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Posted this in /p/ and they shat all over it. It IS shit but I was looking for more discussion and sharing than criticism. Went out today for my first time and it was quite pleasant. But have no clue what I'm doing. /out/ can you share some tips for someone new to birding.
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>>>/an/
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>>1141335
Nice to see someone else enjoying the hobby.

If you want to get anywhere good at identifying, you need to pair up with a local expert. Learn from them the common species, rarities, and general birding skills. With that, go /out/ on your own and practice your ID skills. Work your way around the local species until you're comfortable with field marks and how/where to find the birds.
This isn't something you just pick up over a weekend, but a hobby you never stop learning from and building on as long as you continue practicing.
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>>1142512
Also, don't be afraid to reach out to your local Audubon societies. They tend to have birding trips every once in awhile and there you can meet fellow birders to learn and tag along with as you get into the hobby.
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>>1141335
Cute blue jay OP.

Pretty much what >>1142512 said. Don't know if really finding an expert to shadow right off the bat is necessary, but just get yourself a good field guide (Sibley's, Nat Geo) and sit down and study what is in your area and cross reference the illustrations with pictures online. Allaboutbirds.org is a great resource as is Audubon's site.

Best thing I can really suggest is search eBird.org for your area and look over the hotspots. Learn what other people are seeing and what birds are typical for your area for the season so you have some idea ahead of time of what to look for. It's easy to get overwhelmed at first and think all sparrows look the same, or ducks, or whatever and accidentally confuse something common for something rare. Don't feel intimidated, since if you start posting your findings on ebird it will warn you first if you are reporting a rare one so that will give you a good head's up that you're probably wrong. No worries, just go back to the books and find out what you made a mistake with (if you even did, maybe you did see a rare one, who knows). There are also probably local email lists/sites that you can sign up for where locals report rarities and other unusual sightings.

I've got 500 hours in the field with birdwatching which is a drop in the bucket compared to most people who have been at it 30 years. Enjoy the beginning because it's a thrill when you can go out and claim 20 new species in a single day. That won't come around again for a long time until you travel to a new country. I'm at 178 life species so most of it has slowed down for me, just the usual chickadees and towhees when I go out but it's still fun. I saw an owl unexpectedly the other day, so it's those thrills that keep me going.
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>>1141335
Hey - I was in that thread too. I posted the white throated.

eBird is great. I used Merlin for a while and would scroll through it on my morning commute. I am now using iNaturalist - its a crowd sourcing app so depends where you are for you to get the most use out of it. Still that has helped me id and learn more about insects. It is great for plants, as well, but I am fairly okay with my local flora
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>>1143617
Yeah, it's not necessary but it was definitely a great tool to have when I first started. I couldn't tell you the difference between a sandpiper and a plover, but having a buddy of mine show me the ropes helped me improve dramatically. With the apps you mentioned though, and with a good field guide, you can get by. I agree, the most important thing is to be outside and practice your ID skills, whether with others or by yourself.
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>>1144763
I didn't mean to implying having an expert along wasn't a good idea. I just think having some basic foundation first will help to understand what they're talking about better. Someone telling you the difference between a song sparrow and a fox sparrow won't help much if you don't know what a song sparrow is. I learned a lot by having more experienced people help me along the way, but for a day one trip it would be information overload.

Also I like to solve the struggles on my own. If someone points out a bird ID I usually won't count it unless I know for sure myself that it's true. One funny story I heard from a friend was she was on a field trip to the coast with a bird class and the leader and a customer got into an argument over what shorebird they were looking at. Turned out it ended up being a raccoon.
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>>1144815
True. Either way works. For me it wasn't telling me the difference between birds, it was what makes a sparrow a sparrow and a nuthatch a nuthatch. I also didn't learn overnight, but having things repeated to me helped me grasp concepts.

The racoon story sounds ridiculous, but plausible! Even top birders make mistakes like that. Sibley himself has said he's confused inanimate objects for rare birds. If he's making goofy mistakes like that, then I don't expect to be always accurate on my ID's either.
Birding is like that. There'll never be a way to be 100% sure what species a bird is, short of having it in your hands. You go with what you got and you pick up new things as you learn more. Don't get cocky with how good you are, there'll always be a subspecies or individual that will throw all the rules out the window.
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I like carrying around those heavy laminated tri-fold guides to the birds in my area: SouthEast makes it way more easier to identify when you have migratory birds that are usually not in the area. It's a fun hobby, that you can do casually for your own enjoyment or to better society by submitting findings to groups, etc. Im a casual since I live on a lake and its like Net Geo in the backyard no matter what time of the year. I love it. Also feel like I am giving back from the days I was a kid murdering birds with my bb gun.
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>>1145033
Haha! Any pics of this lake? You're living on it or next to it??? That sounds awesome
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>>1142517
Is his name.... Mordecai
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>>1145050
Close. It's margarit.
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OP here thanks for all the tips /out/ there is a pretty active birding community in my area that has a membership for 25 dollars. Gives all the hot birding spots and group events. I missed an outing today that was in search of Eastern Screech-, Great Horned, Snowy and Short-eared Owls. Bummed I missed it but seems like a good community.

Here is another pic I snagged from my birding last week.
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>>1145414
You're a pretty lucky dude imo. Blue Jay and Cardinal are two of my most sought after birds but on the west coast we don't get them.
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>>1145496
Ha thanks man. There were a bunch of Cardinals out that day but they kept on flying into low bush then I'd lose them. I'm in upstate NY. I guess they are pretty common.
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>>1145496
I see blue jays and grey jays all the te in east oregon mountains
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Enjoy your search for tits OP, may you find many.
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>>1145500
What part? I'm on the island, but I go /out/ upstate whenever I get the chance. I'm waiting for first snow to do some comfy winter camping
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>>1145594
Western NY. Winter time is solid /out/ time for sure. Less people
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>>1145567
That's a great pic, did you take it? I don't even know what tits are. Will have to look them up
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>>1145663
I only have a tiny point and shoot. My goal is to someday afford a nice DSLR but they're too expensive now. I know a guy with an $8,000 lens on his. I'm pretty jelly. For now I just content myself with looking up pictures of tits.
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>>1141335
>move slowly or sit still
>bring quality optics, this includes your camera if you wish to take pictures
>use appropriate shot sizes and obey nontoxic-shot laws where applicable
>find out the hard way dead crows don't float
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eBird is a great resource but you have to take it with a grain of salt. They recently allowed people to add their profiles so it's worth checking into someone if they report a bird you're finding hard to find. I know someone who just started in June and is most likely getting many IDs wrong (calling Red Tails as Rough Leggeds, getting ducks wrong, etc.). If they have a low number of checklists and their oldest one is fairly recent then I'd be more cautious than if the guy has 8,000 lists dating back to 1973 and is a regional reviewer for the site. I've been on more than one wild goose chase before realizing people were probably getting the IDs wrong.
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>>1145893
Dude, you're gonna get nothing out of shooting a sparrow or a starling.
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>>1146118
What do you mean get nothing?
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>>1141335
>Posted this in /p/ and they shat all over it.

I saw that thread, didn't post in it, simply because it is the wrong forum. The best forum is >>>/an/ but here in /out/ is also good. I have cardinals in my area (pic fully related).

Tips:

If you have the land area, put up some various types of bird attractions. This can be bird houses, shallow baths (built-in heater for winter), feeders, roosting areas (shrubs, briar patches), etc. If you place your feeders near your windows, make sure they are very close to the window, birds fly off feeders very fast and the shorter the distance between the feeder and window means less chance of building enough speed to harm themselves should they fly into the window.

Feeds and other attractants,

Egg shells
Nest building materials (hair/pet hair, straw, threads)
Suet
Peanuts/peanut butter
Safflower seed
Sunflower seed
Thistle seed
Nyger seed
Rapeseed
Millet
Water

Don't buy mixed bird seed, that contains fillers the birds often don't eat.

Feeder type and elevation also play an important role in what type of birds visit. Have some tray feeders in the mix and have feeders nearly on the ground.

Stalking Tips for Yard Birds

Wear subdued, humus-like colors, woodland camo is fine, but not strictly needed. You are not hiding from them, you are just not wearing "warning colors". Like the worst thing you could wear are red gloves since your hands move a lot. Go out where you want to observe bird, and sit down (bring some foam rubber padding for winter, you'll thank me!) Get your gear all ready. You don't need to worry about movement so much as sound. Just no waving your hands around. The longer you sit there, the more familiar the birds will become and the bolder they will be around you. I've had birds come up to me to about 2 feet just to inspect me. If you have a loud flappy mirror in a DSLR, take pics every so often so the sound becomes unsurprising to the birds in the area. Be patient, maybe even read a book.
>>
Speaking of colors, I just read Peter Dunne's "The Art of Bird Finding" last week. He covers the very basics which honestly felt almost insulting because 90% of it was common sense but if you're new to the sport I guess it is at least good to cover it once.

But the one thing that stood out is he said never go out into the field wearing white. Apparently white is another one of those warning colors that signals birds to flee. Makes sense since when Juncos fly off you can see white on their tails. I imagine one Junco sees that and is alerted to flee and it just becomes a chain reaction until the whole flock is gone. Not sure how snow affects this. It would make sense to me if you're in a very snowy region you would want to wear all white, but I think the main point was for finding song birds in summer. I doubt hawks care if you white or not. I just try to wear browns and greens.
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Got some snaps of this guy a few mins ago. Its visiting the feeder for my duck which has whole corn in it.

>>1146296
Yeah, white is a good one too. Though, if you are wearing a huge white shirt, I think that'd be better than a white glove or white patch/logo on a shirt/cap. Especially, if there's snow on the ground.
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>>1146329
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>>1146330
And the duck (older pic.)
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>>1146332
Is it cheating to bird watch your own flock?
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>>1146334
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>>1146336
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>>1146337
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If we're posting self taken bird photos I have a few I can share.
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>>1146339
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>>1146341
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>>1146341
Please do.

>>1146344
Very nice. I have one that visits my pond, but not pics of it or the green heron.
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>>1146344
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>>1146342
>>1146346
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>>1146348
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>>1146349
Last one I have so far. Battery is charging.

Old pic from a different camera back in 2008. I had to stalk this thing in my truck for miles before low-crawling a football field length through brush to get these pics. It was skittish as all fuck.
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>>1146350
I like the colors of this one
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>>1146352
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I really need to get some different feeders up. I have all this new camera equipment and winter is going to be pretty damn harsh on me otherwise.
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>>1146353
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>>1146356
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>>1146354
Okay, now I wait.

>*intense waiting*
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>>1146405
Good luck brah, let us know what you catch.
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>>1146422
Thanks, will do.
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>>1146354
Just bought one myself. Hopefully the startlings don't eat it all and gtfo
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>>1145934
There's so many fucking morons on that site, and the reviewing system is fucking shit.
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Got an okay pic of a bluejay today.
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>>1147676
Nice. What camera do you use?
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>>1147134
Can't argue. There should be some way to weed out the newbies so there aren't so many incorrect reports but a) how would you do that and b) it kind of goes against the philosophy of the site where anyone can participate. I mean hell I'm new too but I always try to err on the side of prudence and just omit something if I'm not like 90% sure of what it was, or 100% if it's rare or new to me. I like the science aspect of it and am interested to see how it helps further understanding of birds in the coming decades, but if people are uploading wrong data it spoils the whole thing.
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>>1147763
That was a Nikon D3400 with an Opteka 500mm f/6.3 lens.
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I have been interested in birding for a while and would like to start shooting but don't have a good long-zoom camera to do that with. What's a good, cheap point and shoot camera to use that has a built in zoom? Preferably for $300 or less.

Also what's a decent pair of binoculars that you can't get on amazon? Thanks!
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>>1148467
>can get on Amazon*
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>>1148467
I'm not /p/ so I'm just throwing this out there and it's a little more than your ideal price, but maybe you can get one on sale or used, but I heard good things about the Nikon P900. It has 83x optical zoom and looks like 332x digital which sounds nuts. It's $580 on Amazon but looking at recommended other ones on the page there's a Lumix FZ80 that's 60x optical that's $350. I don't know if either of those are actually good but just check reviews and sample photos. For around $300 you probably won't have too many options, just the leading models of the major brands.

I only have a Canon Powershot 170 IS that's 12x that I got for $140. I like it a lot and it's tiny and fits in my pocket. Usually I can just hold it up to a spotting scope and get a picture that way to make up for the lack of zoom. Pic related is one I took this way, 0 zoom on the camera, 20x on the scope. Quality takes a bit of a hit but it's a compromise. It all just depends on if you want fancy pictures you can frame or just want to ID what you're looking at.
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>>1148477
Thanks, I've looked into the Nikon P900 and might be able to save up for that one. Have any shots with the Canon 170's internal zoom? That one with the spotting scope is pretty neat. And what spotting scope do you have/would recommend?
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>>1148477
>>1148488
>83x
>332x

Not a thing for camera lens. They don't go by zoom factor. Most telephoto lenses are actually 1x to usually 5x max. The only time zoom factor is used is for those crappy teleconverters that goes between the lens and the camera (2x-3x normally). Though, you can get "close-up" lens filters that go up to 10x for macro shots. You know those giant $16k telephoto lenses you see people using at sports events? Those are 1x. Don't compare stuff like spotting scopes to camera lenses. They do two different things.

Like this photo I took. Terrible photo, because it was handheld and shaky as all crap and really hard to focus, had high ISO so it is really super grainy, but those are craters on the moon. It looks like I took it with a potato, but there's 1800mm of glass at only 1x taking that image. I don't recommend viewing this at full size. lol
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>>1148488
I use a Barska 20-60x, 60mm (pic related). Right now it's $75 on Amazon, I've seen it go for $60. Spent another $50 on a tripod. It does the job, but I've been looking to upgrade. I wrote a user review if you want to see more pictures I took through it and my full thoughts

https://www.amazon.com/gp/review/R3HGUZLZDW2YU?ref_=glimp_1rv_cl

I like it, it's light, cheap, and gets me the ID, but I've looked through other people's and admittedly am jealous. This is a super budget scope but for a beginner it's great. A guy I know has an 80mm Celestron that is unfortunately not made anymore or else I'd get one like that. There's a newer model one up now (Celestron Ultima 52250) I was tempted to get, but I doubt it would be a significant enough of an upgrade to warrant the price. At this point I'll just save up for a Vortex Diamondback or Viper. I've heard both are great, but they're $600-800 and I need to do more research and weigh that versus just buying a DSLR and fancy lenses.

The one I mentioned in the review that I returned was a Redfield Rampage. I thought it sucked, even if it was more comfortable to use. It had bad lens flare issues that obscured what I was looking at. I'll look in a little bit and see if I can find a pic I took at 12x with the camera only.

>>1148490
Yeah I don't know much about cameras, but it wouldn't surprise me they try to bamboozle you with zoom by changing the values. I've only ever used point and shoots and it just lists it as 1-36x zoom on mine if I go all the way to digital, which is too fuzzy to be of use. Your moon looks like how I used to watch scrambled porn on HBO 15 years ago.
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>>1148488
>Nikon P900

Keep in mind that there's optical zoom and digital "zoom". Digital zoom isn't zooming. It is blowing up the pixels to make them larger. The Coolpix lines of cameras have that. You can hold the lever to zoom in optically and it will stop, hold it again and it will digital "zoom", but doing that makes the image ugly and messy. Don't use digital zoom since you can do that on your PC easily.

>>1148492
FYI, they make adapters to attach a DSLR to a spotting scope or telescope.

>I've only ever used point and shoots

I recommend getting a DSLR and some lenses. They open up an entirely new world.

>it wouldn't surprise me they try to bamboozle you with zoom by changing the values

That is basically what is happening, you really need to watch the terminology as I state above. Just don't use the digital portion of it. You should be able to hear the zoom motor stop, just stop holding the lever/button down at that point.

>Your moon looks like how I used to watch scrambled porn on HBO 15 years ago.

lol Taking photos of the moon with 2 tripods to hold everything up and holding stuff by hand while the moon is zooming past your lens is pretty crazy. I'd love to have a proper setup.

>resized this image
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>>1148492
Thanks for the link to that scope review, sounds like a winner. You mentioned using it with a lightweight tripod, which tripod do you use?

Also, I'm looking into the Pansonic Lumix FZ80 now, with 60x optical zoom, which is about $350. Do you know anything about this camera?
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>>1148511
I looked through my pictures and apparently EXIF data doesn't show what zoom level the picture was taken at, but it does say if it used digital zoom or not. I'm pretty sure this was just the 12x optical and no digital since for a potentially skittish sparrow I would have kept my distance. For a "cheapy" P+S I think my Canon does good work.

Tripod is the Dolica AX620B100 62-Inch Proline Tripod and Ball Head. It has tabs at the top of the legs you can pull out to make them go full horizontal. My tabs got loose after time but some black electrical tape around them solved the problem, otherwise the legs would over-extend and I don't need them to come out 180 degrees anyway. Solid tripod for a lightweight scope or camera.

If you have the money to burn I might just say go for the Celestron just based on the quality of my friend's one, I'm sure this model is very similar. Twice the price, but the angled lens will save your neck and 80mm > 60mm. Not worth $150 for me when I already have a decent one but if you have nothing right now it looks like a great first scope, though I do like mine if for no other reason than how lightweight it is.

Never used a Lumix, but after the other anon mentioned P900 is a CoolPix model I remember I did buy a CoolPix in the past and returned it, different model though. Picture quality was less than I expected and had a lot of chromatic aberration. Plus being a "bridge" design it was a pain in the ass to carry. Not sure how the P900 compares but again people seem to like it.
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>>1148516
I had a Coolpix L100. With backlighted subjects, CA was a bit of a problem, but only if you didn't like seeing it. It can be quite artistic, though, it is better to include CA when you want CA. I never personally had a problem with it.

This pic was taken with it in macro mode, about half an inch from the tiger beetle.
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ACTION SHOT!
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>>1148864
That's a real fierce looking buggo you got there. Nice colors on him too.
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>>1148904
The way his wing is makes it look like an x-ray with just the bones being visible. I can feel the intensity of his flight.
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>>1148904
ACTION SHOT!
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I got this qt today
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>>1145045
Lake Murray, South Carolina area.
I get terrible pictures most of the time, so I just admire from a distance. I got smart and stuck my monocular on my android phone and was able to take some close ups of a herron on a stump. I'll post when I can in the future.
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>>1150020
>Lake Murray

Looks like a rather nice lake with all those finger-like valleys filled with water and the islands on the map. Where I live there's like no islands and only a couple valleys filled for the lakes. Most of the shoreline is boring and flat. I prefer broken up and jagged everything. It makes for better microcosms for wildlife. Like that one fishermen 500 yards away isn't going to scare the birds off because he's behind 3 hills and you can snipe photos of birds and hide better with that type of terrain. Where I'm at, you hav to have a ghillie suit and low crawl 1 foot a minute to sneak up on stuff close enough to take a photo then someone a long ways down the shore shows up and scares everything off.
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>>1150056
It's not that bad, its one of the largest man made lakes - I forget the exact specs but maybe 42 miles of coastline? We recently spotted a American Eagle cruising by. Lots of woodpeckers showing up again. Worldclass fresh water fishing.
idiot boaters from rich assholes, to redneck bitches in bikinis. depends on the season. For birds: There are islands that purple marlins congregate.. and luckily the locals are chill enough to leave them alone and let them do their thing in giant groups. It's a great lake check our Dreher Island its got camping facilities.
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can anyone get me an id on this? the bill is throwing me.
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>>1150318
scaup of some kind. maybe a mix due to eye color. UK?
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>>1150318
>>1150346
Don't know anything about hybrids, but vanilla scaups have yellow eyes. Kind of tempted just to say a mallard in low light making it look black instead of dark green. Bill should be yellow but I've seen blue/grey ones before. Where was it taken?
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>>1150349
It is was USA and not UK then it is most likely a mallard hybrid. Ducks fuck literally anything and bill color is a common indicator of a mix.
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>>1150346
>>1150349
My bad. I am in nyc. I was hoping for something other than a mallard with a whiteish bill - but the eye is telling me otherwise. Is there a good book on hybrids?
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>>1150370
Books? I'm sure there's one somewhere collecting dust out there. Until you find it,

http://www.10000birds.com/hybrid-mallards.htm
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Sometimes I like to put on music and just sit and rate people's pictures on ebird. I just pick a hotspot and go down the illustrative gallery list and grade them. The one with the best score gets featured. It can be fun to see the variety and gives a good idea of the quality standard to aim for. I think their guidelines are pretty fair too.

http://help.ebird.org/customer/portal/articles/2665949
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>>1148494
>Digital zoom isn't zooming. It is blowing up the pixels to make them larger. The Coolpix lines of cameras have that. You can hold the lever to zoom in optically and it will stop, hold it again and it will digital "zoom", but doing that makes the image ugly and messy. Don't use digital zoom since you can do that on your PC easily.

So if my camera has a setting to disable digital zoom I should always turn it off? Or does the camera making it bigger let me make it even bigger in photoshop later? Maybe I'll do an experiment and test it out. What good is digital zoom then?
>>
>>1150940
It let's camera normies who want an image in the moment just what they want. Literally all it takes is any program that can crop an image and you got the same result
>>
>>1150966
>an image in the moment get just what they want.
>>
I want to buy a DSLR eventually but I'm a moron when it comes to cameras. I don't understand all the math, like f-stop values and ISOs. What's a good resource that is simple to understand for people like me?
>>
>>1150980
You'd probably get a much better and well informed response from /p/
>>
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Bird
>>
I was the one looking into buying a Lumix FZ80, now considering buying a Panasonic 50x zoom camcorder instead. It has the ability to take still photos, do you think it would work as a birding camera in that sense?

https://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-HC-V180K-Camcorder-Stabilized-Optical/dp/B01A60SXSO
>>
>>1150980
F-stop is the size of the hole light passes through the aperture. It measures how large or small it is. The smaller the number means the less of the aperture blades are covering the hole. A higher number means there's more blade area covering the hole, making it smaller. Changing this will dim/brighten the photo and increase/decrease the depth-of-field (DoF) which is the area that's in focus; making the DoF longer or shorter.

ISO is a digital camera term for how sensitive the camera's sensor is to light. The larger that number the more sensitive it is. Meaning you can jack up the sensitivity to ISO25600 and take photos in the near dark without needing to increase the time the exposure takes. The drawback to this is "noise" those little ugly pixel dots that start to be seen in the image, like static on an old tv. If your ISO is low, like ISO100 it means you'll need to take a longer exposure to compensate for the decrease in sensitivity. This is great for sunny days and lots of light. There will be no noise and the image will be smooth from color to color. However, because you increased the exposure time, any vibration or fast movement will blur.
>>
>>1151053
>>1150980
Exposure: the length of time the shutter is open to allow light to hit the sensor. Fast exposures like 1/4000 will catch clear freeze-frame-type shots of water splashes and sports events. Slow exposures like 1" or 1/4 will make action shots look blurred or streaked. Like those long exposures of night cities where the roads are nothing but a streaky blur of red tails lights and white-blue headlights.

There's also, "RAW". That's a file format that is very large and isn't compressed like a "JPG/JPEG" is. There's no loss in image quality. Camera's have a setting from BASIC to RAW. Everything that isn't RAW will be a JPG file. The high quality JPG setting like "FINE" on Nikon cameras will be very uncompressed and large resolution while the "BASIC" setting will be highly compressed JPGs with small resolution. Always shoot with RAW or FINE or RAW+FINE, the latter makes 2 files for you with every shot the RAW and a FINE JPG. If you need to shoot photos for your car insurance or anything legal, always use RAW since it will be accepted easily in court. If you do lots of post processing (Photoshop) then use RAW so you can have a good quality image to edit.

That's mostly all you need to know to begin with. Also, google, "Exposure bracketing". It is a feature some cameras have as a setting. Mine doesn't, so I need to do it manually.
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>>1151053
>>1151055
>>1150980
>>
>>1151019
kek
>>
>>1151019
Nice, what camera did you use?
>>
>>1151024
I didn't know "camcorders" were still a thing. Check Youtube videos and see the quality in action. You could always load the video in Movie Maker or something and pull a still from it if it's sharp enough. 50x optical sounds good on paper.
>>
>>1151053
>>1151055
>>1151083
Thanks anon, that's a useful start. I never even heard of RAW files before. Do all cameras do that or is it a high end DSLR feature? What setting affects clarity or blur? I read it might be best to only use 10 megapixels for sharper pictures even if the camera can go up to 20, is that true?
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>>1151125
I'm >>1148477 so it was one of the first ones I took when I got my Canon Powershot 170 IS back in 2015. Since this thread I've gone back and looked at some of my old pictures and have been sorting them. Here's another one.
>>
>>1151210
Actually that one's pretty grainy. I might be guilty of using digital zoom on it. I didn't realize how much of a cancer it is.
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>>1151201
Pretty much all DSLR and mirrorless do. Bridge and point&shoot may or may not, just check their specs.

>clarity/blur

If the subject is within the DOF then the things that blur it will be motion. Either the camera moves of the subject moves. Adjusting the exposure so it is faster and/or tracking the subject will help prevent blur. Check the stuff in >>1151083

>megapixels (MP)

Check the size of the sensor. If the sensors of 2 cameras are the same size, but one is 10MP and the other 20MP it means the one with 10MP will have larger pixels on the sensor. The 20MP sensor will have smaller pixels on the sensor. MP is basically just the amount of pixels packed into the image. However, sensor size to MP ratio is different in respect to dynamic range. Uh, you know, this is going to get complicated. Here:

http://www.clarkvision.com/articles/does.pixel.size.matter/#sensorconstant
http://www.techradar.com/news/the-a-to-z-of-photography-dynamic-range

Personally, I use a D3400 that has 24.2MP, 4000x6000 pixel images. I got something with large megapixels, but not a full frame camera because I don't have that kind of money. I'd rather have a full frame camera and lenses.

Basically, digital cameras have light limitations. The sensor can only go so far up and down the spectrum from dark to light. The amount of stops in between are what are counted. Digital has 16 stops at most while the human eye can see up to 20 stops. Read the rest on:

http://www.clarkvision.com/articles/does.pixel.size.matter

To make up for this, some people do "high dynamic range" (HDR) in post processing. They take several photos using a tripod of the same scene. Each photo has a different exposure going from light to dark. Then they combine all the photos into 1 photos which has all that light information. Here's an example I did in /p/. 15 photos to make 1 photo. I did it handheld instead of a tripod so there's some ghosting issues.
>>
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>>1151243
And, this is what the 15 photos looked like by themselves.
>>
>>1151245
That's really cool but how does it work? If the brightest image is 15 and the darkest is -15 (just throwing out numbers) wouldn't they cancel each other out and just make a non-picture?
>>
>>1151531
That's not how it works bruh...
>>
>>1151531
Enjoy this video and its squeaky toy presenter,

https://youtu.be/wthhc1s0Pig
>>
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>>1149485
>>1148904
ACTION SHOT!
>>
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>>1151641
>>
>>1151647
What other kinds are there besides mirror lenses? I don't want one if they're going to look washed out.
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>>1151649
Most everything you've ever seen has been lenses that are not mirror lenses. Mirror lenses are a bit of a specialty item for the most part. They are very easy to tell apart. They are short and have a big round thing in the center of the front and a donut mirror when you look inside. Their main draw is the fact they are small.

Top pic is a 500mm Mirror lens (catadioptric mirrors lens).
Bottom pic is a 500mm Telephoto lens, the kind you normally see.

You can see why some people opt for the mirror lens.
>>
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He caught a wild peanut!
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>>1151667
Good Job Birb!
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>>1151666
>>1151649
Other reasons to use a mirror lens are for artistic purposes. Their bokeh is a round donut shape. You can see examples of that in the backgrounds/foregrounds of the photos in: >>1146272 >>1146329 >>1147676

Another neat feature is the ability to see through/around objects directly in front of the lens. Take this video. It shows the water hydrant and that the lens can focus past it. That's a nice feature when you are in the bush and have scrub you are hiding behind and want to get photos of wildlife without them getting scared off.
>>
>>1151674
Dude that's fucking crazy. It's like x-ray vision.
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>>1151692
lol ikr This photo I took through a wire fence and blackberry brambles I was hiding behind. Since the obstacles are close, they completely erase from the image when you focus beyond them. The wider the mirror lens the larger the object you can see around like this.

>I cropped this image down, but didn't resize it.
>>
>>1151667
What kind of Scrub Jay is that? California I'm assuming?
>>
>>1151734
Yep
>>
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I was able to get close to this mourning dove when it got caught inside a chick cage. I let it out. This is a actually a panorama shot where a few images are merged together, via Photoshop CC 2017's Photomerge, into one wide photo. I was using a Nikon D3400 and 70-300mm lens at 300mm about 5 feet from the dove. The hazy lines across it are just the wires of the cage out of focus in the foreground.
>>
>>1153112
That's a damn good pic. Shame about the cage wires obscuring it. But the detail on the feathers is great.
>>
>>1153123
Thanks. I could have had it a wee bit better, but I didn't realize the ISO was set to 800 instead of 100. I could also have slide left to right with more images and stitched them together so the wires are not there at all. I didn't want to terrify more than I already did.
>>
>>1153112
shoulda ate it
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>>1153140
I have chickens I can eat instead. Its mate was waiting in the tree nearby.
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*T-rex roars*
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>>1153783
cute!
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ACTION SHOT!

>tfw didn't get things into focus fast enough

I basically barrel rolled through my yard, with the 500mm, to get some clear patch of sky to get this before they flew off. Oh well, at least it is something more than nothing.
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>>1154466
This one's pretty good. Don't know what he is though. But it's good framing.
>>
>>1154509
Female House Sparrow.

Widespread globally, native to Europe, invasive species in North America. Extremely common in most cities.
>>
>>1154509
Thanks, too bad I didn't double check the ISO setting, It was way too high and everything is grainy.
>>
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Starting work doing biological monitoring and finally upped to a decent pair of binos.

What do other people use?
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Cool thread. I've always been interested in bird watching/learning their calls. Is the best way to learn by Youtube?
I'm in KY and not many birds stay around this time of year. Suggestions?
>>
>>1155048
https://www.macaulaylibrary.org/ has a large collection of bird photos and sounds

allaboutbirds.org/ gives you a few sound clips of US birds, audubon.org/ too

xeno-canto.org/ is for bird sounds but I haven't used it much yet but I heard it's good

Best way to learn overall is to see a bird in person making a call and just sit and watch it. That way you can match up the sound with the visual and make a better link in your brain by having the audio and visual work together. I don't know anything about Kentucky but I'm sure you have tons of birds around you once you get out and look.

Bird sounds are really hard to learn though because some like sparrows can have 5-10 different songs, Starlings can mimic other birds (like red-tailed hawks), and a lot of birds just have really generic sounding chips and chirps that seem impossible to tell apart. I can ID a little over 200 by sight, but only 25 or so by sound alone. It's something I want to work on too but I'm just not very gifted when it comes to music and sound.
>>
>>1141335

Why do north Americans call it "birding"? We just call it bird watching.
>>
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>>1153783
Kinglet?

>>1155048
I hope you are still going to go out though because there are plenty of birds in winter such as woodpeckers, chickadees, tits, and late migrators.
>>
>>1145496
Come to the South.
They’re everywhere around here.
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>>1155046
I use my camera. It has an optical viewfinder so that it doesn't need to be on to use the zoom lens. Thus, I can use it merely as a spotting scope. There's also a "lens2scope" attachment you can buy to put on camera lenses to use them like a spotting scope.

>>1155074
I never heard of "birding" until the internet started using it a few years ago. We've always called it "bird watching" where I live in the eastern USA. Perhaps it is a easier to type out a short word like "birding" on a phone or something.
>>
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This guy beats the ever loving hell out of all the glass windows in the area, including my truck. It is never ending. Every year this happens.
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>>1155263
>>
>>1155074
The first recorded use of the term birdwatcher was in 1891; bird was introduced as a verb in 1918.[3] The term birding was also used for the practice of fowling or hunting with firearms as in Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor (1602): "She laments sir... her husband goes this morning a-birding."[4] The terms birding and birdwatching are today used by some interchangeably, although some participants prefer birding, partly because it includes the auditory aspects of enjoying birds.

In North America, many birders differentiate themselves from birdwatchers, and the term birder is unfamiliar to most lay people. At the most basic level, the distinction is perceived as one of dedication or intensity, though this is a subjective differentiation. Generally, self-described birders perceive themselves to be more versed in minutiae like identification (aural and visual), molt, distribution, migration timing, and habitat usage. Whereas these dedicated birders may often travel specifically in search of birds, birdwatchers have been described by some enthusiasts as having a more limited scope, perhaps not venturing far from their own yards or local parks to view birds.[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Birdwatching#Birding,_birdwatching,_and_twitching

I think "birding" sounds monumentally retarded and I still say birdwatching even if it pisses off other people I'm with. People are so damn hyper sensitive about words in this age of super political correctness. Bottom line is unless you're a paid wildlife biologist / ornithologist you're an amateur so if someone thinks "birder" makes them sound more hardcore it's only to fluff their own ego.
>>
>>1155347
I think "bird watching" is a lot of shit to type out when you can just use "birding" instead. I can't imagine using a phone and trying to type shit.
>>
>>1155364
It's 5 extra letters, howlazy.ru?
>>
>>1155458
Efficient
>>
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...come closer damn you!
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>>1155986
>>
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I saw this guy this spring
>>
Saw a male pileated woodpecker today
Motherfucker was huge, pretty shy though, ran off before I could get a pic

Would he go for suet this time of year?
I mostly see chickadees and titmice eating all the suet I put out
Nothing seems to like the Nyjer I put out either :(
>>
>>1156176
Suet would probably work. Maybe it needs to be a bit higher and more secluded? Do you have gold finches in your area? They usually like nyjer.
>>
>>1156227
It's a bit higher than eye level on an apple tree that all the woodpeckers seem to love, how high should it be though?
I don't really want to have to use a ladder or anything..
Also from mid Atlantic region, but never see any goldfinches in my yard, not sure why
>>
>>1156445
If I had to place on really high, I'd just make a hook for it to be placed on and use a long pole to place it when it needs filled again.

Here's a good site with some good tips for your feeder design too. It may be that you just have a terrible design for them.

http://wildbirdsunlimited.typepad.com/the_zen_birdfeeder/2010/04/bird-feeders-for-pileated-woodpeckers-think-big.html
>>
What's the best reference book for birding in western NA, more specifically California and Nevada? Are Sibley or Peterson guides the best available in terms of illustration of each bird species and description, range maps, etc.?
>>
>>1156533
Probably. I have Sibley Birds West, I've heard it's what the local Audubon branch uses, along with National Geographic.
>>
>>1156602
>>1156533
>tfw there's no torrents of sibley
>>
>>1156533
>>1156602
>>1156692
Sibley makes an app as well. If you find a download for it mind posting it here? I can't seem to find it and its fucking $20 for the app too
>>
>>1156747
>tfw I don't own a phone
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More action shots required.
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>>1150318
It's a duck anon.
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>>1156747
There's one that someone I know uses that only cost a dollar. I don't remember the name but it had bird IDs and calls. Just search what the store has for a buck I guess?
>>
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trailcam visitor
>>
>>1156948
Nice
>>
>>1155074
If you want to really piss people off use the word seagull. I did that once not knowing and got chewed out by like 5 people at once.
>>
I've been meaning to post more of my birding pics here, but I keep on putting off downloading the pics from my camera onto my pc.

Instead, have this crappy digiscoped picture I took of some vultures on my most recent /out/ing.
>>
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>>1157828
my trailcam feeding station got alot of vulture
activity this summer. Never realizedhow cool
those guys are.
https://youtu.be/egfFU3tl7E0
>>
>>1158536
>>1157828
Big birds are so skittish around where I live. Herons and turkey vulture fly off if you are within 300 feet of them and they see you.
>>
>>1158541
I got to within 10 feet of a heron a couple weeks ago. It was a city park with lots of joggers and dogs so I guess this one built up an immunity to people. I wasn't even going after him, I just wanted to get to the bench so I could tie my shoe and he was right by it. I just walked up normally, he took a few steps back and watched, I fixed my shoe and left and he went back to doing whatever it is he was doing.
>>
>>1158622
I live in BFE, no parks of any kind here. Animals get shot if they stay around humans for very long here. That makes seeing anything rare for the most part.
>>
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>>1158628
That sucks, but on the other hand it's probably nice not having hoards of people around everywhere.

I forgot I got a crappy pic of him a little bit after I walked on. I wish I'd got one with the bench in it for comparison but didn't think of it.
>>
>>1158653
>probably nice not having hoards of people around everywhere.

It is!
>>
>>1158541
I was relatively close to those vultures and others too. Unfortunately I didn't bring any zoom lenses with me, so I stuck to using my phone + binos.
I was surprised how close I was able to get to them, but then again we were separated by decent cliffs so they must've felt pretty safe if I tried anything
>>
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Where I lived 5+ years ago I'd get turkey vultures perch on the house's roof or deck railing. I can't find any pictures of them doing that but it was pretty cool to look out the window and see a bunch of vultures just chilling. If they saw me they'd flee though. I did get this one sitting up in a tree fanning out his wings.
>>
>>1159021
Bruddy gud pic there. I wish I could've gotten one like this, since it was just getting sunny after the snowstorm.
>>
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>>1159021
maybe putting vulture feeders on the roof
will be the next big thing for bird enthusiasts
>>
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^.^
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downy's or hairy's?
both seem like males
>>
>>1159177
Tough to tell but the left one's beak looks pretty short so I'd say Downy
>>
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>>1159215
Here's another pic
>>
>>1159221
Top one definitely looks like a Downy, beak is really tiny, looks like a female too because I don't see any red on it.
>>
>>1159244
aww its probably a little downy couple then
>>
>>1156081
Nice shot!
>>
There's like 30 juncos outside my apartment right now
>>
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>>1141335
Found these grouse(?) while outing




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