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Old thread: >>1133050

Search terms:

Permaculture - Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Rooftop Gardening - Vertical Gardening - Subsistence Agriculture - Square Foot Gardening - Shifting Cultivation - Polyculture - Composting - Ley Farming - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Co-operative Farming - Orchard - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish

Resources:

https://pastebin.com/4CqXsHFm

Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2005/may05/SecVeget.html

Scans of Classic Herbal Texts:
http://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/index.html

Homegrowmen Archive (WinRAR/WinZip/7Zip etc open rar archive files):

>76.1MB
>Homegrowmen Threads Mar-20-2013 to Sep-29-2017.rar
https://www.mediafire.com/file/lbotds76751ws79/Homegrowmen%20Threads%20Mar-20-2013%20to%20Sep-29-2017.rar
Originally from archive website: https://archived.moe/out/
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Why did I plant so few carrots and neglect the ones I did plant? I simply don't have enough good soil to plant all I want to plant. It is so nice eating raw carrots that don't make my mouth itch and swell.
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>>1142523
It's winter and I currently have an indoor garden with two grow lights (actually have three, but only using two). I've basically jerry rigged a little indoor grow area with cardboard stapled with mylar, a cheap clothes rack holding up the lights, etc.

I have 10 strawberry plants (2x are tiny babies grown from seeds, one is a large healthy clone from a runner). 2x of the adults have a bunch of reddish leaves (I had it between the two 300 watt grow lights and I think it's getting burn, or something - doesn't make sense though since the LEDs don't generate much heat). otoh the cilantro is in the same pot and is doing the same thing and also growing flowers early and they apparently do that when it's hot (I hate cilantro leaves, I want the coriander anyway.)

I have basil, sage, parsley, cilantro, oregano, dill, chives, and thyme. The chives seem a little weak/undergrown except for one.

Everything has been growing for months and most of it is pretty healthy. Chives seem undersized. Many of the herbs are packed way fucking densely (planted too many in the same area) so I've basically, for example, got a carpet of oregano in one section of a pot and a little forest of basil, etc. Have trimmed some of the leaves and used them, and they're the tastiest freshest herbs I've ever had.

I'm giving all this detail because I'm about to massively reorient my whole setup.

1) I want to get my plants all arranged in the same pots by type - 4 strawberries to a pot, 4 basills to a different pot, etc

2) I want to thin out the ones that are too bunched up

3) I'm considering moving to hydroponics (hence the intro question) - currently just using miracle grow but I'm curious about hydro

4) I've got a bit of an aphid problem on my dill and parsley, and would like to shower those off as somebody suggested in another thread

tl;dr: to solve all of these problems I want to repot these in new soil & rearrange them. Is there any reason I shouldn't? Should I try hydroponics?
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>>1142647
oh shit! forgot to mention:

I also have a way bigger pot with a bunch of cherry tomatoes in it. I plan on moving this away from the other stuff, giving it its own grow light (the third one), and trimming out all of these but 6, then digging up 3 and putting them in another giant pot. This is kind of unrelated to the setup, though.

Elevations have become kind of annoying here because some pots are bigger than others and some plants are taller than others - so the grow light isn't really at the right height for all of them, especially the tomatoes. I may go to Lowes today and buy some bricks or something so I can put them beneath the pots and change elevations.

Sorry about my exceedingly long posts - I've asked bits and pieces of this over the last few days but I thought I'd put the whole picture together so someone more experienced than me can tell me if I'm messing something up too badly.
>>
What do you think of careers in Agriculture and Ranching? I have automatic acceptance into Texas A&M and they have excellent schooling for such majors. I am currently looking at Rangeland Ecology and Managnent because it seems like a versatile major. Anyone have a strong opinion on what Agriculture majors and careers are the “best”?
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>>1142647
>>1142650
Oh, one final (unrelated) question:

My strawberries are finally big enough that they've started to go nuts growing shitloads of flowers and berries. How do I know when they're actually finished growing / ripe? They seem to get so big... these are Ozark evergrowing. I've read that smell is the best way - is that a meme?
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Can anyone identify this? Found this chomping away at my calamondin. Got sneak attacked when I was watering my plants. First time getting stung and it really hurt for a while.
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>>1142647
>>1142650
>>1142659
The chives may need a cooler temperature. Eat/dry the stuff you will thin. Some will not do well being compacted into a single pot, unless it is a large pot, like basil for instance. Check into using "compost tea" and "manure tea" if you want to get away from reliance on store bought fertilizers. Yes, I recommended showering the aphids off or at least I do every chance I can help someone since it works well for me at the very least.

If you are going to repot, research each plant types' soil requirements. That will help you decide what to buy or make when repotting. They may not all like the same thing.

>Should I try hydroponics?

Why not. Research the various styles and methods. Some are super easy and cheap like the "Kratky method" and others are totally expensive and time consuming. When I get around to it, I'd like to try the Kratky method using compost tea or manure tea.

>light

Give everything as much as you have to give. If any white spots start appearing on the tops of the leaves, cut back light from those afflicted planted. I think if I were doing tomato plants inside, I'd use a shop light vertically next to them or have a plant between two shop lights. Then just rotate the plant once every few days.

>When are strawberries ripe?

When the oldest ones start to rot. The instant you see that happen to 1 you know the others are ready to eat. Strawberries from the store are picked too early in order to keep them from rotting. Frozen strawberries are usually picked much riper since they can last longer frozen. The strawberry shouldn't be tart. When fully ripe, they should practically melt in your mouth and be sweet. I find that strawberries exposed to good light, ripen better than shaded ones. Eventually, you'll get the hang of picking them just before they rot. Freeze them if you need to store them for long or build up enough for a recipe.
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>>1142704
Crowned Slug (Isa textula) Some have t he solid white strip in the middle, others have two strips close together like that but with some red spots. So, both are either variations of Isa textula or they are Isa genus, just different species.

>>1142653
It is really up to you and your abilities. Do you like doing that sort of stuff? Are you good at that type of thing? Keep your options open as always, do what you are best at doing.
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>>1142721
Awesome. You found its name real quick. My calamondin plant's on a windowsill. That caterpillar freaked me out because I didn't see any of them before my plant started to lose leaves. How does one prevent these sneaky dudes from appearing again?
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>tfw your Brazilian Starfish peppers and your ground cherries are growing fast

Also have a few more seedlings doing pretty well so far.
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>>1142789
>ground cherries

Those grow wild here. I've been considering growing some, but I've not seen any in the last few years.
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>>1142911
Apparently they grow pretty easily, but we'll see. I'm more afraid I won't have enough room for them.
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>>1142958
Treat them like any other nighshade family plant and they will do fine. Depending on the cultivar, they bush can be small or all over the place. My tomatillos can bush out like mad. Here's one method I might try next year to prevent their limbs from snapping.
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>>1142746
>How does one prevent these sneaky dudes from appearing again?

Check for eggs, squish them. Otherwise, you need to use a screen or row cover material to keep the moths off.
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>>1142975

Looks too easy for the squirrels to get them
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>>1142975
That's a brilliant setup.
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Any advice on growing onions?
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>>1143078
Growing them is pretty easy. They love light, so don't drown them out with taller stuff. Preserving them is a bit trickier. You can't plant too many!
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Story/advice time. My dad has some land that has an old rundown house on it. The area that you could consider a yard is 1.5-2 acres (immediately turns to fairly steep wooded hillside outside of this area.) I would like to fix up the house to live in or for him to rent out (roof is new and foundation is solid, plumbed and wired but needs new siding/insulation/everything else.) The flat yard area is mostly native grass, but I would like to do some landscaping and add a huge garden, fruit trees, etc. I live 3 hours away and would like to start working on this on the weekends. I have some experience with vegetable gardens, but that's about it. What aspect of landscaping plants could be started with only going on the weekend (fast growing privacy trees/hedge, fruit trees, lawn area)?

TL;DR Can you landscape and plant a yard with maintenance only done on the weekends?
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>>1143462
Kudos on fixing up a house. It is cheaper in the long run, if stuff like roof and foundation haven't ruined and taken most of everything with it.

>fast growing

That also means fast dying most of the time. Knowing the climate and temperature zone helps. Some things are better in Zone 8 than Zone 4 for instance. Personally, I'd only plant things that can give some sort of food value. Like shade trees can be full size fruit/nut trees. Privacy hedges can be highbush blueberry bushes. Even the lawn itself can have edibles in it and not pure grass. Though, most people consider these as weeds and want to nuke everything with pesticide until fescue is all that's left. I make make salads and dandelion wine from my lawn. Just having green tops from wild onion/wild garlic in the spring and fall from the lawn is great.

Yes, you can do this only on the weekends. It all depends on how much time you are putting into it. Be that 2 hours a day, every day of the week or 7 hours a day on the weekends. you could even camp over, in the house on Friday night, so you can get a fresh start in the morning and get a whole weekend's work done.
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Should I prune these back even more? New growth is already starting, and the one on the right is putting out a few buds.
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>>1142523
shouldnt we change the pic from a clover to a bepper ?
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>>1143483
Thanks for the input. It's in zone 5, up in the hills in a fairly steep sided valley. I would definitely prefer to have plants that produce food or are useful in a way other than just ornamental, I just know that my garden plants usually have to have more attention than on weekends depending on the time of year. Since it has power and water I'm hoping I could set up some sort of automated drip irrigation throughout the week possibly. One concern is that I'd have to protect new plants pretty well from deer and whatnot since I wouldn't be around.
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Does adding perlite/growstones to soil really improve aeration and growth?
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>>1143497
I wouldn't, though which shape are you trying to achieve?
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>>1143602
It doesn't automatically improve growth, this depending on a lot of factors, but a compacted soil is rarely a good thing to begin with.
Though it improves the lightness and the drainage of your substrate. I add 1/5 clay pebbles because that's what I have nearby, some add 1/3 perlite, it really depends of what you're seeking as a soil.
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>>1143557
Use fencing, netting, and row covers to protect from animals. You can even get a fence charger; solar or plugin. I kept my trees in cages for years until I got 6-feet high fencing. The deer don't jump over unless being chased.
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>>1143546
Yes please.
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>>1143607
No particular shape. I just wanted to stimulate new branch growth and get some bushy plants.
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What does /out/ think about using something like this?

https://www.amazon.com/Grid-Panel-Retail-Display-Perfect/dp/B00TH3RL6W

on concrete blocks with trays beneath it to catch water
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>>1143660
(obviously with plants in planters on top of the metal grid)

sorry, don't know how I left that out
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>>1143546
>>1143621
It is the 4chan logo, /hgm/ style.
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>>1143660
>>1143662
It really depends on how strong it is, you might need a couple T fence posts as cross members to give it better support. Pots of soil are really heavy.
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>>1143695
Couldn't I just pop a couple more concrete blocks beneath it like columns to support it?

Also, can you think of a better source for a strong metal grid like this? Maybe like a hardware store likes a Lowes or something? I guess I don't know but 30 bucks seems kind of steep for something where I don't even know if it's going to handle the weight or not.
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>>1143696
>Couldn't I just pop a couple more concrete blocks beneath it like columns to support it?

Yes, where ever is sags, put a support. you could try a cattle panel. They are HUGE (16'x4'), but have much larger holes and are cheaper. the holes are actually large enough that if you find the right sized square flower pot, it will sit right in a hole. However, you can lay some regular fencing over it for smaller holes and better support. It'd still need some support though. You may just need to walk through the hardware/home center and check what they have.
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>>1143817
>cattle panel

Jesus Christ, just looked this up after reading your post. They are indeed huge and they are priced super low. Can always cut them up with boltcutters or something if I want it smaller, too. Thanks, dude -- looks like exactly what I'm looking for.
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I moved a poly tunnel to a new location. I'll try overwintering these chard. Some frost zapped them a few times already, but they are holding on. I need to debris them later and stack the other side with more thermal mass. I won't be heating this or using a double layer.
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>>1143825
Glad to help. I use them for all sorts of stuff. Like gates, trellis, hoops, grill top, etc. Yes, long bolt cutters will work. You can also spot weld them if you have something with enough voltage to do it.
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>>1143829
I have nothing like that yet but absolutely want to get into various kinds of metalworking so I'm planning on buying an actual torch soon. Nice idea.
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Hello I was told that some of you gentlemen were into beekeeping, and I was wondering if any of you knew some good, reliable resources for beginners to the hobby.

I have researched and it is legal to have them in my district, so I have that taken care of (I think) but I want to become an expert before I take on the life of an animal.
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>>1143853
Lol your going to kill so many
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>>1143838
It is just a couple of microwave oven transformers (MOT) that are modified and paired up to get the voltage just right. It has a higher voltage than a normal MOT spot welder so to power through dirt, grime, and zinc coatings. It is the stick welder version of a spot welder in that respect. If you have some tools, they are super easy to make. Google "DIY MOT spot welder". They are great for odd jobs around the farm.

Like those cattle panels. Google, "cattle panel garden" and you'll get 100s of ways to use them. If you can spot weld them, you can make all manner of very sturdy structures.

>>1143853
I have several hives. There should be a local Bee Keeper's Association or similar group that governs your area. They will be the best resource for hands-on knowledge and sourcing used equipment for cheap. In the USA, we have to register our hives and the Bee Keeper's Association can help with that too, if where you live needs it. you can also help out with other people's hives to gain 1st hand knowledge before you actually get into the hobby. That can tell you right off if you really want to do it.

As for resources,

http://www.abfnet.org/
http://www.professional-beekeepers.eu/
https://www.beekeepers.asn.au/
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>>1143694
I know. Just use 4 habneros/scotch bonnets/carolina reapers
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>>1142975
Kudos for this setup.

Probably work best with smaller species as cherry tomatoes, and to point the obvious, to put some shade for other plans as tomatoes are very good for direct sunlight.

My experience with tomato has been literally plagued with fungus issues, but otherwise, had good results.

A sample of my previous setup, had to disregard it as i moved houses and do not have time to attend a new one. I'm growing some parsley and cilantro as everyone here at home is used to go over the garden a pick whatever the fuck they find, but is only a couple of small pots.
>>
Anyone here into serious botany?
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>>1143653
The general thing is you cut above a node, and buds on said node will be able to grow. You just have to prune accordingly, and give light to buds you want branches from
Then on a quite bushy plant, giving light is often enough to grow a branch because apical dominance isn't that strong
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>>1144044
It may be good for branching plants, not climbing plants. Tomatillos and peppers branch out horizontally, but tomatillos do so more than anything I've seen yet; that still remains to be a bush. Tomatoes do the same thing, but we can train them up and up.

>>1144049
Just what is involved for farming and food production. Though, that's more than one field of study of course. Like instead of focusing on the plant itself, I study the plant and its relationship with everything in its environment; mycorrhizae, vermiculture, endophyte, apiary, etc. I read a lot of papers and watch a lot of talks. All of it is to help my crops do as well as they can in a permaculture manner.
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I just finished processing all the lambs quarter seeds for this year. I have 1 pint of lambs quarter seeds from 2017. I still have some from 2016. Though, this winter I plan to sprout them indoors as both sprout and microgreen crops.

I think there's enough seeds in 1 pint to plant the entire state of Idaho.
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Hi there. The plant in my garden, neglected for years, which I've always assumed was an Ixora coccinea, has bloomed recently with flowers that look a bit different from the common Ixora coccinea I see all about town.

Can anyone confirm if this is in fact Ixora coccinea, or that I've been bamboozled all this while?
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>>1144430
There is a ton of species of Ixora and there's a laundry list of Ixora coccinea cultivars. Narrowing it down is a bit difficult since there's not very good info on all of them online. Most are just descriptions like, "____ is a cultivar of coccinea" or "____ is a plant in the Ixora family" with no photos or other info.

It is certainly Ixora sp.
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How did you guys get your start in gardening? There are no gardening classes near where I live being in the city and I'm overwhelmed by all the online knowledge on the subject and am unsure of where to start. Did you start planting flowers or fruits and veggies first?
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>>1144510
Also what is an easy plant to grow that will teach me the basics of how to garden?
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>>1144510
My mother taught me, but I'm a terrible gardener overall.
>>1144511
I've found that green beans almost never fail.
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>>1144511
Always peppers.
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>>1144510
>How did you guys get your start in gardening?

I worked in the food industry for a while. I didn't like what other people were doing with the food I was consuming; both in the field, processing, and cooking. So, I decided to grow/raise and fix it myself.

>overwhelmed

Just make a list of the stuff you want to grow. Choose your top 3. Research what each needs. Go from there.

>>1144511
Easy plants are those that are good for your area's climate. Find out how many days are between your last and first frosts, if you have any. That is your frost-free days when you can grow things in the open outside. Then when looking up plants to grow, check the "days to maturity". Add 60 days to that number make sure that amount falls under the number of frost-free days. Some companies list their "days to maturity" as starting when you set out starts. As in you've already been growing the plants indoors or undercover for up to 2 months before setting them out after the last frost date.

There's no need to recommend what specific plant to plant without knowing basics for where you live. Like what hardiness temperature zone you live in or number of frost-free days. Then it only comes down to specific cultivars. If you have a short cold season, you get cultivars for that. Another thing, what is it that you like?
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>>1144510
Just find something that appeals to you and start with it. A few years ago i got a cranberry plant as a test (fresh ones are hard to find here). The year after I got a few more and put them in a better container. The year after that I found a single, remaining pepper plant in a garden center. Thing was on sale so why not?
This went on until pic related.

>>1144519
Parents and grandparents that garden are always a good source. I would suggesting using the internet only for specific questions to not get overwhelmed. /hgm/ is a great place for that actually.

>>1144615
This.
The answer is always peppers.
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I fell for the mushroom meme and bought a Lion's Mane growbag, but there's some questions I'm not finding answers to. Are the pollen dangerous and can I leave it in my room? Is there a limit on how many times I can harvest it? If the bag stops producing, is there a way I can get it it to colonize another medium?
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>>1142523
I want to get into hydroponics. I went out and bought some stuff and I still haven't figured out how to mix nutes. What's the best guide to learn from? I looked through the pastebin but didn't dig much, sorry if it is in there. I plan on doing tomatoes and herbs just no idea what needs what or how to mix this stuff.

I got a potted variety of tomatoes and I have the seeds germinating now.
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>>1144637
>Are the pollen dangerous and can I leave it in my room?

Yes, the spores are dangerous to be inhaling from any fungi. It should be placed in a humidity tent. That will maintain its air humidity and contain spores from being a problem with you or anyone else.

>limit on how many times I can harvest it?

Yes, normally kits can give you 3-4 good flushes then a 5-6th weak flush.

>get it it to colonize another medium?

Yes, you can divide it up and make an endless number of new kits or inoculate logs. The methods are fairly simple on how to do that. The only enemy with growing fungi is mold. Keep an eye out for it. For how to do all this, there's several tutorials online for just about every species of culinary fungi.

https://www.shroomery.org/9400/Hericium-erinaceus

>>1144734
Online nutrient information for hydroponics is the most convoluted thing I've ever seen in my life. Everyone and their brother is shilling "special" high cost company nutrient mixes and have an assortment of calculators. If you use the Kratky method then you can use a compost tea for nutrients and skip all the problems. Though, any hydro system that has tubes and such would get plugged up trying to use unfiltered compost tea or grow things in the tubes.

http://www.jasons-indoor-guide-to-organic-and-hydroponics-gardening.com/homemade-hydroponic-nutrients.html
http://www.jasons-indoor-guide-to-organic-and-hydroponics-gardening.com/how-to-grow-hydro.html
https://gardenculturemagazine.com/garden-inputs/nutrients/using-compost-tea-hydroponics/

Hope that helps a bit.
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>>1144782
I think I'll build a humidity tent myself, looks simple enough. What can I use for the sheet?
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>>1144822
Anything air tight will do. Plastic, glass, etc. check the instructions for your kit, if there are any.
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>>1144854
There was barely anything, it was just the bag with the substrate and the colony. The site just said to cut off the bad at the substrate level and keep it moist at 18-24°.
How forgiving is the mushroom in not ideal conditions? I have no way to check humidity and keeping the temperature steady isn't easy in where I store the bag.
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>>1144860
Eh, I wouldn't deviate more than 10% from ideal.
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>>1144449
Oh, thanks for the help. Figured it was an Ixora, pity I couldn't figure out the cultivar. Oh well!
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>>1144822
Just buy a cheap aquarium , easy as af
>>
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Here's my Lions Mane growbag, it's been sitting there for 24 hours but it still looks like how it did when it arrived. Those black spots are just the substrate on top of the mushroom, right?
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>>1145223
Yeah, just substrate. Personally, for that type of fungi, I'd have punched holes around one side instead of opening the top. That way the fungi could have grown out and hung down. That's what they normally do on the side of a tree. It is also cleaner.

>>1145080
You'd need to find the person who planted it or whoever planted ones in the area where it came from.
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>>1145235
Good, that's a relief. The store I bought the mushroom from had a picture of the bag all the way open as well, so I did the same.
Are there any things I should watch out for to avoid contamination? Right now I'm leaving it in my kitchen so I can increase the humidity by boiling water.
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>>1145240
A humidity tent helps prevent airborne spores from landing on it all the time. Not touching it until harvest is also a way to help prevent contamination. you can use a white garbage bag as a humidity tent. Just make sure there's space between so the fungi can grow.
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>>1145349
I prodded it a bit at first when I got it because I didn't know about contamination, I hope that won't be a problem down the road.
I already fried my rice cooker to keep humidity high.
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Any idea what this is?

Also, I know it's recommended to ask here anyway, but is there a recommended app to identify plants? I know it's been asked before but I feel bad about clogging up this thread with identification queries.
>PlantNet is almost, /almost/ useless in Asia
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Is this something to be worried about?
Since it's only on the older leaves I think it might have to do with the trimming & transplantation.
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>>1145568
Pretty neat, never seen anything like it before. Check this thread: >>>/an/2529858

Online Identification Keys for plants are extremely limited it seems. I've been using google images and typing out stuff. Most of the time I get luckier than with ID Keys.
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>>1145705
Looks like bacterial spot actually. It is too uniform round shape to be a deficiency. I would remove all effected leaves.
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>>1145705
Looks like downy mildew
I've treated with sulfur when I've had it in the past.
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Nice day for working in the garden. I'm moving soil from one bed to another. It reduces the amount of growing space, but that entire lower section will have tons of fill dirt added to level off that area, turning it into more usable yard space. I had to evict a family of 5, from the raised bed. They were right in the middle of the construction site.
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>>1145828
Calm down there Chairman Mao
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>>1145874
This is America. Eminent Domain has more sway here.
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>>1145719
>>1145767
I'll take a look at the options, thanks for the input.
It only shows when I look at it like that though, with light behind it, top of the leaves look just fine.
>>
Ah yes, the Homegrowmen off season. Where are all the Australian Homegrowmen?
>>
>>1146867
In Australia.
>>
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Well, it's that time of year when cabin fever begins to bring out the autism in certain individuals. Anyone who has been here long enough know what happens.

Perhaps a preemptive word filter to turn "kid" into "Rugged Outdoorsman" would be a good start. I believe they did that on /diy/ at some point.
>>
>>1147042
/diy/ turned kid into "talented/diy/er" for like a year or more.
>>
>>1147089
kek
>>
>>1146989
You're not wrong, in Sydney atm, but back in Cairns in a fortnight
>>
>>1147042
>cabin fever
Boy fucking howdy you can say that again. Veggies all picked, fucking missed fall mushroom hunting this year, bees are all sealed up, and the only produce I'll be getting are a few eggs from my chickens, who will otherwise be stuck doing nothing except getting eaten by the dogs because they apparently hate their own lives (by the way, if any of you get chickens, here's a pro tip: bantams are great if you don't use eggs that much but don't expect to eat them, even at their peak you barely get enough meat off one for one meal).

What do you all do to stave off boredom and feelings of uselessness during the winter months?
>>
>>1147237
Until January it is planning for next season, saving money for what needs fixed or purchased, clearing ground, building beds, building indoor units for seedling starts, polytunnels and managing cold weather crops, mushroom cultures, etc. January on is all indoor seedlings unless it is a mild winter and cold weather crops in the tunnels are still going well.
>>
>>1142523
I am a hydroponic newbie who wants "the perfect system". I am looking for a technical schematic for an ebb and flow hydroponic set-up with a surge pot. I know it is a constantly advancing field, but I am struggling to find information. All Google seems to provide me is entry level crap, and I need the science behind the professional equipment so I can build it myself. I believe I simply do not know the correct search terms.
>>
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Pom Pom update.
The fungus finally started growing, the surface is covered in small bumpy growths. No signs of mold either. I am unsure about that dark yellow coloring - I read that Lions Mane turns yellow when it gets really ripe, but I'm not even close to harvesting anything here. Is this normal?
Also, all the spraying to keep it wet gathered a good amount of water in the bag. Should I drain it or is it beneficial to the mushroom?
>>
Why aren't we in /diy/ again?
>>
>>1147365
>perfect system

No such thing as of yet. Oddly enough, forums for weed growing are actually some of the best resources for hydroponics information. They normally have a non-weed section too and field non-weed questions. Another community are Aquaponcis people, which combines hydroponics with aquatic life like fish or crayfish; where the creatures fertilize the water for the plants. Many of those aquaponics systems use ebb/flow/flooding. They are mostly based on Murray's designs.

http://opensourceecology.org/wiki/Hydroponics
http://opensourceecology.org/wiki/Aquaponics#Open-source_systems
http://www.powerhousehydroponics.com/crash-course-open-source-hydroponic-systems/

In the paste bin of the OP there's a few more bits of info. Here's the magnet link for Murray Hallam's 4 DVD Aquaponics, which may be of some help, especially the DIY one:

>3GB
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:b21956f1f1ae7165b42a4aeb373a622e548a2a6a&dn=Aquaponics+4+DVD+Murray+Hallam%27s&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.leechers-paradise.org%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fzer0day.ch%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fexodus.desync.com%3A6969

Also, check >>>/diy/catalog for any hydroponics design threads or start a new one if there are none.

>>1147463
Yellowing can be from drying out, due to low humidity. Drain it. It shouldny be swamped with water. The exception is when you are initially starting the flush, where you soak the brick/log in water for 12-24 hours to get it saturated then drained. That triggers the growth. Yours may have been slow going until you watered it so much that it finally became saturated and triggered to grow better.

>>1147488
It was, but got moved to /out/ because it turned out to be the best community. It started in /ck/ before there was an /out/ or /diy/. There are some diy-related design threads for hydroponics, chicken tractors, etc in /diy/ from time to time. Which is the best place for that aspect
>>
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>>1138084
I forgot to give an update for this. I buried it on 11/13/2017 2 weeks ago. I checked it on 11/23/2017 (these pics; 10 days after burial) and the top layer of potatoes where nice & cold, still firm, not covered in moisture, and not showing signs of sprouting. The inside of the lid did have some condensation on it. The hay felt like it wasn't dry, but not really "wet" feeling. The piece of paper on top felt limp, but not "wet".

I'll check them again in another week I think.
>>
>>1147488
For the same reason that people talk about certain video games in /tg/. No point in trying to have a fruitful discussion with /v/ermin.
>>
>>1147463
You want it moist but not sopping wet. So drain it if reaches oversaturation.
>>
Is it worth growing wild pepper varieties? I've heard some can be quite productive.
>>
>>1147968
If you want to eat wild peppers, then do.
>>
>>1142523
Anyone have any experience inoculating apple trees saplings with morel spawn? I want to plant some apple trees at my parents new house in southern Alabama and was wondering if anyone knew anything. I was just planning on making a slurry and dipping the roots in it, then planting them.
>>
>>1147992
>I was just planning on making a slurry and dipping the roots in it, then planting them.

That's probably the best thing, as well as pouring a slurry on a 4 inch layer of wood chip mulch where ever it will be shaded. Saplings may need some shade cloth until they are larger, as well as stakes and guy wires to prevent wind problems early on.

>>1147968
Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum? They can be highly productive, but they are of course very small. I read that the Texas bird peppers is 30k-60k SHU while others are 50k-100k SHU.
>>
>>1147968
Give it a try. They do surprisingly good under less than ideal conditions, too.
Or you could go for cultivated varieties that are close to wild ones, like chiltepin or aji charapita.
The latter is kind of a meme because some guy claims he is selling the fruits at $20.000/kg. But it's a cool pepper. VERY productive, even in pots, and the peppers a bright yellow.
>>
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>>1147954
Here's my makeshift humidity tent - I crammed an old tea boiler in there, so now I can easily raise temperature an humidity. Tomorrow I'll try to find some leftover pvc pipe and wire so I can get a little more fancy.
>>
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>takes half your garden
>>
>>1148210
You won't need to use the tea boiler. The amount of humidity it would need will be taken care of by your normal watering/misting cycle. The moisture will evaporate from the kit, but not go anywhere, raising the humidity to the proper level.
>>
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>>1148230
>blocks your path
>>
>>1148260
Oh, okay then. I made small holes in the plastic sheet as well, are those necessary or should it be completely airtight?
>>
>>1148284
That's fine.
>>
>>1147237
I live in the deep South

Everyone I see on this board seems to hate hot weather, anyone else love it?

Snow is beautiful but being able to wear a t shirt and shorts and feel the warm sun on your skin 10 months of the year. Fuck having at least half the year being cold and frozen, it seems so damn boring.
>>
>>1148337
I live in a high humidity hot summer are where it stay 90% humidity/80-90F at night most times. It's pretty much death. Winter is -40F at worst, -15F usually. Though, the last 5-8 years have been wonky and warm. I'd rather have warm temps and low humidity, no cold.

>Fuck having at least half the year being cold and frozen, it seems so damn boring.

It can be. You have to completely shift gears to a different set of things to do outside.
>>
I'm starting to plan for growing a bunch of plants indoors, I'm thinking tomatoes, potatoes, spinach, carrots, some herbs, and perhaps some fruits (berries most likely). I hear cabbage takes a long time to grow, can it regrow cutoff area (allowing for a good amount of longevity) or is it only viable in semi-large setups? What kind of space and maintenance (especially time) would I need for the plants above? What quantity do I need to plant for it to be sustainable (e.g. not getting one tomato per month on average)?
>>
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I've been dismantling and moving the old, pumpkin hill, compost pile. I'm about half done and this bed is about half filled. I still need to amend it, but I can do that later when I spread it around to other beds in Spring.

>>1148707
>indoors

It is mostly about adequate lighting.

>regrowing cabbage tops

It is just a leafy plant, all the leaves on it are edible. Meaning, you don't need to cut the head off to have something to eat. You can take the outer, older leaves instead and let the centers keep growing. There are various cultivars. Some are very compact and some are rather loose and don't have a "head" per se.

>growing enough food for self sustainment

That depends on your level of sustainability, diet type, and a few other factors for how many you need to plant. If you are a full vegan, growing all your food indoors is going to be quite an endeavor and perhaps rather expensive. If you don't eat all that much in vegetables or fruit then it will be cheaper and less labor intensive. For cost it all comes down to diet, space available, natural light availability, and artificial light requirements.

The best way to figure this stuff up is to make a list of everything you eat and how much of it you are eating per month. then cross reference that with the average harvest yields for those plants per square foot. That will give you a rough estimate for how much space is needed. Keep in mind that various styles of growing food will give you different levels of space usage. Some just are not good for indoors, but others are great and maximize how you use the space. These things change the yield per space results.
>>
>>1148745
To be clear, by sustainable I mean with regard to the specific plants I would be growing only. It is a function of productivity of the plant and how well it can survive in indoors conditions as I understand it. I don't intend to be living only off of self-grown stuff (maybe one day).

Is there a good reference for various styles somewhere? A summary table that I can use to further look into a specific style would be good.

Good to know about cabbage. Obviously I have a lot of reading to do to get started.

With regard to lighting I was going to get a few compact fluorescent lights. I have decent sunlight access as well but winters here are long and rough. Are these the right kind of lights/are they sufficiently efficient?
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>>1148755
Yes, you can sustain most plants indoors. It is all a matter of space and light. Some, like corn or pumpkin may be troublesome, either because of light cycles triggering things prematurely or massive space requirements.

>compact fluorescent lights

CFLs will work fine, just keep it close to the leaves, about 2+ inches from them. But, don't let the leaves get warm/hot from being too close to the lights. Dedicated LED grow lights will be the "best" of course; just refer to their instructions for how to use them.

>summery table

Most resources break it up into 3-4 categories, "soil", "hydroponics", "aquaponics", and "aeroponics". Then they go into detail the one they like the best or are selling. It is rare to have subtypes listed, "horizontal", "vertical", "shelf", "krakty," "water culture", "nutrient film", "hanging", "intensive", on and on. I've yet to see a comprehensive flow chart or table for this sort of thing. Like, "houseplant", can often be is its own section of plants that normally don't need a lot of light. Outside, those would be "understory" plants for an "understory garden". I mean look at this list,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_garden_types

It doesn't really give you a proper flow or categorization of methods. It is just a hodge podge list.

In the end, the best thing to do is write up that list of food then research how to grow it indoors. You'll need to do that for each plant type.
>>
Can anyone recommend a sweet potato variety that grows well in heavier clay soil? I tried some Beauregard this past season and while they produced many yams, they were long and thin. I was told that was due to heavier clay soil.
>>
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My Lions Mane is still growing well, but between noon and evening most of the growths started turning a really definitive pink color. What's going on? I read that they turn yellow as they get ripe, but I haven't heard anything about pink.
>>
>>1148813
Has anyone tried or used pic related?
Especially with peppers.
>>
impulse bought some azomite and kelp meal anyone use that stuff? seems like you cant go wrong with it
>>
>>1149463
It is just a form factor. I recommend making your own, if you want to do hydroponics/aeroponics in a small container. The extremely generic settings on the control panel should be a tip off.

>>1149456
>pic

That's starting to look nice. The color is common. You may be a white first flush a pink second flush and a white 3rd flush from the same kit. Some do it only as they get older. I'm not sure of the cause, most likely some environmental stress, but it doesn't seem to bother the fungi.
>>
>>1149479
I make my own fertilizers and soil amendments, but I've heard good things about seaweed-based fertilizers. I've been looking into rock dusts, but haven't priced it for the area I'd need to dust.
>>
>>1149483
> I shit in my garden

but do it fall or spring not when plants are growing because shit makes good organic material for the soil but it is not good if it actually comes in contact with plants

I use a lot of bad condition apples but I am a little worried that maybe they can make the soil more acidic
I am not really worried about it that much but I am thinking about apple juice in the soil for 10 years
>>
>>1149500
It takes a year to properly compost humanure. Urine can be used very soon though.

>make the soil more acidic

No problem with that. I prefer to feed food refuse to my chickens then compost their manure and bedding.
>>
I have a very small apartment but I am interested in growing interesting vegetables and stuff. How do I get started? What can I do and expect?
>>
>>1149561
The most obvious answer is potted pepper plants.

But I recommend first thinking about what kind of vegetables you like to eat and cook, but which aren't readily available (at all, or in a good/fresh state) from your local markets.
>>
Has anyone grown spinach before? I'm looking into it for the spring.
>>
>>1149751
I grow it indoors mostly during winter for something green to eat. It is really easy to grow. If it gets too warm, it will bolt, and light may also play a role in it bolting.
>>
>>1149774
>it will bolt
How bad is its bolt? Is it like lettuce where it's useless as soon as it starts almost, or like chard where you've got a good margin of time where it's still good to stew?
>>
>>1149780
More like lettuce, you can get it early but you won't want to eat it before too long.
>>
>>1149780
>>1149822
When mine bolted it wasn't like lettuce. Lettuce was horrible. The spinach just became a bit woodier/toothier and had a flower stem. Lettuce when from nearly tasteless to "oh god what did I put in my mouth!?"
>>
>>1149823
>"oh god what did I put in my mouth!?"
That's because it's Asteraceae. That's the normal way for that family.
>>
>>1149823
>woodier/toothier
In texture, you mean?
>>
>>1149456
Looks like a youngin'.

Probably to do with the nutrient substrate. Is it wood based, grain based or otherwise? How often do you hydrate?

In any case, I believe pink is within the normal variety of shades lion's mane can take. Mostly white or beige, but pink is not unusual. Might be a sign of slight stress, but it should sort itself out fine.
>>
>>1149825
Correct. Mine didn't get too bad, because I ate them before they got very far along. I don't know if they get worse than that or not.

>>1149824
Indeed.
>>
hello lads complete faggot here, how do i grow cabbage indoors during winter or any tasty vegetable so i can make myself feel little better aobut my miserable life kek
>>
>>1150228
I don't associate with fags
>>
>>1150234
y-you too
>>
>>1150228
Try reading the thread and rewording your self-depreciating post.
>>
>>1150228
If you're gonna plant it from seed now, you might as well wait until spring anyhow. Cabbage doesn't grow easily indoors unless you have a pro set up and know what you're doing.

Start with something simpler.
>>
>>1150337
>something simpler.
for example? im complete dull not joking.
what can i grow indoors during winter from seed
>>
>>1150358
>still hasn't read the thread
>>
>>1150364
Cut him a break he is dull and can't read so can you post what he needs so he can not read that?
>>
>>1150392
Nice try. Just read the thread m8.
>>
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>>1150392
>>
>>1150502
Maybe you should read the thread yourself, retard.
>>
>>1142523

Got my plots dug before the frost and still got to dig out one compost field, finished one yesterday. Got enough scrap wood lying around to put some pegs down and stop the metric tons of leaves from falling out, also got some sea grass from the beach to mix with the leaves.

Now it's mostly waiting, though I got an old shed on the property that needs to be removed and a new one that will have to be built. Also gotta clear about half of the area of scrubs and trash, so there is stuff to do in winter time.

Coming spring I'll have three plots 1,5x5m in the sun to grow vegetables, I might add some angled frames to grow additional ones over them and will build some potato towers. Also thinking of digging down a greenhouse on the other side, but don't know if I can dig deep enough for it to be effective, still gotta calculate that out.
>>
>>1150546
Why? I'm the one who wrote the answers already ITT.
>>
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>tfw your Brazilian starfish and fatalii/devil's tongue are still tiny while your ground cherries are already getting a bunch of blossoms and at least one maturing fruit
>>
>>1150792
Ground cherry and tomatillo always do that.
>>
Think I could still find pumpkin seeds around?
>>
>>1151260
You can order anything online just about any time of the year. Some garden centers might have old stock locally.
>>
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Mycology nerd stopping by. If anyone has questions or projects involving the cultivation of fungi, speak up. The pic is of some massive SRA that I pulled in last spring

>>1144637
No, the spores from one grow kit are not anything to worry about unless you have a previously existing lung sensitivity. Despite what >>1144782 said, spores are no risk unless inhaled at amounts far beyond ambient levels, and over long periods of time. As long as you aren't literally snorting piles of spores (Lycoperdonosis) or working on a mushroom farm (Mushroom workers lung, hypersensitivity pneumonitis), you are good to go.

Yes, you can expand a kit easily, I just recently got massive fruitings off of paper shreddings I inoculated with spent substrate from an oyster grow.
Just boil or otherwise pasteurize your new intended substrate (something woody or papery) and bag up with some circulation. When using spent substrate as inoculant it is necessary to use high amounts, I'd recommend 30-50% of the total volume of the new substrate be inoculant.

>>1144860
Hericium aren't very forgiving to lack of humidity. If your humidity is close to 90% you are set, otherwise primordia will be stunted. If you have a large tote you can set the block inside and do regular mistings, it will create a microclimate and you wont need to invest in a tent. Don't mist the fruiting bodies directly or they will deform.
I recommend oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus) in the future. You would have to put effort into not having them fruit, they perform very well at room temp/humidity.
>>
>>1151282
Eh, I disagree with sleeping in the same room as a flushing fungi kit.
>>
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>had a bunch of cherry tomatoes in a huge pot
>inexpertly repotted them, probably killing a bunch of the roots in the process
>wake up in the morning and they look like my flaccid cock

I did all this work for fucking nothing and all my tomato plants are fucking dead and I'm so mad

fuck

I was going to repot a bunch of my other stuff but apparently I suck at it so now I'm concerned I'm going to murder my entire garden
>>
>>1151443
>inexpertly repotted them
What did you do?
>look like my flaccid cock
Did you give them some water?
>now I'm concerned
Feel free to google some guides or some shit, but don't just stop because it may not have worked out once.
>>
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>>1151491
>What did you do?

Dug out as much of the free earth as I could, then dumped out the entire pot. I had planted way too many of the things so it was kind of like a forest in there. Was trying to get the biggest six and put them in two big pots in two setse of three.

>Did you give them some water?
Yes. I don't think they're thirsty. I'm pretty sure they're dead.

>Feel free to google some guides or some shit, but don't just stop because it may not have worked out once.

Apparently from what I've read tomato plants (or at least cherry tomatos) are surprisingly fragile. It's funny because they looked thick and strong and healthy, enough to handle some trauma. I'm not giving up but I'm also not going to move adult tomato plants ever again.

I was also planning on repotting a bunch of the rest of my garden but now I'm not so sure now that I know that I am Death.
>>
>>1151499
Do not fear death. It is a natural part of life. If your plants ought to be moved, better to give it a shot.

Be gentle with them of course, and err on the side of more soil rather than less, but give it a shot. I mean, worst that can happen is everything dies and you plant some new stuff. In a couple months that result won't be different than if you left them in a constrained planting anyway.
>>
>>1151443
Water it and keep it in the shade if it has access to direct sun. It is pretty hard to outright kill them from simply root damage. I make cuttings from tomato plans all the time and no roots or special things are involved.

Also, stop using feels memes.

>>1151499
>surprisingly fragile

They are not.
>>
>>1143078
Last time I grew onions I couldn't get them to grow more than the size of a strawberry even though the leafy part was fucking huuuuge.
>>
>>1151282

Aye, got questions. Years ago I watched some DVD series on growing fungi, I'm keen on growing my own edible mushrooms in the garden soon, from what I remember you get the right wood, drill it and stick wooden dowels in there that are inoculated (?) with the fungus you want to grow there. That way the fungus takes over quickly and doesn't allow for other organisms to mess it up, right?

So, given an area with little sun in a rather wet and windy, temperate environment (could provide shelter of course), what fungi would be best? Which fungi are especially friendly for newbies like me? I'd love to try some Shiitake, but IIRC those grow on some plume wood and take years, right? Also since they're Asian mushrooms, they probably don't grow well here.

What about chanterelles?
>>
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>>1151289
No risk to it. Low levels of spore inhalation are never an issue unless you are exposed long-term. I work on a mushroom farm.

>>1151789
There are a number of ways you can grow mushrooms. An easy divide to make is indoor and outdoor growing. Indoor techniques require more equipment and knowledge, but outdoor growing is basically free, and requires little to no knowledge. The tradeoff is time. Indoor growing can get you mushrooms in as little as three weeks, outdoor growing can take up to a year.

The log method you described is the simplest outdoor method for most people, and is a great way to get started. You can buy any number of species suited to every climate on earth (the poles outstanding).
Where are you located? Oyster mushrooms are failproof, and grow in all climates, you just have to pick the right time of year for inoculation. Lions mane, Shiitake, Laetiporus, Pleurotus, all are good species for a beginner and cover all temperate regions, unless you live in the tundra or a desert you're good to go.

If you are interested in indoor growing, or semi-indoor growing, just say so and I can gather up a bunch of relevant links.
>>
>>1151858

I live in northern Germany on the coast of the Baltic Sea. I'd have to do the maths, but if possible I'd like to grow enough mushrooms to be self reliant in that sense. I got a regular 400m2 garden with access to another 800m2, possibly more. I could setup a grow house for mushrooms later on, but for the beginning I'd simply drop some logs in a corner and wait. It also depends on how much time I will have once spring comes, since there'll be a lot of work for me, so I'd like to keep it simple for the start.
>>
>>1151858
Plz hit us with the links.They should be added to the pasta if they are good.
>>
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I'm reading "Victory Gardens" right now and found pic related. "Japanazis" literally made me lol.

https://archive.org/stream/VictoryGardenLeadersHandbook#page/n17/mode/2up
>>
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>>1152028
referring to the aphids on my dill as japanazis from now on
>>
>>1152098

The whole book is full of war metaphors... it's about gardening ffs... /k/ would love this.
>>
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>>1152028
Search google like this:

Victory Gardens Leaders Handbook filetype:pdf

and you can download the pdf of it.
>>
>>1152104
That's where you are wrong kid. It's about winning
>>
>>1152028
>gotta spray a heavy load of DDT

DDT is illegal now
>>
>>1152207

Thanks Einstein, didn't know you could do that, let alone DL things on archive.org..

>>1152217
>>1152226

You should check the Gardeners Don'ts in the book
>>
>>1152344
I make it a point to never click on links posted to 4chan. That's just habit.
>>
>>1152390

It's archive.org. Nuff said.
>>
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>>1151909
Self reliant in what sense? Producing all of your protein, or making all of your income?

That's more than enough space for a large operation.

>>1151946
Here you go!
This covers outdoor woodchip bed growing of Stropharia rugoso-annulata (King Wine Caps, Garden Giants) and indoor growing of Oyster mushrooms on straw. It also includes basic concepts of cultivation and some terminology. Still a WIP.
https://pastebin.com/ddb6fAPS
>>
wondering if anyone has any guides for mixed vegetable patches? as in growing certain varieties of veg together to reduce nutrient depletion in the soil.
>>
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>>1152476
>Producing all of your protein
>mushrooms

did you think he was raising chickens or rabbits anon
>>
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>tfw eating a big meal of spaghetti and 95% of everything in it came from your own garden

That's a good feel. I finished up the first batch of tomato sauce today. 63% reduction ratio.
>>
>>1152616
>tfw jealous
I'm the guy who may have killed his cherry tomatoes. I just wanted to make ketchup and barbecue sauce.

HOWEVER!

It's been a day and a half now and some of the leaves seem to be perking up on every one of the six plants. So maybe they survived after all... they still look dead as hell overall though.
>>
>>1152623
Good luck with it.
>>
>>1152624
Thanks. I still have some frozen seeds so it's not the end of the world if they're dead, but it'll be very nice if they're not.

Did you need a lot of tomatoes to make your sauce? I didn't even think about this but now I want to do that too.
>>
>>1152626
Yes, 63% reduction means 100 tomatoes now take up the space of only 37 tomatoes or 100 jars of blended tomatoes would be 37 jars of sauce. That should give you an idea of what you may want to start with. I had 100 tomato plants this past season.
>>
>>1152632
>I had 100 tomato plants this past season.

jesus christ I need to buy property already so I can have space to not be a casual, I literally am just chilling with six of these things in pots under grow lights
>>
>>1152650
I started with a smaller number then cloned them as the year progressed.
>>
>tfw finally, after a few months, a few blueberry seeds out of literally hundreds I put on a wet paper towel have germinated

For fuck's sake, I nearly forgot about them.
>>
>>1152718
should have grown strawberries instead, I'm finding them easy (both via cloning & seeds, though seeds take forever)
>>
>>1152718
Did you stratify them first? Blueberries need ~3 months of cold to break dormancy. Might explain those abysmal germination rates if not
>>
>>1142595
I feel you bro, I always want as many carrots as I can get and forget to thin them properly. My general strategy with root vegetables is to thin way more than you're comfortable with. Good luck next season
>>
I'm making the Mrs some wooden planter boxes this weekend, any pro tips?
>>
>>1152844
Make them wood and make them rectangular. Not that complicated.
>>
>>1152616
Do you grow your own spaghetti, anon?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tVo_wkxH9dU
>>
>>1152844
Make it out of black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia), teak (Tectona grandis), ipe (Tabebuia spp), California redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) or bald cypress (Taxodium distichum). Those are the most rot resistant woods. After that western redcedar (Thuja plicata), Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and European larch (Larix decidua) are second best. I advise against using treated lumber regardless of what anyone says.

>>1152941
I don't grow wheat yet. I have some seeds though. I also need a proper grain mill. I only have a corn mill which is only good for getting things as fine as cornmeal. Great vid.
>>
>>1152960
>yet
Do you homestead? How do you have the space and time?

t. Dutchman so urban as far as the eyes can see

You might be interested in the background: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MEqp0x6ajGE
>>
>>1152961
>Do you homestead?

I farm for food. That's really about it. I own quite a bit of property, but only a tiny portion is used for farming.
>>
>noobs dunno bout fogponics and zeoponics
>>
>tfw want to buy property and build a giant bug-free greenhouse / warehouse semi-clean-room sort of thing and do hydroponics in it for literally all my non-animal-based food

fuck /farmer/, who here /madscientist/
>>
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>>1153154
I prefer to incorporate a more complete life cycle for the nutrient & carbon exchanges. Hence, my chickens are in that loop.

>tfw still haven't built a glass greenhouse yet
>>
>>1153023
So do you work a job outside farming? Or are you a full time farmer?
Did you inherit or buy the property? Why only a small part? Poultry?

Sorry if I'm asking too much questions, just a Dutchman who wants a plot of land but lives in the most urban part of Europe.
>>
I've just come into a decent amount of money and I'm thinking about starting a medical marijuana farm. Is this retarded? It feels like all I'd really need is property and a tiller+seed drill and a willingness to sift through red tape.
>>
>>1153355
I just farm and shitpost. More of the latter because farming is too easy. There's no need for a large farm if you are only a subsistence farmer, farm properly, and have a proper diet.

>>1153357
There are other better dedicated websites for this sort of discussion. People tend to get banned/posts deleted ITT for it.
>>
>>1153361
If you're just a subsistence farmer, how do you afford utilities, new seeds, etc?
What do you farm?
>>
>>1153361
It seems difficult to find info on it that doesn't come from retarded stoners who just want to grow weed illegally on their shelf. Noted, though! Won't bring it up here again
>>
>>1153365
The Dutchman here.
If you can read Dutch (or German), there's mad amounts of information on it here.
Hell, if you search for "growlights", "growth hormones" or "indoor plant growing systems" first page is on the w33ds.

Quick rundown: High humidity, lots of light and heat. Indoors is easily controlled.
have fun
>>
Hey /hgm/,
I'm growing mellers for the first time and my vine is shooting off in a few directions and sending vinelets off, Is this normal?
Should I prune them and keep a couple of dominant ones, or will this cost me many a meller? The vinelets are less than a foot, so I won't be cutting off huge chunks of the plant.
>>
Any tips for someone that wants to start a homestead?

Like a good check list on what to start?

My goal is a long way off but I’m currently working towards it, saving money for land and building my own house. I would like a check list to help

My goal is to find at least 3-10 acres here in deep east Texas if that helps any.
>>
>>1153589
Potatoes and Onions are easy as fuck to grow very plentiful.
Compost bin for non-edible scraps (citrus rinds, for example).
Get chickens and feed them edible scraps.
>>
>>1153363
I just farm everything I need to eat except for a few things since I also fish, hunt, and have snack cravings from time to time. I have bees, chickens, turkeys, ducks, lots of vegetables when the season is in, mostly greens like now in winter. I do my best to save seed from year to year. The collection keeps getting larger. Total farm expenses are under $100. That's including taxes and insurance.

Goats and greenhouses are on the list.

>>1153589
I wrote this up a few threads ago for another anon. See pic and keep researching.
>>
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Found this on the underside of my small ghost pepper, anyone have an idea what it could be?
>>
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>>1153664
It's very subtle, only noticed it after I was done repotting, when I viewed it under the bright lights.
>>
>>1153664

plant aids, some viral cancer probably. google latin plant name plus disease
>>
>>1153671
Some googling tells me it's probably just from overwatering.
>>
>>1153664
Too much water most likely.
>>
>>1153664
Oedema from sudden overwatering, not an issue at all
>>
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>>1142523

anyone can recommend a good phmeter for outdoor?

https://www.amazon.it/digitale-dellumidit%C3%A0-SUNNIOR-Horticultural-millimetri/dp/B06XDC26PH/ref=sr_1_2?s=garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1507490004&sr=1-2&keywords=phmetro+terreno


on amazon i found this one but honestly i don't know if i can trust chinese tools, what do you use?
>>
>>1153866
I take soil samples and chemical based testing kit
>>
>>1153589

Are you going to buy your animal feed or try to be 100% self sufficient?

If you want foraging animals you'll need pure breeds that have better instinct for finding food, for raising young, and biologically better to survive outside.
>>
>>1153866
>>1153868
I also only use chemical test kits. I take multiple samples from the same area to get a better reading since it can change wildly if the soil isn't very homogeneous. For electronics devices, I'd do extensive review reading.
>>
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>>1153779
>>1153682
So it seems, thanks all! Glad it's nothing, since this one is going to be gifted away.

Imma plant some beppers tomorrow, the soil is pre-heating, and I'm gonna soak them in weak camomille tea tonight. Now I only have to choose which ones, I got like 30 variaties now, as opposed to the 6 I started out with this year.
>>
>>1153954
>and I'm gonna soak them in weak camomille tea tonight.
You're going to do what?
>>
>>1153963
For anti-fungal properties to prevent damping-off.
>>
I had some bad growing tobacco plants and wondered why since some other tobacco plants grew well with virtually the very same conditions. The difference was the bad growing plants have been quite near an active long-distance WiFi Antenna. Well I was literally microwaving my plants there so, no suprise it grew badly.

Now I could say, don't use WiFi near your plants if you want them to grow well, but after some tests I noticed some interessting points.

While most plants just grew badly and did seem to advance from seedling, became yellow and died, two basically grew double speed and flowered early (compared to non-WiFi plants). Those produced a lot of seeds and died right after that. No usable leaves (but I indented to have seeds in the first place so it was okay in a sense)

I feel like those seeds might produce tobacco plants that could handle WiFi better.

Basically I'm not saying "stop using WiFi" but if something doesn't grow well and you wonder why it might be a check whenever there is WiFi nearby. I feel like testing a bit more and see what happens.
>>
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>>1142523
Hey usually I frequent /diy/ but I thought I would ask here. I'm going to be setting up a small aquaponics system, like 40-50 plants, with some eightfoot gutters and a large pond pump I got for free. Something like in this picture but with the gutters being above one another and attaching grow light LED strip underneath. I've run a setup before but it was much smaller.

Does anyone have experience using LED strips ordered off Ali-express/Amazon? Do they get hot enough you need to put fans on them? Are they enough light to actually grow plants? Any brands someone would recommended?
>>
>>1153978
It is only an antenna or is there some electronics with it near the plants?
>>
>>1153986
There've been a few anons with those types of LEDs to post in the past, no clue if they are still around. I use 4 feet long LED shop lights. The kind with 2 rows of LEDs. I keep them about 2 inches from the leaves.
>>
>>1153978

The effects of microwave/radio on plant and even animal growth have been a topic of controversy for some time. One Swiss (I think) study was prohibited from publication by the microwave industry since it supposedly showed that they would affect the food quality negatively, another researchers team let plants and fish eggs grow in a high voltage field with no current flowing. They claimed that the result were forms of these fern and salmon that existed "millions of years ago", meaning archaic forms of giant fern and salmon, independent on how they actually existed.

The author Luc Bürgin has presented this already in 1988, I haven't done enough research yet to say whether you can substantiate his claims or not, but I haven't found anything to disprove him either.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gPOFyYvjWU8
>>
>>1153992
it's integrated, basically an antenna with electronics on it's back. you could also say a wifi-router with a big antenna.
>>
>>1153996
Then the problem may be the heat the unit is giving off or drying out the soil faster..
>>
>>1153995
Interessting. I keep that in mind while testing.

>>1153998
WiFi router, even long distance don't produce any noteable heat however, 2,4 Ghz WiFi is exactly what microvave oven use to heat up water (Power out put is very different).

I guess WiFi is hitting the plant and affects the water in it's veins, maybe heating it or something else. The earth itself didn't seem to dry faster compared to the non-wifi batch.
>>
>>1154009
Those plants mus be damn close to it then.
>>
>>1154009

The whole thing is pretty much wrapped in controversy, with studies being banned from publication (big no-no in science, obviously) instead of just being countered by scientific research. If I had to bet money, I'd say there's something wrong here and the industry is trying to hide it in order to save their profits. "B-but people wouldn't do that, you conspiracy nut!" Listen...

The US told GIs to walk into a mushroom cloud of a nuclear bomb, claiming it was perfectly safe and that radiation could only enter the body through wounds.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NM1-t8FJjg

The US military used fog in Manhattan to test bio weapon dummies on the unsuspecting public. They later caught a lot of flak for that, but it was done either way.

MK Ultra is probably the most famous case where gov agencies have abused thousands of people for illegal experiments.

Doctors used to advertise smoking, saying it was good for your lung.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yt77M4D0PiM

People used to give no shit about asbestos, contergan (what is stereoisomerism again?), DDT, uranium mining, lead in toys and paint, radium paint, x-ray machines and many other things that we today regulate or outright ban, since they're absolutely toxic and a danger to human health and life. All examples given are total fact, not vague "conspiracy theories". That IS the world we factually are living in.

It is very reasonable to assume that we are wrong with things today and that in another 20-50 years things like radio, wifi, etc. will be researched well enough to show long term effects to human health.
>>
>>1154013
right. the affected area was clearly up to 1.5m (60") (and 2m/80" maybe) distance from atenna.
>>
>>1154022
That may as well be in the next room then. The Inverse-square law pretty much robs most of the energy from the signal in an extremely short distance. They'd need to be about 0.3m or less to it to really know the antennae were affecting them or not.

>>1154020
There's been a few threads in /sci/ about all of it. No need to go further off thread topic. Try over >>>/sci/ heavier directed discussion.
>>
>>1154020
well, I don't intend to put up any high voltage devices near the plants anytime soon. However I might play with different radio freqencies to see how it turns out. Problem is, I would literally set up a radio jamming device in doing so. I probably would have build and faraday cage to not get in conflict with laws regarding that.
>>
>>1154030
>The Inverse-square law...

My Plants don't seem to agree with your hypothesis. If anything, think of thin veins, very little water in that and higher chance of getting affected even by low power microwaves as in joules per square inch. Anyway... it just a hypothesis of mine. Not about the why, I can clearly see an plants are influenced being next to wifi.
>>
>>1153954
Why are you planting new peppers in December already?
>>
>>1153606
>Getting a background check on your neighbors

Americans top kek
>>
>>1154092
That's just part of proper parenting really.
>>
>>1153986
That's a super cute setup. Once it fills in a bit, it would make a great ornamental installation in addition to production.
>>
>>1154107
>mismatched tape
>ornamental
Ew.
>>
On Monday I'm going to be transplanting some large kale plants that would go to waste otherwise from a local college garden to my personal garden. I haven't really worked with kale before (I'm not a hippy) but there's dino kale and curly kale, and they're both quite a bit larger than you'd expect for transplanting. Any tips? What's a good rule of thumb for estimating how much root they'll have and how much of the soil should come with?
>>
>>1154114
You'd most likely be safe take a plug of rootball just small enough to fit into a 5-gallon bucket.
>>
>>1154109
Well, that bit could use some touching up. But overall it looks artsy.
>>
>>1153606
Thank you!
>>
>>1151282
Fruit flies are fucking my setup. I've had white oysters and shiitake mushroom in drawers with about a foot of sanitized wood dust. Despite it being a several of months neither have fruited. Pretty sure half the inoculation failed for some reason so I had to redo those ones. Seen growth in the other half but still no fruiting.

I need a cheap way to sanitize mushroom food supply and maintain quarantine conditions.

I am also wondering if should stick with drawers or switch to a bucket and bag system. If so what kind of bags should I use and the best way to keep a good air supply going without breaking quarantine in the buckets?

Probably won't do trays because I neither have space or ability to keep it sanitary. I can't even do drawers right.

Sanitation and space requirements are driving me up a wall.

In other words, I suck at mushroom growing.

>>1151858
I would do outdoor mushroom growing but I live in a desert.
>>
>>1153986
I hope your lighting is better than in that picture. Those plants look horrible
>>
>>1153978

>Well I was literally microwaving my plants there so, no suprise it grew badly.

You are also microwaving yourself. Are you feeling poorly?
>>
>>1151676
New here but imo could be a seed issue.
>>
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Pom pom anon here.
I've made a humidity tent out of a garbage bag and 3 coathangers a good while ago and it helped a lot with the growth, but it wasn't until 2 days ago when the culture exploded. The biggest patch is do large it's sagging under it's own weight, and I only now realize the tent is going to be far too small. The only thing I am unsure about is the fifth of tge mushrooms - looking at pictures online, Lion's Mane usually is very thick and round with a short stem and little brushes, like a bush. Mine however is turning out a bit different; the mushrooms have long and uniformly thin stems that open into leaves, like a tiny tree. Do I just have a different strand or do they eventually get thicker?
>>
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>>1154276
>Fruit flies

Different anon here. Make a fruit fly/gnat trap like this. Just make the paper funnel longer so that it is about 1cm above the water mixture. Use either of these for bait,

beer
wine
vinegar
water + a little sugar + a little bread yeast

Don't use fruit. Only use liquids. Clean it once every 3 days. If there are a bunch of flies in it that are not drown, take it outside and let them out.

>several of months

How moist are you keeping it? If you see growth then it is doing its thing. It has to fully colonize the medium before fruiting. Depending on how much mass you have for the medium will determine how long that can take. It may take a year for a nice big batch to fully colonize everything and fruit. So long as there's no mold, I wouldn't worry too much about it really. Just prevent it from drying out. When they fruit, they will need a bit of ambient light.

>>1154325
That's really nice. Make a larger tent. Different environmental stresses cause different growing reaction. Keep posting updates.
>>
How do I go about soil management in a geoponic setting?
-how do I tell if the soil needs changing? Do I have to watch out for more than nutrients?
-is adding more fertilizer as needed enough or should I replace the soil completely every so often?
-how do I tell if drainage is adequate?
-any tools I should consider as a beginner or can I just look at how the plant is growing and adjust based on that?
>>
>>1154368
>how do I tell if the soil needs changing?

In potted plants, they become rootbound and can't create more root space. For those, you can root prune and repot them in new soil in the same pot or simply repot them in a larger pot. For open ground farming you don't need to replace the soil. In all geoponics you should be doing your best to keep the soil and reuse it as many times as possible. One of the major concerns is losing the soil.

>Do I have to watch out for more than nutrients?

pH level, drainage, organic content.

>-is adding more fertilizer as needed enough or should I replace the soil completely every so often?

You always need to add more nutrients. The form you add them can be very different. For instance, I only use compost to fertilize my crops. I add a layer of it and/or mix it into the soil. Replacing isn't an option.

>how do I tell if drainage is adequate?

If it is pooling up water it can't drain well enough. If it is dry soon after watering, a few inches under the surface then it doesn't have enough organic material to help it hold the water.

>tools

It really depends on your methods as to what tools you'll be using. If you are container gardening, you may only need a wheelbarrow, shovel, trowel, gloves, and pots. If you do composting, you may need a compost bin if you don't do open ground composting. A pitch fork is nice when working with uncomposted compost piles. If you work regular ground, you might like using a tiller if you use a tilling method. A field of potatoes is certainly easier to dig up with a big plow blade than by hand.

As far as the plants themselves. Normally a nice, trellis, tomato clips, string, and bucket/bags for harvesting is all you need. If you have fruit trees, you'll need pruning gear, ladder, and an extendable fruit picking basket.
>>
>>1142523
Today I learned how to clean a grouse. One hit my house and snapped its neck. Waste not, want not, right? I've fished but never done any hunting before.

Things I learned:

It's really not that hard. Especially if you've ever cleaned a fish.

Clip the wings, feet, and cut the head off. Then gut it.

Skinning the bird is a really easy way to get rid of all the feathers. The leg feathers come off like socks.

Have a garbage sack right next to where you are cleaning for quick disposal.

Keep your eyes open for any signs of disease.

You can clean a bird even if you are allergic to feathers. Skinning keeps most of the feathers firmly attached to the skin.

Wear surgical gloves, wash countertops and cutting boards afterwards with bleach.
--------

The grouse ended up being 13 1/2 oz all finished. Currently waiting for it to come out of the oven.
>>
>>1154276
They are not fruit flies. The flies associated with fungus are "fungus gnats" and divided into a few groups. Either way, their larvae burrow into both mycelium and fruitbodies, disrupting formation of mushrooms and encouraging mold. Unfortunately, the only real option is to toss the blocks in the fridge, while you air the area out enough to remove adult flies. You might have to freeze the blocks solid. Most people end up having such severe gnat issues that they fumigate the fruiting area, but ultimately, they are a seasonal issue that is extremely hard to overcome.
I would have to guess the larvae vectored bacteria into your blocks, which is why they stalled out.

The easiest semi-sterile fruiting chambers I've seen are the little closet-sized zip-up greenhouses. I think you can get them for ~100$ and you won't have to upgrade unless you move to a larger scale. Hook up a cheap ultrasonic humidifier, and an axial fan from a computer, and you have an actual fruiting chamber.

When you say "mushroom food" are you referring to the grain spawn used to inoculate, or the bulk substrate that you are inoculating (the sawdust)? Both have different optimal strategies.

How much of a desert do you live in? Region?

>>1154325
Let me guess, you've been spraying the fruits directly?

This is certainly abnormal fruiting development, most likely as a result of being sprayed directly (the drops cling to new spikelets and cause weird shapes), a lack of FAE (Lions mane has a really annoying requirement, lots of FAE, and high humidity, which can be hard to achieve without investing in a humidifier. They don't tend to thrive in ad-hoc FC's.
>>
>>1154511
Oh, and because they aren't fruit flies, this anons trap >>1154342 won't work.
>>
>>1154512
They are still attracted to the trap due to the vinegar produced in all those baits. They are opportunists.
>>
>>1154501
Sounds nice. I've had a few that hit the side of my vehicle while on the backroads.
>>
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The saga continues. Almost 5 months earlier as the previous round, so I hope that + my experience (this was my first attempt at growing anything) will improve my results.
>>
>>1154541
Not to rain into your parade dude, but you are incredibly early with them, so the end result might be the very opposite of improved results. (Just MIGHT though)

Also grow well little peppers!
>>
>>1151501
>>1151515

Update on the cherry tomato situation: I've had them under a grow light for a few days and have been watering them daily. They have all perked up to varying degrees. All six seem to be alive and the biggest one actually seems to be making a flower already (wtf? thought it would be focusing 100% on reviving)

tl;dr I was wrong, you were right. Thanks for the advice!!
>>
For those with pests and happen to have some artificial sweetener lying around:
http://drexel.edu/now/archive/2017/May/Sweetener-Kills-Young-Flies-Fast/
>>
>>1154511
Fortunately, I know for a fact they're fruit flies because they also bothered my plants long before I started mushrooms and are the same type. They have taken a much bigger liking to my mushrooms due to how moist they are compared to my plants' pots. Despite them being a bunch of tropicals.

Bulk substrate since I have quite a bit of it and I live in the Southwest USA.

Details on airing out the area to get rid of them?

I have been trying to freeze them out given how cold the nights get in the desert and dry them out but so far little luck. Guess I can try the fridge and hope that works.

>>1154342
It's colonized the growing medium but for some reason, it's refusing to fruit. Not sure why its stalling so badly.
>>
>>1154610
Fruit flies aren't attracted to potted plants, either. They are probably Phorid gnats. Without using a scope, you probably won't be able to accurately identify them either way.
Remove their source of food (close off the bags, cover potted plants with plastic, etc) and shoo away those that are there. Give it a few days and they should bug off.

There are a few different routes you can take with bulk substrate. For small amounts, a pressure cooker with supplemented substrate is a good option, for large amounts, you can scale up to a steamer setup using a propane burner and a modified 55-gallon drum.
>>
>>1154561
>>1154541
If there's enough LIGHT then they should do well.

>>1154572
Remove all flowers until the plants are over 12 inches high. Force them to grow instead of fruit or it will stunt their early growth. Also, make sure they have enough LIGHT or they will be thin, weak, and really really tall when they should be short, strong, and thick.

>>1154610
fungus gnats eat fungi in soils of house plants. They are usually not a problem, but can become a problem for the plants. Just use plastic wrap or aluminum foil and wrap up the pots and soil to the stem of the plant if you can to help avoid future problems for a while.

The fungi is probably stalling because it isn't ready. There are many triggers. Light, temperature, humidity, and biomass proliferation. I wouldn't worry too much about it if it is properly moist and doesn't have mold. Shiitake can take a while. Mine took a full year. You can also look up how to dunk them in water then drain to get them to fruit if they've the growing medium is completely white with mycelium but not fruiting yet.
>>
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>>1154625
>If there's enough LIGHT then they should do well.
>>1154561
Light is no problem any more, I got a lot of stuff the past season, learning & buying on the go.
And some will be planted later too.
>>
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>>1153993
I'll post pictures of my first two attempts while I wait to see if anyone knows more about artificial lighting. I'm going to try LED strips because I hear they are far more power efficient than traditional grow lighting.

These were some aquaponically grown tomato plants from two years ago, I don't have pictures of my more recent rig but just image something like the second stage with larger growbed and better lighting.
>>
>>1154679
A flat-white panel of cardboard or luan board would be good for the setup in that image. It would help reflect lots of light back to the plants. Even a Mylar emergency blank would be better. You'd get like 75-90% more light.
>>
>>1154325
This time I left off the tent for the entire afternoon (I'd like to say I did it for the sake of an experiment but I just forgot to put it back on after watering), and I noticed even after this short time the tips of the longest growths had already turned brown and slightly shriveled. Which makes me think that perhaps my mushroom is growing this thin as to maximize the surface-to-volume ratio to optimize growth, kind of like how a tree will grow tall or wide depending on its surroundings.
For now I have the culture a healthy dose of water and put the tent back on, hopefully by tomorrow the tips will look healthy again.

By the way, ive been meaning to ask when and how I should harvest. Is the fruit going to get much bigger or is it a good idea to pick the biggest ones by now? And should I use a knife or pluck by hand? I've seen people suggesting either one and disapproving of the other, either because it could contaminate the culture of because it risks tearing off healthy fungi that could still grow.
>>
>>1154511
Oh, I have been spraying it directly. I didn't know you weren't supposed to do that. I did at one point use a tea boiler to increase humidity, but another anon suggested its not necessary and just spraying water would be enough.
Is it still salvageable?
>>
>>1154693
Is it dropping spores yet? Fungi fruiting is like eggplants. You can eat them at any time or size, but some people want to eat them when they are at their largest. You should see me sweat when I have giant puffballs in my yard and I'm trying to decide when to pick them before they change and go bad.
>>
>>1154619
>>1154625
Yeah alright I'll plastic wrap everything and set out some traps.

Damn flies were the only hiccup I encountered. I'll see about adding a fruiting substrate on top to see if that will encourage them to start fruiting properly. Got like half the materials to make it just gotta get the other half.
>>
Do rambling roses need a trellis to grow up a wall or can they manage on their own if the wall material has enough grip?
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>>1154739
A trellis or fence will help if there's a storm.
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>>1154754
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks.
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>>1154695
No harm in continuing to try. I think the combo of top-fruiting instead of side-fruiting and direct misting probably resulted in these deformities.
Try spraying the area around the block, instead of directly. Lions mane is definitely picky when it comes to humidity and air exchange.
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tfw no gourd tunnel
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I need an actual guide on grafting.
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Last winter I came by to ask about mushroom logs. I got my logs cut and plugged before the spring.

Winter started pretty early and there has been a couple weeks below freezing. I used that to start to winter dormancy. Then I brought them inside for a few days to simulate spring thaw. After that I put them back out in almost freezing stream for the cold flush.

Two days later I have little shiitake budding out in less than 8 months.

Thanks /out/
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>>1154924
That's awesome to hear.

>>1154923
"Grafting & Budding" book in the "400__PDF_BOOKS_ON_GARDENING" torrent.
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>>1154989
Libgen's got it, too. Thanks for the recommendation.
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>>1154625
>Remove all flowers until the plants are over 12 inches high. Force them to grow instead of fruit or it will stunt their early growth. Also, make sure they have enough LIGHT or they will be thin, weak, and really really tall when they should be short, strong, and thick.

No worries there, the one with flowers on it is the biggest one which is already a little over 12 inches tall.

Light situation seems ok. I'm using some pretty awesome 300w grow lights.I should probably figure out a way to get them more natural light though. They're next to a south-facing window but I've started closing the blinds because I'm worried my grow lights are going to blind some idiot driving down the street.
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>>1155059
Your lights are not going to be a problem for motorists. They face the headlights of oncoming traffic all the time. I'm sure your lights are nothing like that in the manner they are being used.
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Anyone else raise turkeys? I have a few, but I'm waiting for them to finish laying eggs before butchering them. Next spring I want to get a flock of Bourbon Red turkeys. Evidently, there's only like 5,000 or so in the USA. They are the tastiest turkey breed, but one of the slowest growing turkey breeds, so unlike the Broad Breasted White I have (pic), farmers don't tend to raise them. They don't make as quick a profit.
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>>1155184
>only like 5,000 or so in the USA

Oh yeah, for those of you who want to help grow or raise endangered cultivars and breeds, there's a list that the Ark of Taste maintains,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ark_of_Taste
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What's the best way to germinate pepper seeds? I've had mine in potting soil for about a week and still no signs of sprouting.
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>>1155197
You could put them in a glass of water or wet paper towel for a day before planting. You need to make sure the soil is warm enough for peppers.
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>>1155197
The best way to germinate most seeds is to place them in a wet paper towel in a warm spot near a vent or radiator, check it daily for wetness, when it is completely dry after a few days open it up, if the seeds show no signs of sprouting, repeat. I learned this from a weed website but found it works good for most other seeds
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>>1155197
A week is no problem. They take a while like that. The fastest method is to soak them over night in some water. Put them into a ziploc bag with a damp, but not dripping wet cloth/paper towel. Puff up the bag with some air and change the air every day. Place a good strong light over the seeds. It should be nice and warm for them, but not over say 105F/40C. They should take about 3-5 days in the bag. Wait as long as two weeks though.
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>>1154688
Thanks but my new place doesn't have a great south facing window like this one. I did get some seriously nice tomatoes off these plants though. They grew over 6ft tall before end of life.
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>>1155219
If any window exists, use a reflective panel with it.
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I started a thread for this >>1155297, but someone referred me here, so I'll just try to get this answered here.

Which plants (fruits, vegetable, grain, roots, whatever) produce the most food for their mass? I can only think of one plant that produces truly ridiculous amounts of food and that's tomatoes. Are there any other plants that over-abundantly produce food like this?
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>>1155389
Any plant where you can eat the entire plant is the answer here. Thus, salad greens and pot herbs would work the best since you can eat all of them. Though, stuff like beets where you can eat the tops and the tubers are more 100% edible, resulting in 100% yield.

Otherwise, fruit trees are probably the best yielding for weight. Like apple trees for instance. For vegetable crops, maybe potatoes and sweet potatoes, but not all varieties. FYI, sweet potato greens can also be eaten. Tomatoes are pretty good.
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>>1155390
Alright, that's an okay answer for summer, but a terrible answer for survivalism. My question was more addressed at more useful foods that can be stored. I guess I didn't think to specify that. Tomatoes can be dried or made into sauces, etc. Greens are basically a growing season luxury.

>100% edible, resulting in 100% yield.
This is also not really my concern, although I probably didn't make that clear. True, beets would be more edible than tomatoes, but the same mass of tomato plant will produce MUCH more food total than beets will and take up less space.

Alright, to clarify, I'm looking for plants like tomatoes that fulfill these characteristics:

- Don't take up much space, so the yield is not necessarily tied to how much space the plant itself takes up
- Produce food in abundance and continuously from the same plant mass - preferably year round if, for example, kept in a greenhouse, as tomatoes would - although I guess if you're using a greenhouse, greens would be perfect too
- The produce can be stored

Potatoes and Sweet Potatoes are the only other plant that seems to fit this but not to anywhere near the same degree as tomatoes.

Yes, pomes are generally good and I'd considered them. Apple and Pear "towers" always seemed like a good investment to me.
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>>1155390
>sweet potato greens can also be eaten
not every cultivar
iirc some more decorative or exotic cultivars have poisonous greens
the standard cultivars, those you can buy at the standard veggie garden seed shop, usually aren't, but rather safe then sorry
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>>1155399
All the common Solanaceae family plants do well then. Peppers, tomatoes, indeterminate potatoes, tomatillos, eggplant etc. All can be grown year round as a perennial of you have them in a greenhouse or good climate.

Indeterminate potatoes are the cultivars you want to use for continuous growing inside those potato grow towers. The determinate potato cultivars simply don't work in those, but their season is much shorter at least. Okra is a good one for continual producing. Some greens like kale or purple broccoli can be picked off of for a very long time.
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>>1155411
It isn't a problem. It is the Yams (Dioscorea g.) that are poisonous that people call "sweet potatoes" in a mixup. I'm referring specifically to Ipomoea batatas.
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>>1155413
>Peppers
Peppers don't really produce that much.

>>1155416
I'd like to see some proof of this. Most Ipomoea species have toxic leaves.
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>>1155427
>Peppers don't really produce that much.

You're kidding right?

>Most Ipomoea species have toxic leaves.

Aren't we talking about garden varieties? They are a potherb and tuber.
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>mfw getting home to find that someone threw out all the year's garlic, into the compost pile and put compost activator on everything, because they through they were "dried out onions"

Thank fuck I already planted enough for next year, but now we need to buy BUY garlic for regular eating until next harvest.
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>>1155432
>You're kidding right?
Have you ever raised peppers? Now compare that to ONE tomato plant. I once made the mistake of planting 12 tomato plants and almost fucking drowned.
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>>1155461
I once planted garlic and it would only fucking grow in winter then die off when it got too cold. It did this for years. I have no idea what the hell that was about.
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>>1155481
I have peppers almost every year. Sometimes I skip a year since I still have so many peppers left. They flower and fruit constantly. Like tomatoes, it does depend on what cultivars you grow.
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>>1155482
Cover it with straw for overwintering in super cold areas.
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>>1155492
Peppers don't produce anywhere near the rate of tomatoes. They're not even in the same universe.
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>>1155493
I still don't grasp why it would only grow in winter. It was in a box, but I've grown it in the ground before and it grew normally.
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>>1155498
I'm not sure what you mean, I plant my garlic in the fall and winter every year. That's the normal time to plant it. It grows all winter to some extent then goes nuts in spring.
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>>1155499
NO. You don't understand. It WOULD NOT GROW during Spring or Summer. It would ONLY start popping up in late Autumn, then die back when it got too cold, so it never accomplished anything.
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>>1155500
When are you planting it?
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>>1155501
What difference does it make? I had it for multiple years. I thought maybe I fucked up the first year, but the third?
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>>1155496
I had the same number of pepper plants as tomatoes and ate all the tomatoes as they ripened. If I ate all the peppers my asshole would have been blown out like an aging pornstar
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>>1155502
It matters, because they need to be vernalized. What cultivar of garlic is it? Also, how cold is it getting now? Last year I didn't cover the garlic. This year I'm covering it since it will be a colder winter.
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>>1155461
>because they through they were "dried out onions"
How retarded are they? You made it clear they will be paying for all the garlic this year, right?

Who was it anyway, tard sibling?
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>>1155504
You're full of shit. Peppers don't produce like tomatoes.
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>>1155524
It really depends on the cultivar, anon.
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>>1155521
No one I'd admit being related to.
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>>1155504
lol I know that feeling pretty well actually.
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Thread is full and falling off the board.

NEW THREAD: >>1155539
NEW THREAD: >>1155539
NEW THREAD: >>1155539
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>>1154853
woah! Thats really cool and doesn't seem that hard to make either. I might have to make a gourd tunnel this spring. After I make some permanent raised beds for strawberries.
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>>1155524
No you are full of shit and obviously racist against tomatoes
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>>1145350
Get a humidifier. They're $20, or get a usb/personal humidifier for $5.
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>>1155549
Literally everyone who has ever grown tomatoes has too many tomatoes. Peppers don't produce like tomatoes, despite what you want to believe. The fruits don't even develop as fast and they're smaller plants. What you're claiming is physically impossible.
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>>1155389

Mass isn't the thing, you want nutrient density. 1kg of salad aren't nowhere near equal to 1kg of nuts or roots. So the question becomes, what food do you want to grow, what do you want to buy for storage? Grains can usually be bought cheaply in bulk, so growing rice or wheat is kinda a waste of space and capacity, since you can buy them cheaply.

The next question is what climate do you live in, how's the soil, the water, surroundings, lighting, etc. That has an impact on what you can reliably grow in larger amounts with good yields. You want to avoid mono-cultures though, since they provide absolute benefit to pests with barely any protection from them. Mix your plants in hexagons so they have neighbors that match them and build symbioses.

Roots: potatoes, carrots, beets, all kinds of turnips, allium plants such as onions, leek and garlic (-> fiber, starch, vitamins, protein)

Vegetables: cucumber, pumpkins, broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, tomatoes
Leafy greens: salads, spinach, cabbage (-> fiber, vitamins)

Legumes: beans, lentils, peas and nuts (-> protein, fat)

Berries: strawberries, blackberries, currant, gooseberry, etc. (-> vitamins)
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>>1155608
You're just naming everything though. You're not narrowing anything down. And nut trees are a terrible investment because they don't produce very much. They're great as a component of forests; not so much for agriculture. That's why I'm concerned with which seed and root plants, for example, can produce the most mass from the same space, because those can generally be stored. Nutrient density is something you worry about when you have the luxury too. If you eat enough biomass, you'll generally get what you need.
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>>1155708
>That's why I'm concerned with which seed and root plants, for example, can produce the most mass from the same space, because those can generally be stored. Nutrient density is something you worry about when you have the luxury too. If you eat enough biomass, you'll generally get what you need.

You haven't understood nutrition then, which also explains why you fail to pick your best choices from the list for the ground, water & light situation you have.

There's a basal metabolic rate depending on your weight that the body needs to stay alive, so it burns about 1500-2000kcal every day without you doing anything. Any activity you do adds to that. Historically, many people used to combat hunger by sleeping a lot, since it saves energy. In an emergency, you could hide and spend a fuckton of time sleeping, eating as little as 1000kcal a day to stay alive.

If you eat more than you burn, it'll likely be converted into adipose tissue (fat). If you eat less than you burn, the body will first burn sugars in the body, then fat, then proteins. Burning fat is okay. Burning proteins is dangerous, since they come in the form of enzymes your body needs to function. It's literally eating itself at that point and your muscles start to shrink as well.

In order to prevent that, you need to cover your nutrients. There's macro and micro nutrients. Macro nutrients are proteins, carbohydrates and lipids aka fatty acids. Proteins consist of amino acids, the building blocks of life and fall into two categories for us humans: essential and non-essential amino acids, the former can't be synthesized by our body, the latter can. Carbs come in the form of sugars, starch and fiber, with only the first two having nutritional value, but fiber being necessary to easy digestion and avoid colon cancer. Fats are glycerin with three fatty acids bound to it, making up different fats. There's saturated and unsaturated fats, as well as trans fats. /pol/ is right, trans fats are bad.
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>>1155920
>You haven't understood nutrition then
Don't give me that bullshit. I guarantee I understand it better than you do. I'm talking about creating enough biomass to fill stomachs. I'm not worried about getting enough micronutrients because that's a secondary concern. It's the difference between starving to death and not starving, but nitpicking because you're lacking cobalt.

>There's a basal metabolic rate depending on your weight that the body needs to stay alive, so it burns about 1500-2000kcal every day without
You're resorting to CALORIES to prove me wrong?? That's the weakest argument you could have made! You can get calories from nothing but corn starch, but you could easily die from malnutrition. Calories are interchangeable - that tells you nothing about what macronutrients or micronutrients you're getting.

You need to do more research. And you're still not being helpful.
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>>1155920

Depending on the source, fats can be good or bad, generally all plant fats are a lot less risky than animal fat sources, so I'd avoid those completely.

Lastly, there's a whole array of vitamins, minerals and other trace elements that can number up to 70 if you include them all. Generally, nutritionists just pick a couple dozen of them and are done.

So what's the optimal solution? Depends where you live, what climate, ground, water, light, etc. Without that there's hardly any answer I can give you specifically.

As for storage, go with rice and legumes (beans, lentils, chickpeas, etc.) as this gives you all essential amino acids plus carbs. Add some oil to it and you have an allround meal for very little money with no fast-food health draw backs (fuck ramen & spam).

Potatoes are great to grow, especially if you pull off potato towers. Up to 50kg of potatoes in 1m2 is possible, remember that the ground has to be very fluffy so the roots can grow easily and make sure to prevent any rot.

Pumpkins can be grown over less light needing plants such as salads, so you can double the spaces output by building a frame, having pumpkins and cucumbers growing overhead the salad plants.

Onions and leek can be grown in masses as well, with the latter being able to produce much more "white section" when you wrap them in some dark cover so it think those 30cm or whatever are ground. That gives you kilos and kilos of leek or onion in just about 1-2m2.

Potatoes, onions and flaxseeds with oil make another great meal that will keep you fed for cheap.

Any kind of root plant such as beets, turnips, carrots feature a lot of mass, make sure they don't get eaten by insects or rot. Some turnips can turn out very large and will keep you fed for a long time. Some of these plants like company, others want to be alone.

>Don't give me that bullshit. I guarantee I understand it better than you do.

If you had any grasp on the topic you already would have figured out a solution.
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>>1155928

Are you retarded? I just took the time for you and you especially to explain why your retarded complaint is retarded and what you need to consider when planning to grow self reliant amounts and types of food - and you don't even have the patience to wait a minute before you complain.

If you only grow one type of food because of "muh mass" you can end up like those fucks in Asia who only ate rice and got sick, because turns out one sided nutrition sucks ass, be it rice, rabbit or any other food for that matter.

Variety is a must and if you plan on staying alive, you need to have everything. You can't afford the luxury of cutting out nutrients because "I don't need them herp derp" - you fucking do and if you don't get them for a long period of time your organs are not gonna thank you. Get sick in an emergency and you're fucked, so keep your health at the highest level possible.

Especially since it's so fucking easy for people today to store and plan accordingly. Your arrogance in wanting to overlook this on purpose just shows how stupid you are. You should get back to the books and research more, since you show no understanding of medicine or agriculture for that matter.

You idiot didn't even finish reading my post before going full retard on it. I hoped this board was populated with more reflected individuals, guess I was wrong.
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>>1155932
You did this long-winded monologue for your own edification. Don't even pretend. You didn't even come close to answering my question. You gibbered on about what YOU wanted to be heard.
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>>1155936

Yes I did answer your question, had it not been so fucking retarded in the first place with no info given as to where you are located or what foods you have stored and don't need to grow, I could have saved me the time to go into that. But it's obvious you have not made these considerations or don't feel the need to share these information with us here so we can help you out. You are more interested in shitting this board up with your faggotry and calling those giving you information names. Whatever dude, just starve please.

If it doesn't get into your head why you need to know what you need to eat and what your environment provides in terms of ground, water, light, climate, etc. and what plant provides which nutrients before you plan what to grow, then no one can fucking help you.
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>>1155942
No you didn't. You just listed every vegetable plant you could think of. Now go away, you fucking narcissist.
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>>1155943

Did you read what I wrote?

1. you didn't tell us where you are located, plants need certain temperature, water levels and ground types, without knowing what you can provide to the plants in these regards we can only speculate
2. we don't know what foods you have in storage (my guess is nothing at all and I don't even want to help you change this anymore, just fucking die already)
3. we can't make a good plan for you where to grow what in what amounts, since we have no access to any schematic showing your available land, ground types, pH levels, possible issues with industry or wind, etc.

You give nothing but a stupid over generalized question and expect valid answers. You have never seen a university from inside and if you have shame on your countries academia to allow fuckwits like you to occupy a spot someone else could have used.

I gave you fucking options since there is no blanket answer and went more into detail with every post after that, but you refuse to read and comprehend, instead bitching like the little wimp you are.
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>>1155943

Also failing at psychology by the way, a narcissist would not be out to help you with your shit, as he doesn't care for others except what he can gain from it. If you seriously think there's something to gain from this board besides information (which you so profoundly refuse), then I don't know what life you live in. Just because someone get's fucking pissed at you talking shit to them when they are trying to help you doesn't make that person a narcissist.

I've had it with you, I'm literally /out/ because I got shit to do and don't see a reason to help you any further.




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