[a / b / c / d / e / f / g / gif / h / hr / k / m / o / p / r / s / t / u / v / vg / vr / w / wg] [i / ic] [r9k / s4s / vip / qa] [cm / hm / lgbt / y] [3 / aco / adv / an / asp / bant / biz / cgl / ck / co / diy / fa / fit / gd / hc / his / int / jp / lit / mlp / mu / n / news / out / po / pol / qst / sci / soc / sp / tg / toy / trv / tv / vp / wsg / wsr / x] [Settings] [Home]
Board
Settings Home
/out/ - Outdoors


Name
Options
Comment
Verification
4chan Pass users can bypass this verification. [Learn More] [Login]
File
  • Please read the Rules and FAQ before posting.
  • There are 58 posters in this thread.

05/04/17New trial board added: /bant/ - International/Random
10/04/16New board for 4chan Pass users: /vip/ - Very Important Posts
06/20/16New 4chan Banner Contest with a chance to win a 4chan Pass! See the contest page for details.
[Hide] [Show All]


Janitor applications are now closed. Thank you to everyone who applied!



what do you prefer?
>>
Boots. More durable, last way longer, and are way more comfortable.
>>
>>1179719
>way more comfortable.
>Compared to a pair of trail runners that feels like you're wearing nothing at all, nothing at all
Lol no.
>>
>>1179721
Boots are more comfortable over long distances with weight
>>
>>1179719
how long do boots last in comparison to runners?
>>
>>1179717
Ideally footwear that will give me my money's worth, so boots.
>$200 pair of shoes
>$200 pair of boots
>Boots everytime.
>>
>>1179726
Depends, my boots last 2-3 years of heavy use, but I do a lot of really rough hiking off-trail. I don't hike with trainers outside of short dayhikes established trails in nature reserves, but I run with them almost every day and they last me like 8 months, hiking they'd go faster than that.
>>
>>1179724
Thru hikers disagree with this statement
>>
>>1179732
What? Every thru-hiker I've known has a good pair of boots. I don't doubt they have their place, I just gave my opinion based around my experiences.
>>
Runners all day. Hate having weight on my feet.
>>
>>1179733
>, I just gave my opinion based around my experiences.
I can't allow you to do that. Joking senpai, what works for you the best
>>
>>1179721
If im running out i dont want it to feel like nothing at all. Shit hurts.
>>
>>1179733
AT 08', PCT 12'

Was one of the few thru hikers that wore boots over runners. Did the whole AT im boots, and the whole state of Cali in boots, and loved them (or thought I did). Switched to runners for last 2 states of the PCT and realised that hiking in boots was the worst mistake I ever made. Would never wear boots again even just camping/weekend hiking.

I'd say at least 75% of long distance hikers wear runners, probably more like 90%.
>>
>>1179744
Plenty of runners have a hard outer sole and a soft comfy midsole.
>>
>>1179745
how do you afford something like that
>>
>>1179747
Saved up for both, ended up with a few grand of credit card debt after both. (Pretty anti-debt, but it was definitelt worth it)

Been saving up for a few years now with my wife for a round the world sailing trip.
>>
Trail runners, even in the winter.
>>
>>1179750
Ah
That’s what I’m doing
I’m anti debt as well
May end up saving for longer
>>
>>1179759
Nice, saving up for sailing?
>>
Best option for poorfags in hot states (TX)?
>>
>>1179761
Thru hiking.
It’s my goal one day
Will take a while though so I’m hiking in the mean time
My goal is the pct
>>
I feel like I'm cheating if I don't hike with an extra 8 pounds on my feet. Any time in my life ever, even doing casual daily tasks, I feel like I'm cheating my body if I'm not wearing boots. Every thought, "Wow, I could be toughening my feet and strengthening my muscles right now but instead I'm wearing these bitch cloud slippers called Nikes".

Yes, I'm an accomplished outdoorsman that also works a blue collar job, my entire life involves me wearing boots. I am always either barefoot or wearing boots, I will almost never wear shoes, in fact I don't even currently own a pair of shoes. Sure I'll catch a lot of flack but from personal experience I can say with confidence that I will out-hike the socks off of you.
>>
>>1179733
Flat out 100% unquestionably a lie.

I've hiked the PCT & doing the AT this year - Thought I'd come to /out/ & branch out from my normal boards.
I'm getting tired of /out/ fast. Bunch of basement dwelling retards who don't know jack shit about doing actual hikes(Your 3-day 2-mile hike twice a year doesn't count)

Yeah sure there are some legit people here but 95% of the people here are full of shit

>Muh combat boots
>Muh 40+lb pack
>Muh vietnam era gear
>Muh walmart-tier gear

This board is fucking aids from the very first moment you post
>>
>>1179829
>/out/ is only for long distance, lightweight backpackers
Not even that guy but I can see that you're a pretentious cunt already. Yiu should go back.
>>
>>1179829
>hes too small of a human to go outdoors the way his great great grandpappy did
>>
>2018
>wearing shoes of any kind
>not being barefoot master race

Lol enjoy your blisters anons
>>
>>1179829
I hate yuppies
>>
>>1179829
>you're opinion is a lie!
God, you people are insufferable
>>
File: 1507233610132.jpg (56 KB, 1080x720)
56 KB
56 KB JPG
>>1179717
boots for walking, sneakers for running.
>>
>>1179829
Good riddance you pretentious fuck, man camps a couple days a year and thinks it's fashionable to insult people. Gtfo of here.
>>
boots if i'm going to be hiking any appreciable distance over continuous snow.
runners if i'm not.
>>
>>1179717
Boots, though thinking of getting a nice pair of hiking shoes/runners as I've been trying to lighten the load all around since I'm getting old and back might not be up to old heavy shit.
>>
>>1179717
lightweight, low-top boots. Good compromise between comfort and not getting rocks, thorns and dirt inside.
>>
>>1180090
>all of the costs of both
>none of the benefits of either
smart, anon.
>>
>>1180096
in practice it works and is cheap. life is compromises
>>
>>1180104
10 inch boots or gtfo
>>
>>1179750
can you tell me which runners/boots did you buy
>>
>>1179829
And what footwear would you recommend?
>>
>>1179750
Yes everyone needs to use neon and pink gear/clothes or you're a tacticool poorfag
>>
>>1179750
Fuck meant to put this asshole >>1179829
>>
Runners %100.

Ankle support is a joke, even with a pack. Boots are not a replacement for watching where you're going.

Quick dry is super necessary anywhere not arid, and not a bad idea for sweat in the arid regions.

Bootlets are the batonners and fire steel adolescents of the woods.
>>
>>1181090
Not everybody hikes flat groomed trails. Runners can't edge for shit.
>>
>>1179717
Depends on what I'm doing. Some places I go for hunts and day hikes have these shitty little cacti that go right fucking through the side of runners and light-hikers so I pretty much have to wear full leather boots there.

>>1179726
Depends on the boot's construction. Some of them can be resoled indefinitely as long as you don't literally tear the leather upper, others have glued-on foam midsole that's nonreplaceable that will break down in a couple years of regular use.
>tfw I have my grandfather's Irish Setter moc-toe hunting boots that're on their 9th or 10th sole and still going strong
Crepe rubber soles don't last very well but goddamn they're comfy and grippy.
>>
>>1181615
Hiking over rocks and uneven terrain

>light, maneuverable runners
>heavy, clunky boots

Runners win here too friend
>>
>>1181621
>actually needing the protection of the material of boots
The first legit justification for using boots in this thread
>>
>>1181656
Torsional rigidity and good edging is necessary for a lot of regions. What part of the world do you hike in?
>>
>>1181656
Have you ever hiked over scrambles like that with heavy weight?

also >clunky
try buying a good pair of boots
>>
>>1181662

I literally have. 50 pound pack, no word of a lie just as technical as that plus rain and 5°c temps. If you can't rotate your ankles to match the terrain you're fucked. We were blasting past the manlets with their Merrell©® boots and arcteryx©®©®™ coats.

I will concede one advantage to boots, that they don't pull off as easy in bogs. I've lost 2 shoes going off trail through muskeg and falling in to my waist suddenly.
>>
>>1181661
AT thru, PCT thru, lots of hikes all over PA, currently live in Hawaii, jungles, mountains, and lava rock, wouldn't even consider owning a pair of hiking boots.

>edging

Are you wearing boots for rock climbing???
>>
>>1181715
Lots of people hike trails where edging ability is highly desirable.
>>
>>1181753
Examples? I'm actually curious
>>
>>1181753
>Lots of people
If you can't speak from experience just shut the fuck up.
>>
>>1181764
I am speaking from experience. I wear boots on more serious hikes and trail runners for more casual ones.
>>1181759
The stable platform of a proper boot is an undeniable boon for edging, scrambling, and wedging into footholds between rocks. This is especially true with heavier loads while backpacking. I'm in NH and have gone on plenty of hikes where I regretted misjudging the terrain and wished I'd worn a nice stiff pair of boots. There have also been days where I wished I'd stuck to my salomon trail runners and felt like the boots were overkill. I own several pairs of hiking footwear and pick the best for each occasion.

I haven't even mentioned yet that stiffer boots shift the muscles used in your foot movements more to your quads instead of your calves. Tapping into the bigger muscle group is helpful.
>>
>>1179829
Nice gatekeeping
>>
File: L37073100.jpg (108 KB, 680x680)
108 KB
108 KB JPG
Wait, what are these? Boots or runners?
>>
>>1182115
They're shit is what they are. Pretty much my most regretted purchase.
>>
>>1182145
Fudge, why?
>>
>>1181090
This is a fucking lie. Try wearing your shitty neon runners in places that actually provide a constant challenge, like for surveying and establishing a base camp around muddy riverbanks in a fucking jungle, instead of muh thrushit. There's a reason they are named TRAIL runners.

inb4
>just wear rubber boots and cramps for mud and snow
Then why are you sperging about shitty neon runners?
>>
>>1182149
Sole started peeling off badly within three or four months of light use, and they started to leak badly shortly afterwards.
I will say that Salomon gave me a replacement pair, so I appreciate their customer service, but they're doing the same thing. I will be buying LL Bean Crestas soon.
tldr; I've had two pairs fail me in just barely a year of use total.
>>
>runners or boots
You might as well ask axe or saw. They're different tools for different purposes.
>>
>>1182162
That's fucked up, and for fucking pricing of average Salomon boots I would expect more than barely a year of light use.

How often do you hike?
>>
>>1182218
I hike roughly 1-3mi/day per day most days in spring-fall. Light hiking on well established trails, very rarely do the trails around here have any scrambles or particularly steep slopes.
>>
Running shoes wear out fast enough on asphault. I'm not getting them dusty and torn up kicking rocks and branches. I'd go broke. Hiking shoes or boots are built tougher.
>>
>>1179829
You’re not wrong.
>>
>>1182152
I spent two and a half weeks in the far units of Denali in Cascadias and was fine
>>
Low top 80$ nikes. Last a year. I run hill country trails with them, as well as hike.
>>
>>1181707
You live in a babby climate and terrain. Constant summer with mountains and tropics OH WOW try being balls deep in snow and telling me how your Nikes©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™ Snektech©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™ 360s©®©®™©®©®™©®©®™ work out.
>>
>>1182218
The new ones are pretty garbage from my understanding
>>
File: 1516147980614-1621203103.jpg (2.96 MB, 2160x3840)
2.96 MB
2.96 MB JPG
>>1182426

5c in June is not tropic. If there's snow and ice on the ground I'm not doing any mountaneering, but I'll be wearing large insulated snow boots and if necessary snow shoes, which is a different discussion altogether.
>>
>>1179721
>wearing nothing at all

sucks when youre hiking through rocky trails
>>
>>1182471
5C isn't fucking cold you stupid fuck.
>>
>>1182347
That's nice. I can't do as much because of the job. Right now only sundays for three months during winter when it's hunting season here + occasional stroll.
>>
Hiking long distance and challenging hikes are cool but I did the lamington national park medium level hike in half the specified times in my PJs and sandals whilst passing all these old men with their gay boots or runners. Kinda a joke at times
>>
>>1182675

In June it is, yesterday was -18c, over the Christmas break it was -26.
>>
File: 81mUNq2NEJL._SX480_.jpg (45 KB, 480x360)
45 KB
45 KB JPG
I have strong ankles so I only wear boots during activities that require my ankle to be protected from getting hurt like chainsaw work, prescribed burning/wildland firefighting, using sharp tools, etc. The other exception that I make is for winter or if it is colder than 32F(0C).

Other than that though, I wear pic related for all my trail running and hiking/backpacking. I am with all the others who have stated the benefits of the breathable mesh. These shoes dry faster than a waterlogged boot. I also hate how heavy boots are.
>>
Are there any footwear that combines runners/sneakers and boots? Like pic related, but not Salomon.
>>
File: IMG_7473.jpg (71 KB, 315x236)
71 KB
71 KB JPG
I just don't understand how someone can pay $1000 for shoes for a thru hike

Most trail runners last about a month+ of daily heavy wear, people hiking the AT report buying the same pair 4-5 times over the trip. That's just plain silly

>5 x $150 for one thru hike
Vs
>1-200g more boots that will last the whole trip

Here's a middle path, lightweight desert boots with nylon and roughout suede. Look nice, much tougher than trail runner mesh, and weigh
>385 grams each (that's just a hair over the weight of an Altra Lone Peak mid),
and that's before modifications like cutting the shaft off, unstitching parts of the upper, installing Salomon speed laces, swapping the insert etc. You could probably shave 50-70g off these if you did that, for a much tougher, longer lasting boot that looks far better than the fragile mesh socks worn by thruhikers.

These Rocky c7 CXTs aren't perfect, they're a little narrow, the sole wears kinda quick and the lace eyelets aren't very comfortable, but it shows that you can get a hardwearing boot at the same weight and breathability as a trail runner pretty easily if you look

A lot of the trail runner craze is just marketing + people who haven't looked very hard + people who have a lot of cash to burn on weak mesh socks + people who never have to kick anything, scramble, walk through thorny bushes, or properly abuse their footwear.
>>
File: IMG_7426.png (484 KB, 540x753)
484 KB
484 KB PNG
Call me a larper, but I love simple boots with the passion of a thousand suns. Nothing looks better than a pair of beat up leather boots that you're not afraid to run on the beach or bushwhack in.

Any recommendations anons? How can I switch to the world of performance lightweight hikers and keep the look of simple leather boots? Everything just looks so overdesigned and technical, I want to get off the wild ride of 21st century hiking shoes
>>
>buy shoes with built in redundancy from weak cheap materials
>bu-bu-but they weigh 10g less!
>proceed to walk through mild scrubland and instantly destroy $150 shoes
>>
>>1183080
>A lot of the boot craze is just marketing + people who haven't looked very hard + people who have a lot of cash to burn on pretending like they ever have to kick anything, scramble, walk through thorny bushes, or properly abuse their footwear.
generalizations are a 2 way street anon. there are plenty of asskicker trail runners that aren't just overly soft glorified street runners with a different color scheme and a premium price. i have boots for when i need spikes, but 9 months out of the year i'm going cross country with a heavy climbing pack in trail runners.
>>
>>1183055

Give Altra a look. I have a pair of road running shoes from them and they are fantastic.
>>
File: 4291-10.jpg (220 KB, 1000x1000)
220 KB
220 KB JPG
>>1183092
>switch to the world of performance lightweight hikers and keep the look of simple leather boots
Full leather boots aren't light anon, better get used to that. If you want welted full leather boots, there are a few offerings. Meindl and Hanwag come to mind for the european market and I believe Danners makes similar things.
>>
>>1179717
Boots. If you can do it in runners you aren't really /out/.
>>
>>1183092
>muh look
Fuck off /fa/ggot
>>
>>1183225

>if you can do it in runners you aren't really /out/

found the anon with weak as fuck ankles
>>
>>1183225
poser
>>
Wanna go backpacking, looking for boot recommendations, something that won't fall apart within the first month.
>>
>>1183302
Found the memester who's never been off trail in cold wet weather.
>>
>>1183502
>it's only /out/ when it's cold and wet
>accusing others of being memesters
>>
File: IMG_7475.jpg (105 KB, 400x400)
105 KB
105 KB JPG
I've done it
I've found the perfect 3 season boot

I present to you, the Danner Tachyon
>375g (the weight of an Altra Lone Peak Mid)
>suede version lasts a year of combat or several years of hiking
>would probably shrug off a thru hike
>dries incredibly quickly, good ventilation
>rubber (not EVA foam) sole
>every buyer reports they feel like runners
>Danner makes some of the longest lasting boots available
>fokkin cool
>come in black, sage, coyote suede and actual polishable leather

Kino in boot form
>>
File: IMG_7477.jpg (384 KB, 890x1335)
384 KB
384 KB JPG
There's even a lighter short version if you don't like high military boots, Danner x Hobo Japan
>>
>>1183513
and extraordinarily round toe
>>
>>1179717
The answer is always, "it depends." I use trail runners a lot still, but I look at them as more of a fad that has a lot of appeal to the uninitiated, but to anyone who has hiked in trail runners extensively, you'd understand that they are not intended for backpacking long distances, on rocky trails, with a significant load on your back, in wet conditions......the list already should rule out backpacking for anybody who has done it.

>>1179721
>a pair of trail runners that feels like you're wearing nothing at all
Yeah, maybe on a short hike, but try saying that after you just hiked 20 miles and had to FEEL every single rock and root and bump on the trail in the bottoms of your feet because the soles of your shoes are so incredibly thin and flexible.
>>
>>1179732
>Thru hikers disagree with this statement
What percentage of AT "thru hikers" quit before they've even left Georgia? Isn't it something like 80%?

>>1179829
>Flat out 100% unquestionably a lie.
Most thru hikers don't actually hike all the way "thru," so who gives a shit what they think or do? Thru-hiking is mostly involved with following the latest gear fads and planning. Trail runners are a fad.
>>
>>1181656
>Hiking over rocks and uneven terrain
>
>>light, maneuverable runners
Sorry, no. Doesn't work like that. First of all, you have a 25-45 lb pack on your back, so you aren't jumping around like a fucking fox on these boulders. You need something that will do what you want it to do on the rock while at the same time supporting your weight - the shoe needs to retain its shape to perform like that. The trail runner will flex around your more rigid foot, causing extra pressure and strain on your feet, which leads to pain and your feet getting sore quicker over the course of the day.
>>
>>1182115
Mid size hiking boots. Nothing wrong with these. I use Keens that are about the same height. You lose some (not all) ankle rigidity, but the soles are stiff, the toebox is protected, they're relatively lightweight and you can get them with insulation or waterproofing if you need it, unlike trail runners.
>>
>>1182353
>I spent two and a half weeks in the far units of Denali in Cascadias and was fine
I spent a whole year in Poland and was fine. That doesn't mean jack shit about trail runners.
>>
>>1181615
Fucking retard, there's a reason approach shoes and climbing shoes are soft and flexible.
>>
File: Untitled.png (166 KB, 616x461)
166 KB
166 KB PNG
>>1183552
>approach shoes and climbing shoes are soft and flexible.
They aren't, though. You seem a little confused.
>>
>>1183553
They are though
>>
>>1183555
This is not a matter of opinion or shade of preference. You just have your facts wrong. It's a matter of definitions. Approach shoes are relatively stiff shoes - certainly stiffer than trail runners - with a sticky rubber sole. The sticky rubber doesn't make them "soft," just sticky, in the same way that the texture of a good truck liner will prevent objects from sliding across it. It's still relatively rigid. Climbing shoes function by constricting your foot into a hard mass of bones covered in sticky rubber. Neither type of shoe would do much good without its rigidity.

If you don't know that, then you shouldn't be posting your opinions on /out/. It's not that your misinformation would really hurt people - people need to fend for themselves and vet any information they come across from third parties - but it adds to the noise that includes all the trolling, and just drags everybody else down with you.
>>
>>1183560
Approach shoes are far more flexible than boots
>Climbing shoes function by constricting your foot into a hard mass of bones covered in sticky rubber
100% bullshit
>>
>>1183562
Just don't post if you don't own any of these shoes or have never used them.
>>
>>1183562
>>Climbing shoes function by constricting your foot into a hard mass of bones covered in sticky rubber
>100% bullshit
But it is not. Just ask anybody in climbing, what they tell you is that your climbing shoes should be small as possible, normally you wear a size or 2 smaller than you would wear on any other footwear, because you want to press hard on the footholds, specially if they are small.
Then the rubber sole for it to be sticky and not slip.
>>
>>1179747
I just sold my memecoins, in a week I'm leaving for three months of New Zealand. I'm so fucking happy
>>
File: mindbenders 2.5 years.jpg (529 KB, 2163x528)
529 KB
529 KB JPG
>>1183541
>>1183547
>>1183553
>>1183560
>>1183599
>he fell for the "all trail runners are squishy nikes" maymay
do some fucking research. my vasque mindbender trail runners are significantly stiffer than my vasque grand traverse approach shoes. the approach shoes are stickier and have a better edge, so anything slick or 4th class+ i'd rather have them, but everything else i prefer my trail runners, including carrying a 50+ lb backpack across talus fields. and fwiw my merrell phaserbound boots are stiffer than either, but they're just for snow.
>>
>>1183599
I am in climbing I don't need to ask anyone to know you're totally full of shit.
>>
>>1183706
>I am in climbing
What a bizarrely vague statement of your alleged credentials. Not, "I belong to a climbing club," or, "I work part-time as a climbing instructor." Just, "Yeah? Well I AM in climbing, so stop questioning me! I r-really have worn climbing shoes once or twice before guys, for reals this time..... they're soft, believe me..."
>>
>>1183703
>>>1183541(You)
>>>1183547(You)
>>>1183553(You)
>>>1183560(You)

>do some fucking research. vasque mindbender trail runners are significantly stiffer than my vasque grand traverse approach shoes.
Apart from the manufacturer's categorization, what's the difference between the Mindbenders and any given pair of "low hiking boots"? For an example, see pic related. Not trying to trick you, I'm genuinely curious.

As for the "approach shoes are soft" meme,
> the approach shoes are stickier and have a better edge
I think you articulated the definition of an approach shoe pretty well right here. I didn't mean they are stiff, but just relatively stiff - stiff enough that you can use the edges if you need to. Soft approach shoes would suck when you needed to use the edge, and be unsuitable as an approach shoe.
>>
File: low hiking boots.jpg (49 KB, 988x510)
49 KB
49 KB JPG
>>1183728
>>
File: flexible.jpg (135 KB, 730x548)
135 KB
135 KB JPG
>>1183722
>missing the derisive use of your own words this badly
>>1183599
>Just ask anybody in climbing
>>1183706
>I am in climbing
that's exactly how i would have responded, because it's not like you'll believe anything he says, anyways. and i'm still interested in hearing your response to me >>1183703 and just to prove you're a retard who's doubling down instead of admitting you're wrong, here's some oc.
>>
>>1183728
>>1183729
>what's the difference between the Mindbenders and any given pair of "low hiking boots"? For an example, see pic related.
look at the pictures and answer your own question, dumbass.
>>
File: wtf.jpg (150 KB, 800x573)
150 KB
150 KB JPG
>>1183734
>make a claim about a specific shoe you own and have access to
>get politely asked to elaborate on said claim about the specific shoe you brought up
>"fuck u bitch, i aint gotta explain shit"
>>
>>1183735
oh, i'm sorry, i didn't realize you're blind and need someone to describe what's plainly visible in the two pics. well, one's a trail runner, and the other's a low boot. hope that helps!
>>
File: wtf.jpg (39 KB, 314x236)
39 KB
39 KB JPG
>>1183738
Your comment was specifically about your the stiffness of your trail runner's soles. I asked how that compares to a similar shoe, information which is not readily available in any sort of printed or pictorial format. You come back with,
>IT'S PLAINLY VISIBLE IN THE PICTURE, DON'T QUESTION ME

K, hun'. You have a good time with your trail shoes, then. I'm going to stop taking your retarded bait and close the thread.
>>
>>1183742
>abandoning thread before addressing the pic i posted in >>1183730
and no, you're question was not "specifically about your the stiffness of [my] trail runner's soles". it was
>Apart from the manufacturer's categorization, what's the difference between the Mindbenders and any given pair of "low hiking boots"?
and there are lot's of differences, most of which can be gleaned from the picture by anyone who has experience wearing a variety of /out/ shoes. but since you clearly don't have that experience, i guess i can understand why you can't pick up on the differences. but have fun ducking facts and resorting to ad hominims.
>>
>>1183744
>inb4 you jump on the wrong version of your to validate your superiority
>>
>>1183502
>wear boots
>they get wet
>cold feet for the rest of the trip
OR
>wear shoes
>they get wet
>make a fire and dry them off
>don't walk in puddles again
>>
>>1183686
Good for you for actually doing something with all your internet money
>>
File: climbing shoes.jpg (148 KB, 1280x720)
148 KB
148 KB JPG
>>1183562
wut
>>
File: dd3.png (143 KB, 600x600)
143 KB
143 KB PNG
>>1183744
>verbally abuse people just trying to talk
>get confused when they stop talking to you
>>
>>1183765
>retard talking out his ass
>gets called on it with proof
>abandons thread
almonds, etc.
>>
I've been wearing Salomon XA PRO 3D, the non-GTX ones.

Would not recommend it hot weather, I've got heat rash on my feet from them.
>>
>>1183550
>>
>>1179829
>Muh combat boots
>Muh 40+lb pack
>Muh vietnam era gear

I did was easily doing 50km+ a day with a heavier kit than that when I was in the army and it was fine though? Like I'm glad you can spend $5000 on ultralight shit but there's nothing wrong with a setup like this or they wouldn't issue it in the army
>>
>>1184056
sort of playing double's advocate, sort of sincere, but the military doesn't care about you enjoying yourself, or about the long term health of your back and knees.

not that i'm a ul fag, just pointing out that uncle sam isn't the best measuring stick.
>>
>>1184061
I still wear my issued combat boots 10 years later and they feel great, I definitely wouldn't be carrying a 75kg ruck again though that's for sure. Military surplus is cheap and fine and surely it's better someone can get out with some cheap gear than not get out at all
>>
>>1184064
>75kg ruck
You're lying
>>
>>1184064
>Military surplus is cheap and fine and surely it's better someone can get out with some cheap gear than not get out at all
agreed. i really just have issue with
>there's nothing wrong with a setup like this or they wouldn't issue it in the army

that's also not to be confused with broad anti-military sentiment on my part. i'm always grateful of people like you who are brave enough to risk getting shot at to protect cowards like me.
>>
File: KY38Manpack.jpg (26 KB, 220x276)
26 KB
26 KB JPG
>>1184067
I always see pictures of military guys on the internet carrying a manpack by itself and get real jealous, they always made us strap them to our already full ruck
>>
>>1179717
boots for carrying 30+ lbs, trail runners for anything under
>>
>>1184067
That's actually not unheard of for real world missions or something like the Robin Sage infil.
>>
>>1179717
boots provide superior ankle support and are better in thick vegetation. Shoes are not really for hiking as much as going for a stroll.
>>
>>1183753
> wear shoes
> they get wet
> they freeze
> get frostbite
> amputate toes
FTFY. Not even exaggerating, that's what happens this time of year.
>>
>>1184153
>there is only one climate in the entire world and it is homogeneous to the one you live in
sorry, i forgot that detail about earth
>>
>>1184142

>superior ankle support

The ankle is meant to flex and move, you actually are more likely to injure yourself in boots than shoes. Boots don't allow full ROM for the ankle.
>>
>>1184153
Depends. If you're walking around in wet snow all day you're pretty fucked regardless, unless you're wearing rubberized winter boots, and even then you need to make camp and dry out pretty quick anyway. If that's what we're talking about, then yeah of course I'm bringing boots. But even if it's cold, if I'm not expecting snow I'll just wear shoes. Boots aren't necessary 90% of the time.
>>
>>1183686
Hey congrats dude i hope you enjoy your stay here. When are you getting here, and which part?
>>
>>1184067
Get a load of this fag
https://mwi.usma.edu/the-overweight-infantryman/
>>
>>1179717
I just bought these, they haven't arrived yet but I'm hoping they'll be comfy for hiking. I live in South Florida so it's very humid and wet, boots aren't good here.

https://www.amazon.com/New-Balance-481v2-Trail-Running/dp/B00QM48NT8
>>
>>1184067
Go read about bravo two zero and you'll be surprised on how much a mule soldiers are turned into.
>>
>>1183730
What is that?
>>
>>1183706
Then explain how are the shoes you wear to climb a vertical wall, and how do you achieve precision on small holds if the fit of your shoes is loose.
I haven't said anything about flexibility, you can bend regular climbing shoes quite easily, but they do have to constrict your foot.




Delete Post: [File Only] Style:
[Disable Mobile View / Use Desktop Site]

[Enable Mobile View / Use Mobile Site]

All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective parties. Images uploaded are the responsibility of the Poster. Comments are owned by the Poster.