Do it every day for a week. Do not do what you were planning to do. There's no need to do anything else than hose them off like that. They will eventually be gone completely.

>>1140205
It doesn't really matter. They held up well to the water bath canning and even when making soup/stew with fresh ones. I only pick the ones still on the vines. I try to get the largest and leave the smallest during most of the season. The good thing about them is that the crunchiness doesn't have any woody parts in it.
>>
>>1140215
>You can simply hose off the aphids in the shower. Put plastic over your pot's soil before you do it. Do it every day for a week. Do not do what you were planning to do. There's no need to do anything else than hose them off like that. They will eventually be gone completely.

Fascinating. Will try this. What temperature of water?
>>
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>Gonna grow broccoli at the start of spring
>Phase into squash and tomatoes mid april
It's months away but I'm already excited. Vegetable stews all summer next year.
>>
>>1140257
I dehydrated a lot of stuff over the past season. Now I'm enjoying hot veggies stews all winter long.

>>1140246
>What temperature of water?

Cold will be fine. Do not use warm or hot. I use that method for overwintering peppers and in my gardens. It usually takes about a week to get rid of everything.
>>
I'm looking into starting a farmers market over here. I live in an area with a lot of farms and local food.

So far I've found:
- honey (bio) and additional related items
- bell peppers (bio)
- tomatoes (bio)
- chickens (bio)
- peppers (bio)
- grapes (bio) and jam

What do you think should be the first step? I think contacting these companies and setting up meetings would be smart.
>>
>>1140642
Make sure there's not already a farmer's market in the area. Sometimes they are a bit hidden or only open 1 day a week or may be called by some other descriptive name. That would give you tons of info.
>>
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IT'S ALIVE!
>>
Harvested two of my dragon-cayenne hybrid, ate them with dinner, this was my first successful growth to full maturity, as they kept withering on the vine otherwise, they were really good, spicy but also fruity. No pics though
>>
>>1140642
I reckon quite a few people go to a larger farmer's market in a bigger city nearby.
>>
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>>1140777
I've taken the baby Carolina Reapers and put them in their new homes for the winter. It's going to be a long four months.
>>
helo hgm

I took a cutting from a rosebush a month or so ago just to see if I could, and it took. i put it in a pot and covered it with a glass vase, left it outside, and it sprouted leaves to my surprise. now what im wondering is, since I'm fairly certain I picked the worst time of the year to do this, (winter soon, but zone 10 so it doesn't get that cold) should I keep it the way it is; outside, with the vase over it? or something else
>>
>>1136767
I don't think so, aside from them being hollow they had a weird shape, also the leaves had this weird growth pattern. I think it's the variety
>>
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>>1141226

>"Hey I saw this weird thing happen."
>"Here are clearly documented reasons why that happens."
>"No you're wrong, I think its the other thing."


Go back to facebook
>>
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>>1141232
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/tomato/hollow-stuffer-tomatoes.htm
>I'm going to arbitrarily give credence to a post despite not having any authority myself
delete your comment
>>
Quick question to mushroom growers. The plastic bag I was storing mushroom plugs in accidentally spouted mushrooms without me realizing it. Can I still use the plugs or am I gonna need replacements?
>>
What's the best way to affix cherry tomato plants to lattices/metal stands/whatever? Tape? String? Anything I should avoid here?
>>
>>1141194
So long as it doesn't get too hot in the sun and is able to be watered properly, it should be fine.

>>1141278
Yes, it will be fine. You can make your own mushroom kits with those mushrooms; either from their spores or tissue cultures. Only only time you can't use something is when there's mold involved.
>>
>>1141280
The best way is weaving it thru/around but string, twine or baggie ties will work
>>
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New members to the family.
>>
Let's say you fuck up and plant too many of something close together, and you want to repot them. What's the best way to do this? Dig them out with your fingers? Certainly don't want to pull them out, I assume, since it messes with the roots. Wash it out with water, put in new soil?

Will any of these methods harm the plant? I don't want to shock them to death or something.
>>
>>1141483
It really depends on the plant's root type and how well they are entangled. You can slice it with a knife in the middle between the two stems, rip it apart with your hands, or do this push pull jiggling thing to vibrate them apart. The latter is the least destructive, but doesn't work well with super entangled stuff where only a knife would work.

Keep them in the shade and give them water when you do this.
>>
>>1141497
Do you think just killing the ones I don't need would be the safest option? I fucked up and planted way too many cherry tomatoes next to each other and I really just wanted three, although I'd kind of like to save another three for a different pot.
>>
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>>1141194
Since it's going to be dormant soon (yellowing and dropping leaves), you could probably transplant it into the ground and feed it so that it does well in the spring again.
Do you know what variety it is?

>>1141280
I'm trying this method this season:
https://www.theartofdoingstuff.com/turns-im-never-really-satisfied-anything-including-tomatoes/
It should do well and is pretty simple to set up, they use is it growing commercial tomatoes.
The main difference in my setup is that I have an A-frame at either end of the row and have a rope running between them as an overhead truss.

>>1141396
Cute flowers anon, I've got a mix of Marigolds, dill, borage, coriander, cosmos and buckwheat going at the moment to attract some useful critters.
Might be time to get a little beehive soon!

>>1141507
An alternative is that you could leave all the plants there and either fertilise them more aggressively or prune them/strip them so they have to support a few less fruit at any given time.
Dynamic lifter used as a "tea" works well for me: a litre of lifter pellets in a 10 L bucket and pour off the liquid when it gets dark into a watering can at about 25% strength. You can reuse the same pellets about half a dozen times before they get kinda spent so it's cheap and effective as well as quick-acting.
>>
>>1141396
Oh my. How nice. What's the name of the flower on the right?
>>
>>1141618
Not him, but that's columbine.

I tried growing some from seed, and they lasted about a year before root rot and squirrels killed them. They never flowered.
>>
>>1141507
If you are thinning plants, always cut them off. Don't try to remove their roots.

>>1141599
The cherry tomato person still needs to thin them or the plants and fruit will suffer from diseases because of less light and air penetration into the foliage.
>>
>>1134536
>They cause me way WAY too much gas and bloating.

Isn't this because they carbohydrate they contain is inulin a starch that humans can't digest. Hence as a calorie crop not that useful.




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