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File: fukuoka.jpg (19 KB, 264x353)
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Hey /out/
I would like to ask for your advice, situation is the following:
I graduated a week ago, so now i have a degree in horticulture. My long term goal is to save up enough money to buy a 1,5-2 ha land in my home country (Eastern Europe region) where I can set up a smallscale organic farm. To achieve this, i have to get a job and grind first. I would like to work in my field, but i can not make money out of that around here. So I'm thinking about going west for a couple of years, to get my hands dirty with some full-time or seasonal farm/outdoors work. Any help is appreciated, point me to forums, share your experience, tips, stories. I'm really desperate here.
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>>1180057
WWOOF
World wide opportunities on organic farms
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>>1180063
Thanks anon. I checked WWOOF, but it mostly seems to be about unpayed volunteer-work. Maybe my original post was not clear, I want to save up money for the future. I want to go abroad mainly for that reason. Is it possible to transition to a paying position after WWOOF-ing? To find out about local opportunities during volunteering? I really like some of the stuff on WWOOF, but I am already in my mid 20s, so I have the urge to consider future goals as well.
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>>1180057
I know you're asking for questions OP, but I'd like to ask you how was it working for that degree in horticulture? I'm interested in something like that as well since I also want to start an organic community farm in my area, although I'm in the US.
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>>1181935
*asking for answers
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>>1180057
Don't the Dutch have a large greenhouse industry? You might try inquiring at some greenhouse facilities in the Netherlands.
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>>1181938
OP here
I do not know about the laws in the US concerning agricultural-land ownership. If it is a requirement to have a degree to buy land, go for it. If you plan to chase a career in agronomy at big companies, go for it. If your plans are to go small scale and organic, getting a degree would be a waste of time in my opinion. You have to learn way too much shit in areas useless for your cause like marketing, economy, industrial-scale crop production (think monsanto-style methodology), a ludicrous amount of raw and potentially useless data (this happened with me in courses of ornamental plant-production mostly), etc. All in all about 2/3 of the stuff I have learned would only be useful if I planned to chase a job in some super specified area, and half of that will be outdated in, say, 5 years if not less. Hands-on experience was way too scarce as well, most of the 3,5 years was classroom stuff. Needless to say this is not a field you can become an expert of in a classroom. Also, organic farming was a specification, in the base curriculum it is barely mentioned.
Bare in mind I know nothing about how this goes down in the U.S.. If it is somewhat similar, I would say it is a waste of time considering your goals. Getting real-life experience at full- and small scale organic farms, learning about organic production in the means of self-education and saving up some money to fund your future farm-projet would be the way to go.
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>>1181940
Yes, the dutch are the autistic geniuses of the greenhouse-industry. I'm already looking for job opportunities there. I have some moral dilemmas tho, as I think that kind of agricultural practice is the very basis of the first worlds overconsumption, and a prime example of technological insanity. None the less, I do not really have the option of sorting things out on a strict moral basis right now, so I go wherever I get a chance to go to.
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I'm gonna derail this thread.

I'm studying electrical engineering technology, what's a quality /out/ job i can get? I live in Canada btw.
>hear stories of people changing massive resistors in the middle of nowhere from helicopters for distribution purposes
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>>1183365
You need to put in hundreds of hours before anyone will even refer you to that kind of work. Get busy, boyo.
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>>1180057
3.8-4.9 acres is not alot of land. I'd look for 10-12 if it was me. Never know if the land prices will skyrocket.




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