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Old thread: >>1142523

Search terms:

Permaculture - Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Rooftop Gardening - Vertical Gardening - Subsistence Agriculture - Square Foot Gardening - Shifting Cultivation - Polyculture - Composting - Ley Farming - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Co-operative Farming - Orchard - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish

Resources:

General: https://pastebin.com/4CqXsHFm
Fungi: https://pastebin.com/ddb6fAPS

Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2005/may05/SecVeget.html

Scans of Classic Herbal Texts:
http://www.henriettes-herb.com/eclectic/index.html

Homegrowmen Archive (WinRAR/WinZip/7Zip etc open rar archive files):

>76.1MB
>Homegrowmen Threads Mar-20-2013 to Sep-29-2017.rar
https://www.mediafire.com/file/lbotds76751ws79/Homegrowmen%20Threads%20Mar-20-2013%20to%20Sep-29-2017.rar
Originally from archive website: https://archived.moe/out/
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>>1155543
I strongly considered making one myself out of cattle panels and some piping. Like I have raised beds and could put that over the entire walkway between.
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>>1155545
>I have raised beds and could put that over the entire walkway between.

That would be amazing! I made some raised beds this year that turned out really well. Used them mostly for weird varieties of veggies and herbs. But I might even do that with some cucumbers or beans. I was thinking PVC since I have some lying around. What gauge cattle panel would you have to use?
>>
Outside of the regular herbs I grow in my kitchen (Oregano, Sage, Mint, Thyme, Rosemary, Parsley, Terragon, Bay in the garden, Dill, Coriander, compact Greek and giant Genovese Basil, Chives), has anyone any fun ideas on other herbs I could grow/plant for fun? Maybe specific cultivars?

I've got a small grow room in my basement for this stuff. I've got lovage and marjoram germinating at the moment but I've got no clue what to do with the stuff. Outside of dill pickles I never use my dill either.

Also any ideas on what to do with them would be helpful, I never make any real dishes with them as I tend to eat simple and consistent.
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>>1155550
Adding on, actually, any uncommon or unknown veggies or fruits or cultivars would be nice too. I'm in a colder climate sadly.

Currently attempting to gather some funds to turn my small garden in a greenhouse so I can grow sweet potatoes, bell peppers, some hot peppers and tomatoes all year round.
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>>1155550
Epazote
Horehound
Shampoo Ginger
Star Anise

>>1155557
Reisetomate
Romanesco Broccoli
Purple Sweet Potato and/or Purple Potato
Akebia quinata (Hardy to Zone 5, frost kills, otherwise Zone: 4 to 8)
Jaboticaba (greenhouse)
Hardy Kiwi
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>>1155548
PVC turns brittle in sunlight and cold. If you paint it, it will last much longer.

I'm not sure what gauge my cattle panels are.....seems 4 gauge. The panels are sometimes called "feedlot" panels. They are 16 feet (4.8m) x 50 inches(1.27m). They can't support themselves over a wide arch or with heavy stuff climbing on them.
>>
I have some 10 gallon aquariums laying around and a few grow bulbs. I was thinking of growing some small edible plants in them, what kind of plants would be good? I'd also consider decorative plants, maybe in one I could do carnivorous plants
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>>1155570
>Epazote
Outside of boiling black beans, what do I use this stuff for?

>Horehound
>Shampoo Ginger
Quick googlin', apparently this stuff is good for digestion and teas? Any use you can recommend?

>Star Anise
Never actually thought of growing these at home, would have to read up.

>>1155570
>Reisetomate
Shit, I really need to track some of these down.

>Romanesco Broccoli
Actually, already growing this.

>Purple Sweet Potato and/or Purple Potato
Okinawan purple sweet potato is actually something I was already growing under one of those pipe greenhouse things but they wouldn't really grow.

>Akebia quinata (Hardy to Zone 5, frost kills, otherwise Zone: 4 to 8)
Those things look damn weird. What can I use the fruit for?

>Jaboticaba (greenhouse)
They look amazing but probably too big for an average greenhouse. Any experience?

>Hardy Kiwi
I actually grow those already too. They're indoors for most of the year.
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>>1155580
Bean sprouts.
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>>1155557
Grow some Indian corn varieties. That's what the natives were doing (or trying to do) before they all got smallpox and their world went to hell.

I'm in Wisconsin. I've grown small plots of corn a few years now, always ended up with a 15-20 ears of various (satisfying) sizes. OK for a small garden. You won't always get huge county fair cobs from Indian corn, but they come in so many varieties. Preferable not to mix genetics, so only plant one variety at a time. I like reddish and bluish ones (some are virtually black). Have used them for making hominy or dry grits, mostly. The waxy varieties fresh eaten are like sweet corny beans.

If you are directly downwind of open prairie corn monoculture, maybe give it a miss.

https://www.nativeseeds.org/get-seeds/adapts
https://shop.nativeseeds.org/pages/seeds
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>>1155581
>Epazote

Google its uses. It has a very unusual and distinct odor. A lot of Mexican cuisine requires it.

>Horehound

Candy and tea. The candy you can use as a cough drop.

>Romanesco Broccoli
>Actually, already growing this.

Then "Early Purple Sprouting Broccoli."

>Akebia

It is a bitter flavor. If you like such things then you may like it. It is in Japanese cuisine. Try it with pork and miso.

>Jaboticaba

I wish. They are really neat. I saw them as a child and had a drink made from them, but I really don't remember much about the flavor.

>Hardy Kiwi
>I actually grow those already too.

Passion flower then, Passiflora edulis? Fruit is edible when fully ripe.

>>1155580
Watercress and you can't go wrong with Drosera sp..
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>>1155584
I second this. My preferred short growing season corn is Painted Mountain. I pick them after they are dry and grind them into grits, cornmeal, and cornflour. FYI, painted mountain is a super mixed variety, great for northern areas.
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>>1155585
>Google its uses. It has a very unusual and distinct odor. A lot of Mexican cuisine requires it.
>"It is commonly found in Mexican cooking, where it’s a popular pairing with beans, since it can reduce their tendency to cause flatulence."
Well shit, I can fart like mad. Guess I need this stuff.

>Early Purple Sprouting Broccoli
>Akebia
I'll have to track them down, see if I can get a taste before trying to cultivate. My garden isn't too big.

>Passion Flower
Not sure passion fruits can grow in my area, I'll have to read up but in a greenhouse it'd probably work.

>>1155584
>>1155589
I'm in the coastal Netherlands (so think English in climate), Painted Mountain is a variety I was looking at.

How are your seasons? We have dry hot summer with freezing winters.
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>>1155585
All these tanks have cracks in them, don't think I can do watercress. But drosera look awesome know anywhere good to buy them?
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>>1155576
Pepper plants can last for several years like tomato plants. Though some can grow for longer than a decade. They can flower and produce constantly, though not all cultivars are like that. You are probably not growing heavy producing cultivars. You also need to remember that peppers are hollow and weigh less, so comparing tons per acres is a bit of a skewed comparative measure.

>>1155594
The Early Purple Sprouting Broccoli doesn't have a compact head and you can eat off it all season long, instead of harvesting it once.

I live in Zone 5 and Passion Flowers can grow here and come up again next season. To get fruit, I'd put a polytunnel over them in the spring to give them a longer time to ripen later on.

Climate here is at its maxes, -40 winter, 110F/43C summer with 80-100% humidity. If we are lucky it will only be -15F/-26C winter, 95F/35C summer with 80-100% humidity.

>>1155599
A crack like broken glass or cracks like the seals need replacing? Replacing the seals is very easy, there are lots of tutorials online and on youtube. You can often times find Drosera at local plant stores and nurseries. They are normally very common and seed easily. Otherwise, just order them anywhere online.
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>>1155601
Broken glass, I went to buy some fish from a breeder and he gave me these for free, he had hundreds and broke a few I guess. I do lots of aquatic plants like this bucephalandra and figure this is a good chance to try some other stuff
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>>1155605
Well, water cress doesn't need very deep water. Shallow pans/trays can work inside the tanks and the tanks would keep the spray and mist from getting everywhere. Perhaps you can repair the tanks by replacing the glass?
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>>1155605
Can you show pics of the broken glass? They're usually easily fixed.

Have you tried FLEX TAPE?
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>>1155612
>>1155609
I guess I could silicone pieces of plexiglass to the broken panels, but chunks of glass are missing. I was trying to use what I got without spending extra money/effort though. I was just gonna chuck in some potting soil and seeds/plants
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>>1155608
>Mass isn't the thing, you want nutrient density. 1kg of salad aren't nowhere near equal to 1kg of nuts or roots.

That's probably the most important aspect.

>>1155613
Then just use a plastic liner to catch any drips from pots inside.
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>>1155623

For a couple hundred bucks you can buy food for years, mostly dry rice, barley, corn, other grains, beans, lentils, chickpeas, flour, salt, sugars, oils, etc. This will ensure both long term feeding and the ability to fail with growing sufficient food amounts when gardening yourself, let alone any losses that might happen if SHTF.

If you can get cheap but quality almonds, those are great snacks for travel. 100g of almonds has 21g of protein and 50g of fat, also providing many vitamins and minerals. Add some fresh wild greens to that and you're set for some time.

Especially those foods that you can't grow yourself are worth storing, same goes for any other commodity.
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>>1155633
This makes me wonder just how many people who do legitimate prepping for local disasters and who have land actually plant fruit/nut trees and shrubs. Next year I plan on going crazy with more trees. I wish I had done it 20 years ago.
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>>1155635
You should do some paw-paw trees if you have suitable conditions. The best thing that grows on trees that you can't buy in the store.
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>>1155638
I have them all over the property naturally. I've never been able to get a single fruit though.
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>>1155635

Problem is Zombies. Yes, Zombies. Let me explain, I don't mean the undead or infected brain eaters, but all those masses of people who have not prepared for whatever emergency might happen. Those people, starving, desperate and more than motivated to use violence to help themselves, will attack and live off those who have. So simply having a garden and food stocks won't help you, you'll need to also make sure you will keep them.

After WW2, many people in Germany used their small gardens for food, but they also spent the night in them with a loaded rifle or shotgun, ready to shoot any thief that was attempting to steal/rob their shit. I can't speak for other countries, but the gov has made stockpiles of grains and legumes in secret places for emergency cases. How they will effectively hand those out is beyond my understanding and no matter how well the overall emergency clears, there's always problems with crime on the smaller scale.

So if you're serious about emergency preparation, make sure you avoid large cities and other sources of danger. A garden is nice, but what will you do when groups of people come and demand your stuff or simply take it?
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>>1155644

Forgot to add, cannibalism was a regular thing in Soviet Russia/Ukraine and other parts of the world where people were starving. Experiments for the rebuilding of Europe after WW2 showed in the trials that the members were thinking of cannibalism after just a few days of not eating. They were normal healthy people, prohibited from eating for weeks. After just a couple of days they couldn't stop thinking about eating each other.

In the UK a group of truckers blocked a main road and basically cut off a town from food, just three days into the ordeal people were beginning to starve since the supermarkets were empty. Just in time system plus lack of preparation equals starvation. There's a good documentary on it called "nine meals from collapse" or something. It was a remark made by the governor of the city regarding the situation, saying that Western civilization was 3 days (nine meals) away from collapse.
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>>1155649

Fuck my memory, it was some head of agriculture dude, not governor. The phrase was uttered in 1906, the crisis was in 2000. Documentary was this one I think, rewatching right now: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWQ_hKLL7io
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>>1155644
>>1155649
>>1155654
Keep it in >>>/k/
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>>1155668

It isn't weapons related, but a question of preparing in terms of food that you store/grow yourself.
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where do yall go to buy specific kinds of trees? i have a few acres of land and want to grow a bunch of nut and fruit trees. but these got dang tree farms don't have no nut trees around me, at least the ones ive seen on the websites.

anyone ever have trees delivered? how'd that go for ya?
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>>1155672
It can be hit or miss ordering from a website or catalog for shrubs and trees. Don't order in the heat of summer. That's the worst time for them to roast in a delivery van or worse, you mailbox in the sun. Just dig a $100 hole for each tree before you order them. You could also ask the local tree place to order something in for you then call you when it arrives. That way if it is DOA they can deal with the company instead of you.
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Just letting folks know it's the fungal nerd reporting in. Any questions regarding cultivation of fungi, I got you covered.

May as well dump this photo sequence of Oyster mushrooms I grew.
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>>1155685

Thanks for telling me about that board.
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>>1155680
How effective are spore plugs?
Ive got a lot of old alder wood laying around in piles that never got brought in. Would putting plugs of something like Reshi, Lions mane, or some culinary mushroom work well?
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>>1155715
Not him, but I've done plugs before. It is very easy. However, the main problem is that you need to do those with a new log, not old ones laying around which may be infected with something else by now. It is better to plan around an event like felling a tree for firewood or it is in the way or something. Like if a storm comes in through the area and there are fallen trees all over. The best time to put plugs in is within the first week of the living tree coming down. After that, success rates start to drop.
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>>1155680
Is there a way to inoculate hazel trees with truffle spores without specialised equipment?
What kind of spacing is ideal between plants to make it easy for them to form a network once inoculated?
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WHAT THE FUCK MODS , THIS GENERAL WAS NEVER MEANT FOR FUCKING CHICKEN FARMERS AND DUCKFAGS. THIS GENERAL IS BULLSHIT NOW. CHICKENS DOGS AND TURKEYS BELONGS ON >>>/an/ . THIS GENERAL WAS MADE FOR VEGETABLE/FRUIT GROWERS, NOT ANY FAGGOT WITH AN ANIMAL. FUUUCK YOU
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>>1155635
Walnut trees are nice too, if you can manage to avoid some of the common diseases to walnuts in North America. Healthy, tasty and the wood is excellent when its time to harvest the tree. My grandparents had a bunch of various trees in their property, including walnut.
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>>1155599
Read up about drosera though, there are tons of species from all over the world, and many wouldn't like terrarium conditions.
The /an/ general usually has cp posters.
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>>1155605
That's pretty. Why and how did you get into aquatic plants?
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>>1155802
>GENERAL WAS NEVER MEANT FOR FUCKING CHICKEN FARMERS AND DUCKFAGS

•August 23rd, 2013, /hgm/ thread #4: First OP listing of "Aquaponics," in the search terms and extensive resource links on the matter. Aquaponics uses aquatic animals such as fish, mollusks, and crustaceans.

•October 21, 2013, /hgm/ thread #6: The Double OP post to list extra resource links includes a photo of the OP's chickens as they fight.

•November 20, 2013, /hgm/ thread #7: The Double OP post includes resources for chicken and rabbit farming.

•August 4th, 2016, /hgm/ thread #68: The first large list of animal names was included, when there was more room for them, after the resource links were compiled into a pastebin link and the Double OP posts cease.

•December 9, 2017, /hgm/ thread #111: The first inclusion of farm animal clip art into the /hgm/ logo.

See source screenshots here as well as the Homegrowmen archive link download in the OP of this thread. Throughout the /out/ history of the Homegrowmen there have been extensive discussions about farm animals. Every thread in >>>/an/ >>>/diy/ and /out/ that deals with farm animals almost always has a post directing people to the Homegrowmen threads. This also includes threads in >>>/an/ for chicken pets and chicken tractor construction threads in >>>/diy/ simply for people's reference.
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>>1155893
And the clip art is fucking piss.
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>>1155899
In this age of using negative terms to mean compliments, this sick post confuses me. Are you taking a piss or pissing the take? Does that mean bad (good) or good (bad)?
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>>1155893

You are proving his point in a way though. After the #7 thread, it ceased to feature animals until #68 and then #111. If it was an integral part you could assume every or every second/third thread featuring it, but it doesn't apparently.
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>>1155940
No, it featured/referenced animals/resources for raising animals from #7 to #111.
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>>1155945

Your source didn't show that at all.
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>>1155948
The source is in the archive link in the OP. The link is at the bottom. I'm sorry you are so new and angry.
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>>1155958

Not angry, but new. And I will probably stay new, since this seems to be the way people treat each other on here, so I'll go search my info somewhere else where this kind of one-up-manship is not practiced. Bye.
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>>1155966
>get proven wrong
>cry about it
>this is supposed to have an effect
Then go away.
>>
/out/ is cranky in the winter. Get some house plants and liven things up. you'll feel better.
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>>1155802
Who would win? A thread of civilized people discussing homegrow or one salty boi

>>1155883
I got a fish tank when I was 5 and it turned into a lifelong hobby, the plants have become a major part of being an aquarist for me.

>>1155882
I'm not sure I want to do a fully covered terrarium, I could do open or semi covered. This is my first venture into this so I'm going to keep beginner species.
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>>1155971

>caring about a reference made on an image board
>getting emotional about it

Yeah... I mean... yeah.
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Snow is finally sticking and staying on the ground here. It is about a month late, but that means a month extra of good greens to eat, without extra care. The chickens and turkeys get free range inside one of the gardens over winter. They will fertilize it while eating weed seeds and pests over the entire plot by next spring. They followed along and ate isopods and everything else moving, as I was digging up the potatoes.

>>1155802
There has always been farming and gardening both. It is in the title of all the threads.
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>>1155985
How do you survive when 8 inches of snow falls? I always make the greenhouse cover as tight as possible so the snow slides off on it's own. If it's loose like that I have to manually push the snow off.
>>
I had a hidden ootheca hatch out in my plant room this weekend. It hitched a ride on a ficus I kept outside all summer.

I caught ~100 nymphs, and put them in little jars with a few fruit flies. I assume there will be some cannibalism, but it's either that or the 25*F weather outside right now.

I'm going to 'free range' the rest and see if they can't take out my fungus gnat problem.
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>>1155966
>Bye.
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>>1155991
The plastic hoops prevent it from being pulled tight. They just deform if I try. It doesn't harm anything, I just flip off deep snow. It is just a polytunnel with plastic supports. The only real problem I foresee would be isopods and gastropods going nuts in the polytunnel. I may install some slug traps at the very least.

>lunch time!

>>1156026
Oh wow. I was considering taking in one, but I just stuck them around my garden instead. Hopefully, they will make it through the winter. I have all the gear for raising them, but I really want to focus on other things this winter.
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>>1156037

I'll send you 25 nymphs if you give me a split of one of your hives in the late spring :^)
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>>1156037
Well I totally thought that was a full size metal hoop greenhouse

That is pretty nifty. Why all the blocks under the cover? Looks like perfect insect habitat. Removing those may be more effective than traps
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>>1156040
lol No dice. I didn't combine a couple and those two died.

>>1156042
I wish!!! though, I do have all the glass I need to make a huge glass greenhouse. I've been putting it off and learning more about greenhouse design until I think I'm ready. I have a laundry list of features I want to build into it the first time around.

The blocks are the raised bed supports. The bed isn't totally full of soil yet so the extras were put on one side. They stay there to add thermal mass so that temperature swings are not to harsh on the plants. Yes, they are a haven for isopods and gastropods, but also for their predators. I have a huge population of chilopoda that readily munch on the isopods and gastropod eggs.
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>>1155893
>eating anything that grew in PVC.
I hope you enjoy cancer and mutant sperm.
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>>1156062
For hydroponics and aquaponics you can use other materials other than PVC. Though, I'm not too sure that anon, who posted that in 2013, is still around now.
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>>1155722
What about trees that died standing up and haven't been subject to any rot? Is it worth trying to colonize that lumber?
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>>1156118
The logs need to be green still.
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>>1156118
Yeah, it has a lot to do with the sap and sugars that are still in the "green" wood. I mean if you have some left over or extra plug spawn, you can just shove it into every stump and dead standing tree you find and hope it goes from there. It isn't optimal, but it can work. There's just more chance of loss or being out competed.
>>
Does anyone have any experience with "Easter Egger" hens? I live in the Northeast US and want to know if they're worth it or just a meme
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>>1155635
Transplanted 4 American Persimmon trees from my moms house to my acreage at about 4 foot tall. I'm unsure if they will make it since I've always heard larger persimmon trees were difficult to transplant.

Went to TSC to see what they had about 2 months ago. Since they were worried about frost, I got 10 apple trees (Gala, Courtland, and 1 Red Delicious), 2 Santa Rose Plum Trees and 1 Kanza Pecan. I got them for $12 a piece with them being about 5 foot tall when planted.

I don't have any Paw-Paw trees as >>1155638 suggested, but it will be the best fruit that you can have on your homestead. It's only marketable locally due to not lasting long enough to ship. Kentucky State University is a big supporter and researcher of the paw-paw and they are looking for ways to value add the fruit. Peaceful Heritage Nursery out of Kentucky will be your absolutely best source of obtainment.

I also transplanted some 4 Sugar Maples, 2 White Oaks, and 1 Chestnut Oak around the house. All of our Ash trees are dying due to the Emerald Ash Borer. It has decimated the Ash population in my area and it was one of the main species.
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>>1155844
Purdue University has the best cultivars of Black Walnut. You can target nut production or wood production.
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>>1156273
>It's only marketable locally due to not lasting long enough to ship

pulp and freeze
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>>1156216
I have one. Only difference from other chickens that I have is that she seems to become broody much more often. Maybe about twice a year.
>>
>>1156273
Nice amount of trees.
>>
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Winter is officially here in Ontario and life seems to have no purpose.

I remember when I went to South Carolina back in 2011 to build houses for Habitat for Humanity - it was February 12th, and the Carolinians were complaining because this was one of their coldest February's on record. It was 7:30 am and it was 9degC out. 9degC, in the fucking morning in February. These fuckers were complaining because it was 9degC on a winter morning. Meanwhile I'm stuck in the Siberian wasteland of Canuckistan where a few years ago the average winter temperature was -20degC and several days reached -40 with windchill.

I need to leave this place. I will be a certified phlebotomist in a year's time... how hard would it be for me to move to some small town in the southern US and be a Doctor's assistant? I don't ever want to see a snowflake again. I want to buy a cheap plot in a small town, plant my summer/winter crops, and brew some homemade beer and marry a white woman (so few of those where I live).

Please, tell me there is a chance.
>>
>>1156432
The only thing hard about moving is the mental part and the connections part. Everything else is moving piles of junk from one place to another and learning milk comes in plastic jugs. If you are good with the social aspect of making new connections in a new location then you'll do fine.
>>
>>1156432
Ahhhh... do you live in brampton?
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>>1156432
Travel around the South visit churches and marry an American country girl. Work on getting a work visa at first then when you're there start looking around for a wifey.

Would suggest taking an outdoor job that educates kids. TONS of chicks there do that kinda work looking for future husband material who want kids.
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>>1156510
I'm not an SJW. I hate all of them. I went through an unfortunate Daily Show phase when I was younger but I blame my country's cultural environment for that.
>>
>>1156466
No, I live in the People's Republic of Markham
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>>1156432
Well, if you don't move you can always build some greenhouses or have a couple indoor shelf units for growing some stuff to begin the season earlier.
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I went out to dig up another row of potatoes. The work crew was already waiting. They even wait right over the place I'm trying to shovel so they are first in line to get the worms and isopods. A few take shovel rides. It is neat, but I have to move slowly since I won't want to step back on one or cut off a toe.
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>>1156922
You are an inspiration to us all. Your methods are correct and good and yield appropriate results.
>>
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>>1155715
"Spore plugs"? I'm guessing you're talking about the wooden dowels coated in mycelium used to inoculate logs.
Usually just called "plugs".
They are very effective, but really only work on whole, unsplit logs. Ideally, logs that are under a year old but older than 1-2 months. Split, dried firewood won't work. Thankfully Alder is the preferred substrate for many species, especially Oyster mushrooms.
Reishi, Lions Mane, Oysters, Shiitake, Laetiporus, and a bunch of others will all thrive on an alder log. Just order plugs and wax and assuming you have a drill and hammer, you'll be ready to go.
Do you need me to walk you through the steps of inoculation and incubation?

>>1155759
It is very situational. If you are talking about introducing truffles to an already planted and mature orchard, your chances of success are almost nil even with the best equipment out there. If you are planting an orchard, equipment definitely increases the chances of success, but isn't necessary. Your main expense is going to be purchasing enough truffle tissue to inoculate with, and amending the soil.

I need to know more about your situation before I can give much input. How old are the trees, what region are you in, what species of truffle are you trying to grow, and what your neighboring properties are (agriculture, industrial, residential). The more I know the better.
>>
>>1156432
>>1156532
>another suburban crybaby who spends all his 'free time' (i.e. 18 hours a day) on vidya and masturbation complaining about nothing to do
>>
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Luckily, I put the preying mantis ootheca in container, because there was a second hatch out last night!

Bout a hundred more mantises to deal with.

The original hatching is feeding on the fruit flies fine. Maybe a little bit hesitant because they're hydei, which are a little big.
>>
>>1157173
Hate hydei. Much better escapists than melanogaster, they seem retarded in comparison.
>>
I'm building a house in Zone 6 USA and can't initially afford a lot of landscaping, but wondered what are some long-term preparations and installments I should do ASAP to save me trouble later on? I'd like quick growing shade trees/bushes and anything else that would be a general improvement like maybe something that bears food in 3-5 years or helps with soil/drainage.

Already decided to pop in a weeping willow somewhere and some climbers for the house.
>>
>>1157188
easier to gently grab between your thumb and forefinger though. you dont even hurt them
>>
>>1157208
>weeping willow
I hope you get enough rain year-round or are located near a stream or something for flat groundwater. Those things have very shallow roots, and a 30 year old one completely dried up 2 years ago here because of a slight drought
>>
>>1157208
Fast growing is mostly about water and feeding. Though there are some to stay away from, like oak. One tid-bit, longer lasting trees of any species are those that have conditions that keep them slow growing.
>>
can anyone explain this praying mantis stuff to me? what are they used for?
>>
>>1155985
it might sound like a weird question, but how far away are your raised beds from your fence?
>>
Uh, dude weed lmao anyone?
Gonna plant another White Russian soon, still in process of consuming the last one
>>
>>1157414
>weed
drugs are bad
>>
>>1157410
Just far enough to manuever a wheel barrow around them.

>>1157414
>>>/b/

>>1157388
They eat pest insects, but also bees when they get bigger. So, it isn't always a good thing. You place the ootheca in your garden, it hatches out, and the little ones start eating tiny things like ants and aphids. They work up to larger pests as they grow.
>>
>>1155539
Anyone ever tried that affnan siphon thingy?

I wonder if I can plant some tubers using that kind of setup.
>>
>>1157468
>the little ones start eating tiny things like ants and aphids. They work up to larger pests as they grow.
How long do they need to grow up?
I don't like them though if the bit you said about the bees is true
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>>1157414
https://youtu.be/vpj9IOXB0P0
visit us
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>>1157510
Here's one finishing off a bumblebee in my garden. They don't eat many. They take 4-6 months to mature and live another 3-8 months as adults, depending on species.
>>
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Is that anon with his algae farm here by chance? I may have a few questions for him.

1) Is it all still running? And how long did it last?
2) Where did you get your cultures?
3) What did you use the algae for?
>>
good Christmas gift idea----- grow your own coffee kit

but im already making homemade yard or garden decoration and some really good cookies
>>
>>1155550
Cuban oregano- Plectranthus amboinicus
>>
Hugelkultur, a new word to search, this permaculture garden is created by mounding biodegrading wood material and covering with growing medium. The wood absorbs water and reduces irrigation needs.
>>
Anyone have experience growing black pepper plants? I ordered some seeds from a seed supplier and I've read that they can take a very long time to germinate. Any protips to ensure success?
>>
>>1157696
Soak for 24 hours, plant and keep heated to about 75-80F for.......30 days at least. Never allow to go below 60F.
>>
>>1157414
If the /pol/ janitor is still around, you may not get far here. Just wait a day or two to check if your post gets deleted
>>
Just had some of my first log grown shiitake and they were so good. Thanks again /out/
>>
>>1157922
Woohoo!
>>
>>1156062
doesnt our water go through pvc pipes?

it's not like the plant is eating the pvc, it's just next to it.
>>
>>1157986
Plants do uptake some of the leached chemicals from the PVC. To people who don't use PVC for water delivery in their home, that is something that is a concern.

>Does this ingredient or leached chemical improve or maintain my health?
>>
>>1157720
Thanks, I'll try that out.
>>
>>1155973
>I'm not sure I want to do a fully covered terrarium, I could do open or semi covered. This is my first venture into this so I'm going to keep beginner species.
Beginner species are so easy they don't really benefit from a terrarium, and even if it's open it'll look less pretty and make maintenance harder than it should be, I think.
Your call tho. Drosera Capensis is tough and easy, just keep it frost free. Flytraps are easy too, and can take a little frost, need it even for dormancy. Same for most garden center variety Sarracenia.
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5 days in, most germinated already. So far so good. How long do you reckon I can keep them in this setup? Soil is about 2 inches deep.
>>
>>1158321
>How long do you reckon I can keep them in this setup?

Not very long. Root entanglement will be pretty high. You actually might want to get a spoon and transplant them into separate containers, even party cups will work well, with drainage holes. You'll cause less damage doing that now than a few days from now. Try to keep the soil compacted around the seedling roots and it should be quite fine.
>>
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Lighting for a hydroponic set up for basil and tomatoes.

I have used LED before, but I don't have the money for the LED's this go around. I was looking at some T5 lighting. But I can't decide if I want a two light set up, or a single light set up. If I have a 5' x 3' grow patch, can I cover that with a 4' lamp with 1 fluorescent bulb? Or should I get a 4' lamp with 2 fluorescent bulbs?

And have you had good growth with full spectrum fluorescent lights, or should I be using specific colors?

Noob at fluorescent. Please advise!
>>
>>1158544
You need the 2-lamp lights. How many are you going to purchase? Large plants, that grow tall like a tomato plant, need more light coverage because of how much it will shade itself. You can also buy LED versions of those long lights for about the same price.
>>
>>1157377
>>1157208
This. They are basically "creek and pond" trees.
>>
>>1157414
420chan is way more helpful besides. I've done it before and who knows, might possibly again, but this board is hostile to fun substances.
>>
>>1157986
It shouldn't if you live in a first-world country, because PVC pipes are not rated for drinking water or food.
>>
>>1158559
Can you recommend me the LED versions because everything I'm looking at LED are nearly $600 for area coverage. Or are you referring to the T5 LED replacement bulbs? I didn't think those were any good because there were so few actual diodes producing light. Are they worth the buy?

I plan on replanting the tomatoes once they reach about 2' outside in my greenhouse. This rig is for indoor use in my kitchen. I will likely grow lettuce or bok choy after the maters.
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>>1158588
When I grow plants for the season's garden I start them indoors for two months. I use 4 feet long LED shop lights from Sam's Club:

>4,500 lumen
>42watts
https://www.samsclub.com/sams/linkable-shop-light-honeywell-led/prod20590154.ip

I keep the lights about 2 inches from the leaves. For a short "row" of 2 adult tomato plants I'd probably use 4 of these. 2 at the top, and 2 just down on the sides a bit. But, for anything under 12 inches, only 1 light is needed. I have 2 lights per shelf and it is packed with plants. I have actual fluoro grow lights and they are old and terrible.
>>
>>1158600
Great, thanks.
>>
>>1158566
PVC water pipes are a thing in the USA. Most people have Copper, PVC, or PEX. Everyone is switching to PEX because contractors fucking love it. It is like the drywall of the plumbing world for them.

>>1158562
I tried weeping willows around my pond. They all died. I let a creek willow grow up and several sycamore trees. The biggest sycamore trees are like 2 feet in diameter now.
>>
>>1158614
I have iron pipe
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>>1158620
We use iron pipes for natural gas lines and sewage. PVC for sewage too, the Schedule 40 stuff.
>>
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Birbs
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>>1158614
>PVC water pipes are a thing in the USA
PVC is only for drainage.
>>
>>1158644
It must be comfy knowing you could eat them at will.
>>
>>1158665
Each state, each county, and each city/town has its own rules for building codes. Where I live you are allowed to use PVC and many people have it.
>>
>>1158674
That's some shit. I've worked construction for years and have never seen that. I didn't know it could be pressurized.
>>
>>1158681
Well, not all PVC is the same simply due to wall thickness.. There's both PVC and CPVC. Both are used for pressurized water, but CPVC is stronger. There was a time when people were changing to CPVC, but PEX came out and took over everything since it doesn't burst when freezing and is super easy to install.

>>1158644
Nice, how old are they? Eggs yet?

>>1158668
When you start getting eggs from your chickens, you think about that less when you are hungry.
>>
>>1158563
Nah, EtOH (from grapes or hops) and tobacco are totally halal here, but anything else is "muh degeneracy"
>>
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my serrano peppers that i overwintered last winter just died after two months inside this year. guess I'll just buy starters in the spring.
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>>1156978
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>>1158759
How?
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After thinking that I was never going to grow any peppers until it got warmer, I managed to sprout my habanero / Thai chilli peppers (I planted both in the same container so it would be a surprise). It took a total of 13 days without soaking them in water, I put them straight into the soil. Any tips on keeping these guys strong and healthy? Pic related, I feel so proud of myself.
>>
I'm thinking about getting chickens this year and I'm just wondering what I'm getting into. Pretty sure I can keep them as neighbors down the road keep pigs and cows. What should I expect if I plant on keeping a small amount of chickens, <4 chickens. Also is it a good idea to mix chickens and ducks?
>>
>>1158863
Chickens and ducks are fine with each other, but the ducks will try to fuck the chickens. Just make sure there's lots of female ducks and very few male ducks. Raising both from chicks/ducklings at the same time will help them get along much better.

Predators are the biggest concern. Have places where the chickens can run under cover to get away from hawks. At night, lock them up in the coop with a padlock to prevent smart animals from getting in. If you have loose dogs, coyotes, foxes, or wolves in the area you'll need a parameter fence and something to prevent them from digging under it.

Beyond that, fowl are the easiest thing you can raise. Make sure their coop has a thick layer of bedding like straw or wood chips. Their next boxes should be kept clean at all times with fresh straw.

If you have a waterway or pond for the ducks, remember that ducklings are not waterproof unless they have a mother to help make them waterproof. Otherwise, if they get wet, they will die. Having too many drakes to hens will be a danger to the females. The drakes will drown them trying to mate. Too many roosters is also a problem for hens which can kill the hens for the same reason, just on land instead.
>>
>>1158544
Led lighting is really cheap right now, and you can get a few smaller pannels that way you can grow plants of different heights.

My problem with florecent is its hard to grow anything at different stages because you cant position the light per plant. you have to do some shit angle thing or cater to the tallest plants.

With some cheapre LED panels, you can get 2 or three and then have them at different heights for different plants. Hell even if you grow just basil. you can at least get like 3 sets in rotation with three panels. LED looks like fucking trash though, I have a setup in my room and its ugly
>>
>>1158859
Light and not too much water.
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>>1158930
>My problem with florecent is its hard to grow anything at different stages because you cant position the light per plant. you have to do some shit angle thing or cater to the tallest plants.

Yeah, I have that problem with different types of plants under the same 4' LED shop light. I just angled the light and placed the plants in order of height under it.
>>
>>1158801
I am still relatively new to fungi, but I really want to start growing edible sources of fungi. All I have been doing is researching which known types are considered "choice edible." I need some guidance for manuals and information stockpiling with how to get this moving along. Can you give me some learned advice?
>>
>>1158958
FYI, the second pastebin link in the OP has a fungi anon's detailed report on starting your own fungi growing.
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>>1158969
Oh shit. Sorry. Missed that one completely.
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>>1158801
They really start opening up from now onwards. Keep in mind, this was two photos per day. You can leave and come back in an hour and they will have visibly grown.

>>1158958
Yeah, go ahead and check the paste, it contains most of the basic beginner info as well as an easy indoor method with Oyster mushrooms (One of my favorites, tastes like pork and has a texture like chicken) and an easy outdoor method with Garden Giants (Like a more flavorful and delicate Portobello, single specimens average >1lb and easily reach 5lbs if conditions are right, dwarfing any storebought species.)

I am going to add outdoor growing with Oysters on logs too, probably before the next thread opens up. Also, thanks OP >>1155539 for adding my paste! I'll work on getting it fleshed out and more streamlined. It was my first time using pastebin, so it isn't very pretty.

If you have any questions, go ahead and shoot em my direction.
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>>1159190
Awesome. I suppose my first question is when starting with SRA colonization, how would you store it during that process? Use a terrarium or just a 5 gallon bucket? Or do something like this photograph?>>1158801
Next question on that, while it is colonizing in your isolated substrate indoors, what elements of exposure should I take into consideration? Temperatures, light exposure, etc. Or is SRA really just that easy to grow? And lastly on this subject, how much moisture should I add to the substrate while colonizing?

You mentioned growing from logs. How much more difficult is that to inoculate your spawn as opposed to just using mulched substrate? What type of wood and how aged does the wood need to be?

I am sure I will have some more questions later today. Your responses are highly appreciated.
>>
>>1158859
>>1158933
>Light and not too much water.
This. And some warmth wouldn't hurt either.
>>
What are some easy animals to breed, and to care for? Interested in growing some of my own food. Have a small piece of land and a small pond.
Was thinking Tilapia for the pond, and Squirrels or Ducks for the small piece of land.
>>
>>1159582
Tilapia are warm water fish, so if you live in an area where the water is 60-80F, go for it. Otherwise, try catfish instead. At least there's no pinbones in catfish which makes filleting them very easy.

As for difficulty in raising:

Easier/Harder in respective difficultly tier,

Easy Tier: Fish/Chicken/Duck/Rabbit/Squab
Medium Tier: Turkey/Goose/Sheep/Pig/Goat
Hard Tier: Cows/Ostrich/Bison

I've never raised squirrels, but I imagine they are escape artists; like goats are. Only they can climb trees and everything else. Remember, anything you get will turn into a pet if you name it or have less than 5 of that animal. Don't let people name your food and always have 5+ animals to butcher at any one time. Though, butchering 5 cows may not be recommended if you don't have that kind of freezer/canning space. lol

Since you have a pond, you can do both tilapia and ducks. The ducks won't need much land space. You can actually combine a chicken/duck coop together. The ducks and tilapia will forage for aquatic plants and animals, respectively; while the chickens patrol the land area. You can also combine squab with the chicken/duck coop in an upper section that opens into an aviary.

If you have crop rotation, you can keep one section of farm land covered with a pen/chicken tractor for the chickens to scratch through and fertilize. A rabbit tractor can be moved around in the same manner. It can be raised up to allow chickens to scratch under it. Just keep moving the tractors around the off-season garden every few days. If you have orchard trees, make a portable fowl corral around them, moving it once a week from tree to tree. The fertilizer the fowl put on the ground will be amazing for the trees. For the garden, wait at least a few months after a light amount of fowl fertilizer has been scratched into the soil, before you plant in it. Like over winter.
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>>1159518
>>1159518
So, the first bit of isolated substrate you are colonizing, what you'd call the inoculant for the outdoor bed, isn't very picky.
The main thing to dial in is moisture content, since something too wet won't colonize (it goes anaerobic) and something too dry will colonize very slowly. (the mycelium has to waste time and energy importing water to anything it wants to digest)
If you are using chips that haven't already been sitting outside in the rain, you'll want to soak them overnight (a trash bag works well, tap water is fine) and then drain for a few hours the next day, until it is barely dripping. You don't want water pooling in the bottom. I really need to update the guide to include this, but you'll also want to include a small portion of soil, probably about 1/5-1/7th by volume. SRA is a predator on bacteria, so it thrives best given some soil to colonize on top of the cellulose matter.

>Chips: soak overnight, drip dry, load into 5 gallon bucket, terrarium, garbage bag, etc. and mix in 1/6 b.v. soil/grain

If you're using straw, you'll want to do the same thing, just soak it overnight and drain, then inoculate. You shouldn't have to add any soil for it to colonize.

Another tip: SRA loves to be disturbed at all stages of growth. Once you see that the SRA has leapt off a little into the substrate, feel free to give it a shake. This distributes the mycelium onto new pieces of substrate and speeds up growth.

Light isn't an issue, direct sunlight is a no-go but otherwise they aren't sensitive. If you notice fluid pooling in the bottom of the container, you'll want to tip it to drain or poke holes in the bottom. It invites contamination. Room temp or slightly above suits this species best, as long as it isn't below 45f it'll work. Good luck!
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>>1159518
When doing log cultivation, you don't actually have to do the step you do with SRA where you create your own inoculant. Well, you can, but for the sake of not writing up a whole second pastebin (maybe in the future) I'm going to omit that process.

Log growing is by far the simplest process for growing mushrooms, unfortunately it just takes so damn long, and success isn't guaranteed. Granted, the outdoor SRA bed method isn't guaranteed either, but it hasn't failed me yet. Wild species tend to outcompete your intended one.
All you have to do is buy "plugs", instead of grain spawn, which are wooden furniture dowels colonized with the mycelium of a wood-loving species such as Oysters, Lions Mane, Shiitake, and many others. You drill holes in the logs that match the diameter of the plugs, hammer them in, and use wax to seal the holes. Then to hold in moisture, some people also seal the ends of the logs with wax by dipping them.
Bam, you're literally done. Just wait for atleast a year (sometimes up to three) and you'll get your mushrooms. One advantage is that once a log starts producing, it often continues to for years afterwards. Stable production.
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>been living in apartments for 4 years
>finally going to be in an actual house with a yard
>can start planting and growing stuff like I've wanted to for years
>mfw all this new information at once
>>
>>1159719
Good for you. Be sure to post a pic of the 100 pepper plants you start in the spring.
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>tfw smaller plants growing on a table in front of the windows on the south side of the house
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>>1159664
The land is very small, like a backyard. The pond is also pretty fucking small as well, used to have a bunch of Koi (Water Level is low because it hasn't been used in a while). I have enough space for like 10 Tilapia, and quite a bit of cagged rabbits. Only issue with rabbits is that they eat A LOT!
Thanks anon.
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Asked a few threads back. Anyone recommend some LED strips? I need to order about twenty four meters of them before I can start building my aquaponics setup. Will post pictures when I start, thanks.
>>
>>1159582
>>1159664
This guy has a series of videos on raising rabbits for meat:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1sEpGxeTsg
>>
>>1160073
i want to do this but i live in a housing development. am i going to be hauled off by peta types? how do i do this without getting in trouble. i can stand my anonymous neighbors judgement but i could not afford a lawyer on any day. one of my neighbors has chickens for eggs.
>>
>>1160089
Just tell people they are not for meat then butcher them in the confines of your home and enjoy tasty meats. Remember, they shit a LOT and it is great to compost and turn into fertilizer/soil for a garden. It is worth a great deal.
>>
>>1158688
They're about three months old now, no eggs yet
>>
>>1160089
They're gonna stink up your apartment if they're indoors.

I'd just look up the legal situation in your town/housing development if it's permissible to keep 'livestock' in your apartment (renters/tenants rights, etc.). Chickens are a common exception. Rabbits might not be.

I wouldn't give a shit what neighbours say. People who scarf down chicken mcnuggets are the exact same types who think hunting is evil.
>>
>already getting lots of blossoms and a few peppers from the plants I pruned a couple months ago
FUCK YEAR
>>
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>>1155539
Any help with ID is greatly appreciated
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>>1160535
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>>1160536
Top shot
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>>1160535
Might be a really old chicken of the woods. Was it hard or soft?

>>1160536
>>1160538
No clue, a bit too old.
>>
>>1160541
Hard
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>>1159676
>>1160535
I would agree with >>1160541, very old Laetiporus.


>>1160536
Could we get a shot of the stem base, where it attaches to the ground? Try not to damage anything, you don't have to pull it up yet.
>>
>>1160838
>pic

Very nice.
>>
Beginner mushroom grower here. I'd like to be able to clone mushrooms I forage in the wild but I don't know exactly how. I've read about putting a piece of the stem in agar but I don't have a sterile environment for this. Any way I can create a sterile environment?
>>
>>1160918
Personally, I don't recommend agar. When making regular kits you don't need to sterilize. You only need to pasteurize. Sterilizing can actually be a problem. There are many microbes that will help in the substrate to fend off mold and other bad microbes.
>>
>>1160073
the comments on that video wew
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>>1161019
Never read yt comments.
>>
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>>1161032
>Of course not. He's not the kind of person who has any empathy for animals at all. He sees them pretty much like plants, and the way he talked about them surviving in the cold or how he let them live their whole lives on wire proves it.
>>
>>1160918
Mycology anon here.

There are a number of ways you can clone wild specimens, each with varying success rates, cost/prep, and incubation time. It also depends on the species you have chosen. Pic related is SRA running on cardboard. Easy cloning technique

Agar is the ideal for cloning, and you can get pretty much anything (even some mycorrhizal species) to take on agar for long-term storage and utility with little difficulty. It does require that you perform with sterile technique, something that requires a decent investment in materials, and either a book, or the ability to do effective online research. The simplest setup you can get is a still-air box (SAB) which can be made pretty easily out of a large rubbermaid container on a tabletop. Success rates can be hit or miss. No matter what for agar work you'll need a pressure cooker (PC), which has a pretty variable price range, but most are affordable. With those two items you can get started pretty easily, but the learning curve is steep, and you'll have a lot of failure initially before you ever succeed, assuming you have no labwork experience.

For folks who want to just casually grow with little investment, I recommend tissue culture methods that don't involve agar, such as "cardboard cloning" or tissue slurries.

First off, how informed are you already on the concepts of mycelium and basic cultivation? Give me a rundown so I know what level to start at.

>>1160953
You can't really make "block" kits with cloning methods that don't involve agar, or sterile technique at some point in the process. Unless you are making un-supplemented kits, which are likely to stall out from lack of nitrogen.
>>
Any composting tips? I'm not sure what to keep mine in while it is composting. Could I just use a plastic bin, or do I need something fancier? Also what are some basic household compostable items
>>
>>1155680
Will the use of hydrogen peroxide mixed with water hurt mushrooms? I am trying to get rid of fungus gnats but all the guides I find to do so always assume its for plant care.
>>
>>1161038
Nothing wrong with that.

>>1161105
>You can't really make "block" kits with cloning methods that don't involve agar,

That's what I did for many years. I used plastic bags back, in the day, filled with substrate tailored to the fungi type.

>>1161108
It depends on what kind of composting you'll be doing. I prefer to use containers that allow more air flow to allow more aerobic microbe activity and keep odors down. You can compost any organic materials like food waste, manure, paper products, etc. Though, paper products are better composted using pearl oyster fungi.
>>
>>1161108
everything organic is potentially a fertilizer, as for inorganic natural ferts you could buy micronised rocks
>>
any good homesteading YouTube channels?
>>
>>1161215
No, it won't affect the fungus. Unfortunately you are going to deal with larvae buried deeply in the substrate, which won't be harmed by the peroxide. The mycelium will protect them. If it is a situation approaching total loss, just toss it in the freezer long enough for the outer surface to freeze. Then, move it to the fridge and allow it to slowly thaw for awhile before moving it back. Obviously, you need to deal with the adult gnats as well. Potted plants could represent a reservoir.

>>1161286
What substrate were you using? How were you inoculating? Supplementation?
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>>1161532
>>1160838

Oh, also. This was the last image before harvest.
>>
>>1161532
>What substrate were you using?

Straw
Coffee grounds
Hardwood Saw Dust
Logs

It really depends on the type of fungi. I even started pearl oyster kits using only shredded news paper. Nothing was larger than what I could pasteurize in a stock pot. Except the logs, those were not pasteurized. Oh and for a time I made a slurry and just poured it on wood chip piles outside. I really need to get back into doing that.
>>
>>1161559
What were you inoculating the bags with?
>>
>>1161564
pearl oyster
shiitake
maitake
lion's mane
turkey tail (not 100% it was turkey tail, we have false turkey tail here too)
>>
>>1155550
Mint - great tea for upset stomachs
Oregano - great tea for asthma, trouble breathing

Reccomend - borage and german chamomile.

Borage is fantastic for attracting bugs away from other plants. The flowers, eaten, are excellent against depression. Check out candied flowers, use egg powder and sugar to preserve.

German chamomile - tea - natural laxative, gentle but effective. Also will make you drowsy and calm.
>>
>>1156532
F
>>
>>1155550
Marjoram is nice on chicken with garlic, it's also very good dried
>>
>>1161609
No, I mean what was your inoculant. Grain, Slurry, liquid culture?
>>
for aquaculture: guys i found brooding clam species that dont parisitize your fish. does anyone sell american nail clams? they give birth to baby clams because they have a brood pouch or something instead of having a larval stage that sucks on fish gills. they would keep the water clear without removing the nutrients the plants need. but the only ones im finding for aquaria is invasive like golden clam and zebra.
>>
>>1161864
Slurry for some and the others was just a slice of the original fungi. I've never done grain or liquid culture with spores. I guess the one time I took a ripe giant puff ball and blended it would sorta be liquid culture since it was like 200% spores. The slurries were just fungi blended with some water and poured into the containers with the substrate or onto substrate outside.
>>
>>1161998
Like Pisidium sp & Corbicula sp? I'm not sure you can get Pisidium, but Corbicula is very common from a variety of aquarium shops online.
>>
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Birbs
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>>1162641
Cute

Bathing

Hens
>>
>>1162641
>>1162642
Welsummer or black copper maran?
>>
>>1162004
That's surprising. How were your yields? Pretty much everyone I know stops working with unsupplemented substrates due to low yield and slow colonization
>>
>>1162674
Some were good some were not good. Pearl Oyster and Shiitake were the best.
>>
>>1162675
Yeah, I've grown Oysters on paper before. Pretty sure they'll take anything!
>>
>>1162673
Black Sexlink, two Americaunas and a Rhode Island Red if that's what you're asking
>>
>>1161998
on a related note planeria [flatworms], the aquatic worms that are not parasites, I have heard they can be introduced to clean algae and breakdown poo, but im not sure where you would buy them.
>>
>>1162830
>Americaunas

I have a few of those. Everyone loves their blue-green eggs.
>>
>>1163088
We are very excited for eggs, should start in about 6 weeks here, I've never had fresh eggs
>>
>>1163120
It is really great to get fresh eggs every day. Mine are not laying right now very well. I'm getting at most 2 eggs a day. But, their pasture is still restricted due to fence work, which is taking forever. It seems like fresh eggs when boiled are a bit harder to shell than when they are left in the fridge a couple weeks then boiled and shelled. Not sure why.
>>
>>1163120
>>1163143
They taste better if you feed the chickens well. There's a big difference in my eggs when the chickens get to go out in the yard and eat all the bugs and weeds. They also get lots of veggie scraps. My favorite thing is to hang a cabbage from a string in their run and watch them play with it all day. i just stab a hole through the cabbage with a screw driver and then push the string through with the screwdriver, and then tie a fat pentaknot
>>
>>1163162
>chicken party with a cabbage pinata
.webm please!
>>
>>1163192
Seconding. "Webm for Retards" is a good, free, no-nonsense, video-2-webm converter.
>>
Who here grows indoors significantly?
Im a loser who lives at home, but im looking to move out into a two bedroom apartment and convert one room to indoor growing.

Right now I have a small setup in my room.

End goal is own a house with property and a greenhouse because I live in wisconsin
>>
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Nice day for some more work, so I made this bed ready for planting in spring.

>>1163699
A few months before spring planting, I grow lots of starts indoors. I plan on making a new shelving unit to better fit some of my hardware and lights. It is really easy, but less expensive if you have good strong sunlight coming in through large windows. A greenhouse is one of my goals. I think I know enough about the things I want to add to it, in order to start designing it.
>>
>>1163200
Can't get webm for retards to work. It said I needed to install avisynth, and i did, but nothing happens when i run it
>>
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>>1163744
Nevermind, I'm retarded.
>>
Growing some pot (legal in my area) and I've run into an issue. I'm growing more than I smoke and its still illegal to sell. How do I keep new generations of clones coming without producing a surplus?
>>
>>1163751
Wrong forum, go to 420chan
>>
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>muh go to a different site to talk about that plant

HAHA ewwww what a faggot, stop trying to make this reddit, just go back.

>>1163751
just sell it to friends you dummy every grower goes over the allowed amount
>>
>>1163759
t. violent marijuano addict on my peaceful forum
>>
>>1163745
lol The irony is killing me.

That's an awesome vid.

>>1163751
>>1163759
Still not federally legal in the USA and not on 4chan either. Most people ITTs dislike people talking about it. Historically, this is the wrong place.
>>
>>1163745
Lovely, thanks!
>>
>>1163759
Well, this site/thread is controlled by M*rmon straight-edgers, you gotta accept that
t. someone who has tried the 420 about 10 times in total, the last time being 9 years ago, deciding it's just not a thing for me
>>
>>1163959
>>1163759
>>1163751
GFTO
>>
>>1155635
Do you think they can grow in Houston?
>>
>>1164031
Fuck. Meant for>>1155638
>>
My little ecosystem is getting more complex: having increased the amount of mulch pretty drastically, i have had lots of cute little wolf spiders; but now I've noticed that spider wasps are moving into my yard and will be taking some spiders.

I don't want to lose too many spiders, as they keep my aphid population down, should i leave the wasps alone or rehome them somewhere else? If they ate slugs, stinkbugs and other pests I'd be more keen on keeping them desu lads.
>>
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>>1164031
>>1164044
Yes, here's the range.

>>1164129
It should balance itself out without your help. For every 1 spider you see there's probably 20 you don't see.
>>
>>1164129
Too much mulch can be bad. Mulch requires nitrogen to decompose so it will leech it from the soil, potentially robbing your plants of their most important nutrient.
>>
>>1155539
Im bored as fuck since its winter and there isn't as much to do outside agriculturally (garden is dead for the year and all the animals are really low maintenance). I'm kinda interested in aquaponics after learning a bit about it, but honestly I don't think I'd really use the herbs and leafy greens enough to make it worth it, but the thought of having tilapia ready to roll whenever I want some sounds awesome. So maybe I should try just straight up aquaculture?

I'd probably be looking to do a basement setup either way. Anyone got any advice on the pros and cons of aquaculture and aquaponics, which is more cost effective for growing fish, which is easier to get into, etc?
>>
>>1163745
Mesmerizing. Thanks, Anon.
>>
>>1164295
That is only a problem if you are mixing the mulch into the soil. It is quite fine for laying on the ground as normal mulch usage.

>>1164367
Aquaculture is easy to get into since more people do that minus the eating of the fish via normal decorative aquariums. Thus, all the info you need to keep fish alive in a normal aquarium environment is easily available online and probably locally at any pet store. Aquaponics in comparison, is much more difficult. It takes a lot more maintenance and constant testing for chemical and pH levels. Just because it is more difficult, doesn't mean it is "difficult" unto itself. Think about it this way, which would be easier for your average friend/neighbor to take care of for 2 weeks while you were on vacation? That should help put it into better perspective.

Personally, I'd try with aquaculture first then move on to aquaponics if you still want to do it. You'd still be using the exact same equipment between the two except the aquaculture may be using a filter that wouldn't be used in the aquaponics.
>>
>>1164367
Have you considered growing mushrooms? Perfect basement activity
>>
>>1164367
Tilapia farming is a pretty big undertaking. You'll want at least 200 gallons, which means that will be 1600 lbs of water on the ground and potentially a massive spill if anything fucks up. The electricity costs will be high, heating and filtering will be expensive, about .5kWh, plus equipment costs. Tilapia is cheap, you could make a lot more money with a 200 gallon aquarium by breeding ornamental fish.
>>
>>1163751
throw it your nearest playground sandbox. don't forget to put your thumb prints all over the baggies.

>>1163756
Careful with that. I got a one-day ban a few weeks ago (presumably) for writing a message almost literally identical to yours.

>>1164367
>>1164456
>>1164602
Tilapia are junk fish. To each their own, but I honestly don't know why anyone would bother eating them, let alone raising them. They're good for catfood and grinding up as organic fertilizer, not eating for dinner. Flavourless in a bad way and nutritionally meh. I'm not sold on farmed fish in general, either.
>>
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>>1164612
Tilapia are not a junk fish. That's just a social thing you are repeating, like the stigma for carp and catfish. Their nutrition is fine, if they are fed correctly. The biggest problem stems from the food used for farmed fish as well as the antibiotics given to them due to how they are being raised. Farmed fish are in a CAFO environment and come with a massive amount of problems, more so than bovine CAFOs, due to how easily disease spread via water.

The only thing that has ever held me back from doing aquaculture in my pond has been the food source for them and disease prevention/treatment measures.
>>
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>>1164616
Still not a tilapia fan. I also see it marketed in stores as some great amazing exotic thing, when it's literally just farmed junk fish. Carp and catfish aren't too great either, IMO. I don't mind (wild) catfish too much, it's inoffensive at best, but only if it's caught at the right place/right season. But that muddy taste some describe I have encountered.

If that's what you've got where you live, OK, whatever, make do.

Maybe I am also spoiled because I grew up on coast and just generally prefer saltwater fish.

I'm surprised no one has mentioned edible snails, which are easy as piss to raise, if you can get over any squeamishness. Just avoid the giant african variety which are invasive species.
>>
>>1164656
Most people don't understand fish very well and will sell you anything and make anything for you to eat. With catfish, size is one of the most important thing. They must be under 24" or you shouldn't eat them. That's not just because of pollution, but for flavor too. The best tasting ones are about 12" long. The color of the meat is also extremely important. Don't eat anything that's yellow. It tastes muddy and super fishy. It also has the most pollution in that section. The color goes away when you cook it, so you may never know what you are eating until you know why it tastes the way it does. The reason for this is because catfish are a high order predator.

If I had my pick of fish, I'd always have yellow-tail snapper. I never eat tilapia simply because all of it is farmed. I eat some salmon and cod from time to time, but only the wild caught stuff.

>snails

The only way I can eat clams and oysters is batter dipped and deep fried. I think that's the only way I'd be able to eat snails too. However, that is a good recommendation for farming. Lissachatina fulica is quite fine for farming, just like all snails you need to take care to not feed them foods contaminated with rat feces, and you must strictly keep them in a terrariaum at all times and sterilize anything coming out of it. Since they eat fruit, veggies, greens, boiled eggs, etc they should be piss easy to raise for sure. Though, a calcium source should also be provided. They seem like a good pairing with chickens since they can eat the egg shells too. Since they are super invasive to warm climates below 40° latitude (coldest being 34°C), checking to see if you are legally allowed to raise them is needed.
>>
Why grow tilapia when you can grow bluegill or a comparable sunfish? The only thing is that bluegill are not vegetarian but that makes things easier actually since most pellets contain mostly krill or fish protein.
>>
>>1164682
>>1164656
>>1164616
The flavoring issue is due to a variety of factors. Wild Caught and Farm raised can have flavoring issues unless properly managed.

https://srac.tamu.edu/serveFactSheet/33

If the fish tastes muddy just add something acidic to it, and it should take care of the off flavor.
>>
>>1164773
You can grow feeder insects for them and feed the insects veggies and such.
>>
>>1163143
Assuming you're in North America, your chickens are probably freezing their asses off. They dont like to lay when they're cold. I always coop mine at night and have a heat lamp inside and 90% of them lay an egg a day year round
>>
>>1164801
Naw, I found a clutch of eggs they were laying out. There was 16 eggs just from one chicken. lol It has been cold so it is like they've been in the fridge this entire time. Since I tore up the area they've been laying in their boxes again. That happens from time to time.
>>
>>1164602
I have a 200 gallon stock tank. What kind edible fish could I raise in that? I'm not married to the idea of raising tilapia, I am more partial to catfish, crappie, and salmon for personal consumption (I know that little stock tank definitely couldn't support salmon).

To the people talking about raising bluegill- why? I've only ever thought of them as those annoying little turds who eat your worms and minnows when you're fishing for real shit. Do people eat them, or are they farmed so people can stock their ponds with a tardo fish their kids can easily catch?

And is the wild>farmed thing legit or just a meme? Can whatever bothers people about farm fish be remedied by feeding them decent food instead of little soy and corn balls?
>>
>>1164808
With farming it also affects the muscle quality. Just think about it: they're paddling around in relatively small confined spaces, never REALLY stretching their muscles. Some operations have huge tanks and limited fish per, but the problem is still there. Even the best farmed salmon is still greyish (it is 'pinked' before being harvested/packaged)

I get that farmed fish take pressure off wild stocks which we are over-fishing, but with the two choices I just prefer to forego fish and just occasionally buy good wild stock. Sardines are fairly sustainable and taste good (they do not taste like they smell).

But to each their own.
>>
>>1164808
Bluegill are just as good tasting as a crappie, I guess crappie are superior due to the easy fileting. They stay smaller so you could have more of them. Another fish to consider would be yellow perch.

Perhaps if you had a seperate 30 gallon tank to raise some livebearers in such as mollies, you could have an endless food source for the crappie. You'll also want a worm farm. Red wrigglers are great fish food. Blackworms are an easy to culture aquatic worm. You can also set a bucket outside and get mosquito larvae in the spring and summer. Frozen shrimp are also good.

You might be able to grow a 6-8 crappie to 10-12 inches in 200 gallons. It really isn't a lot of space to work with. Perhaps more with overkill filtration and constant water changes. If nitrate gets too high in the water it will stunt the growth and affect the taste. Same with ammonia. Which are both products of fish waste, and you will want to be feeding this fish a lot to keep the growth up, so do constant water changes and buy an expensive filter. Or buy an adequate pump and make a DIY filter out of a 55 gallon drum using an overflow. Once you know what your doing maintenance might be only an hour per week. Buy a thing called a python to fill and drain for water changes. Dechlorinate your water. Clean your filter but don't clean the biomedia that contains beneficial bacteria that detoxify fish waste. Don't feed the fish more than they can eat.

I breed aquarium fish as a hobby and this is what I do to grow fish.
>>
>>1164948
Since nitrites and ammonia are a concern with a small setup like that, would aquaponics be a better alternative so that the water wouldn't need to constantly be changed?
>>
>>1164948
>crappie...easy fileting.

I find they are equal in that, only the bluegill are thicker normally. Though, black crappie can get really tall. Both have pinbones, unlike catfish. Which makes filleting more of a chore since you need to spend more time picking the pinbones out of the fillets. Carp have branching pinbones which make that process a major pain to do correctly and it is one of the main reasons carp have a bad reputation.

>6-8 crappie...200 gallons

It really depends on you biofiltration system and what kind of person you are. If you have a really big biofiltration system that can process a lot of water then the max ratio of gallon of water to pounds of fish is 2:1 So, 200 gallons could raise 100lbs of fish. Personally, I'd stick to 3:1 ratio, 200 gallons and 66.66llbs of fish. Aquaculture/Aquaponics are always intensive like that, which is far different from the decorative fish trade for most hobbyists (big commercial operations are also intensive of course.) Hpbbyists seem to care more about fish health and mental state than the commercial operations. At least the commercial aquaponics systems are normally much better for fish health than the aquaculture ones. I think it has to do with the type of personality of the people.

>>1164779
>>1164948
Feeder roaches are easily fed. There's several species in the pet industry. 2 are best that are not a problem if they ever get loose, unlike native species which will carry your couch off a week after escaping. You can grow tons of them, freeze them, and feed them to your fish later on.

Blaptica dubia
Blatta lateralis

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nb1qMZOHJv0

Of course if you have lots of stuff that needs composted, use Black Solider Flies (Hermetia illucens) instead. You can still freeze their larva for fish food too. Harvesting them is super easy since all you need is a ramp in the bin with a drop into a container. Some people have the ramp directly into the tank or chicken pen.
>>
>>1164974
Yes, but in the beginning, before your biofilter is fully colonized, you'll need to change some of the water just to maintain proper chemical levels. After that, the system becomes more stable. However, you'll spend more time and work testing the water at very regular intervals. Even at good stability, the entire system is normally on a knife edge chemically. You can reduce that problem and make it increasingly stable by increasing the size of the biofilter system. I think most biofiltration systems are actually too small in most systems I've seen online. People just don't like using up their space.
>>
>>1164656
>>1164682
Soaking the fish in water and a bit of vinegar gets rid of the smell. Fry the catfish in small pieces and throw the belly to the animals. I prefer a cornmeal fry.
>>
>>1161108
You can buy plastic compost bins. Not sure what you would consider fancier. You could also make a wooden box but you'll have to replace it after a few years as it rots and becomes one with the compost pile. To be honest, you could really just make a compost pile if you're certain no animal will drag it around.
As for what to compost; food leftovers, dirty paper that you can't recycle (such as paper towels) and any leftover stuff you get around your plot (branches, leaves, grass).
>>
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MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!

A bit of an update. The chard is doing very well in the polytunnel despite the cold temperatures. Last night it snowed, but temps the previous week had been in the 40-50F/4-10C range I have a new rooster that I introduced to the hens last night. He bloodied his comb doing stupid things and got it all over everyone else it seems, but he's perky and fine this morning. Through my own error, I neglected to double check a head count and look under the chicken coop last night. I think it was because I was dealing with the new rooster. Regardless, the "lame" turkey decided to roost under the chicken coop as it did from time to time. It was the turkey hatched with one leg messed up, but did well growing up and became the star egg layer. Unfortunately, a raccoon or brave opossum got to it and it died. Though, if an opossum was involved, it was most likely after the turkey died from exposure. All my fault of course, but such is life and death on the small farm. One mistake and nature is there to remind you of it.
>>
>>1165681
what you doing with the corpse?
>>
>>1165689
I prefer not to compost meats and such so I'll feed it to the local coyotes outside the main fence. It'll be gone in the morning.
>>
>>1165693
sounds good
>>
>>1157208
Willows roots destroy everything
>>
>>1165760
Nah, none of those and I actually do drink and have been smoking cigs for a long time but no weed, just pointing out the hypocrisy of some /pol/acks
>>
So I bought a house this past summer and I'd like so start a garden this spring, but I'm kinda new to the whole thing. The property has an area that gets sunlight almost all day, but there is currently a trailer sitting in the middle of it. I've found a buyer fir the trailer, and it will hopefully be gone in the next few weeks. How likely is it that the soil under the trailer would be poor or possibly contaminated by something? Would it be worth it to try and improve the soil and dodge water lines and the septic tank, or should I just go ahead and invest the money into making raised beds?
>>
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>>1165904
House trailer? It really depends on the type of person who lived in the trailer as to how contaminated the place is. Like did they work on cars and dump oil and anti-freeze nearby? With a raised bed you can all manner of perks, though it really depends on your area. Just don't make anything directly over a septic tank or its leach field.

Here's some general unsorted info I've copied from the Homegrowmen threads about raised beds. At the very least, it is a good start for your own research.
>>
>>1165909
Thanks fren
>>
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>>1165909
>Marigolds deal with slugs
Awesome, I love marigolds.
>>
>>1166044
It works well enough for me, but I've never done scientific testing. The ones with the strongest odor are best. Mexican marigold and French marigold.
>>
>>1166044
Do they? I have always placed them in my beds but for the purpose of keeping deer and flying insects away. Come to think of it, no slugs
>>
>>1166079
>>1166044
They area trap plant for slugs.
>>
Follow up question to >>1165904
What do you guys use to fill your raised beds? I've read a lot of people use 1/3 construction sand, 1/3 compost, and 1/3 peat moss, but that sounds like its going to get really pricey. Could I get away with using 1/2 local topsoil and 1/2 compost?
>>
>>1166249
Yeah, that should be okay. I use mostly compost and coarse sand. I need to add a bit of clay to it, but that will come in time.
>>
>>1166249
I did a hugelkultur this year, it worked well. I put all kinds of shit in the bed. logs, sticks, leaves, topped with some nice worm dirt from the nearby landscaping supply.
>>
Is this a fungal or bacterial disease? It's on a young mango plant
>>
>>1166485
Might be Cephaleuros, but looks like there's a nutrient deficiency as well, evidenced as the yellowing between the sections. The deficiency could be caused by too much watering or simply not enough nutrients in the soil.
>>
>>1166503
I hope it's a deficiency. I wish I was better with plants
>>
I've been given a cold frame for christmas and to be honest I have no idea how to really utilise it.

I started growing veg on an allotment last year and did fairly well and finding sunny spots for all the flats of seeds was a nightmare.

Can i just basically throw my flats in there?
>>
>>1166707
You can use it like a mini-greenhouse when things are starting to warm up before the last frost. Just put some starts that are hardened off to being in the cold frame. If you want, you can grow cole crops all year long in them.
>>
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This is my first time on this board, here's hoping I can get some help or at least an interesting discussion:

I've been thinking about living away from the city for a while now.
I don't plan to be completely self sustaining, or to go completely off the grid, but I feel that living a simpler life is better for the mind and soul, and I have my doubts about the future of the industrial society.
That being said, I plan to get a taste of it planting some stuff on my backyard (pic related).
The grass is where my dogs piss and shit, but I guess I can start working on the elevated areas for now:
>Do I have to remove the "dirty" soil before I plant anything on it? There is a cat that every other day comes to my house to take a shit on the area I intend to cultivate.
>Is it a wise move to build a composter before planting anything?
>How many hours a day should I expect to work in order to keep the garden in shape?
>Is this life style compatible with a freelance career (illustration) or people have to work full time if they want to be more self reliant?
>>
>>1167120
>remove the "dirty" soil

No need, just remove visible cat crap. The soil might need amendment and fertilizer/compost, but it should be better than the local soil. Use netting/fencing to keep cats out of it after you've cultivated it.

>build a composter before planting anything

You can do both at the same time.

>hours a day

That depends on how large it is and your methods of gardening. If you spent 2 hours a day in the garden, you'd have an amazing garden of a good size. The garden will take care of itself for some of the growing season.

>compatible with a freelance career

It really depends on how large it is and what type of diet you have in relation to what you are growing. As well has how many hours you are working your normal job. How you garden will be a big part of this. Something simply like mulching can help reduce lots of work. That's just one time saving method of many.
>>
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Anyone here Have a horticulture degree? I'm 21 and considering getting my associates for it. I work at a botanical gardens already and was talking to my boss who suggested a college about an hour away from my hometown. Im not really looking to make a ton of money, I just want to do something I'm passionate about and Im happy making a living wage. I dont want to work somewhere that makes me want to an hero every day.
If anyone have any advice/experience I would love to hear it because Im feeling pretty lost at the moment.
Basically what I do now is work in the greenhouses taking care of and propagating new plants. I really just want to keep doing this but have more responsibility and make more money
Pic related, it's where I work now
>>
>>1167272
Go get that degree, take some business classes, the ones that teach you how to navigate paperwork and taxes. And get a credit card asap so you can build credit to get a loan to start your own business propagating plants.
>>
>>1167280
Ahhh that's the dream
Thanks anon
>>
>>1167280
>And get a credit card asap

I'm so glad I got out of all debt. I switched over to non-debt mode about 10 years ago. I recommend it to everyone. Turns out, its mentally better to simply use a savings account, put money into it, and have that on hand for big purchases via debit card. Thinking about a wad of cash in your savings account, instead of a pile of debt on your cards/loans, really changes your frame of mind about everything.
>>
>>1167332
>t. financially illiterate

You need credit to take out a loan to start a business. So you get a credit card and use it like a debit card. Is anon just supposed to wait 18 years to save up 60k to buy a property and greenhouses and business supplies and stock?
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>>1167336
I had 2 businesses. I sold both for a bundle. You can save up 60k in 2-3 years at most. Stop being poor minded. You are the only one holding you back.
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>>1167582
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>>1167587
I was born into a poor farmer family. I've come full circle and am again a farmer.
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>>1156432
just move to BC
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>>1167332
so many things wrong with this post
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>>1167587
>its everyone else's fault that I piss away my money instead of saving it
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Well, it was -1F/-18C here last night. The ground is frozen, pond is frozen over, the duck is moved in with the chickens, a water heater was installed for the chickens, and I can't dig up potatoes any further. I have plenty of potatoes already dug up, to eat on, until the ground thaws out in spring. It has been a full month since I've opened the trashcan cellar to check on the potatoes. Here's the results. The top layer of potatoes seem normal. They don't have any sprouts and they are not spongy. It was down to 32F/0C in my garage, so I decided to move the rest of the seed potatoes into the trashcan cellar. I also chucked in the thermometer, the temps on which right now don't show the actual temps since it just came from the garage.

All-in-all, the trashcan cellar seems to work, but I'll not know until I empty it completely next spring. Hopefully, the temps at the bottom will be low enough that the potatoes there won't sprout further.
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I live in USDA zone 6, is it too late to still plant garlic? I've seen that it can be planted in December but I'm not sure if it would just be a better idea to plant in the spring. I ordered 8 cloves of California softneck so I can't wait to plant them.
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Can someone ID these two plants?
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This one is some kind of tree
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>>1167907
>>1167910
What part of the world?
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>>1155966
how dare you insult our culture you newfriend faggot. Where the fuck are you from woman? That's basically 4-chan culture.
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>>1167928

Northern Italy, both are ornamental plants planted by the previous owner of the house
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>>1155966

Fucking normies get the fuck out of my boars REEEE
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>>1155966
Nobody is going to miss you.
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Added some stuff to my compost pile today and noticed the top 8 inches or so was frozen solid. Is this normal? I thought it was supposed to start generating its own heat as it decomposes. This is my first time composting, so I'm not really sure if I'm doing this right.
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I've germinated some kiwi seeds from a store bought fruit and they've done well so far indoors, but I'm not sure they'll survive in my climate. Is zone 7 too cold for planting kiwis outdoors?
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>>1167910
Looks like one of many species of Lantana

>>1167907
Those look like ornamental chilies, but I could be wrong.

>>1167992
Sounds like you need more green matter. Compost does generally do better and break down faster in warmer months.
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>>1167992
Yes, that is completely normal. Even a perfect mix will freeze over, depending on how cold it is. Winter simply takes longer regardless.
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>>1159729
my man
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>>1167272
>>1167320
I wish I still worked in a greenhouse. Too bad the boss was shit at economics and went out of business. All he needed to do way pay someone to fix the heat exchanger on the furnaces and the leak wouldn't have gassed the plants and bankrupted the biz.
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>>1165225
>>1161108
You can also just stack bricks to about waist or chest-height on three sides and heap the compost against it. Various wire fencing could be used to seal it in, depending on the critters in your area.

Where I am, raccoons (yes, plural) are a real fucking problem and they will dig around in and scatter your shit. There's the occasional mouse/rat I'm sure, but neighbourhood cats can deal with those. You can't kill raccoons in my municipality, and neighbours would probably freak out... Live traps will catch them, but it's a spit in the bucket for all the help it does -- there's a conga line of raccoons behind each one you trap.
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>>1167999
Not an expert on US hardiness zones but Kiwis are not a tropical fruit, so it sounds like they'll be OK. The question is whether they'll produce well enough under more 'natural' conditions and not intensive agro like store-bought kiwis are.

They'll grow a bit bigger/quicker in warmer weather, naturally. My in-laws have vines for smaller "berry" kiwis and they can get winters down to -5°C (southwestern Germany).
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>>1167999
>>1168595
"Hardy" kiwi varieties are better for colder climates (supposedly -40F USDA Hardiness Zone 3, but I'd not want them past 10F realistically). Regular kiwi are for USDA Hardiness Zones 7 through 9. In Zone 7 I'd watch out for freak cold snaps and maintain the plants in something that can be easily covered when needed to prevent sudden frost damage before the plant has a chance to go dormant.

Regardless, harden them off before putting them outside. I'd only do that in the late spring or after last frost.
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>>1167999
>>1168595
I'm living in a winter-mild (8a) but very cold summer climate (July daily mean 20°C), and we always get tons of kiwis each year. We pick them in late October/early November, then let them post-ripen indoors for a couple weeks
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Hi all. I've just gotten back from sowing cacti seed. Am I doing it right and is there anything I should do further? This is the first time I've planted anything.

>Used cacti/ succulent mix in small, relatively shallow plastic pot
>Moistened it, but let the water run through, making sure none is left standing
>Spread seeds out after flattening
>lightly brushed some soil over the top of them (one lot i used the same cacti mix, the next lot I sprinkled dirt. I don't have access to sand.)
>put the small pots in individual plastic sandwich bags

I've left them outside. Is this a bad idea? I'm in the Australia in the middle of Summer right now. Will they get too much heat during the day? I realise they are cacti, but nevertheless I'm not sure if exposing them to that much heat is a great idea if they're still seeds.

With that said, if I leave them out during the night, will they get too cold? I'll obviously bring them inside when I know it's going to rain.
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>>1169020
Forgot to attach. Here's my setup, pots in sandwich bags atop my old brick BBQ. I could theoretically place them between the BBQ and the wall beside it, so they only get direct light for like 6 hours.
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>>1169020
Growing cacti from seeds is a bitch. Depends what you're planting, of course... I can usually get them to sprout, but I've never had a cacti sprout last more than a few months without dying despite heating mats and seedling greenhouses domes, etc.

To be fair, I haven't tried more than a few times. And I live in Canada, so for me it's generally indoors with cacti. They need fairly humid conditions at first, at least in my experience.
>>
I found out about Aguadulce broad beans. A broad bean race that you sow in oktober/november and harvest april/march.

They survived the 4 inches of snow for two days last week and -1 celcius. Pretty neat.

The ones in the mini greenhouse are doing significatly better. I'm probably going to keep them all and plant them in pots.
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>>1169104
These little ones survived being buried under snow. Amazing!
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>>1169104
Going to plant these in pots, hopefully that will do the trick.
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>>1169020
It is better to make sure that the seedling roots don't entangle with roots of other seedlings by planting the seeds in separate pots. This makes transplanting less stressful.

>in bag, outside, Australia

Keep them in the shade at all times while outside. Otherwise, they may cook, if the sun hits them in those bags.
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>>1169104
I read about those once long ago. they seem interesting for sure. I wonder how they'd fair in my area. It is super wet in the winter and the first thing to sprout is chickweed. If I don't keep it clear it will create a thatch that even asparagus has trouble with.

>>1169106
Those look great!
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>>1168764
>then let them post-ripen indoors for a couple weeks

Are they picked "green" or are they actually ripe when you pick them? I take it they need a slightly longer growing season.
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>>1167272
Anon, if that is something you really like doing and you can make money doing it then go for it! Just remember to make good connections with people in the business in order to better find work/customers. Typically, people who really love something will research everything about it themselves and won't need a degree to do that. some people need structured curriculum to get them moving in the right direction. Regardless, there may be aspects of research you would not know about if you didn't get a degree and most importantly, you will make friends in that field and important connections when taking classes for a degree.
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>>1168038
>>1167907
>Those look like ornamental chilies

I agree. These cultivars are also round:

Cappa Round Tricolor
Nosegay
Black Pearl (really awesome looking with black-purple leaves)
Holiday Cheer
Marbles
Guyana/Wiri Wiri
BM25 Cappa Round Red
Hot Pops
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>>1169152
Fresh off the vine they're just too hard to eat directly
But that way you can store them for months at just above freezing, and then put them at room temperature for a couple days before eating
But yeah they're green ones, a bit smaller than store-bought though
Putting them near tomatoes/apples accelerates the ripening a bit
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>>1167801
I was surprised just how little you can stuff in one of those full-sized metal trashcans when you use hay to layer them. I know you could fit in a ton more if there was no hay, but somehow it just seems right to have the potatoes separated into layers as a way to improve some airflow and prevent spread of rot.
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NEW THREAD: >>1169147
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>>1169152
>>1169157
Also for hardiness it depends a little, the plants had no issue with the -16°C we got in 2012, but this year in late April when it was in flower we got an unusual light frost (just -2) and some of the flowers froze away, but this also affected some apples and grapevines
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>>1155557
Grow banana peppers, extremely easy and prolific
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>>1155584
>(satisfying) sizes.
You stick them up your ass dont you?
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>>1155668
Not weapons related, fuck off
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>>1155966
Lurk moar
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>>1155668




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