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Old thread: >>1378974

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>>
>>1386700
>>
>>1386666
Nice quads, ya fucking satan...
They're obviously reaching for something, and that something is light. Also, as someone said already, light breeze makes em combat that by thickening...
>>1386690
I was thinking maybe sewing mylar to a pp non woven cloth, and making it like a grow tent...
>>
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It has been a few weeks since I brought in my leggy, malnourished black Hungarian chilies and they have been doing very well; they were snipped down to a few barren stems with some half-dead leaves - now with just the light from a desk lamp and starting today, my new grow light setup, they have some nice new foliage with some purple pigmentation, as well as some flower buds. Could I leave these flowers and expect them to produce fruit over the winter? It would be nice to get some fruits, and I figure that diverting energy to fruiting may temporarily retard the vegetative growth of the plant, meaning it will take longer for them to fill up their pots and risk becoming root-bound (which I have been told could stymie their growth in the future, when I plant them back outside in Spring).

Is my thinking correct? I used to just plant new seeds every season, so I'm flying completely blind when it comes to long-term care of peppers and herbs. Every time I start a new hobby there is this massive gap between my ambition and my ability/knowledge, and it's very frustrating. Between these and the poblano plants and herbs I have to somehow care for, it's all so nerve-racking.
>>
Has anyone tried the idea of "no-pruning" fruit trees from Fukuoka? What have your results been like?
>>
>>1386753
I did that...because I was lazy. I don't recommend it. Fruit trees are much better if you prune them even a little bit. I'm sure some cultivars may do better than others on their own, but unless you know which ones, I'd advise to prune normally. Also, no-prune methods seriously your ability to do things like espalier. lol

>>1386737
>Could I leave these flowers and expect them to produce fruit over the winter?

Yes.

>Is my thinking correct?

It only works up to a certain point of course, but yes. Mine gave me a crop of peppers both winters I had them indoors.

>it's all so nerve-racking.

That is similar to animal husbandry. The main solution is to do more, grow more, raise more. You do more and gain confidence. You raise or grow more and their increased numbers help lessen the emotional impact problems will have on you.

>>1386735
I've tried sewing off-brand Mylar before and it never works out very well. It sort of splits sometimes other times it is okay. Do a test and find out.
>>
Any Californians here? I want to bring a fruit tree from arizona. Will customs not let it pass into california?
>>
>>1386817
>customs

Are there boarder checks or something? Do they have kinder egg sniffing dogs and search tonka beans?
>>
>>1386875
California doesn't allow a lot of other stuff from other states into it. Like any citrus trees, and if you do bring plants into the state than you have to use soil you buy and not already there.
>>
Someone recommend to me to use centipedes in a garden for pest control. How effective, do you think?
>>
>>1386924
They should be fairly effective for ground-based insects or ground-based larval stages of other insects.
>>
guys, whats the best ecological method to kill off aphids? this year they ravaged my beans, carrots and are now starting to affect my pumpkins
>>
>>1387049
I'm no expert but I just recently dealt with my own aphid problem. I've used pyrethrum to spray them when I've seen them pop up or I crush them with my fingers. You also really need to keep your eye out for them since they multiply so quickly. The best place to check for them is anywhere the sun doesn't directly shine on so under the leaves and shaded parts of the plant.
I'm hoping someone else replies to you with an easier solution because the way I do it is a little tedious and I'd love an easier way myself.
>>
>>1387049
There's a whole range of plants and grasses I know of but it's basically impossible for me to translate local names to English... From soaking them in water to boiling, mixes of them, all sorts of things you can do to prepare the spray... go in that direction, ask old folks in your area, they usually know that stuff and local plants....
>>
>>1387049
I just hose them off with a stiff spray of water.
>>
>>1387049
Get ladybugs. But NOT the Chinese ones, they are worse pests than anything else.
Certain species of spiders also make wonders.
>>
>>1387049
>>1387104
Also, go search for nearby ant nests and destroy them. Ants farm aphids. Go figure.
>>
>>1387049
If your zoning local laws allow for it, consider chickens. They fuck shit up when it comes to insects, and they give you tasty eggs and deity tier compost. But don't get just one, they are social animals and will not do well when all alone. I know that feel.
( ._.)

I'm so alone
( ;_;)
>>
>>1387215
It sounds like you need some more chickens.
>>
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>>1387053
thanks, i didnt know about natural insectizides. i guess ill try this one out next year
>>1387060
i will ask my russian neighbour then. he should be up to date in those things
>>1387061
pretty sure that this would damage my plants, since i already tried this one
>>1387104
>>1387106
ladybugs are really rare in my city and always get hunted down by ants. thanks for the suggestion, but that didnt work for me in the past. destroying nearby ant nests will cause other problems
>>1387215
i already got some quails, but they arent really made for pest control. my grandfather had chickens and they destroyed many crops, just by being chickens.
i thought about bantams tho, maybe they would do a better job than quails or regular chickens.
people always tell me to go out when i am alone, but we are already /out/, are we?

thanks for all the responses guys! really appreciating the help!
>>
>>1387237
>pretty sure that this would damage my plants, since i already tried this one

Don't use water pressure so much that it bruises the leaves.

>my grandfather had chickens and they destroyed many crops, just by being chickens.

Yeah they are bad at that. Ducks are less destructive, fyi. They are also amazing for slugs.
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What can I plant in these plastic cup things? 4 inches tall, diameter 3.5 in. I have like 50 of them. Any ideas?
>>
>>1387049
ladybugs or diatomaceous earth.
careful about how many ladybugs you use though, they will try to enter your house for shelter in the winter
>>
>>1387263
Probably anything, as long as you drill holes into the bottom
>>
Brother got a dog, dog's fine but dogs tear up the grass in a garden. Are there any deep rooted grasses I can replace the backyard with so we won't have a large mostly dirt patch?
Southeast texas, for climate information.
>>
>>1387263
For food? Herbs mostly. Make drainage holes. You can grow garlic for garlic tops really easily in containers that size.

>>1387293
Bahia
>>
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Working on a greenhouse, essentially made from trash from work. Now I gotta think about heaters.
>>
>>1386753
Lots of fruit trees are grafted or pruned when you by them. He has a chart explaining how to prune them to be closer to a natural tree, which I follow to an extent. But trees are pruned in nature by bears, deers, wind and snow. If theres branches which are sick or growing in a bad way, dont be afraid to prune it.
>>
>>1387311
Looking pretty good so far.
>>
>>1387104
I watched some guy explaining ladybugs on certain medical plant (you can probably search it on yt). The trick is you give em space nearby to live in and have water, so when they breed the little ones can do the job, because apparently they're the ones that eat bad bugs, the old ones you buy are just lazy...
>>
>>1387334
The adults are ravenous for aphids too.
>>
>>1387509
>I just planted my first hydroponic basil, how long until it sprouts?

7-14 days, depending on temperature, maybe as little as 3.
>>
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Hi, I found these yesterday night, there was a literal mountain of these (thousands and thousands) just lying at the side of a field.
Im from middle germany

What are they? Are they edible for humans? Any chance they would be unsafe to eat? (Maybe they were meant for animal consumption and have high pesticide concentration or something like that)

I could just ask the farmer, but it could become a bit awkward.
>>
>>1387630
Never seen sugar beets / Zuckerrüben before?

You could theoretically extract the sugar, but really not worth it
>>
>>1387630
they are edible for humans but have a weird taste. where are you from? those are quite big, the ones in my region got swallowed by the drought this year
>>
>>1387311
Not enough light if you ask me. What are you planning to plant inside?
>>
>>1387630
Those are sugar beets. They make a great fodder for animals and this is the stuff sugar is made off, but that's about it. As for eating, they are edible, but not exactly tasty.
The fact they are put in a large mountain is simply the way how beets are stored. You just pile them together. So they are perfectly safe to eat.

Alternatively, some lazy ass "hunter" just put a prism of those (if it wasn't THAT big) for boars to came out of the forest and shoot them, but that entirely depends on the fact if there was any forest nearby AND how big the pile was.
>>
>>1387334
The adults are just as good, but the difference is that adult specimen also travel for much larger distances, so they might end up eating some other aphids than the ones you want to get off your own plants, while young ones have shorter range and thus are more likely to devour all kind of shit that's destroying your garden.
And yeah, there are few different species of plants that make a great haven for ladybugs, aren't invasive themselves and some even look nice (while others can be planted behind tool shed or in the middle of the field you need the ladybugs on), so it's working pretty well.
The main issue is what the original anon already mentioned - ants tend to hunt for ladybugs, simply because they are "shephards" defending their "flock" of aphids. But if you have work against ants (which is very easy, as opposed to aphids), then ladybugs can clear everything else.
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>>1387698
Not enough sunlight in the winter around here for really anything to grow (5a). I'm really just trying to overwinter some lemon trees. I may put some lights in.

I'm going to insulate it and put up white tile to reflect some light around. Infact i'm going to tile the whole thing, just because I have so much of it.
>>
>>1387630
Is there a pig or cattle farm in the area? Mangelwurzel are one of the big ones used for that. That one is either rutabaga or sugar beet.

>>1387700
>The fact they are put in a large mountain is simply the way how beets are stored.

For the winter, people normally pile a few feet of hay over them then dig into it when they need to pull some fodder out. That keeps them from freezing and going bad.

>>1387707
Certainly paint/make everything white inside. That helps a great deal. The only black stuff should be thermal mass for keeping nighttime temps warmer. Like a drum of water.
>>
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That's how I'm doing, my carnation finally kicked the bucket I'm having no luck growing a carnation, I'm in zone 10a I'm gonna need one carnation seed that is stronger than all the other ones to end up having one grow.
Would it be possible to grow a carnation inside in zone 10a?
What kinda small set up could I use to try and grow one my south end of the house has no sun due to hurricane shutters so have no spot I could put the seedlings at to get sun light.
>>
>>1387793
You'd probably need to do it indoors in Zone 10x or create some sort of micro climate outside. You'd only need to change it by 1-2 zones at most.
>>
>>1387707
is it meant to be temporary?

I don't see any kind of a foundation
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>>1387707
Lemon tress really don't like a bright/cold wintering. The leaves will try to continue photosynthesis, but the roots will be too cold to deliver water. As a result, they will defoliate which really drains their resources (google "winter leaf drop"). In temperate climates it's really the best option to winter them cool and dark. Or, if you can afford it, warm and lit with plenty artificial lighting (south window will NOT do unless you want super leggy growth).
>>
>>1387878
where do I learn stuff like this?
>>
>>1387645
>>1387695
>>1387700
>>1387717
Thanks
>>
dumped the gas out of the tiller, replaced the plug, and it finally started up

I may have been trying to start it wrong the whole time....
>>
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>>1388458
lol If I tilled, I'd probably just use a pig.
>>
Does anyone mind posting their indoor growing setup?
I am in zone 5 so there is no chance for me to grow outdoors for the next 5 months or more .
I am thinking of growing peppers and some leafy greens like lettuce and spinach.
Any tips or anything you wish you knew before you started?
>>
>>1388489
you probably should be focused on starting plants on 3-4 months....unless you're bringing things inside to tide them over

I started on time this year, but was delayed due to an idea that failed....still had a good year

I've got seeds, trays, and lights all ready to go for next season
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>>1388641
Not the same guy but Im curious also, how many months before last frost is ideal to start seeds indoors? If my last frost was say, sometime mid march, would I plant in December?
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>>1388641
If i am doing things inside why should I be waiting until march to start?
I dont want to use it just for seedlings.
I have 2 small bell peppers that are just growing by my window now.
Why couldnt I grow something with a short life cycle like lettuce, or even shorter like microgreens?
I am also thinking of growing green onions, basil, mint, carrots, and even cherry tomatoes or any combination of them.
>>
>>1388647
>If my last frost was say, sometime mid march, would I plant in December?
well, that's like 2 months earlier than here....and I believe peppers should be started about mid march....so january-mid january sounds right

depends on what you're growing

>>1388650
you can grow whatever you want if you have enough space and lights
>>
>>1388650
If youre growing just from window light theres the risk you wont be getting enough light in the winter time, as well as temperature being too low, plants might get leggy and wont fruit.
>>
what determines if a squash is "ripe" or still good?

I found a single lonely one while cleaning up....it feels solid, but didn't get very big
>>
>>1388650
You either buy a grow tent or build something similar yourself. Check light color needs for leafy growth and for flowering/ fruiting... LED lights are really cheap these days from China, for two peppers I don't think you need extreme setups... Use more of your lights by encasing it all in something reflective, or at least white. Don't forget about air and heat exchange. You can control all of this pretty easy if you know basics of Arduino, Chinese knockoff nano is dirt cheap, plus a few cheap relays and sensors, a bit of time, no sweat... you fertilize them just like they're outside, depending on their stage...
I'm in a process of collecting stuff for my own grow tent/ box, thinking about differetn needs now and next year when I'll start seedlings.. whatever you do post pics, I'm interested in all sorts of ideas...
>>
>>1388647
>>1388650
Weeks, not months. The plants don't really get much more benefit from months of growth before being transplanted outside. If you have a greenhouse or polytunnel then you can do it better, but indoor stuff required an ass load of light and lots of rootspace. Otherwise, you can end up stunting the plants and they do worse. Also, the spectrums needed for most the plants after a few weeks changes. If you have full spectrum lights that is fine, but if you are going the cheap route then you'll need extra lighting for the higher spectrum range requirements.

>>1388661
If they have a hard rind they are more than likely ready. If they change color then they are ripe when they finally change fully. For all squash, you can eat them at any time. It is just about palatability and flavor. The younger they are the softer they will be and more fully you can eat them, but the flavor won't be mature for some varieties until they are much older. Other varieties are the other way around for flavor and end up bitter the older they get.
>>
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i found some of these eating my carrots and coriander, what do
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>>1388758
>>
>>1388758
>>1388759
Pluck them off by hand.
>>
Where does homegrown buy their seeds? I'm looking for particular varieties/more exotic plants for my vegetable garden next year since my local choices are really plain.
>>
>>1388806
ebay has really fucked up seeds you can buy
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>>1388806
The OP has a paste bin and in that paste bin there's a lot of links for buying seeds all around the world.
>>
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I'm trying to set up some hydroponic blueberries, and while we get the finishing touches together, I've moved them inside to protect against the frost.

The leaves have begun curling, and a google search seems to be telling me it might be overwatering, can anybody confirm?
>>
>>1388835
Are they already in their growing medium and hydroponic solution? It is probably a nutrient problem, not specifically an overwatering issue. double check your nutrient mix with what hydroponic blueberries require. Make sure algae isn't growing somewhere and that everything that deals with the water is light tight.

Also, double check for thrips and aphids.
>>
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>>1388838
Thanks for the tips. They're currently in the boxes I got them in from the greenhouse, because we had a couple hiccups getting things set up and I didn't want to expose their roots until we could get the solution stable. Is there a reasonable way to give them temporary care? We want to have them in the greenhouse within the week, but I want to keep them alive until then.

I'll check for the pests now.
>>
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>>1388844
>>1388838
No pests seem to be present, but they've got this splotching
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>>1388844
>>1388849
Then it probably is some overwatering if they are fairly wet. If so, let them dry out a bit. If they were outside in the ground I'd say look like they've been a wee bit cold with rainy weather and have a small amount of bacterial spot/canker. Remove the worst leaves. Some of the stems look like they are also affected. Prune when they are dry. Keep insects off them. Water and insects can spread it around. If you foliar water them, stop doing that. You should have enough info to google better info than I can give you.
>>
>>1388855
That's pretty much perfect, thanks. Google's great, but I have to know what I'm dealing with. I'll try to return to a future thread with results.
>>
Asked this on /an/ but I'll ask here also:

I want to grow high-light plants like vegetables indoors, but the lights for doing that are so fucking ugly and they make everything look like a pothead's bedroom. Are there any lights that can grow plants indoors that don't look alien and unpleasant? Plants I want to grow:

- Tomatoes
- Romaine Lettuce
- Real high light plants like grasses or landscaping ornamental plants
- Bananas, other tropical fruit plants

I know there are set-ups for corals that emulate full sun, but I'm not sure I could find them in the right size/shape or if they would be exactly right for things like grass or high-light flowering plants.
>>
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Can someone explain to me why two of my avocado plants in 2 gallon pots have stopped growing and the avocado in a 1 gallon pot is growing just fine..
>>
>>1388806

Baker creek heirloom seeds is my go-to. Lots of neat varieties of just about everything.
>>
>>1388900
did you have a cold night recently?
sometimes when plants are shocked they stop growing entirely
>>
>>1388888
You don't need to get the ones with the colors. Just get full spectrum stuff or anything that is at least around 8k color temp. Some plants need more than that so make sure to look up individual needs. It will also depend on what stage of growth or flowering/fruiting cycle they are at.

>>1388900
Could be a lot of things from it gets less light to it has more nutrients in the soil or the soil/container holds/drains water differently than the others; even a combination of everything.
>>
>>1388729
hmmm, I don't remember what variety it was

I found an old seed packet, and figured I'd try it and see if anything grew....I believe several of them did, but the plants got swamped by the cantaloupe
>>
Anyone on here have any experience growing Australian native bush foods, I'm thinking of trying to grow the native banana, passionfruit and grape over Christmas if I can source any seeds. Also want to try to grow the kakadu plum, but that seems hard to find seeds. Live up in Cairns so it will be raining a shit ton
>>
>>1387299
>bahia
Thanks anon, was out for a couple of days but wanted to let you know I appreciate the response.
>>
>>1388900
You always need to use pots of appropriate size. If you overpot it holds moisture a lot longer, and if you water them on the same schedule small roots suffocate and die setting back your plants. Some plants also build root system big enough to fill the pot first before going into green mass but I dunno if avocado is one of them.
>>
>>1389173
Good info. I'm a fan of, "use the largest container possible." Unless, it is for bonsai of course.
>>
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Now that my fluorescent grow light setup is made, I'm getting around to making reflectors. I taped aluminum foil to cardboard and tried to deform it as little as possible. If I just painted these with white with acrylic would that suffice?
>>
>>1389293
Deforming it is fine, that won't affect reflectivity too much, but smudging it with your hands can leave oils that would affect reflectivity. If you were using them for sunlight for plants, you'd want to deforming so it doesn't create hot spots.
>>
>>1389293
>If I just painted these with white with acrylic would that suffice?

Yes, flat/matte white.
>>
>>1387263
not poppies
>>
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Don't know if this is the best place to ask, feel free to refer me elsewhere;

I've got a plant which I think is some kind of Haworthia which I recently repotted. It's not doing real well anymore, and I can't figure out why. I used to have it inside on a windowsill and it would get sun during the early morning and late afternoon, with shade the rest of the day (since the window looked out on a patio). I don't think I'm overwatering it since I only water when the soil is just about completely dry, which is what I've read I'm supposed to do. Last time I posted about this someone mentioned it wasn't getting enough sun and had no room to grow, so I put it in this pot and stuck it outside where it gets sun most of the day. I'm in central AZ; it's pretty cool outside right now so I wouldn't think it's getting sunburnt. Plant next to it is Euphorbia Grandicornis for green reference. How do I stop it from dying?
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>>1389773
Pic related is what it used to look like (next to a euphorbia trigona), and the light level is pretty much what it'd get most of the day.

Unfortunately I knocked off a couple of "leaves" while repotting it but I cleaned them, sliced off the very base, and covered it in rooting hormone; don't really know what will happen but I guess I'll see.
>>
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>>1389773
>>1389777
If it's never been outside ever, it could still be sunburn if you moved it directly into full sun (though that's what I did with mine too at some point and it didn't care, then again I'm much farther north than you with weaker sun).
I also exposed mine to temps down to just above freezing but never below 0°C - was there frost already in your area?
Also consider x-posting here: >>>/an/thread/2845907
>>
>>1389795
>tfw to stupid to properly link
Now perhaps?
>>>/an/2845907
>>
>>1389795
I stuck it directly in full sun, I had hoped it wouldn't be too strong during the fall. I'll move it into a shaded area. I never (or, very very rarely) get below zero in my area; the lowest temp I've gotten so far this season is 12C/53F. Thanks for the link, will crosspost there.
>>
>>1389798
Ah OK, probably sunburn then. You're at like 35°N I guess and quite a high elevation I assume? So you'll have very strong UV still now
>>
>>1389801
33 30' N and 1257ft elevation
>>
>>1389805
That might explain it, I'm just 50°N 230m, but even here the weak February sun once managed to scorch a Dracaena I put into the sun for maybe 3 hours.
Maybe your Haworthia species is more sun-sensitive than mine (H. attenuata) too
>>
>>1389773
F

Sorry for your loss.
>>
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Does anyone know the name of these flowers? I'm about to plant my garden for Summer and I want to try and get the right flowers to attract insects like ladybirds to kill pests.
>>
>>1389808
Well, shit, it's been out there for a couple of weeks, I guess I'll put it into the shade immediately

>>1389811
Surely it's not dead yet? It's got green parts and the inside looks reasonably green and vaguely healthy
>>
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I posted this as an individual thread because this is my first time visiting /out/ and I wasn't aware this general existed
Hi, I want to start growing something edible in my garden, but I haven't a clue what or how, and I've got some pretty limiting circumstances
My 'garden' is a small square of concrete, if you're familiar with British terrace housing you'll know the type. What can I grow in such a garden? I can get plant pots and even create a planter out of wooden boxes and pallets, but I wanted to ask people with more knowledge what kind of smaller crops I should stick to given the circumstances - I was thinking probably cherry tomatoes, strawberries or carrots or something?
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>>1390030
Ill give the same advice someone else gave me when i first started out. Most edible veggies are really easy to take care of, look for whats common or native to your area. My apartment deck is filled with spinach, broccoli and other leafy greens right now. I have a few root veggies but they take longer to grow.

Unfortunately its a little late in the season to plant anything if you live anywhere that gets frost.
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>>1390030
some lettuce can be grown outside through the winter if covered

otherwise put a mini greenhouse inside with lights

strawberries can be done in pots, but the yields are not great unless you have a lot of them
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>>1390041
>>1390048
Thanks for the advice, going to look into broccoli and lettuce now. how big should a mini greenhouse be? I need to be conservative with my space is all & ah, I'll forget about strawberries for the time being then
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>>1390055
whatever you can fit in the space you have

something like this is not a bad choice: https://www.amazon.com/Blissun-Tier-Mini-Greenhouse-green/dp/B06XRR8M8H

...or make a simple shelf out of wood; https://woodgears.ca/storage/shelf_plans/index.html is a pretty good, basic design that can be shrunk down....I would still put some kind of plastic sheeting around it

as long as it has some way of holding trays, and hanging lights, it will work

lots more ideas: https://www.google.com/search?q=wood+grow+plant+shelf&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjcg6XywrXeAhUEmeAKHe7dC38Q_AUIEygC&biw=1366&bih=607
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Come this Spring I'm going to have my own house. I want to get a head start make sure I'm prepared with everything that I need to start the growing season. I'm in zone 5. Any tips?
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Alright, in a few years I plan to raise my own meat before environmentalist nutcases convince people that eating wheat grass is a better alternative to using a condom so the "carbon footprint" isn't created in the first place. So, would rabbits + chicken be the best combo considering utility (rabbits for fur, chickens for eggs, both for meat)? Or would different poultry/small mammals be better?

Side note, if I ever get a decent sized plot of land, which is more efficient? Sheep or goats (for dairy and whatnot)
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>>1390118
Look into making cheap polytunnels so you can get a jump on the season before the last frost. Research growing starts indoors a few weeks before putting them out in the tunnels. Learn how to "harden off" plants before setting them outside the final time. Only grow what you want to eat.

>>1390124
Rabbits convert about 80% of grass into meat while for chickens that's about 15% conversion. Amounts vary for breed of course. Evidently, guinea pigs are even better than rabbits at that. Thus, a rabbit/chicken/guinea pig tractor you move around a yard of grass will maximize your feed costs. Move it every day for rabbits & guinea pigs, but only every 3 days for chickens. Do this through an orchard and you help fertilize the trees/shrubs and chickens help remove pests. You'll get meat and hides from the rabbits & guinea pigs and meat, feathers, and eggs from the chickens.

Goats will be better for milk, but not for grazing grass. They are foragers so scrub and grass is best for them. Sheep are lawn mowers. You get hide, milk, and meat from both of them, but also wool from the sheep. You'll just need to figure out what you want to do. You can try both. The biggest concern is which breed to get based on what you want and how easy birthing them will be. Otherwise, you'll be up to your arm pit in goat/sheep pussy trying to maneuver the kid/lamb around and pull it out. Infrastructure is very important with large farm animals. You need a barn to house feed, stalls for birthing mothers or sick animals, and milking stations. Loading ramps, tie-stals and chutes.

Remember, there's also geese, turkeys, and ducks. Geese and ducks don't need a body of water. All give meat, eggs, and feathers. Geese can also be used to help protect a flock to a certain extent (google, "guard geese"). FYI, my personal fave eggs are turkey eggs. Some breeds can lay quite a few per year, so look into that if you want.
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>tfw had to pick all my remaining carrots because of m*ldew
Note to self: Next time being more careful when watering, so only the ground gets hit and leaves stay dry
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>>1390148
Thanks for the advice but what if I want to grow enough to sell some too?
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>>1390162
Simply grow/rise more than you need. The more you grow/raise the less time per plant/animal you'll spend. For many things, the initial cost is a lot higher than say doubling the amount of stuff you grow/raise. Though, it depends on what you are doing of course.

>>1390158
Nice haul. I wish I had more good soil to plant more stuff. I have plenty of space and even doubling up things with companion planting isn't enough.
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>>1387049
nasturtiums are a good ground cover, they will attract hover flies, which eat aphids
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>>1390148
>Do this through an orchard and you help fertilize the trees/shrubs and chickens help remove pests.
Isn't the chicken shit bad for the plants? I've heard something like that, but it might not be true?
>meat, feathers, and eggs from the chickens.
it's minecraft all over again

>>1386700
Help me out /out/, I've planted some tomatoes, and while they've grown quite big now, they fall over as if their stem is too weak, so I had to tie them to sticks with some rope. Are their stems supposed to be so weak?
The leaves also hang, I'm not sure if that's related, and I think it's due to too much water or too little, any idea I can be sure which one it is? I've guessed that it's because the plant was too dry, as the ground was really dry.
Also any info on how much water a plant should get? A growing tomatoplant in my case. I've got like 7 or 8 in one container and I just basically give them a liter of water, is that too much or too little?
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>>1390173
My soil is shitty for carrots too (clay), so I did those in a raised bed
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>>1389173
>Some plants also build root system big enough to fill the pot first before going into green mass

>plant plant who does this in the earth
>watch as the entire earth is filled with roots after which out of nowhere the whole world sprouts the exact same plant
>mfw the world dies because you've planted a plant
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>>1390233
>Isn't the chicken shit bad for the plants? I've heard something like that, but it might not be true?

When people use manures for fertilizer they need to compost them properly in order to lower their nitrogen levels. Otherwise, the concentration of fertilizer will "burn" plant roots. When animals are out and about grazing and on rotation, there won't be enough build up to root burn plants or trees. Thus, you can pasture animals around trees and shrubs to fertilize them. Just move them onto another location after a while.

For garden plants, the poultry can end up eating the plants. So, you need to pair the correct breed and species to the plants in a way that they are not eating your crops. Also, I wouldn't allow animals to go through the garden like that anyway due to rain splash. Anything they crap will get splashed up onto leaves of plants you'll be eating. That isn't healthy for you. Normally, shrubs and trees never have rain splash problems like that.

I personally, pasture my poultry in my orchard and winter-fallow vegetable garden.

>it's minecraft all over again

Depending on the breed and species of poultry, you are raising, the feathers can be worth quite a bit. With most animals, you can properly clean and sell their skulls, bones, and hides online for a little bit of income; just check the legality of that for your area. Every time you butcher, you'll have leftover that can also be turned into pet food and/or fish food, if you don't simply compost the carcasses.

>>1390235
It refers to root surface area more than anything. Hence why some get root bound before doing anything of note. they are merely in pots too small for their proper life cycle. In the ground they do the same thing, only the barrier isn't there.
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>>1390243
>>1390148

where do you learn this kind of stuff lad
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>>1390282
either he's born and raised on a farm or he's a purebreed autist who's recollected farming knowledge lost to 99% of the populace (autism is the next step in human evolution tbqh)
but i guess experience is the mother of knowledge in either cases

I've just planted some things for the first time and you can see alot of things you did wrong quite fast, from there on it's just planting the same plants again, not making the mistakes you previously made, and seeing what goes wrong this time.
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>>1390282
I grew up on a farm and have lots of hands-on experience. I own a small farm now. Then the internet became a thing and I do lots of online research to streamline stuff. Today, I've been cleaning up raised beds, planning, and spending a few hours researching small animal & poultry breeds for the next season.
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>>1390288
do you have a wife? how many children will you be raising?
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>>1390148
you seem well informed, what do you thing about starting a goat farm, i live in a semi-arid area, temperature varries from -7° in the winter, to up till 47° in the hottest summer days i witnessed

goats seem pretty profitable tbqh, from both meat and milk, so what would you suggest


also elaborate as much as you can
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>>1390148
>>1390314
i was thinking about starting an indoor seed starting business

but this guy inspired me

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZc7ja_apqk
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Passion fruits
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>>1390323
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>>1390323
>>1390324
>The leaves, flowers, peels and stems are all used as medicine in different ways. The leaves mainly contain the alkaloids. Harman, mentioned above, lowers blood pressure naturally. The flower can be made into a sedative and antispasmodic. Passion flower is also used to treat nervous disorders, bronchial conditions, arthritis, asthma, insomnia, gastrointestinal disorders and menopausal symptoms. Carotenoids and polyphenols in the yellow fruit extract can also kill cancer cells in vitro.

>So you may be asking, what’s the whole religious thing about Passion Fruit? I first heard the following story from my grandmother when I was a child. Grandma would always make me a drink of some natural herb or fruit and tell me how they were connected to nature from a religious point of view; it was just her way. According to her, catholic missionaries who accompanied the Spanish Conquistadores in their conquest of the “New World” believed that there was a religious connection between the flower and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ, hence the name “Passion.” They associated the three stigmas of the fruit to the three nails used to pierce the hands and feet of Christ. They also saw the threads of the flower as representing the crown of thorns on Jesus’ head; the tendrils found on the vines as the whips that were used to lash him and the five anthers represented the five wounds, including the one made by the Spear of Destiny.
It wasn't me who wrote this
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This Numex Twilight has been a bonchi for a year now, I'm liking it.
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>>1390327
1 year ago
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>>1390327
>>1390328
I have those but they are 1 meter and 20 centimeters tall
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>>1390293
Anon, I live in an area of eternal 2/10s who do nothing but tv/internet/phone/spend.

>>1390314
>profit

As with everything for a business, you'll need to do some hard research in your area. It may not be viable where you live and you won't know until you research it for yourself. You might find out that quail eggs are the ultimate cash crop in your area or something else odd. Like where I live, everyone already had goats and there's no market for it in stores. But, there's a few people who sell microgreens to restaurants, in the nearby cities, who make enough to live on.

>>1390327
>>1390328
>more /p/ than /p/ photos

Thank you for reminding me of the ones you posted....whenever it was year(s) ago. Very nice aesthetic.
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>>1390288
Got any tips/pointers for raised beds? I'm in Zone 7 and planning to build one for the next growing season.
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>>1390327
Very nice! This pleases me.
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>>1390331
Mine was taller too, but I cut it down specifically to make it look like this.
>>1390336
>>more /p/ than /p/ photos
>Thank you for reminding me of the ones you posted....whenever it was year(s) ago. Very nice aesthetic.
Cheers mang, I remember you liking them! It's been a year almost to the day. Time sure flies.
(Just cellphone pics by the way. I guess the lights & clean background help a lot).
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>>1390347
>Mine was taller too, but I cut it down specifically to make it look like this.
It's pretty, here there are just too many people that stop to pick them up, there are several.
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>>1390339
Design them so you can dismantle them if you need to change something. Make them so you can easily install insect cloth, glass, or plastic for making tunnels. Having a wide top to the walls allows for easy sitting or kneeling while working in the bed. Making the bed less wide so you can easily reach past halfway, from either side, seems to work out a lot better than merely stretching halfway on a wider bed.

>>1390347
I give critique to every photo in the most of the /rpt/ threads on /p/. I'm pretty cold with it, but it is really only technical info I give. The photo here >>1390327 has an excellent composition.

>>1390323
>>1390324
Those are pretty nice. I wish there were a hardy version for Zone 5, so to get fruit.
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>>1390358
>I give critique to every photo in the most of the /rpt/ threads on /p/. I'm pretty cold with it, but it is really only technical info I give. The photo here >>1390327(You) has an excellent composition.
Well, thanks, haha. I know nothing about photography though, I just tried to get it centered & focused.
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>>1390361
>>1390358
Got any basic pointers to take halfway decent pictures for a nub like me?
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>>1390362
Lurk /p/ and google up photography books. Read up on composition, color theory, golden ratio, rule of thirds, dynamic symmetry, phi grid, etc.
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>>1390358
Thanks, I will keep that in mind while building
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>>1390339
>>1390366
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>>1388888
HPS bulbs have a nice, natural white glow to them but can run very hot and wrack up a huge energy bill. You need proper ducting and ventilation to run *one* of those things.
LED's offer slightly less light per square foot, but they are extremely cost efficient and run cool at a lower wattage. Full spectrum colorless brands are available on amazon.
Avoid anything labeled as UV-B or UV-C. They emit ultraviolet light which can cause skin cancer. Generally they are used for sterilization, but plants do love them.
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>>1390377
Thanks my dude, the hugelkultur approach is what I had already in mind since some bushes need to go come spring.
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>>1390233
>Are their stems supposed to be so weak?
tomatoes need support

>The leaves also hang
if it is droppy, it needs water

>I've got like 7 or 8 in one container
that sounds like too many

>>1390339
if they're on the ground, use metal fencing to keep things from burrowing
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>>1390385
Will do, although I haven't signs of burrowing little shits until now
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>>1390385
>>1390392
No need for a bottom layer. They will just crawl over.
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>>1388464

I was madly in love with Sorsha when I was a kid. Also that movie kicks ass.
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>>1390413
moles wouldn't
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>>1390418
Moles eat insects and worms, not crops. They make tunnels near the surface to allow worms to fall into then they catch them and store them for later eating. Voles are the ones that eat the roots of the crops and leaves. They crawl all over the place like mice.
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>>1390425
they don't stick around long enough to give an interview, but whatever they are, they leave tunnels everywhere
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>>1390436
Moles tunnels are really large and wide. Vole tunnels are pretty small in diameter. Moles will make tunnels all over the surface area making it look like someone went crazy with bugs bunny tunnels. Voles make a few small tunnels that go right for tubers and plant roots.
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>>1390562
I keep finding voles dead on the surface. Most of their holes are gone too. Did someone poison the poor chaps?
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I really used to like MI gardener. Then he started to have him on..
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>>1390609
Maybe you are growing a plant that isn't from the area that is poison to them? The following are reputed to repel/poison voles:

Hellebores (Helleborus)
Monkshood (Aconitum)
Bleeding heart (Dicentra )
Lily-of-the-valley (Convallaria majalis
Mayapple (Podophyllum spp)
Daffodils (Narcissus spp)
Trout lily (Erythronium americanum).
Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis)
Hyacinths (Muscari botryoides)
Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum)
Crown imperial (Fritillaria imperialis)
Castor bean plant (Ricinus communis)
Italian arum (Arum italicum)
Goldenrods (Solidago odora)
Bee balm (Monarda didyma)
Salvia
Irises
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>>1390646
Okay, thanks for the info.
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Hi all,

I've had a dehydrator for years and only used it to make yogurt and dehydrate chives.

Are there any cheap grocery store fruits/herbs/veggies that are worth drying/grinding? I was thinking of doing green onions and dried shiitake mushrooms to add to soups, but I'd like to try some other stuff as well - maybe try some homemade hot/sweet pepper powder.
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>>1390327
Based and comfy
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>>1390699
I sometimes buy mushrooms and dehydrate them. They last a lot longer that way and I always have them on hand without worry of them going bad suddenly. I suggest only making containers in pint size unless you use a lot of something at once. I prefer using mushrooms I've grown or harvested on the farm. I actually ran out of pearl oyster mushrooms with the meal I'm staring at now.

I make hot pepper powder and dehydrate tomatoes, tomatillos, wild onion tops, red bell peppers, and a host of other things.
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On a whim, I left a volunteer sunchoke that popped up in my asparagus bed. I've not planted them for a few years, so this one came up from a disturbed tuber that was left behind. So, today I dug it up after a few frosts. There's 40lbs of tubers there.
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>eternally researching new species and cultivars I've never grown
>find out about "yucon"
>"tastes like a combination of apple, pear, carrot and celery"

Seems they need a 5-6 month growing period. Not something that will happen in my Zone 5. I guess some people are able to grow them in Zone 7. I can grow luffa to maturity, if I try really hard, but there's no way I'd be able to grow yucon. I'll just have to grow sweet potatoes instead.

Anyone know of weird unusual tubers in the US that can be grown in a Zone 5 with around growing 170 days max (frost to frost.)
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Tomato harvest has slowed down, but not really stopped yet (50°N zone 8a). Highs of 15°C and clear skies in the forecast for the next 10 days and almost no chance of frost, so more is to come (under the clear plastic roof shelter it may heat up to 25°C when the sun is out), this might be the longest season we ever had
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>>1390920
Zone alone doesn't say much especially if you do annuals. Here in cool summer 8a, sweet potato is always a bit of a gamble (especially in drought years like this one - this year my best plant delivered just about 2kg, last year when it was wetter I got 5kg of a single one), but some hot summer zone 5 areas, especially if wet, can still lead to large harvests
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>>1390937
I have family that grows some, so I'm good to go. Thanks for the info.

>>1390936
Those look good. There have been several killer frosts here. Only some tomatillos are still hanging on a volunteer plant outside the garden.

>this might be the longest season we ever had

Jelly.
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>>1390939
Well we have oceanic climate, so the season is dragged out, not having tons of stuff ripening at once is one of the upsides I guess.
I start my tomatoes indoors in February, transplant into ground in late March/early April (depending on forecasts at that time).
They ripen rather slowly here though, picked my first cherry tomatoes in mid-June
Downside is that some things only get small harvests due to lack of heat sum,l for example my Tabasco pepper I planted in April only got ripe fruit by earlyx September, so now I'm trying to overwinter it indoors with LED to get better harvest in the 2nd year
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>>1390941
I do the same with my starts. My main pepper crops are cultivars for short seasons and ripen early. The hots always take forever and some never start ripening until it is nearly frost time.
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>>1390945
Cayennes (medium hot) proved to be very early last year, IIRC got the first ripe red ones in mid-June
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why is this allowed
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>>1390845
Are you the guy who posted pictures of dehydrating wild onions a thread or two ago?

If you are, how needy are the wild onions? I ask because I bought wild Canadian garlic, wild nodding onion, and wild prairie onion bulbs and am looking for places to plant them. If they are fairly low-needs, I was going to plant them in all the empty patches on my garden where mostly weeds grow.
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>>1390965
Lobbyists ensure monopoly laws are ignored.
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>>1391019
That sounds like a good idea and it should work. You may need to divide them up a few times for best coverage later on.
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i have a hydro set up but no nutes yet, can I crush and dissolve regular fertilizer (slow release pellets for example) into water for the same results as premixed nutrient solutions?
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>>1391130
Only if you do the calculations correctly and get the amounts correct. Look out for any fillers. Those may cause unforeseen problems.
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>>1390965
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuBstLZINco
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Fucking promise me that we'll never let anyone start and run a discord.
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>>1391168
Always report those and use the drop down for the report as, "This post is advertising and begging". You also never want to use that botnet. All the ones ever posted, in these threads, has always been removed by staff.
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>>1389293
Stupid question - what those reflectors are going to be used for? Because I think I've lost the context
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>>1391237
When you use artificial light or have your plants in a sunny window that isn't sunny enough, you can use reflectors to help recover some of the lost light. Google, "grow box." You'll see how all of them have some sort of reflective sides. While the shiny side of aluminum foil is pretty good, flat/matte paint is even better, and name brand Mylar is best for reflectivity. Keep in mind that Mylar and related off brand products that don't have UV protection tend to disintegrate in sunlight. Aluminum foil will begin to oxidize over time, turning an off-white that is less reflective. If you make reflectors for direct sunlight, their surface should be matte or crumpled to prevent causing focal points/hot spots that could burn leaves.

>pic unrelated
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>>1391171
>>1391168
I don't even know what that site is about and I'm not intending to go there.
I just know autism about it has totally shit up the /an/ plant thread, hopefully the same won't happen here
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I want to try indoor seed starting in a garage that have 0 contact with sunlight, so

>can I rely on artificial lighting 100%?
>what sort of lights should i be using?
>i have a bunch of LEDS, are they good for plants? (i'll cover the the place where im putting the plants with alimiuium so its more reflective)
>what kind of fertilizers do i need to add to compost? (the compost that comes in big bags)
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>>1391267
I honestly don't know why staff allow it on there. It is banned so often on most boards that people who post the links try to disguise the links in their text or images. It is a video gaming application for VoIP and other stuff which allows governments access to info they gather.
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>>1391271
Just make sure there's both blue and red LEDS. Full spectrum lights work too. Just not "warm white" as it is missing the blues
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>>1391271
Also if it's just indoor starts and you transplant them outside in spring, you generally don't have to fertilise at all
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>>1391278
>>1391271
5k-8k color temp range is fine for seed starting. Older plants will need higher color temperatures. Seedling starting is the easiest thing you can do indoors in regards to plant growing. Overwintering fully grown plants is the hardest.

For fertilizers, you need to research each plant type's needs and test your soil with a test kit. Keep in mind that you shouldn't need to fertilize seedlings. That comes later for older plants. Though, they should have a proper amount of nitrogen.
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>>1391264
Oh, so we are back to that greenhouse project. I was simply confused, the post about reflectors came out of the blue and I wasn't sure if it's related with the prior posting about greenhouse being constructed by anon
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>>1391267
The discord existed peacefully along the thread forever, it's just that one autist that has some vendetta against it and keeps stirring up shit. Hopefully he gives up by the next thread and we get back to the comfy that /plant/ has always been.
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>>1391362
>people constantly saying "thank fuck they didn't include that shit discord link"
>discord stands counterposed entirely to 4chan's format
D E N I A L O N D O N
O
N
D
O
N
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>>1391271
any led bulbs will work for starting....the proof is that I did it last year
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Sleep time little garlic, I'll see you on the other side.

Got 8 elephant garlics, 21 russian reds, 21 german extra hardy's, 21 local ontarians, and 9 wild Canadian garlics.
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>>1391425
Very nice selection and thanks for reminding me that I need to plant mine now too. Mine is just some soft neck I got from the local store a few years ago. I also have a bed of elephant garlic, but it isn't really a garlic. It also takes years to develop, even from a clove. The lot I have, in the ground now, will be harvested next season and I'm not planting any more of it after that. I'll stick with the true garlic.
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>>1391448
I didn't realize that it could take several years to get mature cloves from elephant garlic - random google search sites say otherwise. How long did it take yours to reach maturity?

I have freshly made triple mix and the area gets sun all day in the summer, so hopefully that works in its favour.
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>>1391486
Mine are not fully mature yet. They have matured enough to bloom, but only this year have they started to put on actual size. They are 3 years old right now. They should be mature next year. Planting from cloves takes 2 years to maturity while planting from bulbils takes 4 years. I planted them from bulbils. I know a dedicated elephant garlic grower and his still take 2 years to reach maturity for that massive size. He showed me one that was 6 inches in diameter. Most are only 4 inches.

I opted for growing from bulbils because I can get 4 times the number from that than from cloves in the same amount of time. Plus, they were free. I just can't harvest them until all the time is up, unlike cloves which can be harvested anywhere from 1 to 2 years depending on how large you want them.
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>>1391425
Hmm I planted mine in early October and most of them have sprouted now (instead of waiting shortly before the first frost), doing this for the first time, I hope 8a is mild enough so they don't die during winter
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>>1391523
Hmm, could I leave a semi-permanent row of maybe 5 plants and use them to produce bulbils? How many bulbils are produced by an elephant garlic scape? (I'm assuming they make scapes like many other alliums)

One of my goals for the garden is to not have to buy seeds and fresh plants anymore by not harvesting everything and allowing some plants to be seed makers. If these plants are going to be maturing over a few years, can I leave the scapes on and collect the bulbils while waiting for the bulb to mature? Or do you have to cut off the scapes the same way it is recommended you do with garlic?
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>>1391540
This is why I wait till November, worried they are going to spend a bunch of energy and then get toasted by the Canadian frost.

Even if the stem dies back in winter, as long as there is sufficient energy stored in the bulb it should survive.
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>>1391553
Yeah the first frost seems to be quite some time away here, hopefully they can still store some extra energy in the upcoming mild ~2 weeks.
I've been doing winter set onions in a similar way the last 3 years, always worked so far (placing them in late Sep/early Oct, then they sprout, grow slowly over winter, then faster come March/April, finally ready to pick by around June). Now I understand garlic is a bit slower, so the cloves I set should become "solo" bulbs by next autumn if everything goes well
>>
I still have one pot of peppers holding out in a mini greenhouse, but the highs are supposed to be dropping to the 30s on friday, with chances for accumulating snow

I'll have to cut the rest of the catnip, there's no way those could come inside...

have to cover up the strawberries too
>>
>>1391548
They make scapes randomly. You may get 30-50 bulbils from one scape. If a scape starts to form, just leave it until the bulbils are drying and just starting to fall off. That way you can succession plant. They tend to have way more scapes than the garlic I have. The garlic I have never seems to form scapes. With either plant it is faster to grow them from cloves, which will divide into more cloves.

I often times pull the bulbils off and toss them into the wild areas, hoping to establish some there.

>>1391561
>so the cloves I set should become "solo" bulbs by next autumn if everything goes well

My garlic always divides every season, when planted from cloves.

>>1391743
Nice. My catnip overwinters itself outside and stays green most of the time near the base. There's been hard frosts almost every day for a few weeks now and the catnip hasn't noticed.
>>
>tfw needing to do work and it rained all night.

Everything is wet and muddy. Now I'll need to wait a few hours for things to dry out a bit.

>tfw raised beds and gravel paths
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>>1391801
Opposite problem here, way too dry for months, the clay soil has turned into concrete, almost impossible to do anything that requires digging.
And no significant rain in sight, but still warmer than usual
>>
>>1391832
The local soil is all clay too and does the same thing. So it is either rock hard or muddy. That's one reason why I use raised beds and build my own soil.
>>
Help me out greenthumbs.
I might have gone and done a dumb, and probably because of that one of my plants leaves keep dying.
Like it keeps growing new ones, but those quickly start to turn brown at the end.
How do I save it?
>>
>>1391845
Yeah already made one (1.4mx1.4m) too this summer for strawberries and carrots mostly, will probably build another one soon to toss all the tree/hedge/shrub clippings into from autumn/winter pruning
>>
do you think raised beds will ever be used industrially
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Tell ya! What I don't know how this avocado has gaint leafs like this and it's in a smaller pot but this plant is very serious.
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>>1391906
Leaf space = root space. Less leaves = larger leaves. Smaller leaves = more leaves.

Repot it in something 3-4 times larger.
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>>1391923
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what's up homogrowmen. here's a riped chocolate "reaper" not actually sure if it is legit or not but it's super hot. (apologies for sideways picture)
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>>1391874
>brown tip on leaves

Might be overwatering or underwatering or root burn from too much fertilizer.

>>1391882
They are. There are some amazing machines that create the edgeless raised bed, cover it with a sheet of plastic, punch/burn holes in the plastic, if they are not already there, disc some dirt on the plastic edges to hold it down, and plant seeds all in one pass. Some plant types requires workers riding along on the back placing plant starts in the holes or thee will be a separate attachment to do that job. Those machines are really big in the strawberry industry.
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>>1391956
>root burn
That's probably it, how can i fix it?
>>
>>1391957
Flush the soil with water and allow it to drain out, repeat a few times. Get a soil test kit to test before and after flushing so you better know what is going on. Always test the soil before fertilizing until you gain enough knowledge to wing it later on.
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>>1391959
It wasn't fertilizer. What happened is that I got mosquito repellent on it. The citrusy kind.
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>>1391961
Oh, that might be pretty bad. If it got into the soil, repot it with entirely new soil. Getting stuff like that on the leaves may also kill them directly, but new leaves wouldn't be affected in the same way if they were not exposed to it. It'll need to purge it from its system or end up dying.
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>>1391923
Isn't it the other way around? I thought this was the whole idea behind bonsai - reducing root space to force smaller leaves and shoots
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>>1391980
You reduce root space as the very last step of making a bonsai. You would need to trim it to make it create more leaves. Repeat that and the leaves will get smaller ans more leaves are created. Plants with already small leaves can get tiny leaves and plants with large leaves can only get so small. For the art of bonsai, plants that have very large leaves are normally treated in a way so 1 large leaf represents a branch of leaves, thereby getting around the fact they can't get the leaves to reduce in size very much.
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>>1391977
Righty, I have now replanted it entirely.
Let's hope it works out.
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>>1391989
Good luck.
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>>1391763
>My catnip overwinters itself outside and stays green most of the time near the base.

I did not know it could do that, maybe I'll leave them as they are and see how long they last....the cats far prefer the fresh leaves
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>>1392018
Not him, but my mints, lemon balm, thyme, oregano etc. also stay green over winter, though mostly very low above the ground (before re-shooting high around March), I'm in 8a. In cooler zones they may freeze of completely above ground, in warmer ones they may stay high
>>
i feel like a much better gardener after studying botany
>>
>>1392316
>Level 5 Botanist
>Level 7 Gardener
>increases...
>+5 Disease Diagnosis: Any plant you care for will now have 3.5% extra disease resistance.
>+3 Raised Beds: Any raised beds you make will now have an area of effect on the plants, fungi, and creatures growing in it. Boosts 3% per level for disease resistance, 2.75% drought tolerance, 1.25% season extension, 74.5% less tilling needed.
>+10 Skill Points to be spent on any of your skills.
>Total unused skill points: 14
>Unlocked: Mycorrhizal Relationship Skill. You can now level up Mycorrhizal Relationship to better understand symbiotic fungi-plant relationships. 1.2% less fertilizer required per level, 1.25% disease resistance, 1.2% drought tolerance, 5.2% increased yield, 10% chance of edible fungi flushes after rains.
>Unlocked: Shrine of Theophrastus. You now have the ability to build a shrine to honor Theophrastus. When a shrine of Theophrastus is added to your garden you will get a 2% bonus to all your stats, you will be able to classify plants 30% more efficiently, and have a better understanding of the usefulness of the plants you grow. If you have wine making skill or perfumer skill you'll more easily be able to identify new ingredients for your concoctions.

Nice. I hear at Level 10, in both fields, you can gain a Companion Planting skill that really takes things up a notch. Though, I think you have to build a shrine to Dioscorides at that point.
>>
So... I've inherited two weeks ago a small homestead. It's slightly above 2 ha of "farmland", but grandpa wasn't using it for anything else than grazing handful of goats and solely to keep the farm status and keep the grass and weeds down. I have zero agricultural experience and I'm sane enough to not consider suddenly moving there and became a farmer. In fact, I enjoy my office job.
But I still want to use at least part of that land. Obviosly not now, considering it will be probably snowing by the end of the month, but autumn and winter sounds like the good time to prepare for next year.
I'm thinking about using part of the land for garden-tier "farming", so some veggies, maybe bit of beans, nothing more. It's southern Poland, the soil is pretty weak and sandy, but that's all I know about it. Any half-decent "Gardening for Dummies" and alike out there? I won't be living in that farm, but it's close enough to come visit for a weekend with ease or maybe in case of emergency even come during the work week for an afternoon there, but that's about it when it comes to time I will be capable of spending on working of the land.
Sorry for messy post, just need some beginner's tips for veggie gardening. Right now by myself I can keeping potted plants alive and well, but never tried gardening (lack of garden was a bummer for this)
>>
>>1392409
Weekend visits are not frequent enough for a typical vegetable garden. Every other day would be better. Problems can arise that totally devastate the crop in a very short amount of time. Things like nut/fruit trees/shrubs and berry briars are mostly plant and forget with long term pruning. Only during harvest do you need to be there often. Also, for a typical vegetable garden harvesting may be a daily chore.

You are basically starting out gardening by going on weekly vacations. That can be pretty terrible just for 1 week. Having two days may not be enough time to take care of the garden's general needs and work might begin to stack up quickly. You'll not be able to weed as often as you'd need to. Use mulching systems like plastic sheeting or deep wood chip mulch. Watering is a huge issue so having a timed automatic watering system is a must. To help prevent full disease/pest problems, divide up your plantings in distant areas from each other. That will minimize disease transmission, giving you more time to catch and stop a problem. 3 separate gardens about 30 meters from each other is good enough for that.

For soil issues, research how to make, "loam," from your area's resources. For instance, if there's a local horse farm, volunteer to muck the stalls for the manure. That's the easiest manure you can start out composting for your garden, but anything is better than nothing at all. Treat any soil you build like gold. Don't let it get away. A simple boarder to prevent erosion or full raised beds are best to maintain your wealth of good soil.

>resources

Most "beginner" resources will get you started. It is when you are focusing on one plant or method where you need more expert level information. Like mono-cropping pineapples or doing hydroponics/aquaponics. Find out your hardiness zone:

https://www.plantmaps.com/interactive-poland-plant-hardiness-zone-map-celsius.php

Get cultivars that are suited to your hardiness zone and local area. Get local seeds.
>>
What should I do with depleted potting soil? I dont plan on using these pots next year so should I just dump it in my compost? Put it into a new container and add fertilzer? toss it into the yard?
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>>1392450
Pretend soil is just a growing medium. Like what people use for hydroponics. If it lacks something, replace it. Yes, putting it into your compost pile will work, though it would be better to merely add finished compost and whatever ferts it needs to it instead. If you have a lot of containers of it after the end of the season, mix it together well then do a soil test to see what it is missing. Take notes on that for later and add what it is lacking. If you really want to get sciencey, you can run soil tests for eat pot of soil for each plant type, but that is expensive. The info you get from that lets you know what plant type uses the most of a type of fertilizer. Though, knowing the starting amounts of fertilizer before you grew anything in them is better.
>>
>>1392409
There is some stuff that doesn't usually need daily attention, like carrots, potatoes (a couple fungicide applications against late blight might be necessary - if you don't want to use them, then plan in some severe losses, up to 100% in a wet summer), pretty much any brassicas (beware of white flies though), sweet potatoes.
Stuff like tomatoes, peppers, strawberries, asparagus, fruit trees, melons, (in harvest season) etc. will need more frequent (ideally daily) visits though
>>
>>1392453
thanks anon, you are a smart person.
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>>1392463
>brassicas

That's just asking for a caterpillar Armageddon without lots of Bt or a screen enclosure.
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>>1392427
I was considering raspberry shrubs (since they definitely are "plant and forget" type of deal), but the field is completely open and I'm afraid wind would damage them in such situation, while the ground around the house, barn and shed is paved.

As for composting, wouldn't simply cutting all the grass and storing it for compost work? I mean that's 2 ha of grass and weeds right now. And I'm not sure it's going to help much with anything. I remember digging to help change pipes as a teen there and there is less than a shovel-deep layer of soil, then just sand and dry loam (made the dig twice as wide as it needed to be to just get to the pipes). I would probably had to compost it for few years to get any meaningful effect.

Zone is 6b

>>1392463
As far as I know, potatoes are out of the picture, due to extreme case of potato beetle infestation in the area going for past two years.
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>>1392509
>raspberry shrubs
I've never heard them called shrubs

they don't require much maintenance, but they do need regular water monitoring

wind should not be a problem
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>>1392509
Briars are not affected by wind damage for the most part. Trees can have damage and tall crops like vines, corn, sorghum, and such can have serious problems with low storm winds. You can use briars as wind breaks coupled with taller shrubs then trees to better angle winds up and over more delicate crops (similar to pic).

>potato beetle infestation

A "carbaryl" based pesticide is what most people use here in the states. The brand name I know of is, "Sevin Dust." Neem oil is also a go-to organic option for pretty much anything. Insect netting row covers work very well to keep the adult beetles off the crops in the first place. There are also a few insect predators that eat them and also birds you can attract. Though, I don't know which ones eat them in your location.

>I would probably had to compost it for few years to get any meaningful effect.

Start right now. Put all your organic waste into a container that has good air flow. Google up how to make compost at home and don't worry too much about green/brown ratios and recipes right now. The sooner you start the sooner you get results. The most important composting method will come later when you've found good and large sources of compost material. Research, "Berkley Method Composting." It is a method to hot compost everything in only 18 days, but it is a LOT of work if you only have hand tools. It is very worth it if you have a medium amount of compost.

>2 ha of grass and weeds

Hay is normally $7 a square bale where I live. So 2ha/5acres is a good deal of money in hay. Many people here work out deals with local animal farmers. They come and cut the hay fields and pay the land owner for what they get, though at a reduced cost since they are doing all the work. Others lease the land to them for that under contract. It also makes GREAT compost. I simply cut it and pile it in heaps all year with other compost materials. At the beginning for the second year I plant pumpkins on it. 3rd year it is soil.
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Well, this is the first time I germinate a seed after a lot of years when I was on primary school.

Now I germinated some pumpkins ones, but the problem is I thought the most it grow on cotton before earth, the better! (Not true, I guess), and now that I want to move it from cotton to earth I find the problem that roots spread all over the cotton and I dont know how to without hurting it, is it too late? Should I let them in cotton? I don't want like to get some pumpkins, just put it into a flower pot.

Any advice is well received
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>>1392562
Photo of the back
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>>1392562
>>1392565
I don't know if it holds true for other curcubits, but I know for a fact that watermelons have extremely sensitive roots and are very difficult to transplant. So I'd suggest replanting them with the cotton intact (carefully cut into pieces and transplant all gently into a new pot/your garden soil)
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>>1392562
It is too late. Plant the entire thing in its final location. Then when each plant has 2 true leaves, snip off all of them except the largest. If you can do >>1392568 then great. I'd start more seeds right now, each in a separate container. I personally use a wet paper towel inside a ziploc bag that I give new air to every day and keep in a warmish place that isn't over 110F.

> I don't want like to get some pumpkins, just put it into a flower pot.

okay.jpg
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>propagating invasive berries from my relative's house to my garden
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>>1392540
The bush is the only other word that comes to mind. So what's the right term for raspberry plant in English?

>>1392554
But my question was about if it makes any sense at all, if there is so little fertile soil carrots are already reaching sand when growing. I could literally double the layer of soil by opening a bag of soil for potted plants and spreading it over one square meter of ground. This is also the reason why my grandparents were mostly using their land for gardening and cow grazing - nothing really grows there. And ultimately not even that turned any sensible profit.
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>>1392702
>The bush is the only other word that comes to mind. So what's the right term for raspberry plant in English?

it's not so much being wrong, as different vernacular

"bush" would probably be better than "shrub", but not as good as "patch"

>a part or area distinct from that about it
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>>1392702
I'm not seeing a problem. Everything takes some amount of work. I built up all my garden soil from nothing because the local soil is terrible. You can always treat the poor soil as a growing medium and add all the fertilizer needed instead of building it up. There's also a pseudo-container method where you make/buy some small amount of good soil, dig small holes just big enough for the adult plant's roots, fill the hole with the good soil, and plant in it like it were a container. I did that for years with good results. It allowed me to use lots of land space, but reduced the need for lots of good soil. That method is what you need to do for new trees anyway.
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>>1392707
>>1392710
Dully noted. I'm going to be there this weekend anyway to cut down the grass before winter comes, guess I'll pile it up for compost.
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>>1387263
Small hydroponics for herbs and small greens. Look up jeb gardener on jewtube
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>tfw so much catnip

Damn, this stuff is the most invasive mint I've grown so far. It isn't like peppermint or spearmint where those can lay down & root and do so very readily as a course of action. Catnip blooms with big stalks of flowers that litter thousands of seeds of highly viable all over the place and ALL the seeds sprout into new plants.

One weird thing seems that it is only super invasive in the garden. I took bushes of catnip with tons of seed stalks and shook them all over the property to establish wild patches. However, when I looked for plants in those areas there doesn't seem to be any. I think the super wet summer and local clay soil did them in when they germinated. The local floral is well adapted to this climate and will cover just about anything in just a few days with several feet of growth.
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>>1392716
I like that dude. Such a based boomer
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>researching apple cultivars

God damn it. There's like 1 billion apple cultivars. I just need a big ass list that shows proper stats. Like when they bloom, when they ripens, and disease resistances. Every list I can find is a completely different list from other lists and has only 1, sometimes 2, of those things listed in them. Some sites say, "here's the rating system for when the bloom" but don't actually use the rating system at all in their list of cultivars. Collating the data is annoying as shit.

It is like no one can use a spreadsheet.

>tfw the best lists are for European cultivars only and not for US cultivars
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>>1392747
Post em when you’re done? Probably won’t even be relevant to my climate, but the same thing frustrates me.
>>
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Pepper plants they're growing retarded..
>>
Anyone here have any experience with forest gardening? I'm considering making my backyard into a food forest and was wondering if anyone has any advice.
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>>1392863
MOAR LIGHT
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>>1392868
And the same goes here, undershade of large trees is usually too dark for most things
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>>1392892
Not really interested in planting big trees, more like dwarf and semidwarf fruit trees.
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>>1392901
K then, so basically an orchard?
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>>1392904
Sort of but more complex. Think a forest but all the trees, bushes, vines, and understory plants give food. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forest_gardening
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>>1392776
If I make a spreadsheet, I will post it, but that will be an inordinate amount of work.
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Behold, the juriest of all jury-rigged grow setups. Hopefully the white reflectors with foil underneath will suffice for the time being. When I have time I will make something less primitive, hopefully.

Also, should I be getting a brush and manually pollinating the black hungarian flowers? Will they do it themselves or do they need assistance?
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>>1392934
Naah, just a few shakes now and then will do it, if you have ventilation it's done deal..
I kinda feel you'll need more of them red spectrum lights if you plan on going to the flower/ fruit stage...
Why did you hard prune your plants if you plan on keeping them in grow box? I'm not saying it's wrong or anything, but usually people do that and let them hibernate trough the winter in chill and dark place. Ones that go under the lights to live on and produce usually get lightly pruned, if any...
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>>1392939
My original plan was to hibernate them, but I realized there isn't anywhere in the house suitable. The whole house gets heated in the winter, so the only place would be the garage, but my father has a full-on wood workshop set up in there, so there is no room for the plants, and when he uses it a lot he turns on the heat, which would compromise the dormancy (I imagine).

The non-red lights are 8K temp full spectrums, so they should have a decent range of wavelengths. I only bought the red one back when I was a newb because I thought that red was needed to balance out the cooler bulbs (before I knew to look at the spectrums and saw that the full spectrums already have lots of reds). I also don't really care about getting good fruiting - the sole purpose of bringing these inside is to keep them alive so they can be put back out next year. If I can keep them alive without permanently retarding their growth, that is enough for me. Although, maybe encouraging fruiting would slow down vegetative growth, preventing them from getting overgrown and root-bound...
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>>1388855
>>1388849
>>1388844
Update on blueberries; after I stopped watering them as much, and took off the worst of the leaves, they perked up quite a bit, but some of the them have been getting crunchy over the last few days, and losing their colors. Did I let them get too cold?

Crunchy
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>>1392963
Healthy

I've been giving them all equivalent treatment as far as watering (at the bases instead of over the leaves) and light.
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>>1392963
>>1392964
Where are you growing them? How many chill hours do they get (important for flower set next year)? How's the soil pH? It needs to be in the 4-5 range - run off the mill potting soil + some meme "organic methods" like adding pine needles will never be able to drive it that low, either you use peat as growing medium from the get go or you acidify your potting soil with iron- or aluminium sulphate
>>
>>1392968
Currently, I'm moving them from outside during the day so they can get sunlight to inside upon nightfall so they stay warm. We don't heat our house a ton, though; it's kept at about 69 degrees. I'll move them out in the morning usually around 10:00 when the sun's fully up and the air has had a chance to warm a little.

I'm currently waiting on some batteries for the PH tester I got, so I'm not sure exactly what the soil PH is yet, though I'll get back to you, but I've kept them in the medium the greenhouse sent me them in; it implied they should be alright if it takes a bit to plant them as long as I keep them watered.

These are the berries I got:
https://www.waysidegardens.com/sunshine-blue-dwarf-blueberry/p/v1070/

Good tips, though, anon. I'll screencap your post for reference.
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>>1392971
Well, if you're keeping them inside the house over winter, where they never get to experience anything below 10C/50F, they most likely won't flower (and fruit) next year, because of the chill requirement
>>
>>1392973
I intend to winter them at some point, they're easy enough to transport at the moment, I just want to make sure they have what they need/that I'm not wasting time on a dead plant.

I've heard it's about 350-700 hours to chill them, right?
>>
Hey all,

Are there fruit/veggie seeds that benefit from being sown in fall so they sprout next season?

I am doing this with garlic, but I also have leeks, carrots, and kale that I am growing next season. If I stick the seeds in the ground now, would the winter freeze improve germination for next season or is pointless?
>>
>>1392982
If they are sunshine blueberry bushes, then they will need at minimum 150 chill hours.
>>
why my chamomile doesn't grow pass the tiniest shrubs? Was it the hot weather?
>>
>>1393116
Did it bloom? If it didn't then perhaps it is, "Treneague"? I've seen a few confusing venders sell it as Treneague, but have photos of large blooming chamomile. How short is, "tiniest"?
>>
Morning, boys. In the midst of designing a keyhole garden for the backyard and I wanted some ideas as to what it could be built out of.

I’ve made all of my beds out of recycled materials so I want that trend to continue. Any thoughts?
>>
>>1393178
"Urbanite," if you are really thrifty. It can be shaped, if you have the tools. Otherwise, old blocks and bricks from construction sites that are tearing down old walls. Sometimes they will even load it up for you with machinery. I'd be wary of used lumber, as it may be older stuff that is treated with stuff you don't want in your gardens.
>>
So, today I inoculated two bags with black oyster mushroom grain spawn which I made using a liquid culture. Since I've heard oyster mushrooms can digest pretty much any wood-based substrates, I have one bag filled with sawdust and coco coir, and the other one filled with just regular cardboard from some old boxes to test comparative yields. However, I did supplement with a little bit of used coffee grounds in each one. I weighed approximately 1 kg of dry substrate, fully hydrated it, pasteurized it in the oven for a few hours, and then filled up the bags with cooled substrate and grain spawn. Since my pressure cooker is too small to sterilize this much substrate, and I'm using a pretty poor, makeshift laminar flow hood to reduce contamination, I added the pasteurized coffee grounds together with the grains spawn so the oysters can quickly spread to it in case any contaminants fell into the substrate.

I'm also attempting to grow enoki mushrooms, king oysters, and golden oysters. The king oyster spawn is doing well and was transferred to more grain today, but I'm not seeing much going on with the enoki and golden oyster so far.
>>
>>1393324
Very nice. Most people only pasteurize large batches in order to lower the microbial/fungal content, but not sterilize it. That way some beneficial microbes and fungi can help out. It is mostly about getting your stuff to inoculate the substrate quickly and overcome any errant spores before they are a problem. I really need to get back into growing fungi. I want to do it on logs again so it is less work and doesn't take up space inside.

Are the enoki ones that need refrigeration to grow well?
>>
first winter advisory starts tomorrow morning, supposed to be in for a few possible inches
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>>1393353
>It is mostly about getting your stuff to inoculate the substrate quickly and overcome any errant spores before they are a problem.
Well, thankfully the black oyster mycelium has been tearing through the grain spawn like nobody's business, so that shouldn't be a problem.

>Are the enoki ones that need refrigeration to grow well?
Yeah. Enoki and king oyster mushrooms need cold temperatures to initiate pinning and fruiting.

Which mushrooms did you grow before?
>>
>>1393387
Shiitake and pearl oyster.
>>
I usually post an informative q/a (use to do it on /diy/) about fruit trees and plants. Trying to help people choose fruit trees or get into propagation. Im in a mediterrenean climate so i dont have experience on growing fruit trees in a cold climate, but i have read plenty and can at least point anons in the right direction. Ill repost same post in the new homegrown thread when this one dies.
>>
>>1393324
This is interesting as fug please post updates in the future
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>>1393427
Put in some effort and infographize it with cited sources.
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>>1393473
1) I am pretty tech ignorant. Even MS paint is a challenge.

2) I am coming from the perspective of a homegrower. Mostly backyard orchard culture. Most of the peer reviewed papers are not easily applied to the homegrower because research is paid for by commercial growers and is geared toward large scale operations.
>>
>>1393324
>>1393411
>enoki
>shiitake

Some of my favorite mushrooms right there. I gotta get into this.
>>
>>1387049
I use rosemary oil 1ml +
neem oil at 1ml +
peppermint oil at 1ml +
sesame seed oil at 30ml +
water at 100ml
works great, if it gets rough you can add eucalyptus but that isn't 'edible' as the others, but neem isn't really either. but all are easy enough to wash off.
worked for me for ~10 years
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I'm trying out hydronics. Never done it before so I built all this & the light.
I have a question about nutrients. Is the npk rating a percentage? So if I add 1ml of 20-20-20 to 10ml of water I basically made a 2-2-2 mixture?
>>
I just threw some rotten cedar mulch into my garden bed & compost bin. Did I fuck up? I was reading and some people say it can ruin soil.
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>>1393594
It sn't a problem for vegetable gardens and many people actually use cedar mulch to keep weeds down in their garden. Most of the problem woods cause a problem with seeds sprouting, like walnut, via a chemical the wood has. If you direct sow and use walnut products then you'll have trouble most likely, but if you set out seedlings instead, there won't be a problem.

>>1393523
I don't know how to help you, but that's a neat setup. I'd keep the PSU above the water though. lol What is the heatsink cooling resistors?

>>1393482
It is super easy if you do the outdoor stuff like mulch beds, logs, and living trees. Indoor stuff is a bit harder due to mold problems.

>>1393427
Nice. Just jump in and reply to whoever seems to need help and you know info to help them. Do that even to backup someone else's info who may have already replied to the person needing help.
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>>1393523
NPK is a bitch.
I just plain do not understand it.
What I use to calculate is an excel I found on the net
https://ufile.io/g0h36
Be mindful that I changed the feed calculator to ml/L while the example sheets are still in ml/gal.
You can add/delete products by inserting/deleting rows as needed.
>>
Hey guys, dumb question. Is there an equivalent to the USDA hardiness zone chart for animal husbandry? I want to make some sort of map/graphic that shows what animals can thrive in certain areas.

Bonus points if you know of a data source that describes agricultural production at US county-level (or finer) granularity.
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>>1393601
>USDA hardiness zone chart for animal husbandry

The map can apply to anything since it shows the temps in those areas all the way down to state counties. So, all we need is the info on the animals. I don't know of a single chart for animal breed hardiness.
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>>1393599
as always I fucked the NPK formula trying to clean the thing.
This is a correct version of the file:
https://ufile.io/3gtgs
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>>1393601
I wouldn’t mind something for heat hardiness. It’s easy to keep delicate critters warm compared to trying to keep them cool.
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>>1393607
>The map can apply to anything since it shows the temps in those areas all the way down to state counties. So, all we need is the info on the animals.

Right, that makes sense. Regarding "info on the animals": can you think of any keywords/metrics that describe the range of ambient temperatures that animals can tolerate?

>>1393611
>I wouldn’t mind something for heat hardiness. It’s easy to keep delicate critters warm compared to trying to keep them cool.

Good point. The type of shelter is a major factor in this, right? So I'd need to get data on what animals can thrive under conditions of 'no shelter', 'light shelter from shade', and so on?

Thanks a ton for the feedback folks
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>>1393624
I did a ton of googling and there doesn't seem to be any easy to search terms for such a thing. Most stuff is about how to keep animals warm. However, there are charts and lists for body temperatures of animals and their various stages of growth/breeding.

The best you can get seems to be stuff like "cold hardy __ breed."
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>>1393625
I'll try an agricultural librarian. This data must be tucked away in a dusty almanac somewhere. Appreciate the effort!
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>>1393630
Report back if you find anything!
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>>1393598
The Intel heatsink is just the fan. Under it is a 10 amp (Max) voltage regulator... DC to DC step down. To give me 12 volts. It gets hot I just put the fan there I got like 8 extra lol
The PSU is mounted under the plexiglass/acrylic sheet now..I just set it there for the pic, was half built still not done. Going to make a timer with an attiny84 or maybe raspberry pi

>>1393599
Thx I'll check that out. I'm trying to learn the chemistry so I understand it fully. I'm decent at it now where I can buy nearly anything & get proper micro & macro nutrients but I'd like to understand it way more, the formulas might teach me some stuff. I'll watch the measurements no worries
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>>1393710
>step down

Ah, that makes sense then.
>>
can anyone tell me what mushrooms these are? I'm thinking maybe honey mushrooms but not sure. they were growing on a dead tree and I'm waiting on a spore print atm. they smell like regular mushrooms and when I tasted one it left a bitter and almost painful taste on my tongue. they have little hair-like things on the top of the cap as well as slightly curled gills. found them in maryland. any help would he appreciated.
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>>1393755
If I didn't know any better I would say they look like shiitakes... but those don't grow native around these parts.
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>>1393755
Armillaria spore prints should be white, so make sure to do it on a white paper and black paper or anything light/dark to get better contrast. Galerina has rusty-brown spore prints and Pholiota have grey-brown spore prints.

The yellowish parts on the stem make me think Pholiota.

The flavor "painful-bitter" was it like spicy-hot-bitter? Armillaria luteobubalina is purported to be like that, but us edible. I don't think it made its way to Maryland though. lol Most of the species tastes bitter, but that cooks out. You just need to nail down what it is before even consider trying to eat it.

Since it doesn't look like it has changed color after being sliced, that is also a plus for one of the Armillaria spp. The ring on some of the stems throws me off though. I'd just try to identify them then toss them out later.
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>>1393789
it definitely was not spicy-hot. it felt like a kind of scratch or irritant on my tongue. i put it on a white paper about 2 hours ago, and see nothing. i'll try a dark paper next. thanks.
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>>1393769
>>1393755
I grow shiitakes on dead trees out in the woods by drilling holes and planting spores. I've never seen any that have the hair look those do sooo not sure
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>>1393828
>>1393769
>>1393794
>>1393755
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinellus_fusiger
possibly the hairs?

I am decently sure these are your mushrooms though.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armillaria_ostoyae
see the second pic on the page, left side. you can see the secondary ring under their main head
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>>1392562
As long as you don't damage the roots should be fine girl, get a box cutting or some kinda knife like object and cut the cotton around the roots, you can plant the with the cotton attached to the plant
>>
>tfw spending 3 hours downloading pdf files on plants, animals, and farming methods to research

Christ, there's like 3k files and it weighs in at 5gb. Glad I decided to collate it as I got it. Now to go through it and remove duplicates and worthless stuff.

>>1393834
The increased hairiness is from high humidity. Like from keeping your shiitake in a humid room or it rain a lot when they the flush was growing.
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>>1393834
those were definitely not the hairs. they were much smaller, almost like a strawberry seed. definitely looked like the ones you sent in the second article, except the black spots were a light brown. The spore print is not visible on the white paper, and i did another test on red paper about 2 hours ago, found white marks in the shape of the gills, which im assuming is the spore print. seems like its edible :)
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>>1393755
rip buddy, nice knowing you
https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/armillaria-ostoyae.php
Although all Armillaria species were for many years generally considered edible when thoroughly cooked, members of the honey fungus group (including Armillaria mellea, the type species of this genus) that occur on hardwoods are considered by some to be suspect, as cases of poisoning have been linked to eating these fungi; this is most probably due to a small but significant proportion of people being adversely affected rather than a universal human reaction to these fungi. Armillaria ostoyae, which occurs on conifers and particularly often on spruces, is generally considered edible when properly cooked. (The stems are tough and are best discarded.) As with all fungi, it is advisable to eat only a small portion initially until you are sure that you do not have any adverse reactions to this particular species.
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>>1393839
>seems like its edible :)

Neat, but I still wouldn't eat those without a second opinion, one that is in person rather than online.
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>>1393845
yeah, for sure. im just glad i managed to find something today
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>>1393839
that one in the second is edible when cooked thoroughly. if that is what it is. they're very invasive toward certain trees and come in many forms of spots and hairs etc as seen in the first-nature article above
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>>1393847
Do you think i could take them to a farmers market or something to get them confirmed? I'd really like to try them
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>>1393855
You'd be better to check for mycologists at a local college.
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>>1393855
yea I'd check the college like he said. honestly mushrooms are very dangerous. my buddy tried one a few years back and his kidneys and liver shut down was in the hospital 3 months.. and he's out doing fungus stuff daily for ~10 years, and he thought he knew the type...
shit is scary
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>>1393861
I've been doing it for a couple decades and even I don't touch the ones that have deadly look alikes. I stick to stuff like giant puff balls that are giant, chicken of the woods, and pearl oyster that is pretty obvious. The only time I eat other things is when I grow it myself from purchased kits, plugs, or spawn.

It is just too easy to be absent minded one day, be in the habit of, "I'm really good at this," and end up like your friend. You'd never get me to do shrooms either for the same reason and because I never trust anyone else's identifications. Well maybe if I were with Paul Stamets that'd be completely different.
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>>1393868
yep lol I grow shiitake that's the only ones I've ever ate other than store bought.
I like this guy cuz he calls me his friend in every video intro.
he has fucking badass greenhouse too, hydroponic + dirt and water leaks all over and just insane growth everywhere
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v9L9lqzI64M
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>>1393868
ok, so even if i can confirm the spore print color, it's still too risky?
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>>1393875
For me it certainly is. Some of that stuff can affect you anyway even if edible. Either from a sensitivity to it or because it is too old and its chemical makeup has changed or bad bacteria have colonized it. Some even react to food combinations. That's why there's a small set of fungi that everyone eats; other than ease of farming them of course.
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>>1393878
how about morels and chanterelles? I've heard that they are extremely popular but also have toxic lookalikes.
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>>1393880
None grow here.
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>>1393868
any tips on finding mushrooms with no toxic lookalikes? where to find them, what time of year, etc. also any that grow around this time of year would help me a lot
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>>1393903
When it rains and after it rains. Cool weather in spring and fall. Beyond that you'll have to check each individual species of fungi you'll be hunting as to where they will be. Just google them.
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>>1393840
Some people are affected by chicken of the woods and some are not. I think it is either they are picking it too old where it has bad bacteria started or the host tree is something different and doesn't agree with them. I think more people get sick west of the Rockies where it has a different species on a different host than in the east.
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>>1393522
Does it work better than just neem oil?
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>>1393917
neem and eucalyptus are the strongest in the batch. but a lot of bugs avoid peppermint & rosemary, also it burns their exoskeleton.
also it makes it smell really nice so my gf doesn't ever complain about it. where-as just neem sometimes she didn't like it.
majority of the store bought ones have rosemary, it burns them pretty good
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>>1394043
I see, thanks.
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Ok, question.
I'm buying some land which I wish, in part, to coltivate.
Which are the tests I should do to be sure it's good land?





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