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Old thread: >>963302

Search terms:

Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Vertical Gardening - Square Foot Gardening - Polyculture - Composting - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish

Resources:

http://pastebin.com/RDDAm3Jz

Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2005/may05/SecVeget.html
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I hate waiting on peppers to sprout. That's the one plant that takes forever for me. I may get a seed heat mat one day just for those.
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Pretty flowers and methodically placed strings keep my demons at bay.
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>>967686
>Ill copy paste my original question so people actually see it since it was right at the end.

Hello first time posting here so sorry if this is a bunch of retarded questions or the wrong place.

Sorry if this is a wall but trying to be thorough.


I've been growing and separating an Aloe Vera plant for a year or 2 now, I started off with 1 medium sized one and I'm currently at 55 total plants.

I want to kick up their growth so I can get a few of the medium and smaller ones to the size where they too produce pups so I can get some exponential gain going and grow a fucking army. So far I've only really replaced all the soil of every plant with Miracle gro cactus mix. this really made them grow well.

Yesterday I bought a soil testing kit and tested some of the newish (few weeks old) soil of one of the plants to see what kind of nutrient balance the soil came with and pic related is the results of that and a PH test.

I was reading some aloe vera articles online and I came across a few that cited a university study showing that a 10-40-10 liquid fertilizer provided the best possible growth, and the Ph is best around 7 from what I gather, some places say 7.0-8.5
What can I do to ramp up production? My only goal is more pups, I couldn't care less about leaf size.
For some reason this particular one and it's offspring just fucking love to produce them, so I thought I would capitalize on it.

Any tips or advice would be appreciated, this is the only type of gardening I've ever really done.
Thank you for your help.
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>>967734
same answer from me: >>967704

>>967731
That will look awesome when those morning glories cover all the strings. Though, their flowers will mostly be on the outside I think.
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>>967704
>>967696
>>967734
Ok so how exactly do I go upon doing that?

If the recommended fertilizer is 10-40-10 how do I go upon keeping that particular balance?
Do I just add a small amount of nitrogen since its currently at zero?

At first glance at my work (trying to stick to shit we sell since I get huge discounts and all)
>Nitrate of soda 16-0-0
>Blood Meal 12-0-0
Blood meal seems to be the only one claiming slow release, and from what I understand that's what aloe wants.

But how exactly do I keep the 10-40-10 balance, or am I misunderstanding something about fertilizer?

I'm 100% new to this shit, this aloe pile is the first thing I have ever really attempted to grow and I've just been letting it do its own thing with the exception of switching the soils until now.


Side question, could the test be fucked up? Why would nearly brand new potting soil come 100% nitrogen depleted? Does that sound right?

Also, what else can I do?
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>>967743
>FYI, if you pinch out the center growth, they will send out side shoots you can use to cut off and root as new plants. The center should regrow.
What exactly do you mean? Are you talking about the little pups that share the same root system I've been breaking off and replanting?
I've never had to tear anything off for them to get growing.

Random google picture to clarity.
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>>967746
If you remove this center leaf, the one that is center most, so that nothing is growing in the center, it will sprout shoots up from the soil like in your photo. I did it all the time when I had aloe plants and was eating the centers and "pups" as you call them.

>>967745
Make a pot of coffee, let it cool, dilute it 1 part coffee and 1 part water, use that as your fertilizer. Coffee grounds are N2.1% P0.3% K0.3%. That is the fastest way to give them nitrogen. Make sure to check the soil acidity. Too much coffee water will make it acidic. The soil pH should be 7.0 and 8.5 for aloe. Use the coffee water once every 2-3 waterings until your nitrogen levels are sufficient using that tester kit.
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>>967752
Looking at that ph test I did the the soil appears to be at like 6.0 right now unless I'm retarded (good possibility, check for yourself)

Should I do something to make it more alkaline before risking putting it over to even more acidic?

And so if my main plant is already shitting out a stupid amount of pups, cutting the center leaf will make it go into even more overdrive?
The largest one grew about 38 pups in less than 4 months give or take.
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>>967759
You can mix in some lime with the coffee water and test the pH of that before adding it. After a few tries you'll get a ratio that you can always use to keep it neutral or raise/lower it if needed.

If the plant is already making shoots, there's no need to pinch out the center. Use that method as a last resort for a stubborn plant.
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Beginner here.

I live in a small department in a third floor, pic vaguely related. Unfortunately, the windows that receive the most sun are the smallest ones, and I don't have access to some kind of garden, so I'm pretty much limited to small pots.

The climate is sub-tropical, so I was wondering which plants would have the best chance to thrive in this conditions? I wanna try some spice herbs or vegetables, but flowers are also ok.
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>>967771
2 things
1. Correct me if I'm wrong but from what I've witnessed and understand it doesn't go crazy with the shoots until it becomes too big for it's pot right? shoot production is a response to the root system becoming too cramped.

So when I repot larger I should see a lull in the shoot production but it will be even greater once it fills the larger pot.
I understand this correctly?

2. Would bloodmeal be usable or would that be too much nitrogen?
Since I have a decent amount of pots I would rather use something I can buy ready to go, made even nicer since I have employee discounts and all.
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>>967797
When you stress a plant they try to get around the problem by flowering or in this case sending out new shoots from the roots.

Take a sample of the soil, add some blood meal and test it. It is merely a ratio. You can "dilute" it too. Blood meal also makes soil more acidic.
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>>967814
>When you stress a plant they try to get around the problem by flowering or in this case sending out new shoots from the roots.
Is that why pinching out the center leaf makes it have new shoots?

What other things can I do to make it go shoot crazy? That's my only goal at the moment.
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>>967821
Changing sunlight and temps sometimes triggers such behavior in other plants, but I've no clue about aloe in that respect. Removing a part of the plant like that changes the plant's chemistry, just like cutting a limb on a tree does. The flow of chemicals that prevent bud growth on a limb ceases, allowing buds below the cut off point to start growing. It is a similar thing with aloe.

You do know that you can start aloe vera plants via cuttings right? Google it up.
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So i planted some mint seeds last week and today i noticed two were sprouting ^_^
i forgot to thank the people who advised me in the last thread to not give up immediatly.

I have another question tho, for this kind of plants, would it be more efficient if i germinated the seeds using a cup of water or wet papertowels beforehand and then transport them into the soil?

Pic related is an Aloe that started growing 2 new sprouts a few weeks ago
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An update on my red russian kale.

When do you think i should start eating the leaves? I think they are still babies.
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>>967852
how long exactly it takes ?
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>>967813
No idea actually, this is a runner from a strawberry patch where my parents live. My best guess is that the previous owner bought and propagated some domesticated ones.
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>>967859
Any good? Never seen it before.
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>>967777
Can you install windowboxes (or whatever they're called)?
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>>967859
I think they are mature when the leaves are about a foot long. You can eat them at any time, but if you want the plant to survive you need to be sparing. Which is why you normally grow a ton of greens at the same time. So you can pick 1 leave off several plants.

>>967852
Grats! Some of my catnip came up a couple days ago. Most seeds benefit from initial soaking in water for about 12 hours. Be that on a wet paper towel or dunked in a cup. The ones that really need it are the ones that need stratification, scarification, and/or an acid/basic dunk. Usually trees seeds that is.
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What greens and vegetables are good to grow in shade?
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>>967950
Quite a few, according to the link below. Cabbage, lettuce, leeks, carrots, etc.

http://www.harvesttotable.com/2012/04/vegetables-for-growing-in-shade/
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>>967907
I doubt it. As you can see on the pic, nobody have some, being the same situation on my own block.I don't know if is because some regulation, or the material, but I'll try to look about it.

However, just to be safe, the answer would be no.
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>>967852
I've used the paper towel method to germinate seeds, and then placed the plants into pots and it has worked just fine. It is useful for plants that produce a shitload of small and numerous seeds. OTOH, if they are coming up just fine in soil, that is probably the best way to sprout them. Keep in mind that some seeds that germinate after a few days on a wet paper towel can take a few weeks in the ground to emerge.
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If an aloe has root rot, is it good enough to just leave the pot to dry or do I need to do something drastic? The leaves are reddish and deflated.
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>>967903
They are pretty sweet and tender when they are young. Once they mature, they taste more like spinach and are tougher. I pick like 3 leaves at a time for sandwiches
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>>968028
Drastic would be to remove all leaves and grow them separately. If it already has root rot then that may be the best course of action. Is the soil well draining?
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A big muscular robin showed up on my lawn during the heat wave last month. Now that we're back to full winter and the ground is frozen, he's been standing around my front yard looking really confused.

And now there's a huge storm bearing down on us.

Is there anything I can feed him so that he doesn't starve or freeze to death? He really cheered me up as the first sign of spring last month.
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>>968064
The soil is kinda soak but drying. You can grow the leaves?
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>>968125
https://www.google.com/search?q=aloe+vera+cuttings

>>968119
Nope. Also: >>>/an/
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>>968140
Thank you good sir
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>want to make a raised bed on marsh so in best case I wouldn't have to water plants
>parents laugh at you

>agree that I would just move chicken pasture's fence for more garden room
>parents still find you wanting to grow stuff ridiculous

This is my life, folks
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>>968302
Laughing and ridicule are not physically blocking your from doing anything.
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>>968302
>fine with raising chickens but think a garden is weird

Your parents are odd.
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>>968306
Mother mantains a garden and grows tomatoes under plastic tube, it's on tiny scale, thought, as apparently it's just "better" to buy food than to bother growing it myself.
Thing is that I tend to get "weird" ideas, so they're opposed to anything I do that isn't getting a job or college stuff (more or less, they themselves got me into that mess).

I'm supposed to work at coal mine as metalworker or work somewhere at shop. In first case there is employment crisis in public sector and I instinctually avoid retail, it doesn't feel like real job, more like daily social shit test.

>>968305
Except the fact I have no job on my own, so I depend on them...
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>>968322
Enable yourself and keep the drama on >>>/r9k/
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>>968325
Sorry.
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seriously what the fuck do I do about powdery mildew

this shit is a fucking curse
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ok so i tried my best to replant this blueberry.

mixed a bunch of pearlite(~<10%) and peat moss(~<10%) with home depot potting soil, then mixxed that with ground bark/the mulch(~>20%).

I made about a 2-3 inch layer on the bottom of just mulch for drainage, then the soil mix listed above followed by a 2-3 inch layer of mulch that you can see on top.

After this picture i picked off about 15-20% of the flowers and pre-berries, i REALLY WANT TO START THIS OFF RIGHT.

Pleas advise. I am trying to get 2 blueberries started in containers for my mom so when i leave it will be easy for her to take care of, she's 60 now.

I would really appreciate help and im kinda drunk so sorry if this is typed bad.

pic related
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>>968422
Serenade works, but your yard and possibly your neighbors will smell like rotten eggs farted for hours.
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>>967292
Missed you in the last thread man. I'm on about 20 hours, so it's still a while away 'till I can go camping and shit of my own volition. It's a real pain when my mates all have different ideas or diffierent scedules, so planning beocmes nigh impossible.


Also, thanks for the inforgraphic. I picked up a few carrots, and I'm planing them now
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>>968428
Get a cheap pH soil test kit. Blueberries like pH about 4.8 to 5.5.
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>>968452
i should have picked this up at home depot but it wasnt in plain view and i hate being in public(uberautism)


If ensuring soil ph is really that important then i will buy one but i figured mixing potting mix with pearlite, peatmoss, mulch would make it more acidic.

I'll also occasionally pseudo-fertalize with spent coffee grinds which adds nitrogen and lowers ph.


Just hoping someone here has experience growing blueberry cause theres so much information online that differs ever so slightly. Maybe that means i have a little room to make mistakes.


I am being neurotic about this because i did a terrible job with my first blueberry plant a few years ago. It's at my fathers house and looks like green sticks pressed into the ground, no leaves, nothing
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>>968460
Testing is important for good blueberry production. It is the difference between a 1 gallon bucket of blueberries and a 5 gallon bucket of blueberries. I have 8 blueberry bushes myself.
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>>968470
>I have 8 blueberry bushes myself.
thanks, i really appreciate the personal experience. ill buy a testing kit tomorrow
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>>968422
I always get powdery mildew on my pumpkin leaves, usually late enough in the season that I just ignore it, but I did read that spraying a mixture of milk and water (1:1) will kill it, I'm assuming it's the enzymes in the milk, so you may need unpasturized milk for it to work, but it sounds like a preferable method if you're organic.
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>>968422
Spray them into submission with baking soda. Great results on my beleaguered rosemary plants after constant application. Just be careful with the mixture proportion and test it on a small batch first or you'll burn your plants' precious leaves.
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>>968035
Grouse. Ill keep an eye out for seeds
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Would this shit be a good substitute for the recommended 10-40-10 liquid fertilizer for aloe vera?

Regardless of what it says it's for, the NPK #s are all that matters right?
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>>968574
Pretty much. You can dilute it if needed.
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Any idea what might be going on here?
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>>968597
Potassium and/or magnesium deficiency? Could be caused by overwatering if there's enough nutrients in the first place. It that an apple plant?
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>>968460
Yeah, blueberries are one of the plants that when they give a ph range, they really mean it. I flat out can't grow them where I am because of my alkaline soil.
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>>968651
>I flat out can't grow them where I am because of my alkaline soil.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/blueberries/lower-soil-ph-blueberries.htm

One of my bushes is right next to my chicken coop. Poultry manure is 6.5-8.0 pH and high in nitrogen. That bush is amazing.
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>>968653
Left out a sentence:

"It is the nitrogen in this case that allows the bush to outperform the other bushes. If the pH was correct, it'd be 10 times better."
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>tfw overwatered tomato seedlings
>tfw first true leaves!

Hope the seeds that have not germinated yet are not rotting...
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>>968653
Naw m8. My ph has dropped because the organic matter in my soil acts as a buffer. It dropped to 7.5. It was 8.5. I'm not going to go through the PITA to drop it far enough to grow blueberries. The ph will come back up very quickly here. This used to be part of a shallow sea, and there is a lot of soil that used to be limestone.
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>>968650
pear
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>>968659
how are those toilet paper pots doing?
tried planting in them three days ago,and they're now all covered in some kind of fungus
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>>968574
Why does it have so much phosphorus? Do aloe need a lot of it? (Same thing for N and K though, I only got 3-3-3 for most of my plants, but I don't have any aloe)
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>>968818
2 have started to come unraveled, but I think that is due to how they are put together with different TP brands. Overwatered ones do have some fungi. The fungi shouldn't harm the plants as it will only attack dead organic matter.
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>>967942
>>968025
Thanks! Just noticed today i have more than 12 super tiny sprouts, here are some in pic related.
Today i had plant physiology class so i asked the teacher for some advice when the class ended. She said really small seeds are best grown directly in the soil because there might be damage when transporting them from the papertowels, at least for beginners. Also she let me take home a bag of nutrient rich soil we had some tomatoes planted which we used in class. I gonna use it to plant rosemary
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>>968540
Ayyyy, fellow aussie detected
Are you the new fella from last thread in eastern Melbourne, somewhere on the bay?
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>>968911
>She said really small seeds are best grown directly in the soil because there might be damage when transporting them from the papertowels, at least for beginners.


Yes. This is especially true if the root burrows into the paper towel. The trick is that you need to be VERY careful to not damage the root when pulling it out. Out of about 40 or 50 that I did last month (peppers,) I only messed one up, but I have so much seed that it doesn't really matter.
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>>967734
this is my first time on this board. but most plants and flowers actually use ferts in equal measures. 10-10-10. if you went on some forum for aloe there might be a trend towards a particular one but I doubt it. You would have better luck honing in on a soil type and lighting requirements. I'm fairly certain greenhouses have access to some magic chems but I would focus on the lights and kind of soil first
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Need advice..

Just moved into a new house and started digging yesterday in a part of the back yard to get this hugelkultur started. I get a few inches under the ground and realize that this whole little plot, probably 60sq ft is completely covered in gravel 2 inches under the dirt.

My question is, what should I do with it and how will it effect my hugelkultur if I go through the remaining steps without removing all of this gravel?

Or should I just move to another spot in the backyard? The current plot is the best possible spot as far as sunlight goes. I can't get a better one without cutting down a couple of massive oaks.
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>>968911
>>968953
When you use the paper method you just bury the entire square of paper with the seed. Toilet paper is best, but paper towels are fine too. There's no need to extract the seed, you just bury it. The roots will go right through the paper.
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>>968970
You use the hugelkultur or raised bed specifically because the local soil is shit. Thus, use that spot as intended. You also don't need to bury the bottom of the hugelkultur in the ground. You can do it on the flat ground. It just means it will be slightly taller for a while longer and moisture will run off a bit faster from within.
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>Eat the Weeds!

I cleared out my winter garlic and volunteer weeds. I've been cutting the garlic tops all winter and eating them. There was about 2 mouthfuls of weeds to eat (chickweed, lady's thumb, and lambs quarter). It seems the lady's thumb grows best indoors, especially if the soil is a bit moist. Now I have more light room for seedlings.
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>>968972

Thanks for the reply, anon. Gonna get back on it as soon as the sun comes up <3
>>
Didn't water pineapple plant for a month, kept it virtually in the dark for a week, just soaked and drained he soil in the sink, fertilized the soil, and put it by a south facing window in full sun.
PLEASE FLOWER!
>>
Is ganja discussion allowed here? I had an idea recently. Heres some OC aesthetics
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>>969046
You'll get called a degenerate, you degenerate.
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>>968460

I have quite a few types of blueberries,from your standard run of the mill high and lowbush ones to things like native pallidum and arboreum types in my area.

Testing is very important to make sure the soil is compatible with the plants.

Remember,most types can't survive with a pH that is below something like 4.3 and above 6.5 for the more acclimatized types.

Too acidic,and you get various types of metal poisoning like with manganese and I think aluminum. Been a while since I've looked up that stuff though.

Above 6.5,which a FEW types can reach,most start having issues at 6-5.5,you'll end up with iron and nitrogen issues because the plants simple can't uptake anything from the soil. Foliar sprays can help temporarily in those situations but the plant will be pretty stressed.


Anywho,what the FUCK is up with the weather?

Nearly everything in my yard is fucked because of this bullshit of 60s-80s one week then freezing and back to heat ever since January. I'm starting to wonder if any of my plants are going to produce anything because this crap.
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>>969046
No.

>>969051
>tfw can't find low bush in my area

I need to order some of that stuff for wine making purposes. It has the best anti-oxidants out of all of the blueberries.

>weather

ikr all spring flowers fell over into a frozen mess today. i'm just glad my fall-planted potatoes never sprouted
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>>969064

You should. My Top Hats do amazingly around here in 7B. Nearly reached full size in one year,good crop for it's size after that.

Not sure what the acid profile would be like though if you didn't let them fully ripen before picking though because they tend to stay a little zingy even when they turn color to blue/black.

And shit,not just flowers for me blooming. I have everything from tiny little wildflowers to full sized trees blooming and fully leafed out at this point and we are getting snow and freezing temps again.
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>>969046
DEGENERATE
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>>969105
>>969048
tips fedora
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My Salvia plant is starting to blossom.
Sadly it isn't the psychoactive variety kek
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>>969204
My salvia requires a shit ton of water.
It caught whiteflies and its already been a few months and i cant get rid of them.
I soon gave up on using them for food so i could spray the fuck out of it with insecticide but they keep comming back.
Little shits.
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>>969204
I had one freeze back to the ground over winter (it reached almost -10°C once), while rosemary and French lavender remained unscathed and bay laurel got just some leaf damage.
Out of all those, I never expected sage to be the most sensitive
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>>969022
new anon here, kept my pineapple in exact same conditions and just repotted with lighter soil and fert last week(original dirt was far too compacted/slow draining)

im ready!!!!!(or i apple bag it)
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I'm running out of light room on my seedling shelves. Feels good. Some things are popping up like crazy, others are not so good (really old seeds), some are nearing their range of germination. I'll need to make some cold frames for some of this stuff next month I think. I don't think the vine plants like gourds and watermelon are going to play nice indoors.

I'm hoping to make at least 2 more raised beds this year.
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so I've been doing potatoes on the same spot for the 4th or 5th year in a row now. Am I playing with fire? I would rotate cultures if I could relocate them elsewhere but I just don't have the space. Also do you guys follow the lunar calendar? I planted the potatoes yesterday and shallots this morning based on it this year
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I'm 12 and what is this
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>>969322
Yeah, you really should rotate them.

>lunar calendar?

I don't, since I try to squeeze in several crops every season using cold frames, tunnels, seedlings indoors, and such. All I need is a greenhouse and I'd be fully gardening year-round.
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>>969324
Leaf Miners
>>
What's a cheap way to build your own greenhouse? The growing season is short here and pests are a problem in the summer, so I feel like that'd make growing veggies and herbs much easier since I have a black thumb.
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>>969346
Get used glass and frame it up. Use local stones for making the foundation. You can use local wood if you have the woods and a few hand tools. You can get used glass from people who are tossing out sliding glass patio doors or windows. If you are in the states you can use freecycle.org which has a yahoo group hookup for giving/receiving free things.

Buildings that are being torn down and construction companies usually have glass you can get. Some window making companies have defective windows they will set out for the dumpster that are usable.

If you know how to frame up a shed you can make a greenhouse. Remember you can also wrap it in plastic instead of glass. For that you can use plastic pipe for domes/tunnels and put plastic over it. Google it up "polytunnels" or "cold frames".
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if any blueberry bros are left, i checked my soil today

(home depot moved the one soil ph tester out of the giant outdoor landscaping/gardening areas to indoors and of course only customer service desk knew)

But anyway it looks like 5.1 and 5.5, so i was going to add a little bit of acid? Vinegar or used coffee i think, ill just follow a guide online.

But i was also wondering if the mulch and peat moss would acidify it enough over time because i literally just repotted from 2 gal and read mulch acidifies?
>>
>>969377
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/blueberries/lower-soil-ph-blueberries.htm

Coffee isn't acidic enough to lower it below 5pH even though it is below 5pH itself. You need something a bit stronger for that range. Read the ink above. Use a mulch and fertilizer method for acidifying it.
>>
I can't wait until this dumb winter weather fucks off at the end of the month. I've started many seeds and my peppers, watermelons, cucumbers and flowers are sprouting.
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>>969594
We had 10 degrees celsius here today and sure as shit it's going to freeze again on Friday.
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>>969322
You either need to rotate or get into polyculture like fuck.
>>
hi is beekeeping allowed here
>>
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Is there a reason for concern?
Pepper plant, nothing similar on the other leaves, affected part feels like thin and really dry paper.
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>>969636
See how "honey bees" are mentioned in the OP?

>>969637
Check the bottom for and damage to the center of the leaf stem.
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>>969637
Could it have been touching something too cold or hot? maybe a window.
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>>969645
I just never see bee stuff
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>>969645
The leaf stem looks normal, like all the others. If it's mechanical damage that's a relief to me. I just want to make sure that it isn't something that spreads between plants.

>>969647
It has been sitting on top of a radiator next to a cold window. Now that you mention it, pepper has been outside (50F) for a few minutes, but I guess that's too short a timespan to affect the plant. (?)
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>>969650
I don't normally post my bee stuff because bee keeping kind of sucks and isn't really exiting. Just lots of heavy lifting and extremely how suit wearing. The honey is great though!

>>969656
Don't set them out if the temps are below 55F.
>>
>>969658
>>969656
I planted my peppers outside last year in late April, and it still got down to 4°C in some nights after that - no issues
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>>969682
You need to "harden off" plants that have not experienced those temps. Just putting them out in the cold, heat, and/or sun can kill them in short order. Being lucky isn't something you should rely on.
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>>969688
It was like 14 plants and previously they had been sitting inside at never less than ~17°C, yet not a single one of them died/got a "shock" or similar upon transplanting
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>>969324
seriously, is this shit fungus?
>>
>>969734
see
>>969329
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>>969377
So I ordered some Blueberry bushes for my new place. From what I've gathered online, Pine Bark mulch is good, since it will add acidify the soil. Also that strawberries do well with Blueberries ( Companion Planting), as they will also tolerate the more acidic soil.
>>
>>969738
>Leaf Miners
fuck, I thought you were memeing
>>
>>968911
>>968953
Huh? Isn't possible to just put together the paper and the seed on the soil? Dig the hole, put the wet paper on the bottom with the seed on top, put soil over it?

As long as the paper doesn't have some strong harmful chemicals, it would just rot and disappear, right? Afaik, only special paper for offices have special chemicals, like acids for whitening, although some kind of paper employed for personal care (like some tissues) have chemicals like fragrances. But common sense should tell anyone interested in growing to avoid those when germinating seeds.

/po/or person here.
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>>969801
correct, see:
>>968971
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>>969377

I've never really trusted those meters to be really honest,I've gotten wildly different results depending on soil moisture levels and just moving it inches over at a time.

I generally do tests where you take a soil sample and test it either in a lab or with one of those kits you can buy at a nursery with a tube and those little pills,but you have to make sure to use the right kind of water.

That being said,the 6-5 range you have there is just dandy for blueberries. If you think it's a bit high in an area,there are always things to help slowly bring the pH further down,though 6 is OK.

>>969746

You can look online and most places where they have done testing shows that while pine bark and needles might be slightly acidic,it really doesn't make this giant difference in soil pH.

However,I still suggest it. It's a great mulch,covers well,adds organic matter and helps keep the roots cool which is important since the roots aren't that deep.

And I will say,where do you find most wild ericaceous plants? In pine and oak barrens. While it might be coincidence,they obviously have no problem with each other and if it works well for wild plants it should work well for yours.


Also,has anyone found somewhere where you can find ericoid mycorrhiza? I searched high and low last year but couldn't find anything except some company that would have to ship it in from the Czech Republic or some crap.

I'm interested to see what kind of difference it would make in my plants.
>>
What is the best way to test soil for arsenic and other heavy metals?

I'm moving into a house that has some nice raised flower beds but they are made out of railroad ties. I want to test the soil to ensure I can grow food in it safely.
>>
>>969815
>>969381
thanks, yet again i am really happy i asked.


What i did was add a little elemental sulpher mixed into the very top soil, and then sprinkled some on the mulch on top Had some from a really old science kit. Made sure to keep it ~<1teaspoon per pot

Might pull them out of the sprinklers and let them dry a little tiny bit so i can water them both with a 1tbs vinegar to 1gal mixture of water then put them back.

I could imagine those meters aren't very accurate but still nice because i can go around my yard and see if there are any acidicish areas i can plant my raspberries or >>969746 strawberries (maybe ill have to get some now)
>>
>>969827
>>969815
Yeah, I'd look at the review for any testers you look at. When you do tests with them you take lots of tests to get a better picture of what is going on.
>>
Does anyone have experience propagating succulents from leaves? Any tips/good guides? My leaves keep shriveling up or getting weird marks while drying.
>>
>>969861

Post pics
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>>967859
you can eat at any point. ive eaten the sprouts and the foot long leaves. younger tastes better raw, older tastes better cut up in soups or baked.
>>967903
i highly suggest it. very easy to grow, nice taste. itll replant itself if you let it go to seed
>>
>>969325
>>969630
what do I risk? Increased chances of my potatoes catching diseases? If I were to leave the soil alone for 1 year could I plant another 3/4 years in a row after?
>>
Are sub-irrigated planters a meme? I really want to make some for some peppers this year.
>>
>>969910

I never used those, but I think roots will eventually clog it, right?
>>
>>969904
Smaller yield aswell, specific nutrients that potatoes need are getting lower, unless you restore it with manure, but the disease chance is definetly higher.
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>>969919
each year I put a bit of "or brun" which is a fertilizer before shoveling the ground, so yea. Fingers crossed I guess

do you guys know any good plants that are good repellent for slugs? I've been told marigolds could do the trick
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>>969861
-Remove leaf, preferably naturally where it snaps off on its own at the base (even with aloe).
-Allow that torn off tip to dry out for about 1-3 days inside a paper bag allowing the cut to scab over (this helps prevent infection and too much water uptake.)

The next part is your choice so choose one of these or do all 3 with different leaves:

1: Wrap in paper towel and keep the towel slightly moist. Don't wrap the entire leaf, just wrap the bottom 1/2. Keep the paper towel section loosely wrapped in plastic to prevent it from drying out super fast. Don't wrap the plastic tight. It does need to dry out a bit, just not instantly. So don't over water this part.
2: Lay the leaves on top of soil and water them. Keep the soil moist.
3: Bury the leaves about half way into the soil, keep the soil slightly moist.

It should take about 4 weeks to get roots started. Remember, too much water = rot. After 6-7 weeks should should have new growth on the tops.

How does that compare to what you've been doing?

>>969922
For slugs, you want to attract them to something else, not repel them. Any ground cover plant will help do that. Remember that a perfectly weeded garden is like a desert and your plants are the oasis. If you have ground cover plants, it becomes a jungle and your plants are hidden Mayan temples. Slugs also love mulch so don't use that in the rainy seasons of spring. Marigolds are a trap plant for them. They eat them. They work well. Use beer traps too. They are amazing.

>>969910
They work well.

>>969913
You always need to repot plants over time. Which takes care of that problem.
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>>969962
how often do you have to renew the beer? Can it be harmful to other critters?
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>>969962
Well since I'm a complete noob at this and have taken no precautions to avoid infection and promote moisture retention, that explains what I did wrong. Thank you, I know where to begin now.

>>969896
Unfortunately I threw away all the damaged leaves.
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>>969964
If you have raccoons or opossums in the area, they sometimes raid the beer, which doesn't harm them. Other insects can be caught, most notably vinegar gnats, isopods, some types of moths, and if the rim is level with the ground it is a pitfall for some spiders and beetles. Being level with the ground is best though. Cover them with something to keep the rain out. Change the beer once every 2-3 days at least.

If you don't have beer or don't want to buy some, you can use water, a bit of sugar, and baker's yeast. Just mix it all together.

>>969968
When you are allowing the torn off end to scab over, sometimes the succulent leaves will start to shrivel just a little bit. That is okay, just don't let them go too long. Also, too much moisture will cause rot. It is a balance and can depend on the humidity of your area.
>>
>>967708
Ausfag from the last thread here. On advice from a few other anons, I realized I won't be able to grow much in current conditions until the weather changes.

To that end, I've started a very small scale garden in pots. Might try to transplant a few into the ground when they're larger and stronger.
>1 tray of tomatoes
>1 tray of chives
>3 more pots of chives
>3 pots of mint
>pot of mint

I've also aquired 2 much larger pots; planning to grow spinach in one, and plant carrots in the ground, since they apparently don't really care about the temp.

I'm also planting strawberries in a few pots with the intent of transplanting them to a hidden area in the local wetlands for an autistic secret treehouse of wild fruit.

Looks like farming rabbits is a no go right now; I'm still living in a house owned by my parents (uni student); and my sister put some strange ideas in their heads.


>Will post pics of what I have so far if there's any interest
>inb4 blogpost; barring my girlfriend, you guys are the only ones interested in this stuff
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>>969976
*pot of lemongrass. I'm retarded.
>>
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Dear anons of the soil. I cum in piece and beer the offering of one kot.
My question to you: is it possible to grow plants from
1.raw pumpkin seeds from the store (no husk variety)
2.peanuts (raw in shells) from store
3.cashews, walnuts, almonds, brazil nuts and other treenuts (raw unsalted variety) from store
3.poppy seeds
4.mustard seeds
5.coriander seeds
6.Juniper berries, dry
>>
>>970033
1: Yes
2: If raw and unsalted/cooked/roasted, yes.
3: Only if they are still in their shell. Some companies may kiln dry them though in order to loosen them from the shell to all easier shelling. This occurs naturally anyway, they just speed it up. Kiln dried nuts in the shell are probably not viable. Some tree nuts need scarification and cold stratification to sprout.
3: Yes
4: Certainly
5: Yes
6: Maybe, it depends on the drying method. If they were kiln dried then probably not. I'm testing dried goji berry seeds. (Hopeful!)
>>
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>My hg:

>Solanum lycopersicum + >cerasiforme
>(tomat, cherry tomato)

>Cucurbe pepo
>(eggplant)

>Capsicum annuum
>(bell pepper)

>Ocimum baslicum
>(basilica)

>Cucumis sativus picolino
>(mini cucumber)

>Petroselinum crispum
>(parsley)
>>
>>970033
>(no husk variety)

Didn't see that part. If the seed was manually husked then no. If the seed has a husk but it is thin enough to eat and for some reason is called "no-husk-variety" then it will work.

There is always a slim chance you can actually sprout a husked seed.

>>969976
Hope it goes well. What are the outside temps like there?

> you guys are the only ones interested in this stuff

Do things you like to do regardless of what others think. Look for friends who share similar hobbies/likes.

>>970057
Nice, but those need more light (stems too long and thin) and the ones in the bottom right seem to have soil that is too wet (yellow leaves, no drain holes). Also, the next time, fill those containers up until the soil is 1/4" below the rim. As they are, the seeds won't even be able to use half the soil because the roots will shoot straight to the bottom. Which is why if you don't have drain holes the excess water can wreck them in short order.

>scored 2 carton juice containers, about to do the same thing
>>
>>970033

Piggybacking off this how about seeds sold at the grocery store for seasoning?
>>
So, does the material of the garden pots have any impact or relevance?

I keep hearing clay and wood pots retain better the humidity and keep warmer temperatures, but I keep recycling large plastic bottles for this (20lt), doing holes to drain water and such.

So? Any merit to spend additional on commercial pots, or just keep recycling old containers?
>>
>>970071
As far as I know they just hold in water differently. The clay pots are porous, that will let it air for the roots when they are dry. Some plants need that more than others.
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>>970063
I have growth lamp and sunlight
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Just finished making these two and planting them with some purple cauliflower. I line mine with newspaper or thin magazine pages if I don't have newspaper. It keeps the soil in, but still allows water out. I fold the cut tops down to the sides and leave a rim on the edges to help strengthen them.

>>970076
Good, I wonder why they are so leggy then?

>>970070
If the seed is whole, yes.
>>
any of you guys grow brocoli? How hard is it? Might give it a try this year for muh gains
>>
>>970033
if i recall any cashews you buy that are "raw" actually arent raw, as the true raw nut contains oils similar to poison ivy and therefore they flash cook them before selling for saftey reasons
>>
>>970122
ezpz
>>
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>>969324
New gaming input device from Razer?
>>
my chillis have sprouted. better results just putting them in the window than doing the paper towel technique. one of my leggy seedlings look like they're growing roots above the ground. should i repot it deeper?
>>968875
it's almost a little benefit though if they unravel easily when it comes to transplanting them.
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>>970141
how many should I grow for it to be worthwhile say, to feed 2 persons? I have no idea what yield they have
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>>970170
1 plant = 1 head of broccoli

A variety like early purple sprouting broccoli is an older variety and doesn't form a single compact head. Instead if forms several smaller heads throughout the season and grows rather tall. You can harvest pretty much all season from it. The newer green broccoli you get in the store is pretty much a one-time deal.

So, how much broccoli do you eat normally? 1-3 heads a week? That's how you'll be planning.

I recommend using insect cloth over top. Moth caterpillars are a fucking bitch.
>>
Can someone please fucking tell me what the downsides of no-till are, even on the industrial scale? All I can find for information is massive propaganda.
>>
>>970207
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No-till_farming

https://www.google.com/search?q=no-till+pros+cons

The biggest con I know of is that pest insects can lay eggs and hide in the old stuff. Crop rotation helps keep that problem to a minimum when one type of pest from the previous season can't eat the new crops. However, this also allows a better environment for beneficial insects.

http://greentumble.com/pros-and-cons-of-no-tillage-farming/

Many of the cons can be delt with using common sense. Like not watering so much to prevent rot. Or using cover crops to help reduce weeds. Though the system itself helps reduce weeds.
>>
Convinced parents to let me make a raised bed garden for them since they expressed interest in starting a vegetable garden again. Gonna get started in a couple days, and maybe use left over wood lying around, maybe. They need seeds, too, so they can grow things besides tomatoes
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>>970235
Why did we till for so fucking long? Is no till only better because of modern advances in technology (like herbicide)?
>>
>>970088
Did drown a box
>>
>>969823

pls respond
>>
>>970284
>>969823
Kits are like $20-$40 online.
>>
Rookie home gardener here. Me and my housemate started a garden that didn't take off too well. The corn was fine but not much else. The garden also fucking exploded with weeds. Need time after shit sprout should we cover the rest of the soil in something to stop weeds? If so what? I'm going to buy some tester kits because the first time shit flourished in the garden and this time not so much so i think a few things are going to be deficient?
>>
>>970284
Have you google searched "soil contamination testing kit"? I have a basic PH reader and I am sure that commercially available metal ion testers exist as well.
>>
is air pruning a meme? Are the roots just responding to increased oxygen availability?
>>
>>970325
It is a legit technique though. It happens because of dry air. Google it.
>>
>>969308
I could have probably used better soil but I didn't want to deal with changing soil indoors (still -5C weather outside).

Hopefully this will be enough to provoke it to flower.
>>
>>970063
Outside temps were really high this week (like, 30 Celsius) then they dropped to 20, but they're varying a lot. I'm mostly waiting for it to stabalize before I start planting; right now it seems like there's a decent chance they'll either be scorched or rained out.


And yeah, I don't really care what my mates think, but it sucks not having a knowledge base to tap. My girlfriend is good with plants, but knows very little aout growing food.
>>
what is best After replanting ?flowers, Veg or???
>>
>>968011
>I don't know if is because some regulation, or the material
Could just be the local culture.
>>
>>969972

Can you feed slugs to chickens?

Is it possible to make a slug capturing "farm" to capture enough slugs to act as feed? Can you plant special plants?
>>
>>970459

N/m, read a scare story about slugs carrying worms.
>>
>>970459
compost bin with black soldier fly larva. they process your compost and will happily march to to their deaths in your chicken coop.
>>
>>970459
Chickens will eat literally any fucking thing.
>>
>>970254
just bear in mind rotting wood won't last that long.
>>
is there a way to attract glow worms in your garden? Maybe they could take care of some snails/slugs
>>
>>970057
Where are you keeping them? On a windowsill?
>>
>>970467
>>970459
My chickens eat slugs all the time. Though a few don't.

>>970057
>>970076
NOT ENOUGH LIGHT

Get it?
>>
My spore plugs arrived today. Before I read that a fresh cut log was best to use. The paper that came with the plugs says cut the logs then wait 2-3 weeks before putting in the plugs. Any recommendations? How longs should the plugs hold up if I don't get them in a log right away?
>>
>>969801
Yes, you can. I had some issues with peppers emerging last year, and I wanted to see if it was a germination issue this year, so I put so many on the paper towel that it wasn't practical to tear the paper for individual seeds. FYI, I didn't have a germination issue. It was probably a critter issue, eating them as soon as they came up. I also put about 50-60 into soil in plastic cups inside this year and they all came up. Then a couple got snuffed by a rollie pollie.

Here is where I like to use the paper method of germinating seeds:

>An issue with plants emerging pops up to see if it is a germination issue.
>Small, plentiful seeds that need to be on or near the surface.
>seeds where there is only a few sent in the packet and I'm not sure they're going to not get whacked by critters as seedlings.
>>
>>970033
I've grown mustard from the store. Coriander should grow. I did a germination test on some Red Mills poppy seeds just out of curiosity once, and they germinated. FYI, growing those is a legal grey area. If the pumpkins weren't treated, they should germinate. Same with melons. I've tried raw shelled peanuts and they didn't germinate, but unshelled are worth trying if you find something that you like. As for the nut trees, the closest that I've had to experience with that is pulling weeds out of the garden, and it turned out that some critter had been burying walnuts from a neighbor in my garden, and they germinated. If they are raw and in the shell, they will probably germinate. FYI some places treat their shit so that it won't germinate, though this has more to do with shelf life than keeping you from growing things.
>>
>>970158
>my chillis have sprouted. better results just putting them in the window than doing the paper towel technique. one of my leggy seedlings look like they're growing roots above the ground. should i repot it deeper?

On an older plant, a few roots above the soil generally isn't lethal, but yeah, either pile some soil over those roots or pot it deeper. When/if you put it in the ground, if it is leggy, you can put a lot of the stem in the ground and it will put roots out. That's one method for dealing with leggy peppers/tomatoe/solanaceae.
>>
>>970207
If you want to do no till on a small scale, you're going to either pull lots and lots of weeds, or you're going to have to work with other weed management systems. A lot of no till is glyphosate based these days. If you want to get away from that, look into cover crop cocktails. There are a lot of annuals/biennials that will grow in the winter or come out of dormancy VERY early in the spring that will crowd weeds out that you can kill by knocking down once they start to flower. You knock them down, then use them as mulch. While this will stop weeds and build organic matter over the years, this will force you to come up with different methods of planting seeds for stuff that you direct sow, and it will exert some control over your schedule.
>>
I planted myself a Chinese pear / nashi tree a couple weeks ago because I like the fruits and they're quite expensive in stores here (usually €1 a piece).
I know it says that a second one improves yield, but now I read that the variety I got ("Kosui") is not self-fertile at all?
So if buying a second tree, what's best? Another of the same variety, a different one, or a European pear?
I do have a quince tree about 40m away, will that one maybe do, or is the relationship too far?
>>
>>970727
Get one of a different variety and make sure that it is one that matches the time frame for blooming as your first tree.
>>
>>970745
Hm, so a relatively early one I assume (supposed to flower early April). Won't be easy finding something like that (European pear) which is also not sensitive to pear rust and fireblight
>>
>>970750
>>970727
In the meantime I was at the store and got myself a "Clapp's Favourite" pear tree. Only early one they had, and apparently highly sensitive to fireblight, which kinda sucks.
Don't know yet if I keep it short and potted to only move it near the Chinese one during flower time, or plant it nearby, we'll see
>>
How do i make a greenhouse that is colder on the inside than the outside. Plz respond
>>
>>970779
it's called a fridge
>>
>>970779
Lots of thermal mass, AC instead of heating, and if you live near a location where you can freeze water outside, you can store ice.
>>
>>970794
but the light goes out when the door is shut.
>>
>>970799
cut the little trigger off so the light stays on
>>
>>970800
Im making this for when SHTF so no electricity

I need a way for sunlight to get in but for the temperature to be a lot colder
>>
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>>967711
Literally having this problem right now. Cherry tomatoes all on their second set of leaves and the damn jalapeños are still loafing around in the dirt.
>>
>>970814
cooling requires electricity, if money is not a concern, you could wire solar panels to a thermoelectric cooler
>>
>>970829
There has to be someway to natutally have a cool greenhouse, like digging underground and having only foggy glass at the top so the plants recieve some light without much heat. Or something
>>
>>970835
>>970829
Its extremely hot where i live and only getting hotter to the point where nothing grows, i live in the outback and have no electricity to where i plan to build this thing.

The plants need sunlight so maybe putting a tarp over it with open spots for some light?
>>
>>970814

You could build an icehouse ala the 1800s, anon. Otherwise, you need to find a way to have a lot of water evaporate in the vicinity. Look up how swamp coolers work.
>>
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i want to do a keyhole set up inspired by The Elder Scrolls. what are some legal plants i can grow that have pharmaceutical/interesting properties befitting a wizards tower?
>>
>>970851
*alchemy sounds*
>>
>>970836
>>970841
>>970835
>>970829
A swamp cooler is about as good as it gets, but still requires electricity. Couple it with ice from the winter and it may keep it cool. Knowing what temp difference there is inside and outside can help you decide on what solution to use.

>>970851
Keyhole raised beds are swank.

Google "medicinal plants" as there are 1000s. Some have scientific papers on them so use Google Scholar. Whatever you use, do lots of research. Some are dangerous for fetuses or have bad interactions with alcohol or meds.

Typical stuff:

Aloe Vera
Boneset
Pennyroyal and Pennywort
Yarrow
St. John's Wort
Plantain
Mallow
Queen Anne's Lace

Ironically, most everything in Oblivion that you can harvest for alchemy is a real world plant with real world uses, many are in Skyrim too:

http://en.uesp.net/wiki/Category:Oblivion-Flora
>>
>>970591
bumping my mushroom questions
>>
>>970913
>>970591
Put them in right away. The anti-fungal chemicals the tree naturally has will break down, but will not cause a problem with the plugs themselves. Then the fungi in the plugs will be the very first to inoculate the log, without question.
>>
>>970915
Thanks, that's the answer I wanted. I'm going to try to get the plugs in this weekend, but if I don't should they be good for a week? Where is a good place to keep them? I have a room that isn't heated, but won't go down to freezing, I thought that might work.
>>
>>970898
How am i suppost to grow in a global warmed shtf scenarios reee
>>
>>970931
Keep them in your fridge.
>>
>>970943
Use a shade cloth. That's what the greenhouse here do when their cooling isn't up to the task in summer.
>>
>>970943

Move north
>>
>>970980
I already am north, im central canada but its going to eventually become too warm here, infact in sask its gets rly hot
>>
i'm sorry if this is the wrong thread, but does anyone have any resources on bonsai trees? i'd like to give it a shot

the 400+ pdf torrent from the pastebin doesn't work anymore since kat is down
>>
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>>971031
>1930s mostly

I don't think you have anything to worry about. It gets 100% humidity and 110F every summer where I live and my tomatoes and peppers love it. I've never seen it lower than -42F or deeper than 12 feet of snow in the winter though.
>>
>>971031
Make a regular hot house now. Fill it with fruit trees and tropical stuff. Then when it is warn lose the house.
>>
Any tips on growing wild sourgrass indoors? Asked before but thread died on me.
>>
>>971077
Nothing special really. I have some that came up in my indoor garlic. I ate it.
>>
Hey /out/ I have a question

When germinating ready seeds is it better to use the paper towel method or is that only good for fresh seeds
>>
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Do plants need actual sunlight or will pic related work fine?
>>
>>971278
It won't work great but it's better than soda or purple stuff

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MQE3jWYuGiw
>>
>>971222
It depends on the seed. Some take several weeks and may rot in the paper towel, but do better in soil.
>>
I'm finally moving out of my parent's basement in April. I'm interested in getting into gardening, especially since it should be good timing and I'll have a 10 sq. ft. patio at my new place (apartment).

I want to grow tomatoes and onions for sure, but I'm interested in finding something unusual to grow as well. I like doing stuff that's off the wall or difficult. Any recommendations? I'm in NE Ohio so weather can be fluctuating but summer is generally warm.
>>
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I have a bad camera on my phone but here are the herbs I grow so that my bees will have something to forage come summer.
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>>971363
>10 sq. ft

Smallest patio ever? That's like a foot step. This garden here is 16 square feet (4' x 4'); red outlined area is 9 square feet (3' x 3'). Did you mean 10' x 10'? That's 100 square feet.

>unusual to grow as well.

Some will need to be moved indoors in the winter:

Hardy Banana (google for edible types)
Hardy Kiwi
Mexican Sour Gherkin Cucumber
Veronica Cauliflower
Buddha's Hand (citrus)
Peruvian Tubers (pic related)
Reisetomate Tomato
Pineapple

>>971365
Honey bees? Did you double check the varieties with what they are able to use? It depends on tongue length and such for nectar. Looks like a good start, good luck!
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>>971376
>Peruvian Tubers (pic related)
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>>971376
I bought the seeds from a list of plants that are good for honeybees (or so it said). It's oregano, hyssop and Salvia. They say that honey gathered from herbs usually taste of mint which would be really nice!
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>>971400
Sounds good then. I personally plant whatever and don't worry about the honey bees. Bumble bees, wasps, flies, and ants are the major pollinators on my farm.
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>>970501
Thanks. They have treated wood lying around, and it's jut the right height, width and length to make the raised bed. I'm just not sure if its safe to use, especially since it's had some iron rods in it, lying around for a couple of years
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>>971376
Yeah sorry, I dorfed. I don't know the exact amount but it looks to be at least 50sqft.
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>>969827
From the literature that came with my blueberries (just arrived today)..

Blueberries thrive in a sunny to partially shaded location with well drained, VERY acidic soil ( pH 4.2 - 5.2). Do not change the pH of your soil more than 1/2 of a point each year.
Do not fertilize newly planted bushes until they have leafed out. Work a fertilizer designed for acid-loving plants into the top 3" of soil around each plant, apply again 4-6 weeks later. Apply fertilizer to the soil beneath each bush, keeping it 5-6" away from the main stem.
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>>971494
So, just a hair over 7' x 7' then.

That's plenty to grow a fair amount of food/herbs. Perfect for an kitchen herb garden really. Shelving will be your friend.
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2 litre bottle planter + about 100 small holes + paper towel.

Any suggestions or improvements? It's for a chilli plant. I will add a lid.
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>>970851
What magic do you like?
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>>971567
Illusion sounds fun. Summoning is too risky.
>>
>>971567
uhh, fire magic? i really just want something that looks kind of fantastical and has some practical uses at the same time.
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>>971576
Try avocado
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Just getting into gardening. What ails my tomato plant? And how can I help it?
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>>971601
not good at this stuff but it looks like something has been eating it
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>>971601
That might be the start of tomato blight.

>>971603
Parts would be missing if it was a bug
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>>971590
bit big for a raised bed yeah? or can you dwarf them?
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>>971621
Is blight treatable or is it best to just destroy the plant?
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>>971629
If it's not too bad you can just get rid of the nasty parts. Serenade does work but smell terrible,
http://www.tomatodirt.com/tomato-blight-early.html
>>
I ordered some diploid potato seed, and the guy sent me a freebee of 10 Chinese Artichoke tubers. I am completely unfamiliar with this plant. I looked on Wikipedia, and two words were on the page that makes me think that potting this might be best: Rhizome and Lamiaceae. Would this be correct? Anything else to look out for?
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>>971474
No go on the treated wood, but they're okay with using lots of old wood from trees they've chopped down in the backyard. I've measured it out, and I have plenty of mid sized logs from the wood pile to make a 4'' wide, 8'' long, 8' tall frame. It's all been sitting on top of some older wood, and most of it is only a year old. I know this stuff will only last a couple years, but its all I can do for my parents at the moment, and I wanna make something nice for them to help them learn to garden again. Is there anything else I should beware? I figure I can fill the gaps between the logs with some tightly packed mulch
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>>971601
It is just physical damage, nothing to worry about too much. Many things can cause it. If they are brown spots with black rings, then you can worry all you want because it will be bad.

>>971639
>Chinese Artichoke

Stachys affinis? Tubers look like giant maggots/grubs?
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>>971657
>Stachys affinis? Tubers look like giant maggots/grubs?

That's what the package says.
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An update to my russian red kale. Its almost ready to start harvesting leaves for sandwiches.
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>>971670
My brussel sprouts. 2 plants. I have a few others but they are still seedlings.
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>>971673
My dark opal spicy basil! I basically saturated the pot with seeds.
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And one pot of my sugar snap peas. I have a few other pots scattered about.
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>>971675
And is this key lime almost ready?
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>>971677
I have no idea how to tell when a lime is ripe. That's why I have a lemon tree no and green peppers.
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>>971683
FYI, green peppers are just picked unripe. When they are ripe they turn color. The problem is that those varieties like to rot before they ripen.

>>971683
>>971677
Limes turn yellow when they are ripe. The green ones in the store are unripe.
>>
>>971677
A bit early, imo.

The feel looks wrinkled and thick, and the fruit still have dark green areas. Usually, depending on the type of lemon, the peel turns yellow or light green, and the peel becomes smother and thinner.

Also, try to pull it softly. If it resists and the entire branch bends, then clearly is unripe. Ripe lemons usually drop from the branch on their own.
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>>971686
Lemons are yellow
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>>971708
Indeed, but so are ripe limes.

https://www.google.com/search?q=ripe+limes&tbm=isch

Earth shattering isn't it?

>>971717
>inability to read thread
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>>971747
Why aren't limes sold ripe?
Do they taste different? It is just to avoid confusion with lemons?
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Can anyone help me determine what specific species of aloe this is? it started as one plant in my backyard years ago and now there are a lot of big ones and a shit ton of babies. i don't water them or fertilize or whatever, they are just in dirt.
>>
>>971757
They create more sugar as they ripen. Limes are used as an ingredient and that ingredient needs to have a certain flavor profile; one that isn't packed with sweetness.

>>971765
Good luck,

http://www.succulentguide.com/cactus/?start=0&genus=aloe
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does high pressure aeroponics count in this thread?

I am messing with some strawberries this is my biggest, they're babies still

wrote some software on a raspberry pi to control all feeding etc
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>>971775
things for the link. many of those don't have pictures with them but from the ones that do have pictures i have narrowed it down to seven different species that look at least vaguely similar.

aloe duckeri
aloe dyeri
aloe esculenta
aloe keithii
aloe microstigma
aloe parvibracteata
aloe porphyrostachys
>>
>>971813
Not too many people do hydro ITT. I've seen some in >>>/diy/ for the technical aspects. A few people here have very small setups I know that much.
>>
>>971906
yea I saw this gardening thread from diy so I came here

been gardening for about 14 years didn't know this existed
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>>971624
You can. They won't bear fruit though. (It probably won't either way unless you graft anyways)
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>>971961
yikes, pre-grafted avocado trees are expensive.
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>>971966
Very. I've grown a few dwarf avacado trees from seeds, they're fairly hardy once established but they can't stand any cold.
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>>971675
I'd say you could easily jam a few more sugar snaps into that pot if you wanted to. Atleast my variety I could get like 8-10 seeds into a pot that size and have them grow unhindered.


My potato bucket is doing well too, a bit cold outside here 8 celcius during day 0 at night but it seems to be growing so I can't complain.
>>
I'm planting Marigolds and Nasturtiums, can anyone recommend more plants that help deter and/or distract insects? I'm trying to grow some fruits/vegetables.
>>
>>972000
Trips can't hurt.
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>>968659
Oh wow dude those look just like mine. I've been lucky as fuck, I grew mine from seeds I just scraped out from store-bought tomatoes. They're growing in soda cans that have been cut in half. just transferred them to the main garden today worked out great because you can just cut down the side of the can then around and they pop out whole causing minimal stress to the plants and the cans can be recycled afterwards.
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>>971988
You think so? I really want to avoid dwarfism from too much competition or getting them rootbound
>>
>mfw faggot crows already digging up my shallots

it's treason then
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>>972259
Use deer netting/bird netting.
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>>972000
What I've noticed helps a lot is planting your crops intermingled and random instead of perfect homogenous rows
>>
JFC these peppers have taken over 2 weeks to germinate
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>>972444
iktf all too well

>tfw mine are overdue
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>>972444
I grew peppers last year, planted some and transplanted others. Made zero difference--both did jack shit until start of august/very end of july.
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>>967777
>sub-tropical
I know for a fact tomatos and sweet potatoes do alright but the latter may be difficult. Whats the roof access like?
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>>968322
Sounds like you have autism friendo, how about leaving your fathers property and doing as you please with chickens. Also eat more kale.
>>
Lol
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>>972596
Tomatoes and peppers are good pot plants, and they are both sub-tropical species so will do quite well in that environment.
>>
I got corn, blackberries, tomatoes (i hate) and something else i forgot. If they don't take I'm mcfucking kill my self. lol jk
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Need a bit of advice.
I've got about 400 catnip seeds i plan to secretly infect the apartments i live in with so i can have a nice harvest of fresh catnip every so often.
how can i make sure i get the best growth rate?
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>>972751
They like full sun and sandy/gravel soil that is drier and well draining.
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>>972705

>plants don't grow
>kill self
>corpse fertilizes soil
>plants bloom
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>>972596
>Whats the roof access like?

>I don't have access to some kind of garden,

That pretty much includes the roof. The access door is locked, I have to ask for the key to the maintenance guy. Also, for some reason, the door is like two metres on the wall above the floor and there isn't some kind of stair or something to reach it, so I have to get my own stair to climb up there.

Also, to be honest, I wouldn't trust the neighbours with edible plants. Not so long ago, like two months or so, the neighbours in front of me tried to, literally, steal my pay television while my wife was watching it. One moment she was watching some CSI episode, then the next the signal was out and our neighbours were screaming to each other about the reception. "Not yet, the signal is still bad!", "Better or worse?", "Worse!" And so on.

Best part? When we climbed to check out what was going on, and found the neighbour and the tv box broken with some wires out of place, this guy was swearing he had nothing to do with it... while he was holding a screwdriver on his hand.
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>>972807
Fun fact: when a corpse explodes and releases the liquid that used to be internal organs, the nitrogen concentration is so high, it literally kills all the plants. It will take several months and rain to made the soil suitable for vegetation to grown again.

So, no, even if you were to kill yourself to use your body as fertilizer, you're doing it wrong.
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>>972766
Thanks, i was originally planning on planting them next to water sources to also help keep mosquitos away but now i'll rethink it.
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>>972751
Never done it myself but try making seed balls with well-decomposed compost or potting soil and a bit of clay (as in soil with a high clay content, not sculpting shit). I hear doing that can really improve germination rates in areas where transplanting/obvious care is a no-go
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Hey lads.
I'm interested in growing a small plant, something easy, maybe something that bears fruit or something like that. Though, I am in the southern hemisphere, so it is winter. What should I do?
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>>972954
>I am in the southern hemisphere, so it is winter. What should I do?
Be more specific and at least give a country or regional climate.
"winter" is vague.
>>
grow a pineapple top
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What might this be on my jalapeño? And how do I know when the pepper is ripe?
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>>973039
Mine is 4 years old, still no flower
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>>973043
Bacterial leaf spot; if you put waste like dead leaves in the soil that could cause it.

Jalapenos will turn red when fully ripe with mature seeds, otherwise you can eat them green
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>>973053
Thanks for the hasty reply, kind anon. I'll treat that asap.
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>>973068
Easiest treatment is to repot it with fresh soil and remove and destroy infected leaves
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>>972822
That's what scavengers are for, silly
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>>973043
>>973053
That doesn't look like bacterial leaf spot to me.
I'd say sunburn. Did you move them from artificial light to sun recently? (or from weak light to strong one)
Also, I'd look on the other side to check if there are some insects, sometimes thrips damages looks like sun burns.
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>>972814

sounds like you live in Detroit, go away from it
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>>973043
That is physical damage. Pattern suggests an insect.

>>973053
Not bacterial leaf spot.

>>973052
Mine all grew for 1 year, bloomed and fruited the next year. The fruit took all year to grow and ripen. 2-year turnaround for me.

You need to stress it.
>>
Hi, newfag here
I want to turn my backyard(120sq ft) into an edible garden and it needs to get the foot tall grass knocked down first. The only thing is idk what to grow based on the time of year or where I live. I looked it up and live in a 9b zone( central CA). what can I start in the middle to end of march?
>>
Absolute noob gardener here

Building a raised bed out of 6-9 diameter logs lying around, to make a 4ftx8ft, 6in tall raised bed. They're all only about a two and a half feet long, and are cut roughly, so laid on their sides they don't quite meet up to form a nice seal. I haven't put any soil down yet, since I'm trying to figure out the best material to plug the holes so soil doesn't leak out. Would mulch be a good idea?
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>>973181
Use filter fabric
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Finally these niggers are sprouting
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>>973105
>>973173
It's been growing in the strong sunlight for some time, but the damage just showed up. If we're talking about insects then it's probably ants. I've seen some ants around my plants recently. How do I scare them away?
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>>973473
Ants wouldn't do it. Probably a night time creature. Have you seen any true bugs around?
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Since I didn't rig up a humidity tent for the seedlings in the paper tubes, the moisture levels fluctuated too radically for them. Some seeds rotted, though they were seed that are many years old. Some plants had too much water (red or yellow leaves). Others with extremely shallow planting depths didn't get enough water

All the ones that are sprouted, I've not moving into larger pots. Some are stunted and some are right on track

Left to Right

1st Row:
1: Salad greens (old old onion seeds didn't sprout).
2: Italian pear tomato plants.
3: Roots peaking out from the bottom of the tube.
4: Transplanting a bird house gourd plant

2nd Row:
1: Young Coprinellus disseminatus growing from the outside of the paper tube (too much water).
2-4: Goji plants! (started from seeds out of a store bought dehydrated berry).

3rd Row:
1: Nasturtium (They've grown 2 inches since this morning's pic.)
2: Cauliflower (Violetta Italia)
3-4: Cabbage (Red Express) I added 2 more lights to this shelf since they were leaning and leggy already (these short fluorescent bulbs are brighter towards the center).

4th Row:
1: Bird house gourd
2: Potato plants grown from true seeds saved off my farm (Purple Majesty).
3: Mature Coprinellus disseminatus growing from the outside of the paper tube (too much water).
4: Group shot of one of the replanted shelves.

Frankly, I didn't think the true potato seeds or the goji seeds would even sprout. I lost all the pepper seeds due to rot and the fact they were really too many years too old. Lost a few others for the same reason. tfw the luffa sponge seeds did nothing. I'm going to need to make sure those sprout soon. I'm getting low on luffa seeds and their growing season is out of my range here.

>>973180
You can grow pretty much anything you want. Just google the plant type and when to plant it in regard to temps and frost dates if you ever have frost. Your growing season is much longer than my Zone 5b and I can grow most anything in a normal veggies garden.
>>
Do I an hero? Is this the beginning of mosaic virus on my Bleuberry plant?
>>
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>>973548
Mobile 4chan is so meh sometimes
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>>973531
>tfw the luffa sponge seeds did nothing. I'm going to need to make sure those sprout soon. I'm getting low on luffa seeds and their growing season is out of my range here.

There, I'm starting them in my oven where the pilot light keeps it 100F. This usually gets things going ASAP.

>>973180
too many character to post links in last post:

http://www.almanac.com/gardening/planting-dates/CA
http://davesgarden.com/guides/freeze-frost-dates/

>>973548
No, and I haven't even seen the photo. lol

>>973551
Nope, how many leaves have it? If it started out as reddish spots then you'd need to worry.
>>
>>973473
Burns generally appear during the close next days to exposition.
Check with a magnifying glass the underside of the leaf. Thrips and spider mites are very, very tiny. You don't always see them (even with a magnifier).
I don't think it's ants at all.
>>
>>973551 >>973548
Rather look like deficiency (magnesium or iron, depending if it's on older or younger leaves). Is the plant root-bound? How are you watering it? (frequency and quantity)
>>
>>973564
I agree, We still need to know how many leaves it is affecting.
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>>973552
not many, maybe 3 or 4, and they fell right off when I touched them. Its a young plant with not very many leaves but lots of flowers and young berries

>>973564
>deficiency
This is what im hoping, i think it was sort of root bound when i replanted, i couldnt see the roots but the whole dirt cylinder came out of the 1 gallon pot i got it with, so roots were probably filling the whole thing to some degree.

Old leaves are dark green and a little purple with a few of them having dead areas(blight?) on the edges of the leaves.

New leaves are bright green with an awesome light blue tint. New growth started after i replanted and picked off lots of the flowers.


I water it about 2-5 times a week, kind of sporadic, i just stick my finger in different parts of the pot and if its damp i dont water it. Might be worried this pot isn't properly draining with one drain hole on the bottom.
thanks for the help! hope i explained it well. im dead tired but ill check back tomorrow
>>
>>973648
Are you going to transfer it into the ground later? If you are, remove all the flowers and berries until it is in the ground.

The purplish tint to the leaves may indicate overwatering, but usually it will start to turn red. It normally indicates phosphorus deficiency or sudden cold temps. The deficiency can be caused by overwatering. If you need to water it 2-5 times a week then you are washing away the nutrients and possibly overwatering. It needs to be in a much larger pot or in the ground. You should only need to water it once a week at most in a pot in the heat of summer.
>>
>>973648
You're welcome, though I don't know if I was of any help.
If everything came out in one block when re-potting, maybe the roots are taking a lot of space as you're telling. Can't know for sure. Check the roots if you can, a lot of deficiencies are simply caused by root-bounds. If it's that, no need to add anything. Just untangle and trim if possible.

If you sometimes see some water dripping from the draining hole, no need to be scared. Did you put some clay beads at the bottom of the pot to avoid clogging?

Anyway, if you've just repotted it in a bigger pot, just wait and check to see how it evolves. If new leaves are OK, don't sweat it

The "finger in soil" method is a good one, but as >>973657 said, it's kind of strange that you need to water it so much. Do you live under a hot climate?
>>
>>973489
These are in an urban area, so the usual spider, sometimes mosquitoes, but nothing other than that, really.

>>973562
Will do that tomorrow morning. Might be spider mites, I'll check it.
>>
>>972985
Suburban Melbourne, pretty dry/not much rain but still relatively sunny at this point.
>>
My four o-clocks and one lily are sprouting :3
>>
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Hey guys, first time on this side of 4chan.
Many years ago I bought some habanero seeds on a whim, and managed to get a plant out of it that sprouted 3 whole peppers.
That's as far as my gardening & growing experience goes.
I just placed an order for a variety of decorative peppers which I hope to someday turn into bonsai chiles. I've always been fascinated & intimidated by bonsai and read that peppers are a good way to build some experience, since they grow fast and can be really pretty.
I live in Belgium, so most days it doesn't get super hot or sunny around here.
I have a germination tray with plastic cover, will order a heatmat soon, and if I manage to get some life in my pots, I'll probably invest in a basic greenhouse to put on my terrace (I live on the first floor), pic related is available space.
Now, I'll use google the most like I'm used to, but some things only experience can teach you, so I'm here to ask: Is there anything you wish someone told you before you started growing stuff? Any and all tips are welcome.
Thanks in advance!
>>
>>973987
http://www.fatalii.net/Bonsai_Chiles_Bonchi

I kept some of my pepper plants indoors over winter. I had to hand pollinate the flowers. I attached a stick to my electric shaver for that purpose. The pepper plants lasted a few years before a sudden early frost killed them.

> Is there anything you wish someone told you before you started growing stuff?

-You are going to get addicted.
-You will never have enough room for more plants.
-Brassica plants must have insect screens in this area, no exceptions.
-Start with raised beds.

Good luck with your peppers!
>>
who else ethnobotanical here

i got the usual mescaline cacti but ive been trying to get ephedra sinica seeds to sprout for months and its pissing me off.
>>
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>>974080
Thanks mate! That is the site that kickstarted my interest last week, I ordered some seeds from him too.
Thanks for the tips! Why the raised beds?
>>
>>974185

they don't need to till the soils, plus is comfier to gather the vegetables
>>
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>>974320
Ah, I just googled it, I was imagining something else.
I was planning to stick to pots, maybe get something like pic related to put outside on the terrace (is that the correct word for what I have? >>973987), nothing too fancy yet, see how I'll do.
>>
>>974144
>ephedra sinica

Lay them on the top of sandy soil and press them into the soil, but don't bury them. Temp should be 68F, full sun, non-moist conditions.

>>974185
>Why the raised beds?

For a magnitude of reasons.

>>974377
>terrace

Balcony. A terrace is normally just a raised area with nothing under it. A balcony is normally a porch that overhangs something else. Some regions use the terms interchangeably.
>>
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•••NEW THREAD: >>974435
•••NEW THREAD: >>974435
•••NEW THREAD: >>974435
>>
>>970071

Don't use cans, they rust.




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