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Old thread: >>1155539

Search terms:

Permaculture - Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Rooftop Gardening - Vertical Gardening - Subsistence Agriculture - Square Foot Gardening - Shifting Cultivation - Polyculture - Composting - Ley Farming - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Co-operative Farming - Orchard - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method - Ruth Stout No-work Garden - Rain Gutter Garden - Core Gardening Method -

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish - Donkey - Ostrich - Worm - Black Soldier Fly (BSF) - Beefalo - Guineafowl

Resources:

General: https://pastebin.com/xhWQpG9W
Fungi: https://pastebin.com/ddb6fAPS

Homegrowmen Archive (WinRAR/WinZip/7Zip etc open rar archive files):

>76.1MB
>Homegrowmen Threads Mar-20-2013 to Sep-29-2017.rar
https://www.mediafire.com/file/lbotds76751ws79/Homegrowmen%20Threads%20Mar-20-2013%20to%20Sep-29-2017.rar
>>
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>>1169147
All links in the "General" pastebin have been double checked and fixed. It seems TPB doesn't have some of Murray's Aquaculture dvds anymore.
>>
>>1169157
Ah, very good info to know. I thought they wouldn't last that long. Then again I'm only familiar with store bought kiwi. I really need to get some hardy kiwi plants this year.
>>
>>1169161
(If you missed it) >>1169162
>>
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>>1169163
Thanks, saw it.

>>1169162
The worst average here is -15F/-26C. Though -40 has happened in the past for a short time. So, hardy varieties are needed, even then I'll probably put a bale of straw over their roots in winter.

Here's what things look like currently. 25F/-3C
>>
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I have a coffee plant which is a few years old and has 4 stems. Would it be worth cutting off the 3 smallest to let the largest grow? Would they be part of the same plant or different?
>>
>>1169171
Move some of the soil back and see if they stems connect. They probably do. You can cut them so you only have one stem, if you wish. Since you are not farming them intensively, you can train them how ever you wish. If those are each separate plants then cutting off the extras will help the main plant a great deal.
>>
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>>1169165
Dark now here, so nothing much to see. No proper frost yet so far, so all the weeds that popped up after clearing my annuals in October are still there... some snow yesterday but now it's +11/52 again, so no trace left
>>
>>1169183
I need more masonry walls in my life. What are the plants on the walls? How well do those metal twisted tomato stakes work? I always need to support mine with so much stuff it looks like a state run engineering project.
>>
At a nursery here in North Florida (zone 8), what should I get?
>>
>>1169203
Get what you want, its Florida.
>>
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>>1169196
It's only a small part of the garden, but in the right of the pic, I'm starting a more organised herb bed so I replanted stuff from elsewhere now in October, so it still looks rough in the current state (will add mulch in spring)
Currently with oregano, thyme (vulgaris and citriodorus), majoram, lavender (latifolia and angustifolia), rosemary, parsley and sage
Middle is an ornamental Phoenix threopasti (Cretan date palm), they're supposed to be more frost tolerant than canariensis, so I'm testing it
Left is a Chinese pear (nashi), not pictured further left a regular pear as pollinator (both planted back in spring, so no flowers/fruit yet)
On top the asparagus ramp, and behind that on the wall raspberries and blackberries, but I'll probably have to remove those soon as they have more and more disease (some fungus I assume)
Spirals work good for up to medium sized tomatoes (pic from summer), really heavy beefsteak ones are a bit too flimsy sometimes and might need extra support. They're also quite cheap here, around €1-2/ea depending on size, apparently much rarer and more expensive overseas
>>
>>1169250
I recall that garden!

I'm jealous of your herbs. I don't grow as many as I'd like. It'd be nice to replace all the store bought ones for home grown. I'll keep to using cattle panels for my tomatoes then.
>>
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>>1169254
Haha yeah posted it a couple times from that position
Herbs are pretty much what I started with, because similar to peppers, it takes little care and you don't need too much for a significant effect
Especially rosemary is going absolutely bananas, those two bushes for example were tiny ~2cm cuttings I rooted in early 2016 8you could also start them from seed but they have a very bad germination rate). Also once established you don't really need to water them unless you live in an absolute desert
>>
>>1169260
Nice photo. The main herbs I would need are, black pepper (greenhouse needed) & cumin (easy peasy). I've been growing garlic and hot pepper for a while now.
>>
I can't keep rosemary going to save my life. The one I planted grew rapidly and healthily, but started turning brown and died.

What gives?
>>
>>1169384
what zone
>>
>>1169386
Sydney, Australia. I don't know.
>>
>>1169389
overwatering
>>
>>1169392
I ignored it though. Didn't water much. Planted it in the ground too. It died during the summer.

Might have been the rain but the soil is still well draining.
>>
>>1169402
>>1169384
>What gives?
>I ignored it though.

It could have been anything.
>>
>>1169544
As in watering wise, I gave it a small amount.

I'll try again I suppose.
>>
>>1169598
They are fairly easy to grow, if you have the right climate. Mildew and root rot are common in very humid places (like mine) and in soils that don't drain well. Do a soil drainage perk test like this,

https://www.todayshomeowner.com/diy-soil-drainage-perk-test-for-your-yard/

For rosemary, the drainage should be faster than normal.

https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-rosemary/
>>
>>1169715
Mine (>>1169260) are sitting in heavy clay which is pretty much permanently wet from about November to March, they don't seem to mind at al, even growing faster than ones in other places of the garden that are better draining (elevated and looser soil)
>>
>>1169718
My soil is heavy clay too. Well, you can make nice bricks out of my soil actually. lol

If you are getting snow in winter, the rot shouldn't affect them because of how cold it is. It is the warm times of the year where excessive rain can destroy the roots. I have all that in spades here and no one can grow rosemary in the normal soils. A 1st year plant will grow slowly and during that time, it is more susceptible to problems. The 2nd year plants do a lot better since they get properly hooked up to a mycelial network to help prevent diseases. The more rosemary shrubs you have together the better the net affect of disease prevention from the mycelial network.
>>
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>>1169147
>Homegrowmen Threads

I'm saving recent older /hgm/ threads to my PC and will add them to an archive file for upload at a later date as they occur in batches of 10 threads/year each.

Here's the first batch, threads 106 to 111:

http://www.mediafire.com/file/s1dycle6n9a06n5/Homegrowmen+Threads+Sep-29-2017+to+Dec-31-2017.rar
>>
I'm a graduate student at a private American university that gets good funding and has great connections to the aquaculture and seafood industries.
Any ideas for a practical marine-science related PhD thesis that requires a lot of outdoor work? I'm really sick of sitting in chemistry and bio classes, and I want to build something.
>>
>>1170262
A BS degree in Marine Science can include an Aquaculture concentration, but that depends on where you are and what is being offered.

https://www.bachelorsportal.com/study-options/269779246/aquaculture-fisheries-united-states.html
>>
>>1170306
I don't think there's any point posting fear mongering stuff in Homegrowmen threads. Keep that in >>>/an/ where it belongs historically.
>>
>>1170311
funfact: you are free to leave.
>>
>>1170298
I finished undergrad a few years ago and have a BS in Marine Biology. I've already gotten accepted to the graduate program I like, I'd just like some suggestions for research.

I want to know if there is any big question related to aquaculture or aquaponics that still hasn't been solved and needs a lot of research. It can be chemical, microbiological, genetic, geological (soil and sand especially), economic, legal, whatever. I have connections.
>>
>>1170345
Model the spread of diseases in an aquaculture system.
>>
I'm moving into a single room soon and I'm wondering if I can get anything to grow in such a tight space and if I could what do I grow, any of you in a single room/tight space?
>>
*jumps into your garden and eats your shit*

What do?
>>
>>1170593
I grow all my starts on a 2 shelving units in my bedroom. For tall plants, 3 shelves per unit would probably be the max, depending on how tall the plants are.
>>
>>1170619
Before I got a 6' tall fence, I shot deer in my garden a few times a year. I don't like doing it because they flop around and break things if they don't go right down.
>>
Six USD left over from an amazon gift card, what should I get?
>>
My dwarf avocado tree is dropping leaves as they darken around the edges that spread inwards before falling. Not sure what's wrong since just before that it had been recovering very well and was getting better. Suddenly it changed out of nowhere.
>>
>>1170619
Plant more shit. Seriously. Plant a bunch of cheap crap like buckwheat or whatever they seem to like around the edges. Also hanging CDs around so they flash in the breeze helps. I got tired of fighting the animals & they can only eat so much. The rest is for me
>>
>>1170737
Pepper seeds

>>1170624
Did you eat them?

>>1169764
Based anon
>>
>>1170739
Shit should provide more info my bad.

Currently, it is under a potent light lamp designed for tropicals(I keep a lot of tropicals). I recently fed it with tropical tree fertilizer but I do that only once a month tops. Usually its once every other month. My soil mixture is worm casings, clay, and aged compost. I keep a heavy duty air moisturizer to keep the air moist for them.

It used to be doing great despite nearly dying from an unexpected hailstorm but it started to recover and sprout leaves after shedding them all from shock. Then one day the leaves started to darken around the edges and fall off.

Thought maybe I am not watering it enough but I have a banana tree in a smaller pot that also loves lots of water that is doing great.

Honestly rather stumped and I can't figure what's wrong.
>>
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I want to be a sheperd.

What can you tell me about it ? I have read you must own a minimum of 50 sheeps and sell at least 40% of your livestock a year to be considered elligible for a funding. They are somewhat needed for mowing the grass in ski stations during the summer where vehicles cannot go.

If I start with 2-10 sheeps, can I just use my own estate ? How big should it be ?
If I decide to produce my own hay for the winter, how much additional land do I need for wheat ?
Best dog breed to guard the herd ? What do you think of drones for guarding/watching a herd ?
https://youtube.com/watch?v=yrj8yqdjSTU

Ideally I would like to rely on a very small herd for milk (cheese) and whool (clothes).
>>
>>1170813
>Did you eat them?

Of course.

>>1170842
Worm casting plus fertilizer? Have you done any nutrient testing? Mangos don't like high soil salinity. Repot then drop one of the fertilizers, either the worm castings or the tropical stuff.

>>1170854
I've been thinking about getting some sheep for lawn care, wool, and meat. Wish I had more info too.
>>
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>>1170915
>meat
You would not kill an animal you raised, r-right ?

Some news
1000m2 by sheep
8 months of lactation
and 70kg of wheat by 100m2 but I don't know if it is for hay, crop or both
>>
>>1170619
A high fence, plus an electric wire on top.
>>
>>1170925
Of course I'd eat them. That is what I've done in the past with chickens, turkeys, ducks, goats, ect. People have less problems with killing and butchering something they've raised if they don't give them names and raise & butcher many at the same time.

>>1171001
Electric fencing for a psychological effect. You place it at nose level. Once shocked, the stay well away from it. Placing a single strand of electric fence at deer nose level, in front of a high fence will do far more than having it at the top of the fence.
>>
>>1169147
I have a big garden and i want to get into growing species mostly for cooking,what would you recommend?
>>
>>1171094
Lettuce, tomatoes, leak, potatoes, carrots, onions, garlic, chives
>>
>>1171095
I'm from Buenos Aires summer right now and 30 C i think it's not the best time for tomatoes,what would you grow?
>>
>>1171094
Make a list of the foods you eat normally. Get recipes for those foods. Go through the ingredient lists and choose the vegetables/meats you think you might like to grow/raise. Research each one individually and learn how to grow/raise them in your climate.

>>1171097
You can grow tomatoes outside in any temperature that does not frost or freeze. For cold regions, people plan their gardening between the last and first frost dates. Other people use greenhouses and polytunnels to grow in cold months. For locations where the heat is too much, you need to use shade cloths over the plants to keep them cooler. Where I live the summer can get as hot as 43C in the sun and 100% humidity. I grow all manner of vegetables, especially tomatoes. Most plants prefer it around room temperature (22-23C or so). For high humidity areas, space between the plants and their branches is essential to reduce mildew and mold from starting problems. There are also cold-tolerant species and heat-tolerant species.

The highs and lows in Buenos Aires are pretty much perfect for year-round gardening. You may need well draining soils in your wet season for some crops; like potatoes.
>>
>>1171104
Thanks my man,my father is in to this so i thought of giving it a chance,where are you from? seems like a jungle-like area
>>
>>1171107
One of the temperate rain forests in the USA. It also gets down to -40C here in the winter. It is -20C right now and my water lines are completely froze. Good winter so far. I'm hoping for a good maple sugar run this year. Last year it was so warm that things were blooming this time of year so I didn't make any maple syrup.
>>
>>1170619
Birdshot or a dog.
>>
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>>1170813
Ordered.
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>>1171201
>>
My bees keep dying every winter :(. I think it's because my neighbors use pesticides
>>
>>1171266
It might be that. There's a lot of stuff you need to do to ensure they survive the winter. Including making sure they have enough honey and to feed them directly if it is too cold for them to move over to get the honey they do have. Sometimes you need to use an insulation cover to help keep them warm. Once you've checked for diseases and covered all the bases then you can decide what may be the problem of winter die off.

I caught many swarms this year. 2 of them were rather small and died off in October when it got only a little colder. I'm expecting only 2 hives to survive until spring. I have 4 right now.
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>>1171266
try something like this

https://www.dadant.com/catalog/m00826-boardman-entrance-feeder
>>
>>1171387
That really only works in warmer weather. In winter, the bees huddle up against the brood combs. They even starve too death if it is so cold they won't leave there and go up to get honey from their storage. You have to drizzle the food on them.
>>
>>1171112
That is neat can we see some pics of frozen rainforest pls anon?
>>
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>>1171411
My camera is in for repair, but here's one from a few days ago. The rest with this set are in: >>>/p/3210596
>>
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Just transplanted my pepper seedlings to their first real pot. I'm gonna let them grow a bit more and then use my meme fertilizer on them. I currently have one incandescent bulb on them, how much more light should I look into as they get bigger? I'm planning on moving them outside once the weather warms up and possibly turning them into bonsai trees.
>>
>>1171502
>tfw you posted the "grow well, little pepper" image 6 hours too soon

>how much light?
All the light anon. All the light.
>>
>>1171455
Thanks anon that is some cool photography
>>
>>1171502
Make sure they are a good size before adding fertilizer. Seedlings don't like a lot of fertilizer.
>>
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>>1171502
>>
>>1171873
>grow well, little pepper

does this effect include kohlrabi? that's all I got growing right now. in front of the windows no growlights. but I got lots of windows. the South side of the house has 4 windows right next to each other
>>
>>1171752
I'm going to fill some pots with soil, would mixing fertilizer into it hurt seedlings? Will a month or two help?
>>
>>1172165
Don't give them fertilizer or mix it in. Most soil isn't that bereft of nutrients. Yes, wait a month. then follow directions for typical pepper plant fertilizing.
>>
>>1172183
Is it the same process with transplanting or can stronger plants handle it?
>>
>>1172216
You only need to wait a week usually after transplanting older plants. Unless the soil is bone dry you also hold back water for a day or two. This allows the roots to seal up any breaks before bacteria, virus, or bad fungi infect them. For the fertilizer it allows t hem to reconnect to any mycorrhizal network and remake their fine rhizoids on the roots.
>>
>>1170348
Good idea!
>>
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>>1171266
I know that feel Anon, I lost my first two hives this winter. They were ravaged by disease and I was an amateur. Any tips for beekeeping would be welcome.
>>
>>1172342
The best tip is to check the hives completely every 2 weeks. Learn how to look for disease and how to test for mites as well as how to fix the problems.

You can also create some mushroom garden plots in the area using wood chips (Garden Giant "Stropharia rugoso-annulata"). Bees that gather water secreted from those fungi will have far better immune systems. If you want more info on that, check out this Paul Stamets lecture:

Specifically, around the 50 minute mark and on for more:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8DjeaU8eMs
>>
>>1172508
>Bees that gather water secreted from those fungi will have far better immune systems.
Nature is so fucking cool.
>>
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>>1172564
Yup, at 56 mins into the video in >>1172508 there's a 5 minute subvideo section about putting a similar thing to commercial use. Here's just that video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_lqIUlON1s
>>
Hello /pol/. I recently purchased this large head of garlic cloves and one of them appears to be growing. This happens almost every time I buy garlic and I’m just so sick of it because now I have these garlic babies and I don’t want to abort them (throw them in the trash). How can I prevent this from happening, and how do I plant this little f***?
>>
>>1172639
It is rather difficult to prevent them from sprouting, but keeping them in the fridge does help. The best advice for that is to only buy what you will need to use within 1 week and to check for green tops starting to form on the bulbs when you buy them.

As for what to do with it after they sprout. The flavor of the bulb changes to a slightly more bitter flavor when they sprout. so, the best use I've found is to stick them in some soil in a jar and set it on the window sill. They grow readily like that. Then after they are about 8-10 inches tall, I cut the tops off down to about 2 inches. I use the green tops in recipes and the like. I normally keep several bulbs growing at once so that I have plenty of greens growing all winter long. I can sometimes get up to 5 cuttings off 1 bulb before it finally dies.
>>
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First time growing cassava. I decided to intercrop some basil with it, but realized I may have made a mistake. Won't the cassava grow over the basil (due to their large size) and block the light for the basil? Does basil need full sun exposure?

Pic related, part of my garden. Foreground bed divided in 2 parts: eggplant and cassava/basil.
Background is my (((soy))) plot. Blame /pol/ for making me grow those organic estrogen capsules unironically.
>>
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>>1172903
Beany pods are sticking out now~ uwu~
Soybeans grow great here, got the seeds out of a supermarket bulk bin.
Looking forward to making soy milk, and for the added information, I am NOT a faggot
>>
>>1172920
S O Y B O Y
>>
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>>1172937
~I got a sprout of sage in my container garden too, I saved it just for you~
You guys said being a soyim would be bad, but soy is the strongest and most prolific crop I've grown! Maybe it grows so well because I listened to weeb shit while I was tilling the bed...
>>
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>>1172920
>soy
>>
>>1172920
don't worry, we get more estrogen hormones from our dairy
>>
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>>1172945
>onions
>being this based
>>
>>1169734
The size of these balls are massive! His crop is likely borked but he gets to save neighbouring crops and his neighbours. Such respect for this.
>>
>>1172903
I had giant sunflowers over my basil last year. They didn't grow as tall as normal, but did rather well despite that.
>>
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My soybeans are growing at a an alarming rate. Is this it, /out/? Have I finally taken the soypill?
First time growing soy, and I'm simply too impressed
>>
>>1173412
That's normal for legume crops, if soil and growing conditions are good.
>>
>>1173412
What are you even going to make with the harvest?
>>
>>1173706
soi bois
>>
>>1173706
>>1172920
Like scroll up 10 posts
>>
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Sorry for the block of text, I just want to rescue an abandoned plant. The picture is from Wednesday morning.

Someone left it on the side of the road, where I retrieved in Sunday, and I hope it isn't already dead from the cold. Once inside I left it alone for a day to warm up, then gave it some water, maybe too much. It didn't come with the pot originally. I don't have a picture from the day I picked it up, but in general it seems to have lost color and gained dark spots. I would expect the outer leaves to die but now the inner core of leaves aren't looking as good either. What type of plant is this, and any advice on caring for it better?
>>
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>>1173880

This picture is worse in quality, but I think it also shows that the plant is looking worse. Is it just going to get worse before it should get better?
This photo is from just within the past half hour. I haven't wwatered the plant since Monday, but I did spray it with a little water. I also shined a UV lamp on it a bit, but I don't know if that helps or harms (and in what amount)?
>>
>>1173727
I actually thought the soymilk thing was a joke.

>>1173880
>>1173905
I don't know what kind it is, but >>>/an/2566080 might. You seem to have done most of what you can do for it to recover, but it does look pretty bad right now.
>>
>>1173995
Soyboy here, the soymilk thing wasn't a joke. If I could find the necessary curdling salts, I might even make tofu out of the soy harvest. In addition, I just ordered Star of David okra seeds from rare seeds.com

I'm certain that everything I grow is grown ironically, and I wish I could bring myself to grow normal shit. It's /pol/'s curse
>>
All my tomatoes and assorted tender plants died this week. Florida's been extra hot this winter, with most days hovering near 80F as the high. We got a few days of hard frost this week though and even my covered plants look like boiled spinach. Such is my hubris for trying to grow tomatoes year-round.

>>1174061
Grow something that needs lots of nitrogen in that bed once you're done for real soy gains. IDK what season you're in ATM where you are, but I'd either do squash or brassicas depending on which.
>>
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>>1174117
Pic related. I pulled all the green fruits off the dead vines and saved what I could to make roasted salsa. Still mad that my hour or so spent wrapping every plant in a blanket did jack shit.
>>
>>1174061
>I'm certain that everything I grow is grown ironically
what the fuck is wrong with you?
>>
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>>1174117
Yeah, I grew sweet potatoes prior so I figured growing soybeans would replenish nitrogen in the soil. That is, if inoculation doesn't matter. Will the soybeans find their own nitrogen-fixing bacteria, or do I need to use MemeDip(tm) to introduce that bacteria for them? It's too late anyways.
>>1174262
That's it, I'm replacing my ciliantro garden with a sage and onions now. If it does my induce keks and Lels, then what's the point of gardening anyways?
>pic related, Israeli Okra seeds I ordered from rareseeds.com OY VEY
>>
>>1174117
>>1174129
You just needed some thermal mass and plastic. Even then, if something of the plant touches the covering it will freeze at that spot. Black painted soda bottles full of water make great thermal mass and they are easy to place around plants in tunnels and such.

>>1174270
They'd find the bacteria themselves.
>>
>>1174281
It was two nights of 32 degrees, the rest of the month will be low of 45 tops. I wasn't prepared for real winter, though you are of course correct with your advice of thermal mass and buffer zones to save me next time. I feel really bad driving around town and seeing people's ruined banana trees and curled brown papaya trees.

>>1174270
IDK, I always assumed you'd get some without inoculation, though my aunt swears by adding the memecorrizae for best results. Do you even like okra? I find unless I'm gonna fry it it's only good for like two things, so I never bother growing it despite how perfect my climate is for it.
>>
>>1174577
>though my aunt swears by adding the memecorrizae for best results

I'm sure adding a ton of the exact bacteria to them, in the beginning, would be a lot faster than waiting around for the natural versions to eventually get up to the same levels.

>>1174577
It's already been -20F here this winter now and -10F several nights in a row. Only 4F right now. I have some chard in a polytunnel. I've not opened it up since it got super cold. It'll be interesting to see of they have survived:
>>
>>1174670
>>1174523
Goats only eat selectively. They are browsers. They need a varied diet. You want sheep which are used exclusively in some places to mow lawns. They were also the original lawn mowers in Europe.

Chicken only eat a very tiny amount of grass and it is highly selective.
>>
>>1174677
Goats will take down anything they can get, they'll chew on branches, bushes and tree bark
>>
So I planted some herbs the other week and they've finally sprouted. The germination rate was low so I planted a dew seeds in each 3 inch pot, but all the seeds ended up sprouting. Should I separate the seedlings or just let them grow together? The herbs are cilantro, parsley and chives. Can post pics if needed
>>
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>>1175118
They normally eat bushes, briar leaves, tree limbs, bark, weeds, etc. They don't normally eat grass. They will eat everything else and the grass will be last. If your goats are eating the grass it means their diet isn't supplemented correctly. They are not like sheep or cattle which are grazers not browsers.

http://www.dummies.com/home-garden/hobby-farming/raising-goats/what-to-feed-your-goats/

Grazing animals like sheep are what is needed for mowing a lawn, not browsing animals like goats.

>>1175192
Wait 2 weeks then cut off the smaller plants in the pots leaving the largest. Don't pull them out, just cut them off. The 2 week wait is to ensure there's no problems from, "damping off". The chives may do fine without thinning out the seedlings. I find they do okay as a clump. That will be up to you though.

>Can post pics if needed

Always post pics regardless
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>>1173880
>>1173905
what about giving it a good trim, down to like 2 or 3 leaves
>>
>>1169203
It's Florida, revel in your ability to grow citrus trees, tea bushes, cinnamon trees, and all the jungle spices.
>>
>>1170915
Go for huacaya alpacas instead, unless you live in a stupidly hot climate. Grass grazers, very gentle on the soil because padded feet, quiet, don't challenge fences, cheap, will curb stomp coyote and foxes, dress out to 50-70lbs so you can easily process a carcass, best fiber - seriously warmer, softer, and stronger than wool.
>>
>>1171873
Grow well, little pepper!
>>
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Anyone ever keep miniature/ easy hair sheep with goats?
In our fenced in property, we have about 8 acres of hilly, wooded land and 2 acres of grass. Figure the goats could keep the underbrush out of the woods and the sheep would keep the grass down. Bonus point for selling lambs to the slaughterhouse once a year or so.
Thinking about doing this.
>>
>>1175591
I've only ever owned goats. They can strip a hillside forest of underbrush in almost no time. It is great. I've worked with sheep before. They are a bit more maintenance than goats due to the wool, but goats are better escape artists. Both are usually terrible at birthing. I know nothing of miniatures of either.
>>
>>1175591
Can you answer some of my questions here >>1170854
>>
>>1175204
Rolling for my guardian goat.
>>
So I've been wanting to get into gardening for a while and I've decided that this year is my year and I'm planning on building my first raised bed within the next few weeks. I've been doing some research, but I'm not really sure how deep they should be. I've seen claims of anywhere from four inches to a foot deep. Is there an ideal medium? Also, what are some cost efficient ways to fill the beds and how should I go about preparing the soil for planting?
>>
>>1175893
Building raised beds with wood is kind of expensive and memey. Just get a few yards of quality soil delivered and make mounds. Make sure it's in full sun. Set up timed irrigation with the money you saved on meme wood if you have a day job that might mean the plants go without water for 10 hours on a blistering day.

Source: I spent my money on meme wood and all my plants wilted and were shitty so I wish I had irrigation
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>>1175996
Why didn't you water them?
>>
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>>1170854
•6-10 sheep per acre
•4 to 4.5 pounds of a medium quality hay (or pasture equivalent; 1460-1642.5lbs per ewe per year) and from .5 to 1.0 pounds per ewe per day of a grain (182.5-365lbs per year per ewe)
•wheat gives you about 37 bushels of grain per acre (2220lbs of grain)
•hay gives you about 3.4 tons of dry hay per acre per cutting, up to 2 cuttings per field max per year for 6.8 tons

1 acre of wheat and 1 acre of hay together can feed 6 ewes (8 max on grain alone and 6 on the hay alone.) If you have open pasture then you could probably have 8 sheep without problems using 3 acres of land. 1 acre for wheat, 1 for hay, 1 for pasture. However, you will want more land than that just to have redundancy and crop/pasture rotation. Personally, I'd feel comfortable with 5 sheep per acre on a 6 plot of land where 3 acres are crops and 3 are pasture with everything being rotated every year (total of 15 sheep on 3 acres of pasture fed with 3 acres of crops). If a crop does poorly or fails, then I'd need to supplement their diet with purchased food.

>Best dog breed to guard the herd?

The one specifically bred for the purpose. A sheep herding Border Collie.

Get a local vet to come out and check the animals every so often. Learn how to keep them healthy. Watch out for Wool Maggots/Fly Strike and learn how to help prevent it.
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>>1175996
>>1175893
Use cinder blocks, bricks, or stones. They never rot and you can always move them around later if you don't mortar them. My beds are 16"-18" deep when full of soil. Not all of my raised beds are full yet. I'm still working on that. The beds that are completely full are amazing. Just don't be like me and not make a foundation for the blocks first. Some of my walls are tipping over, but it is an easy fix. I just pop them out and pack gravel under them as they need it.

I believe that you should give the roots as much soil as you can afford (afford in time, local resources, and/or money). The deeper the good soil is the deeper the roots will go, the more expansive the mycelium network will be in good soil, and the better the plants can handle droughts, colds snaps, pests, and disease. I live in an area with so much clay that I can make bricks with the local soil. Some people live in areas where the soil is actually rather rich and loamy. For those people, a raised bed wouldn't need to be very deep. For me, it is like container gardening on a cement patio.

>reposted pic from last season
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>>1176009
I would water them every morning before work and around dusk if necessary unless it was raining. But sometimes that wasn't enough. A really hot sunny day can dry my beds out in less than 8 hours
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>>1176047
A border collie is not a livestock guardian dog lol. Great pyrenees are the gold standard. If you have problems with large wolves or anything larger I would go with a Kangal. Note that these dogs are not pets, they sleep with the sheep, and will probably bite the shit out of you if you try to take them away from the sheep.
>>
>>1176132
It seems like your soil drains too quickly. You should be able to soak it through in the morning and it should last until the next morning. You may also have not given it enough water. Quite a bit of water is needed for a good soaking. You should do a "perk test" to better know your soil and find out what you should add to it, if anything.
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>>1176138
>problems with predators

Use a proper fence. If a predator can get to your sheep it means your sheep can get out.
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>>1171873
Grow well, little pepper!
>>
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Bonchi doing pretty good. Explosive Ember this one.
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>>1176138
>Great pyrenees

While correct, damn those things are expensive, not as expensive as some breeds, but $800 per pup? I'd probably need 3 for my place.
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>>1176154
>dat crimp in one limb on the left side
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>>1175893
Look on craiglist or or area's equivalent for free or low cost building materials. People are usually DYING to get rid of pallets of bricks and concrete block. Also, my local pool installer has been the best to get free clean fill soil from. They ever drop it off for free. Might want to try a local farm too, I know from experience that you can get a good amount of manure for free or a low cost, 20USD for a truck bed full.
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>>1176158
buy a male and a female and make your investment back, thats how u farm
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>>1176182
I'd rather not open my farm to AKC.
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>>1176190
real farmers could care less about AKC show dogs, they want working dogs that are bred for ability to do job and health, not for appearance.
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>>1176142
Fencing 6 acres would cost a small fortune. So much easier and cheaper and reliable to get dogs. Predators will just dig under the fence anyway unless it is holocaust grade nazi fencing
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>>1176162
I know ._. first time ever wiring something, much to learn...
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>>1176224
Fencing is what I did for about that amount of land. My main problem is human-related. People shoot dogs and livestock around here. No arrests yet, though it may have been oil & gas company bullying as it only happened around the time they were bullying everyone and paying people off.
>>
>>1176163
Finding a source of continual manure is the best thing ever for a gardener. I can't recommend it enough.
>>
The season for starting seeds is almost here. My plan is to get seeds in pots by February 1st then into polytunnels April 1st then into the ground May 1st.

Right now, I'm designing a new shelving unit for starts. One made of lumber and very sturdy. If my camera ever gets back from the repair shop, I'll take photos.
>>
I found a ton of old seeds that my grandfather keep in their basement. They've been keep cool and dry. I was wondering how long seeds last or does it vary plant by plant.

>>1176783
what zone are you in?
6b here, can't wait for the weather to warm up a bit. Dying to get some cold hard crops going.
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>>1177003
>what zone are you in?

5

I can probably start the maple syrup stuff soon.
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>>1177004
It's prime birch tapping season.
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>>1177010
Well, here is seems that it'll be 60F days and 40F nights this week. Too warm to get sap because it turns white with microbes above 55F. It went from -4F to 40F almost instantly. It needs to be like 32F> days and 31F< nights for a couple weeks for best sapping.
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>>1177004
8a (but cold summer) here, tomatoes, carrots, peppers and onions will be indoor-started soon
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>>1170619
String up some fishing line about chest high for the deer in your area all around the border of your garden. Once they feel the resistance they'll get spooped and take off.
>>
>>1170619
More specific information here : http://blog.seedsavers.org/blog/deerfence

It's cheap and it works. Been using it for my Grandmothers rose garden for almost 15 years now.
>>
>>1175204
roll
>>
Lads,
Summer is ending soon and i'm thinking of tip propagating my raspberry plant and letting my strawberries set runners to clone them, is it a good time or am i too late to do this?

Any tips on effectively propagating them would be ace too, thanks in advance growbros.
>>
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>>1177004
I'm jealous, my buddy up near the Great Lakes has the best syrup.

>>1177122
This kindly old lady told me about seed savers yesterday. there's so many interesting varieties on there! I want to pick some up but am having a hard time making up my mind.
>>
>>1170739
Avocados are known to be a real pain in the ass, even if you're in the tropic. Take it from someone in Costa Rica.

But once you're able to get it going, it's going to flood you with avocados
>>
>>1171328
I want into beekeeping. I literally live in a forest, regardless the residential density.

How it goes that about 'catching a swarm'?

I'm from Costa Rica, so I guess you can might as well caught an Africanized hornet swarm
>>
>>1171502
Peppers likes light. Not heat, they like light.
>>
>>1177542

You might have better luck buying a nucleus colony (or shaken bees with a queen) from a local bee keeper. It shouldn't run you more than $100.
>>
>>1177435
It is usually really easy to propagate them via cuttings or layering. You can do layering most any time of the year. For cuttings you need to do it in the spring. For dividing to root crown, you can do that pretty much any time. Spring will always be the best time since plants can recover ASAP.

>>1177542
Spring is usually the best time for Northern colder climates. You need a container for the scout bees to find that will serve as the trap. You can make one or buy one. There are also lures you can buy, but normally a container is all you need. The info on how to do this is pretty easy to find on google,

Most bee keepers just use one of their empty hive bodies as the trap and lure. The main problem is ensuring you have enough bees with the swarm. Swarms can be huge or too small to survive properly. The main thing you need is the queen. If the swarm is too small you can always get a few pounds of bees from a local bee keeper for super cheap. It is the queen that costs the big bucks. If you do need to get more bees, do it ASAP before the queen stops emitting the massive amount of pheromones during the search for a suitable hive.
>>
>>1177544
Peppers love heat, just not tons of it.
>>
>>1177577
Pepper like tomatoes are very heat and drought tolerant because of where they originate from. The deserts of North America.

Also if you are getting a shit ton of rain cover your Jalapenos to much water will give them the heat of a bell pepper
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>>1171873
grow well, little pepper
>>
>>1177576
Thanks anon, you da man!
Can't wait to have some more strawberry plants in my row!
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>>1178253
FYI, strawberries are like weeds. Their runners go nuts making new plants. They make good gifts when you are reducing them.
>>
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>>1169165
Camera is in repair so no new photos.

Today is the warmest it will be for a while, so I aired out the polytunnel housing the chard plants. They seem to be doing fairly well. Some older larger leaves suffered some freeze damage, but it was -10F and -15F on some nights. If they make it to spring I'll have a massive amount of chard seeds this year from all the 2nd year plants.
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>tfw you get two more ducks
>tfw all 3 ducks are male and one simply does not stop trying to mount the other duck
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>>1178418
where did you get your ducks from?
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>>1178464
I get them locally. I traded some purple majesty potatoes for them. I'll get some more later, though just females and probably just runner breed. I'll keep the one runner duck, I have now and eat the Peking ducks.
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Pic is what this sub feels like right now. It should be more active, this is a better time to be planning and purchasing than a month after when you should have planted.
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>>1178627
>when you should have planted.
Outside in the ground? Not before April here for stuff like tomatoes and peppers, so it makes no sense starting them before February
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>>1178627
Agreed desu
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>>1178627
I'm currently without a camera. Otherwise, I'd be posting some stuff right now. Plus, I'm building new shelving "soon" for plant starts. The whole cycle starts up again then. Though, I spent more money on my camera today than I wanted to. So, 1 less LED light for February.
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>>1178627
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>>1178634
you can still buy your seeds and materials while it is in desperate sale mode instead of the spring prices. Anyone have a recommendation for a little greenhouse? Should I build my own out of PVC or pipe or get one of these? Just looking for a small one that I can sprout seeds in for outdoors and then grow perhaps spinach and green beans.
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>>1178634
>>1178627
But anyway, more /an/plant/ related I guess because ornamental, but here my evergreen corner of the front garden right now.
Planted a few more primulas yesterday to set up that spring feeling and add a little colour to the bleak, dark, grey/brown 50°N winter
(Not pictured but also in that corner I've got a Fatsia japonica and a variegated Yucca gloriosa, thinking of adding a winter-flowering Med Viburnum later on)
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>>1178712
I forgot to post this pic along with it. I know these aren't high quality but will they work? Or is there a better supplier for a similar price?
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>>1178712
Eh, seed prices don't change that much here over the year and are affordable anyways, like €0.30 for a 30 pack of tomato seeds. Only watermelon ones are very expensive for some reason (up to €5 for 10 seeds). Anyway I actually did buy tomato, carrot and onion seeds a few days ago (still have enough leftovers for peppers, kohlrabi, brussel sprouts... from previous years)
>>
>>1178714
>50°N
I can hardly believe this since you have flowers. I am closer to the equator than you and we've been in about -15C for 3 weeks
>>
>>1178721
Thanks Gulf Stream I guess (even though I'm >300km away from the sea).
It hasn't dropped below -4 yet this "winter" (one night in early December), and so far this January we had highs of 5-11 and lows of 3-6. I haven't even hauled all my potted date palms and spineless yuccas inside, and I hope I won't have to any more
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>>1178715
lol Those would fall over if I pissed on them, let alone stand up against wind. I know a few people who tried them. The only one still standing uses $150 worth of 2x4 framing from the local hardware store. That was added after wind knocked it over for the 4th time.

>tfw it is 68F here

What the hell.
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>>1178735
Florida or SoCal? Isn't it always that mild in your """winters"""?
>>
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>>1178748
I'm in Ohio and today is the first tolerably warm day we've had since November. At 60F I wear shorts.

>>1178735
If that's the only problem, couldn't I just buy heavy duty tent stakes and pin in down good? Pic related
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>>1178765
I'm kinda surprised how some basic garden equipment is apparently insanely expensive overseas, I heard about pic related (tomato spirals) being between $10-20/ea too....
Then again, in turn electricity is off the charts here (€0.35/kWh, thanks eco-fascism), so heating greenhouses/polytunnels as a hobby gardener is out of question here
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>>1178748
Here it is supposed to be -10F to 32F right now.

>>1178765
They need lateral support. The wind just pushes them and they fold right up. It would be better buy one or more of those shed kits where you get all the metal corner braces in the kit, buy the 2x4s for it then a roll of proper UV resistant greenhouse plastic. It will cost 3-4 times as much as >>1178715 but will last a very long time. Replace the plastic with glass as you are able to source it because the plastic will need to be replaced every 5 or so years. Used patio doors are usually easy to find.

https://www.amazon.com/Hopkins-90192-2x4basics-Shed-Style/dp/B000E3XNC0

https://www.amazon.com/Greenhouse-Resistant-Polyethylene-Bootstrap-Farmer/dp/B073Z58FSX/
>>
>>1178776
For greenhouse heating there's a few things that can help a lot. First are wax-filled, automatic vent arms that open automatically when the greenhouse gets too hot and close when it is cold. Then you pack every open space you can with thermal mass like black-painted water containers. They soak up the extra heat and release it during the night or cold snaps to help maintain warmer temperatures. You can also bring in large containers of horse manure. It will release CO2 to help the plants grow and tons of heat. Some greenhouses have a special masonry trough area where the fresh manure is dumped for heating the greenhouse. Then you can make passive solar heaters using glass/patio doors. They lay at an angle facing the sun as low as they can be on the greenhouse. Cold outside air enters their bottoms and exist as solar-heated hot air into the greenhouse. Those are just an insulated box with a black-painted piece of sheetmetal/metal roofing in them with a glass top and a large hole at each end. You can also add a second layer of glazing in the form of plastic to your greenhouse. Many people use giant bubble wrap for that in the winter.
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>>1178781
I actually built a "protection shed" around my ornamental Yucca elephantipes last winter.
Spent €20 for the wood framing (would've been much more if I also had to pay for the main wood stakes and ramming them down into the ground, but I have wine-growers in the family who exchanged them for metal lately so I got those for free), €10 for the plastic foil and maybe another €10 for heating (only went on when temps would drop below -5), plus I hung up several 5L water containers spray-painted black inside so they could heat up in the sun
Still, most of the heads died even though they're supposed to tolerate down to -8 ;_;
>>
>>1178781
>>1178778
Thanks for info anon, this seems like a better idea than those all in ones. However I am renting this house and would like something I could move. What about PVC?
>>
>>1178792
If you use screws and a cordless drill with a screwdriver bit you can dismantle the shed easily enough. White PVC is a poor choice. It becomes brittle in the sun. You can use grey PVC for a much longer lasting frame than the white. If you rough them up with sand paper and paint them black it will extend their life many years. Remember that PVC is brittle in the cold.

There's a video series by Elliot Coleman and in one he shows a super easy way to make a polytunnel with rebar and grey PVC conduit pipe or better yet, black plastic water pipe:

>start at 11m 30s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovR-OZlul3w

Wind will be a problem for some people. If your area is really windy, some diagonal bracing will be needed.

>>1178784
Not bad.

I'm surprised my chard survived in a singly glaze polytunnel when the temps dipped to -10F/-23C and -15F/-26C.
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>>1172508
That's an incredible video! I might have to implement that and plant those mushrooms this year. Thanks man :)
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>>1172920
>>1172948

Nah man, you need to abandon soy and dairy milk. The soyboy meme actually has a basis in reality, and dairy contains mammal estrogen. Drink almond milk instead, it's the nectar of the gods my friend.
>>
>>1178715
I currently use a UK version of the first one in your photo. It works absolutely fantastically if you either bury or groundseal the bottom. If the wind is able to get inside and blow then you're fucked.

That being said, it is simply still definitely worth all the hassle for the excellent price savings. Especially if you arent sure you want to commit to having a huge costly one just yet.
>>
>>1178840
almonds are something like several thousand litres of water per kg of final nuts produced. Why would anyone want to drink an ecological disaster?
Just don't drink any milk and get some juicing on the go. Easily better for you too.
>>
Every spring I see countless normies with huge cartloads of miracle grow soil or other pre-mixed brands. Do those actually work or are they dooming themselves to have nutrient-burned plants?

Alternatively, if I were to order several cubic yards of topsoil-compost mix for delivery, how would I know if what I'm getting is quality enough for a garden and isn't nutrient-barren?
>>
>>1179055
They work, but using compost and composted manure is a lot better. It is difficult to get compost that doesn't have lots of nutrients. You should get one of those liquid test kits for soil nutrients and pH levels. You should have some idea of what nutrients exist before putting new ones on.
>>
Anyone here ever had success growing Juniper berries? I've read to break seed dormancy I need to put it in the fridge for a couple months, and that soaking them in citric acid helps.
I live in zone 8, so I know it will grow, but I have very acidic clay soil, will that be a problem?

If my seeds don't work, what nursery would even carry this specific species?
>>
>>1176163
for the love of god don't use pallets for raised beds
>>
where to get inexpensive seeds this time of year? i usually get seeds from dollar general bc they are super cheap and grow decently (im also a shitty gardener so i'd probably kill off more expensive seeds anyway), but they dont have any for sale until like march/april
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>>1179256
He means pallets of bricks and blocks. As in a fat stack of bricks and blocks stored on pallets so they can be moved around. Like in this photo.
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Update on my beppers, they're coming along quite nicely! One of the seedlings has what looks like a burnt lead, but I think it's just a deformity as it's only on it's first set of leaves.
>>
>>1179269
You just need to order them online.
>>
>>1179310
The one on the far right you mean? That's the cotyledon and yeah, that is most likely from when it was pulling itself out of the seed hull or soil. I see a tint of paleness and yellow on the others (top and left), perhaps the soil is drying out too much at the top, but too wet down in? Probably due to lack of drainage maybe?
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>>1178730
..and today, I noticed the tiny female flowers on the hazelnut are already there, laurel cherries are swelling left and right too. Spring seems to be on the way, unless we get fucked by a late cold wave
>>
>>1179465
Thankfully, it is getting cold again where I live. Sometimes the warm snaps ruin fruit tree harvests for the entire season because the trees bloom months ahead of schedule then it returns to deep freeze weather.
>>
>>1179480
Oh yeah... last year March was warm as fuck here (up to 25°C in some places), but then we got just one very unusual frosty night in late April, which ruined many apples, cherries, vines etc that had been in full flower or beyond (luckily we were somewhat spared from it locally with only minimal losses, so the vine/fruit growers in my family actually profited a bit from the increased prices)
>>
I'm nineteen years old and want to build a beekeeping hive. I mainly want to do it experimentally my first time (see if I can do it, how hard it is, etc.) but actually getting honey/wax would be miraculous. I've saved up some money for my part-time job. What's a good balance between affordable and something that will actually work? I know you can buy frames for 30-40 dollars that come with a wax coating but is that just a meme? Can you just make your own cheap frame and buy some beeswax and prepare it that way? Any advice for someone doing a beehive for their first time?
>Zone: 5B (According to the 1990 map)
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>>1179595
You can make one out of a $5 plastic tote and 3-4, $3, 2x4 boards if you want to. There's the typical ones like the Langstroth hives and there's ones like the Top Bar hives the latter of which is the cheapest to DYI. Top bar hives are normally for when you want to harvest both the comb and honey while the Langstroth is normally just for harvesting the honey. The only main thing you need to know is something called "bee space" so google that up. Also google up some top bar hive designs. Like some people use a big 55-gallon blue barrel cut in half for making top bar hives. 1 barrel = 2 hives.
>>
>>1179595
>Any advice for someone doing a beehive for their first time?

I forgot, find and contact your local bee keeper's association . That's a must. You'll learn a great deal and have access to purchase used equipment. As well as trading help and such.
>>
The fungus guide in the OP seems incomplete so asking here. I'm interested in trying to grow Shiitake mushrooms use the hardwood pellet method, but lack a pressure cooker. From what I've seen, a pressure cooker is a requirement, but dropping $70 for a 23qt pressure cooker is a bit much for what is likely a passing hobby. I'm keeping an eye out as second hand store but nothing so far. Most guides I see make a 5lb block, what's the minimum size pressure cooker I could get away with? Could I get away with a smaller size block?
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>>1179672
You can just use hot water for pasteurizing or even using hydrogen peroxide treatment of the substrate you want to use. Or, like me and not use anything, but I guess I'm just lucky that way. Google up the other two methods.
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>>1179675
Hmm, the three or four guides I saw made it out like pasteurization was only good for hay grown mushrooms and you HAD to sanitize it in a pressure cooker. Might need to do even more research. Haven't heard of the hydrogen peroxide treatment before, I'll check that out. Thanks
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>>1179682
Sanitizing is pasteurization. Sterilizing is what you do in a pressure canner and is completely different.
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>>1179695
Sorry, meant sterilizing then. Honestly never occurred to me that there is a difference between the two words until now.
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>>1179698
Well unless you have another way to get boiling water to 121*C you're gonna need a pressure cooker.
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>>1179705
Yep, that's what I was afraid of. Probably will just get started with oyster mushrooms first and do shiitake later if I'm still interested in the hobby or manage to snag a decent sized pressure cooker from a second hand shop.
>>
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>>1179706
I did shiitake using plugspawn. I drilled holes into fresh logs, hammered in the dowels, and seal them with wine bottle wax. No sanitizing or sterilizing involved if you have a large enough bit of biomass you are using to inoculate the substrate.

>pressure canner
>second hand shop.

I highly recommend you buy a brand new one. These things are super dangerous if they explode. You never know what one from a second hand shop has been subjected too. Older models may have been discontinued or recalled due to improper safety features. They can be deadly. I use a couple several times a year for food canning and I take no chances with them.
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>>1179725
Couldn't I just do 100*C for a longer time to get the same sterilization effect? Or what about just using the oven?
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>>1179731
I'm the clueless anon asking questions, but 100*C isn't hot enough to sterilize, you need at least 120*C(?) to kill absolutely everything. Oven probably doesn't work because, without pressure, the water can't get above 100*C. Sure it can turn to steam and get above 100*C but I'm not sure how that affects things.
I suppose some good news is that in looking up why this doesn't work, I found something called fractional sterilizatio/tyndallization from a brewing blog. You bring the temperature to 100*C then continue to boil for 30 min three days in a row. That might be the way for me to go at least giving the hobby a try.
>>
>>1179731
>>1179739
Yes, you can subject it to a slightly lower heat for much longer in order to sterilize it. You'd need to use 350F/176C for 3.5 hours in a conventional oven to do that. I do this with my glassware (bottles/5-7gal carboys) and metal tools that I use in homebrewing wines and meads. I recommend that you use an oven safe prob thermometer to check the center mass of the substrate has risen to the proper temperature. After that happens start your timer. If you happen to use this method for glassware, make sure you allow it to completely cool off in the oven before opening the door, otherwise the colder air from outside can explosively shatter the glass. Another thing, the temperatures inside the substrate won't reach the proper temperature if it is still wet. Once the water has all boiled out it will start to rise in temperature quickly.

Keep in mind that I'm not saying burned looking substrate will be good for fungi, I honestly do not know how it will react to it, but it would be a neat experiment to find out how well it takes to such substrate. Regardless, sterilizing using this method will work unto itself. It'd be faster to use hydrogen peroxide.
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>>1179725
Where did you buy your logs and how? Assuming you did buy them. I've heard to try firewood suppliers but havent asked any directly since it isn't the right conditions around be to purchase fresh logs and the websites for the ones around me dont mention anything about requesting specific wood types or mushrrom related things.
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>>1180035
I have my own woods. I'll order plugspawn, wait till it gets here, saw a tree down, process it, and fit the plugs into it the same day. The logs are best as fresh as possible. There's less chance of infection from something else and there will be plenty of sugars for the fungi not being degraded by time or anything else. There's still anti-fungal chems in the sap at that point, but your fungi will be fighting against that right away and your fungi will be the only fungi right there when time breaks down those anti-fungal chems.

So, I don't really recommend you purchase a log unless you are picking out the tree that's coming down in front of your eyes. Driving around after bad storms is also a good way to get free logs that have fallen across the road, if you have a pickup truck. Where I live, the state road crew sawing it up has been more than happy to saw it into lengths I want and even load it in the truck for me. Evidently, its a lot less work. Give them your number and you can have all manner of free wood in the future. The same goes with tree trimming companies here. Teh only problem with these later options is you need plugspawn in your fridge ready to go at a moment's notice or you will need to pay for higher shipping costs to get it to your ASAP.
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>>1180055
>Tree trimming
Oh shit I never even though of that and they come around my neighborhood all the time come spring. I'll have to keep an eye out for them. Unfortunately most of the trees around here are black walnut so are useless for mushrooms but if I keep an eye out I should be able to snag something useable I'm sure.
>>
I just planted a bunch of vegetables in herbs in pots using a 50/50 mix of organic compost and potting mix. Was this a good idea? I probably should have researched it first but I heard that this was a good blend for vegetables.
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>>1180486
It should be fine as long as you keep the moisture levels correct.
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>>1180507
I live in Queensland (Australia). Does the addition of compost mean the soil will drain more or less? For unmixed potting soil I would usually water once every morning and then it would have just about dried out by dusk
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>>1180534
It really depends on the ratios of other things in the soil as to what it will do. It will help hold more water, but it can help with drainage, just not in the way you may think. Like a high clay based soil won't drain well, but adding literally anything to it will help, even compost. For other soil types, the compost will help hold extra water. Regardless, watering isn't exactly a scheduled thing, due to wind, temperature, humidity, light, and other factors. You will need to stick your finger into the soil and test it from time to time to make sure when you need to water it. You'll have to base your schedule off the fewest number of hours between waterings when it goes dry. That way you can always come by to check on it before it would go dry in its shortest amount of time.

Another thing. You need to research your veggies and herbs so that you know which ones love extra water and which ones need well-draining soils and less water. You don't want to group them together because one will suffer.
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>>1180534
What are your clay levels?
Adding a bit can do wonders for moisture retention.
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>tfw waiting for time to plant seeds for starts

I've been keeping busy by raising sprouts for greens. My lambs quarter seeds are sprouting in a jar right now. They sprouted in about 30 hours. I was going to sprout some chickweed too, but holy crap the seeds are so tiny that I don't have a screen small enough for them.
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>>1179248
Just try a few cuttings of the juniper you would like to grow, not too hard to do and a lot faster than growing seeds. Plus it'll be a "clone" of the juniper you like.
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>>1180715
How does this work? Spray nutrient water on them?
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>>1180766
Just normal water.

https://sproutpeople.org/growing-sprouts/sprouting-basics/
https://sproutpeople.org/growing-sprouts/sprouting-instructions/

It is the easiest way to grow vegetables as quickly as possible. If you have a few jars and a good supply of seeds, you can have fresh sprouts of various types every day if you so wish. If you make the batches small enough, you'll never need to refrigerate them either. Most people make a big batch and munch off that for later.
>>
>>1180715
>>1180796
I really like this, but I hate how unrealistic it is to do yourself.

Micro greens are almost impossible to maintain if you wanted to produce your own seeds.
>>
>>1179922
>>1179672
The heating for longer method won't truly sterilize the substrate to the degree you need. Pressure cooking the substrate is the ONLY way to ensure that bacterial endospores are killed off. Longer exposure to lower temps will not substitute pressure cooking.
t. Mushroom farmer for a living
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>>1180998
All the seeds I use are from my own garden last season and season before that. That is one main reason I'm doing stuff like lambs quarter and chickweed. A both a single lambs quarter plant or chickweed plant can give you something like 20k-30k seeds. For anything, you just need to allow them to grow and go to seed. Lettuces are really easy too. Keep in mind that if you ever grow lambs quarter for food, like as a leafy green, you need to grow it in nitrogen poor soils. Otherwise, nitrates and nitrites will build up in the plant.

>>1181105
>ONLY

No, you can do the baking too, but it just takes forever. The problem with it is what else it does to the substrate. You should know that 350F is far higher than any temperature you are using in a pressure canner. 10lbs(10.5lbs actually) of pressure is 240F, fyi.
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>>1181132
damn really? Dude I have mad dreams of getting some property and doing permaculture type shit. I want chickens and rotating crops and all that shit. I hope we all make it bros

Thanks for that solid info!
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>>1181142
Once you have the proper knowledge, it is actually really easy. Keep in mind that some methods are just wasting your time, money, and energy. In fact some methods are meant to sell you equipment and chemicals. I found that thinking about how lazy and efficient I could be helped a lot in figuring out which methods are time/cost efficient and actually work well.

As for the microgreen seeds. In my area there are many "weeds" that are readily edible. I have a big list, know what they are, how to grow, harvest, prep, and cook them. Many of them give off millions wee tiny seeds that make for great microgreens and you know how easily it is to grow weeds. Especially since those weeds are fully adapted to where ever you happen to be living.
>>
What are some indoor plants that are fragrant at times and produce something I can eat?
>>
>>1181397
Herbs and Mints
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>>1181397
Citrus
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What color are your maters? I hear black/blue are the best ones.
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>>1181465
The darker ones normally have more antioxidants. Mine are red and yellow, though one does have some purple on it (Cherokee Purple).
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>>1181465
those look interesting
but I always grow some variety of medium sized red tomatoes
anything you grow will be way better than the ones at the store. the store tomatoes aint really made for the best taste possible. they are bred to be good enough but they re mostly focused on storage and transportation and appearance when it gets to the store
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>>1181465
i had some cool Indigo Fireballs last season, they were way better than the other cherry tomatoes i had
>>
Are there any good gardening podcasts that anyone could recommend ?
>>
>>1181535
Slow Flowers
Gardens Illustrated
Sow, Grow, Repeat
Cultivate Simple

Most podcasts are all over the place regarding subject matter. You millage will vary.
>>
>>1181105
Fractional sterilizatio/tyndallization actually kills things better than a 15 psi pressure cooker when done correctly and is used in incredibly sensitive medical applications. Its just that if you are doing any viable quanity of sterilization for mushroom farming, waiting three days everytime you need a jar, agar, substrate, etc , plus tbr cost of heating the water to boiling and keeping it there three times, makes it worth investing in a pressure cooker to get the job done in one go.
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>>1181506
They're supposed to look like that? Looks like when mine caught something and rotted way last year.
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>>1182054
>They're supposed to look like that?

Yup.
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>tfw you only now remember that your house is too cold for proper sprouts

Damn it. No wonder there's low germination rates. It is like 60-65F in here most of the time.
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>>1171873
grow well, little pepper!!
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Can I eat turkey tail (trametes versicolor) raw?
>>
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Bought some tree seeds online, anyone have any experience growing trees from seed? All but three of these require cold stratification btw
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>>1182425
Did the paper towel method with the Sycamore, the Elm, and the Redwood since they don't require cold stratification.

I'll put the other ones in the fridge soon
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Doing some low stress training with two snapdragons for the hell of it. They kinda look similar to cannabis plants right now lol
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>>1182416
Yes, but most people make a tea out of them.

>>1182425
I've done some. Most are pretty easy.

>>1182431
You may want to loosen those ties a bit in case there's wind. The wind can snap the stems if there isn't a little play. Or, add a few more ties for more even support.
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>>1182416
Flavor is nothing great when raw and it is very chewy. Also, the nutrients will be too difficult for your body to extract on its own. Don't recommend eating it raw.
>>
Can jackfruit grow in Los Angeles and fruit? I cant find much online.

What soil would you guys recommend? My front yard is pretty shit and coarse at the moment.
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>>1182213
Get a heating mat. You can buy a cheap one for $15. Sprouted some romanesco broccoli on mine in in less than 48 hours
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>>1182425
I've grown several species of fruit and nut trees from seed. I've grown persimmons, pecans, and pawpaws before, all of which need cold stratification to break dormancy. There's nothing to it.

Simply put your seeds in a container full of *moist* substrate, close it tight, and leave it in the fridge for three or four months. I mostly use sphagnum moss due to its water retention and antifungal properties, but you can use sawdust, sand, paper towels, etc. You want the substrate moist: wet to the touch, but not soggy. When you soak your substrate, squeeze it until no more water is dripping off.

Good luck
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>>1182686
do you have any pictures of the pawpaw fruit or tree? I've always wanted to try one.
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>>1182692
The cream of this year's pawpaw crop. I go around the local parks in August and September looking for these guys. I've got about half a dozen good spots marked on GPS Kit. The flavor in wild trees can really be hit-and-miss, but those good trees make it all worthwhile. I've made pawpaw bread in the past and I've still got some pulp frozen. Planning on making cheesecake with it
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>>1182735
Looks great, funny how you have it next to bananas.
Shame I've never seen them down here in California.
>>
The problem with pawpaws in California (particularly in southern CA, where I presume you're from) is that you don't get enough chill hours to set flower buds. Your best bet in growing pawpaws in CA is to find seeds from trees at the very southern fringe of the species natural range. There are probably populations of pawpaw in FL or southernmost GA, AL, or SC that could tolerate very few chill hours and still set flower buds
>>
Why do all my plants die? I fucking suck
>>
>>1182662
I just put them near a heater.

>>1182805
Take one plant and research its needs, diseases, and how to prevent those problems. Go from there.
>>
Anyone here trying bonchi? I've been considering trying it with my old bell pepper,
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>>1183097
>bonchi

Well, that's new. Also, several people in these threads do it or have done it.
>>
Do these spots look dangerous?
I have not applied any kind of anti fungal.
>>
>>1183135
Yes, get rid of that worst ones and reduce the amount of water you are giving it. Stick your finger into the soil all the way up to test moisture levels before watering.
>>
>>1183135
are you giving it too much water?
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>>1183156
>>1183162
It's a jackfruit so I was under the impression it required a lot of water. I only water it once a week,but when I do its a shit ton of water. The issue seems to be the pot has bad circulation or soemthing and retains the water
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>>1183182
Is that mulch on top of is that the actual soil? It may have too much organic material in it holding extra water for too long.
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>>1178730
uk climate :)
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>>1179027
so as long as it well grouded they're not a problem in the uk?
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Anyone growing a pumpkin in doors this winter?
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>>1184114
Yeah man, trying to start some seeds indoors under lights to get a good start on the season. (uK). Hopefully we will get a warm spring!
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>>1184114
no
no room

and pumpkins grow very easily here
if I shoot a pumpkin with a 12 gauge there is a good chance pumpkins will grow

put them somewhere with decent drainage and I don't have to touch them un til they are ready to pick. they aint never as big as the ones grown in the fields but they make pumpkins
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>>1184114
You are already dead.
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>>1172639
I'm a garlic farmer, over the years the best way is to keep them cool but not cold, in compete darkness.

Just keeping the in a corner in a brown bag will help you.
Try planting some the first week in October this fall!
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First soy harvest today.
Thinking about steaming and buttering the edamame with some sautéed basil.
How are you keeping up your estrogen levels, /out/?
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>>1184891
Gratz, sounds good.
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>>1178627
>two more indoor greenhouses
Check.
>fuckload of jiffy pots
Check.
>potting soil
Check.
>grow lamp
Check.
>seeds for dozens of variants
Double Check. Pic related.

One more week, /hgm/. Can't wait.


>>1178703
Sweet setup.

>>1179310
Grow well, little peppers!
>>
>>1184891
I love soybeans, but I've never grown them. I have a 5x4 raised bed that's unallocated for the spring. Is that enough to get a decent amount of beans, or should I just grow green beans like a pleb?
>>
Germinated some kiwifruit seeds because I assumed they could survive in my climate, but it turns out they can't. Now I have some seedlings doomed to die. Fuck me.
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>>1185253
You could grow them in pots and bring them in for the winter?
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>>1185264
Kiwi vines get fucking huge
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>>1185273
I don't know anything about the specific needs of kiwis, but you can grow much larger things in containers. I grow all kinds of fruit trees just fine in pots.
>>
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How do I get rid of algae in my soil?
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>>1185401
Don't water it as much and amend it so that it can drain faster.
>>
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>>1185220
My soy bed is about 8x5 feet. I'm very impressed by the yield, as the harvest you see there are only the currently ripe beans. There is easily triple that amount still developing.
For what I got, the simple side dish was very good when steamed and sautéed with butter. If I had waited for the dry beans (instead of edamame) I could have easily made a filling meal or grinded some flour. I'd recommend you get seeds from a grocery store and give it a try since they seem to yield for a long period. From what I know, however, the pods don't seem edible, unlike green beans where everything can be buttered up and consumed. First time soy gardener here, so these are all assumptions
>>
>>1178784
Any tips on yucca? I am trying to cultivate these Yucca gloriosas found all over my property. They're my favorite native plant
>>
Not sure if this is a good place to ask or not. I've got a medium sized plot of wheat on my property and I'm looking to make a mill to refine it. There's a waterway that runs on my property and it's usually fairly windy as well, especially around harvest time. What are my options? If I could get a combination windmill and waterwheel, that would be fantastic, but I don't want one to be powering the other if there's a difference in force because that's wasted efficiency
>>
>>1185659
Windmills have to be rather large to be effective, and have a boatload of issues in storms. A water driven mill is much easier to control, to "turn off", and to fine-tune. Lots of videos of Youtube for this.
Tell us how it goes as it is a dream of most to ave wheat and a mill.
>>
>trying to find sweet potato tubers for sale online
>everyone is selling slips/plants instead, no tubers
>they only ship them in "late spring"

This irks me to no end and no one locally sells sweet potatoes other than 2 varieties a white and an orange. Those come from the grocery stores. If you ask about purple sweet potatoes people look at you like you grew an extra head.
>>
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>>1185694
I'm seriously considering getting them from ebay, but I'm extremely hesitant of doing that. I'd prefer to buy from more reputable sellers.

>From China

Eghh.
>>
>>1185696
Growing from seeds is not too popular where I am from. Probably a good idea to do both Slips and Seeds and then see which works best for your local area.

If purple sweet potatoes are rare in your area too then it looks like you have an item that would sell well at the farmer'smarket!
>>
>>1185764
Yeah, I'm not buying TPS, especially from China. The plan is for my own eating + replanting and anything after that is for trade/sell.
>>
Oi, anyone just happen to know where a fine leaf can find some organic sweet potato slips?
>>
>>1185975
Getting tubers from the grocery store and sprouting them is the best you'll probably get.
>>
>>1185977
Ah, well, I can probably do well with regular potatoes then.
>>
Do you folks have any tips on what to farm just to make a decent living? I'm not looking to get rich and I don't mind working my ass off until I'm in my 80's and die in the field.
>>
>>1186021
Fast growing crops and microgreens, also location plays a large part of it also. Check out Urban Farmer Curtis Stone on you tube tons of info.




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