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Old thread: >>987696

Search terms:

Companion Planting - Raised Beds - Hugelkultur - Vertical Gardening - Square Foot Gardening - Polyculture - Composting - Windrow Composting - Mulching - Vermiculture - Espalier - Fungiculture - Aquaponics - Greenhouses - Cold Frames - Hot Boxes - Polytunnels - Forest Gardening - Aquaculture - Mittlieder Method - Keyhole Garden - Window Frame Garden - Straw Bale Gardening - Soil-bag Gardening - Lasagna Gardening - No-till Method - Container Gardening - Ollas Irrigation - Kratky Method

Chickens - Goats - Pigs - Sheep - Cattle - Ducks - Turkey - Honey Bees - Geese - Llama - Alpaca - Fish - Crayfish

Resources:

http://pastebin.com/RDDAm3Jz

Secondary Edible Parts of Vegetables:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/newsletters/hortupdate/hortupdate_archives/2005/may05/SecVeget.html
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>>993446
Without microscopic evidence, you cannot confirm it is bisporus. As a mycologist I can almost guarantee you they are not actually Agaricus bisporus. What are you using as a distinguishing feature to tell them apart?
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Hi, I wanted to post this photo I took today of my garden. Haven't planted much yet, only Italian parsley and some radishes. I hope to plant tomatoes, cucumbers, cilantro and other herbs once the last frost date is past.
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i haven't done much gardening in years. this year i'm going to try to not be a lazy asshole and actually use the space i have. so far i've got some sorrel, valerian, oregano, sage, lovage, and chives growing.
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Question: is it a problem to mix store bought compost with commercial potting mix?
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>>993714
I don't think so, as long as you keep a nice structure to the mix (with enough drainage, enough retention, etc.), depending of the structure you already have.
You may have to add clay beads/perlite/sand or some clay depending of what you got, but this goes with any soil "making", it's not specific to your question only.
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>>993271
>>993270
Nice man! Which ones are you growing?
About giving em a bigger pot, can a new pot be too big for a seedling? I'm new to this and bought a few, but the smallest size I could get at that shop is 10x bigger as the seedling pot (see pic).
I don't mind going out for more sizes, but if it really doesn't matter I'll stick em in these.
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>>993647
The fact that I made a slurry and poured it all over one of the local fields a few years in the row. It started popping up in nearby locations a few years after that.

>>993670
That's a good start. Remember, if things freeze in your area, you should keep those block holes empty of soil or they can freeze and bust sometimes.
>>
What do you guys think of the Sarpo mira potato?
Is it the GOAT potato?
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>>993968
Yukon Gold is the best I've ever had. I've yet to find a tastier potato.
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>>993970

Yukon gold may be tastier but sarpo mira is rated best for blight resistance and has very high resistance to most other potato diseases.
And on top of all that it produces HUGE yields
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>>993973
I really select my crops based on enjoyability and antioxidants. I grow yukon gold and purple potatoes. I've yet to find a red skinned potato that had much flavor. I don't have problems with crop diseases.
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>>993732
>>993714
We all start that way. Learn what you need for soil and add what is necessary. Soil too dry and crumbly? Add clay or organic matter. Wet and clumpy? Add sand or peat moss or perlite.

>>993951
Not him, but as someone who just laid down their first cinder blocks and was thinking of planting in the holes, this is good to know.
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>>994023

Ahh i live in England so blight is always a big concern here.
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>>994041
Its a concern here too, but I never had trouble with any of my crops with diseases. Only problems I can have are animal/insect/slug related, but that's what electric fence, insect cloth, and beer traps are for.
>>
>tfw the first cabbage moth of the year just entered my poly tunnel and laid about 50 eggs on the few brassica plants I have in there

I squished her and all her eggs. Time to build some moth proof enclosures and order insect cloth.

It should be noted that the cabbage moth only laid eggs on the green brassica plants, but not a single one of the purple/red varieties.

>>994040
>Not him, but as someone who just laid down their first cinder blocks and was thinking of planting in the holes, this is good to know.

A lot of people do this without a problem. You really should empty the holes at the end of the season. A lot of times when the bottom row of a block raised bed sinks into the soil, they will crack here and there due to that problem.
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>>993944
nvm about the pot, visited my mom and she gave me a bunch of different sizes
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>>994102

Hope you sprayed every inch with soapy water too.

100% you did not find every egg
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>>994157
They are extremely easy to find and there are only 6 plants that are 4-5 inches tall with like 4 leaves each.
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>>993944
>>994145
Pots can indeed be to big for a seedling.
You got pots now so this is probably useless, but maybe a good tip for later or anybody else:

Stores selling plants get them delivered in really cheap pots in all sizes, so they usually get thrown out. But they are fine for seedlings or small plants and you can get them usually for free when you're asking for them.
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>>993944
Thanks!

>Which ones are you growing?
Aji Charapita
Aji Pineapple
Anaheim
Ancho Poblano Mulato
Apache F1
Carolina Reaper
Cayenne Yellow
Fireflame F1
Gorong
Jalapeno
Jalapeno Tam
Habanero El Remo
Hungarian Hot Wax
Naschzipfel
Numex Pinata
Numex Suave Red
Peruvian Purple
Redskin F1
Scotch Bonnet Orange
Serrano
Tabasco
Toscana F1
Trinidad Perfume

I probably went a little overboard, but there are way too many cool peppers.
Will probably get Habanero Mustard plants too (my seeds did not germinate at all)
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>>994480
Forgot the Chocolate Mini Snack Peppers.
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>>993583

Anyone have any experience getting funding for a farm or agricultural business? Starting a farming non-profit seems like a killer way to be /out/ and make a living.
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>>994496
Google up all the state/county/country/local farm grants. Call your local ag department for more info.
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>>994472
Thanks, I'll keep that in mind should I ever need any extra!
I transplanted 2 today, pic related.

>>994480
>>994485
Quite a lot indeed. I'm no chilehead (yet?) myself, but got interested in em because they supposedly are great for practicing bonsai. And when looking around I fell in love with some of the ornamentals, especially the Bolivian Rainbow. Only 1 of the 3 I planted have sprouted so far, I really hope it'll do okay.
Do you like eating them, or is it more a caring for/growing/looking at em thing? Got any favorites?
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>>994507
Hot peppers can make great ornamental plants, yes. The Bolivian Rainbow is famous for that. Another one that might be interesting to you is the Numex Pinata, very colourful but with bigger fruit. But also consider single colour variants, nothing like the bright yellows, reds, .... somewhere in the garden.

I love eating them. Craving spicy pretty much replaced my craving for sweet or fatty. Peppers can make food very satisfying and they are healthy as fuck (more vitamin C than oranges for example). And super versatile, stuffing the milder ones, pickling and drying or making sauce from the hot ones. This year I want to try my hand on fermenting and smoking some..

All, growing them is super satisfying when you see progress or when harvest finally comes. Or when you have something you grew yourself in your kitchen to use. And they are all real eye-catchers as I said above, those colours!
Favourites, not so much but favorite uses. Like the Hungarian Hot Wax for example, I pickled them semi-ripe, and lightly roasted they were delicious in salads. Peruvian Purples have a very distinct aroma and pack some heat but it unfolds in a very pleasant way so they are great in sauces. The Chocolate Mini Snack Peppers or Naschzipfel are delicious right from the plant. Crunchy and intense in flavour. And so on
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>>994522
I feel ya man. I really hope I can handle at least some of em, my stomach is picky in a weird way. I've had several ulcers in my stomach and intestines, because I used to take a lot of different meds as a kid before they figured out something that worked properly for me (arthritis).
My mom never cooked spicy, but even bell peppers used to mess me up, and now still give me very bad heartburn.
On the other hand, the sweet-ish green 'kebab peppers' I can eat by the handful and not have a problem. Jalapeno flavored snack: pretty hot for me because no tolerance, but tasty as fuck, and no stomach problems. Really strange.
I was thinking, should I manage to get one or more to fruition, to peel, de-seed & dry em, and use them mainly as a spice. Maybe try candying some too: http://fatalii.net/candied_peppers.pdf
And pickling does sound like a good idea too.
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>>994557
>http://fatalii.net/candied_peppers.pdf

Oh my.
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>>994480
Holy moley that's a lotta peppers.
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Has anyone here grown chayote squash before?
I've read that they're vigorous climbers, but I don't know how high/wide they climb nor the manner in which they climb.

I'm trying to pick out a trellis for one.
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>>994506

yeah, but has anyone here actually done it?
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>>994644
That was actually the course of action you need to do, not a brush off. You could try to find a partner, silent partner, or other type of benefactor.
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>>994620
I don't know abut that one specifically, but I will look for it. Climbing squash can get pretty long, plan for at least 6', I've had some get around 12'. They wont get very wide unless you fold it over itself and they put out tendrils.i use the chicken wire on the outside of my garden. Fences work well because they have room to keep going if they hit the top. Trumpet squash is another good climber that produces like a summer squash. I use climbing stuff for a privacy wall.
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On the whole I consider my Mint bush healthy but almost every day I pick off leaves like this.

They are dry, pretty much fall off the stem and are usually found at the bottom of the bush hidden under other leaves.

Anybody know whats happening here?
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>>994698
I've seen that on a lot of wild mints, not sure what causes it, but it doesn't seem to be much of a problem for them.
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Just letting everyone know I am here to answer questions about mushrooms, mushroom growing, and fungi in general.
Mycology guy present.

I am going to be trying morel cultivation here soon, looking to make those big bucks. The Chinese have outdoor cultivation figured out (pic related), but I want to tackle year-round indoor growing, which noone has figured out in any way that allows for mass production.
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>>994557

I have that problem with bell peppers too, they give me horrible heartburn. Spicy peppers are no problem. Not sure what's up with it!
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>>994704

Have you experimented with the cultures or spawn any yet? I played with morel cultures a few years back and never could figure them out very well, they grow fast and strangely and look contaminated even if they're clean. Really weird stuff.
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>>994710
Yeah I have, they are interesting. They like to form sclerotia, which is the key to completing the life cycle. The contamination look you are describing probably looked like orange or white mold showing up right?
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>>994701
>>994698
>broscience> maybe the plants' way to only spend energy on leaves that get a lot of light?

>>994708
I'm not alone, praise jeebus. Those calcium 'candies' (tums?) work pretty well for me.
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>>994708
>>994557
Bell peppers are rather bitter, too. Maybe something else in them fucks up your stomaches. Did that only happen with bought peppers? Have you tried homegrown ones?

If you're looking for mild peppers:
Anaheims are delicious when harvested only slightly red and grilled with a little salt and olive oil.
Trinidad Perfumes have a mild heat and a rich, lemon-y flavour.

Pickling does take the edge of hot peppers, if you deseed them too (also scrape out the membrane), you can take out most of the heat.
/ck/ hat a nice pickling thread last harvest season, lots of people shared really great recipes.
But if you haveold pickling recipes from your (grand)parents, they work, too.
Kebab peppers are pickled, aren't they? So pickling should be a good option then.
Never thought of candying them, >>994563, Oh my indeed. Anyone here ever tried this?
If you want to use them as spice, dry them. Works in the oven. Cut them into rings, i found them to dry considerably faster that way.

Pic: Chocolate Mini Snack Pepper, the superiour Bell Pepper
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>>994617
It is indeed.
Anyone else here who went overboard with a particular kind of plant and why?
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>>994854
>Bell peppers are rather bitter, too.

Bell peppers are sweet. However, 9 times out of 10, people pick them green because that's what they see in the grocery store. Green peppers are not ripe and have an assload of bitter tasting solanine glycoalkaloid poison in them which totally wrecks your digestive system in short order.

>>994708
If they are fully ripe bell peppers it may be from the ascorbic acid (vitamin C). They have higher vitamin C concentrations than oranges have. Even green bell peppers have a lot more.
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>>994828
It is most likely physical damage, either from wind, or insects. Secondary infection is also possible.

>>994861
Hungarian Wax Peppers last season. I needed them. I somehow totally forgot to save seeds to, no clue how that happened. I have bags of them in the freezer and tons of them dehydrated and even more dehydrated and ground up in vacuum sealed jars in the freezer.

I'll need to actually buy a few H.wax pepper plants from the local greenhouse this year. I don't think my freezer stash of chopped peppers will last until 2018 after all.
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>>994854
>Maybe something else in them fucks up your stomaches.
>>994867
>However, 9 times out of 10, people pick them green because that's what they see in the grocery store. Green peppers are not ripe and have an assload of bitter tasting solanine glycoalkaloid poison in them which totally wrecks your digestive system in short order.
>If they are fully ripe bell peppers it may be from the ascorbic acid (vitamin C).

That is what I said/I speculated that there is another reason.

>>994708
Also Water with a high calcium/magnesium content is said to help with heart burn, maybe try that, too
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>>994869
I think I have seen your posts last year. You are the guy who grows a lot of veggies in general and then spends a lot of time conserving his harvests in various ways, aren't you?

>I needed them
>I don't think my freezer stash of chopped peppers will last until 2018 after all.

Yeah I get that feeling. It's only April and i'm almost through my last harvest already.

Why are peppers so addictive?
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>>994893
>then spends a lot of time conserving his harvests in various ways, aren't you?

Correct, though preserving doesn't take much time really. Pic of reposts related.

>Why are peppers so addictive?

They are a very common ingredient for many cuisines.
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>>994893
Do those mustard habaneros taste like mustard, or is it just a 'color name' like chocolate or caramel?
Love me some mustard.
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>>994698
I don't know if its the reason and I'm only talking out of personal experience on spearmint and peppermint grown in containers.
In my case it happened when the mint was stressed by a serious drought and when the roots and stems look like a mess, like a spaghetti plate.

I often tried to fix the issue but I never recovered a nice looking bush.

I cut everything and wait a month or two for it to grow strong again. I use the nice looking stems to clone and/or make some tea.

>tfw waiting for spearmint to grow again after the winter.
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>>994945
No idea actually, but I doubt it. Heat in mustard comes from a different source than in peppers. It's a different thing entirely. So it's probablyjust the colour.

But there are lots of recipes for Habanero Mustards all over the web or ready made products you can buy.
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>>994943
Still pretty impressive.
How much do you grow?
How much work does this take per week?
How long does the entire preserving process take?
How long does your harvest lasts?
Do you have an estimation how much in food costs does this save you? How much when subtracting the costs for jars, preservatives like sugar, etc.?

Better living for a hobby sounds pretty neat.
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>>994652
>They wont get very wide
What's a comfortable number? 3' wide?
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>>994867
What site is that in your pic?
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>>994965
They get about as wide as the leafs. You can set them about 1' apart and stick something like a few pole beans or any vine between them. Look up squash trellis videos on youtube to get an idea.
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>>994976
>or any vine between them
vine flower* It's good to add some flowers for bees.
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>>993583

Hello folks!
Guess I am gonna try gardening some stuff I have a huge terrain from my stepdad that he does not use at all besides Orange Trees and tons of free time.
I have right now Radish, Cucumber, Lettuce and Spinach seeds and 0 expertise


Is there anything in special you guys recommend from the Resources pastebin?
Is there really a 101 gardening videos?

I really want to do something without the help of my stepdad or his friends, would really appreciate any help
Cheers
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>>994869
>>994943
You're so cool, I see your posts and am inspired.
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>>994984
I would add green beans to that mix. They are pretty easy to grow - and if you plant enough of them you can have a nice side dish for several meals during the week.
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>>994957
>How much do you grow?

Not as much as I'd like. Something like a couple tons a year, though last year was pretty low due to various things not related to gardening per se. So, not very much. This year I have more garden space than ever (reposted pic of one of my gardens).

>How much work does this take per week?

Almost nothing after the beds and stuff are setup. Then it is only planting, a little maintenance, watering, and harvesting. It comes in spurts mostly during planting and harvesting. Normally you work 4 hours a day for a few days during planting and harvesting then maybe 2 hours a week if you really want to micromanage things. If I worked 2 hours a day on average I'd feel like I was doing something major. In fact if I worked 2 hours a day I could feed a ton of people. I just need good soil for expansion. That's the only thing really holding me back is lack of good soil and I compost all the time.

>How long does the entire preserving process take?

It depends on the harvest. Some seasons I'll have a bumper crop of apples, other years it is pumpkins, tomatoes or all 3, etc.

>How long does your harvest lasts?

I'm always eating stuff I'm growing. Be that winter greens or October harvesting. Harvests depend on the time you plant and the type of plant.

>does this save you?

I have 6 months of home grown food, on rotation at all times. Every year I either alter my diet to drop store item(s) or add home grown items to replace store item(s). Most costs are merely initial setups. After a year, everything pays for itself. I need to buy things like peanut oil, butter, and "exotic" spices. Though, I normally just trade things with other people for stuff I don't grow/raise myself.

>>994967
http://nutritiondata.self.com/

>>994984
https://www.youtube.com/user/growingyourgreens

>>994993
Thanks. Don't let that inspiration go to waste!
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>>993583

where do I get cheap seeds
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>>995017
Not worried about leaching with those cinder blocks?
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>>995051

Ebay
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>>995009
Thanks! One quick question is compost 100% needed for the first time? Or I can just work the land and put the seeds on?
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>>994976
Do the vines not branch out sideways while climbing?
I've grown butternut squash on the ground before and it covered quite a wide area as it grew.

I'm only growing a single squash plant right now, I just need to know how wide of a trellis to use.
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>>995055
Not at all. They were used in structures I saw prior to their being demolished. It isn't like they were being used at a car garage or in a factory. They only become a problem when they are contaminated by something else after they are made. With clean blocks you'll have more problem with normal rain than anything coming out of the blocks themselves. Everything online is anecdotal at best without solid sources and those with legit sources say there's little to nothing at all to worry about. The worst they can do is raise the pH a bit which isn't a problem since I add compost all the time.
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>>995017
I salvaged some cinder blocks from work and used them to redo the borders of my raised bed.

>>995055
I was worried about this, but they were apparently just a simple wall with plaster and paint that they knocked down. I figured two months out in the elements in the parking lot would hopefully leach or wash away anything I didn't want.

I used to just hop on the log to grab things from my trellis, but the log had become more like cork than wood and was starting to make noises when I tried to stand on it.

I broke up the logs and put the pieces in on the sides/bottom under the new manure and soil I added.

>>995064
You need some source of nutrients. Whether that be manure or miracle gro, plants need a BALANCE of nutrients. Manure and compost have lower numbers as far as soil amendments go, but it's more balanced Macro and micro nutrient-wise and usually won't damage your plants. They also usually improve the general consistency of the soil. Miracle Gro, on the other hand, is usually a 10-10-10 mix of mostly just the big 3 (N- nitrogen - P- phosphate - K- Potassium) and can burn your plants if applied incorrectly. Also, things like fruits and flowering vegetable plants need less nitrogen, as this only promotes leaves. This is why most gardeners use compost.
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>>995098
Pic related
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>>995101
Looking good.
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Does anyone here a job in the /out/? I gotta get out of this sales job before it kills me and I want to go to work in horticulture or a greenhouse.

Anyone?
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>>994704
dayum China
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Can you grow chillys outside in the cooler environments?

Im in the south east of England.
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>>995318
If it doesn't drop under 12°C, it's fine. Peppers can take much lower for short period as long as it isn't under 0°C.
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>>995318
You can grow them, but you'll have to either take them inside in the winter or just pretend they're annuals and let them die in the fall.
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>>995064
I would grab a couple bags of good soil from your local garden center to till in for good measure. Compost doesn't hurt but isn't 100% necessary, plus it is time consuming to get a good enough amount going.
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Ok, so a few months ago I put a berry vine in a bucket of water and forgot about it, I came back to it and it has a large extensive root system

How do I go about putting this in the ground without killing it?
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>>995458
A large and extensive root system inside the bucket of water, you mean?

Has this vine somehow survived for months off of just water?
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>>995375
Well we don't have a garden centre, very small village where everyone as their own grape vines.

Do I go buy conventional fertilizer?
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It's 9°C outside and super windy. Should I put my potted tomato plants inside?
Also, fuck April.
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>>995594
Same here, and frost announced for Friday night, after it was 25°C in late March, what a load of BS.
Those I already planted in the ground will probably get hit, the backup ones I keep in pots have been moved inside yesterday
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>>995594
God fucking damn it just started snowing.
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>>995458
Dig a hole, put water in hole till full. Wait an hour. Put plant's roots in hole and bury until there's no roots visible. Shade it for a few days. Water as needed.
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>>995594
>Should I put my potted tomato plants inside?

Yes.
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>>995318
People are growing Chiles even in Finland or Russia, so I see no reason why you couldn't.
See:
>>995330
Frost is the main enemy here, if you keep them in pots, especially when slightly elevated, you can ignore ground frost and just go according to current temperature levels.

>>995342
Growing them as annuals is probably easier than to overwinter them. Seeds are dirt cheap online (eBay), but if you just start, especially now, I would recommend buying plants. Either you look for a good online store (there a plenty where I'm from, so I would bet they exist in the UK as well), or go to your local garden centre and look what they have.
The online stores probably offer more variety, especially of the "household name" variants, but some chiles are harder to grow than others. Garden centre variations are hybrids (names ending in "F1" or "F2") and selected for success, so what they offer will likely grow nicely where you live. But the selection (colours, flavours, heat levels) will be considerably smaller.
Leave them indoors until there is no frost at nights anymore. Another advantage of online shops: the good ones usually wont ship their plants until they can be brought outside safely.

Before you start though:
Consider if you have a good spot to put them. Do you have a garden, a backyard, a frontyard, balcony, porch or just a window?
Does it face south?
You will want a place that gets a lot of sun over the day, but being able to protect them from too much sun (yes this can be a thing for some variants), too much rain, wind or hailstorms, etc.
(Advantage of pots, they can be moved easily)
Speaking of pots: Some peppers need bigger pots for a good harvest, while others do well in smaller pots and still give you plenty of peppers.
Depending on available space select your peppers accordingly.
Select them also for what you want to do with them.
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>>995612
My setup from last season. The "stairs" face south, means the plants got sun all day. Underneath them I had a stabd for a sunshade, just in case. Ther thing also doubled as an umbrella in case of too excessive rain.
Putting them like that saved a lot of space, they couldn't take the sun from each other while still placed fairly crowded.
The ones that grew high I placed separately so they wouldn't be in the way.
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>>994704
My sister got me this mushroom kit. I was wondering if this is a one and done kind of deal or would I be able to use this as a starter for more indoor growing. I'd like to start growing my own mushrooms.
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>>995640

I got one of those once. You just keep watering it and it keeps making mushrooms until it runs out of food. I assume you can use it as a starter as long as your next food supply is sterile
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>>994984 here, damn this does require alot of work but thank god I have stuff to do.

So a quick update I pick a "small" part of the terrain my stepdad owns and decided to work. Had help of a older neighbour that explain me some stuff mostly how to do the basics. Decided just for today to plant the spinach after 5 hours of work, tomorrow will plant the rest.

> Squares of 25/30 x 25/30
> 9 seeds per square
> Water only the surface maybe like 1lt of water
> Whole zone to work with is maybe 10 meters

Neighbour was really not happy with the amount of water I did put in the Spinach zone telling me to put more like making the whole zone mud-like.
Was he right? Also twice a day is enough to water the Spinach? Everything that I read points to that.

Cheers, this is fun.
>>
How do i kill black aphids?
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>>995681
Soapy water in spray, to begin with
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>>995664

When I first started, I did the same thing: dug a hole, filled it with soil and seeds, and let it go. This caused tons of soil-borne bacterial/fungal issues later on, so I've stuck to raised beds and pots since.

Your garden site being so low will encourage dirt and run-off to gather in there-- which may or may not be an issue. Just something to consider.

Water is pretty crucial, especially at this stage. After seeds sprout, you can cover the ground with mulch to hold onto moisture. Seeds need enough water to soften and sprout, but too much and you get mold.

Your soil is more important than how much water is used, as that says more about how wet your plants stay. If your neighbor insisted you needed more water, you may have very sandy soil. What's your climate? Heat and sun can really intensify the water usage in a garden.
>>
>>995734
The soil must be good because the same neighbour also uses the land my stepfather possess and his portion is filled with more than 10 types of veggies.

I live in Portugal right know we have sorta of sun with cool wind with temp max around 27 to 29 Cel.
I didn't simple dig a hole I really spend the time to clean the soil of any roots and stuff that my neighbour told me to remove.

I might be lucky or since this is the first time it will be a disaster.
Still I have 4 more types of veggies to plant tomorrow and the following days I might look raised beds.

Thanks.
>>
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>>995747
I googled portugal soil and it says it's rocky, sandy, and acidic. Here's a world wide climate map; sounds like you get pretty warm weather and no crazy amount of rain.

Your neighbor may be a good hand of advice (especially about watering), but keep in mind NO soil is perfect without adding some sort of fertilizer. Ask him what he adds to his plants as they grow. Free-range chickens are fertilizer machines, and peas/peanuts/beans add nitrogen to the soil, so keep in mind someone who "doesn't add anything" could be getting help from others.
>>
>>995556
You don't even have a Walmart or something?

Where can you buy fertilizer that you can't also buy bags of soil?
>>
Alright there, /out/.
Student here, I only have a small room with a small windowsill (1,50m x 30 cm) and direct sun for like 3-4 hours every evening (westside of the house).
I bought some plants from the nearby shop, some random roomplants (Soleirolia pic related, and Hypoestes) and something for outside, a bit of ivy.
I'm taking some botany lessons atm to better understand the basics behind the plants.
Does anyone of you have some recommendations on what else I could put in my room and windowsill?
>>
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1. Does anyone know what type of cactus this is?
2. Why has it turned red and closed up?
3. How can I revive it?

Its kind of been neglected but I've started watering it once a week and moved it into the conservatory, its mid spring here so maybe its just a winter thing?

How often should I water it and do I water the soil directly or the plant itself and let the water trickle down? We have hard water here hence the white deposits.
>>
>>995804
that looks like an aloe
>>
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>>995556
>>995769
>>995375
>>995757
The most I do is buy sand now. Prior to buying it, I scooped it out of the local river. Compost + sand is the best answer for problems with local soils. The raised bed in these images is full of nothing but compost. I'm spending today and tomorrow mixing it with a little over 1 ton of sand.

The fertilizer is the plant compost, horse manure, chicken manure and urea from urine. It is all free too. Get some chickens and fence them in over your garden plot for a couple weeks. Move the fencing to a new plot. They will till the soil and add fertilizer to it. In a few months it will be ready to plant.

>>995064
What I did early on was to dig a few holes. One per plant and treat those holes as though they were containers. That allowed me to use as little good soil as possible until I was able to make more good soil using compost and manures.

>>995640
>>995658
Yes, you can tear those apart once they are exhausted, and make many of your own kits with them. The ones I got from fungi.com actually had instructions on how to plow it into your garden plot to help your plants and get mushrooms a year later or so (pearl oyster). You can also make more from each mushroom via culturing, spores, or just the stem bottoms.

>>995793
I was going to tell you to "Mind-your-own-business" but I see that you already are.

>what else I could put in my room and windowsill?
>sun for like 3-4 hours

African violets do well in indirect sunlight. They stay small too.
Jade plants do well with 4 hours of sunlight.
>>
>>995811
Sorry if I missed is somewhere in the post but what ratio of sand to manure are you using? I've got endless sand and manure because I live on land that's almost only DG and my in laws have a ton of cattle, goats, and pigs. When we started building our house we couldn't get anything to grow in the DG for erosion control...
>>
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>>995809
Any idea why its gone red and closed up? I recall a few summers ago it was green and opening up so much that it looked like it was trying to escape.
>>
>>995828
I don't know. Low nutrient levels can cause color change and leaf curling. Or it could just be how that matures.
>>
>>995820
About 1 part sand to 3 parts compost at most.

Collect all the manure and organic materials you can and compost it. I use the long term composting method and simply piling it up and waiting 1 year before using it. I don't even stir it. I let the insects, fungi, and microbes do all the work for me. I turned up the top of my oldest compost pile today to see how well it had composted. It was teeming with 1000s of worms, ants, isopods, etc. I planted the entire thing with pumpkin seeds.

>>995828
Nutrient deficiency or water problems, like not enough water or way too much water. The later two cause nutrient deficiency too.
>>
>>995847
>>995853
Thanks anons. Lack of water could be it then considering how neglected its been, I'll keep watering it and monitor the thing now that the weather is starting to warm up.

How often should I water it?
>>
>>995804
It looks evil.
>>
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>>995867
Its certainly a prickly little devil.
>>
>>995855
Keep the soil just barely moist about 1 inch down into it. If the surface is always moist then there's too much water. Google up succulent and aloe care guides.
>>
>>995804

It's a variety of aloe. Maybe aloe brevifolia?

Aloes/Agaves/Yuccas that grow in that way will close up to protect young leaves from sunburn. It's getting a little too much sun, that's why it's turning so reddish.

Put it in a spot with less afternoon sun.
>>
>>995935
Close, I think it is another cultivar of Asphodelaceae. Turning red is extremely common when they get stressed from heat.
>>
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>>994893
Nice, I'm growing a haba and two Thai birds eyes ATM just put me in 3gal pots on the patio. When should I move the habanero up to a 5 gal? Pic related
>>
>>995993
Take that picture of a flip phone?
>>
So how much do I need to stress my pineapple to get it to flower?
I had this one from full sun to a dimly lit room and no water for 2 weeks
then back to full sun (still indoors, not getting sunburned either) and full water with liquid fertilizer for another 2 weeks and still nothing!
>>
>>996094
Wait longer.
>>
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I got all my Morchella importuna cultures done yesterday, I have plates of tissue from sclerotia, from spore, and from the stem. I'll be damned if I don't get atleast one that takes. I did 12 total. Running it on PDA. I have heard it can colonize a plate in just two days, so by tomorrow I am hoping to be amazed.

I also went ahead and inoculated agar with spores from Agrocybe praecox, a woodloving species that is often ignored as being edible, but is one of my personal favorites.

>>995640
>>995658

You will usually get around 3 flushes if you handle humidity well. You can in fact turn that one block into many more afterwards. Since the block comes with grain in it, you can stretch it out with carbon quite a lot, but will eventually exhaust the grain and need to figure out how to supplement nitrogen in (usually with grain) without getting contamination, and that is where people begin investing in pressure cookers and sterile setups.
The carbon part of its diet can be met easily with coffee grounds, straw, or hardwood sawdust. That allows you to split your kit easily. Don't really need any sterile setup for those portions. (break the block up and mix it in) Eventually though the grain it came with will have run out, and it either wont fruit, or it will stop colonizing.
Grain unfortunately molds if even a few airborne spores get inside, and is already contaminated, which makes that part a lot harder. People usually mix wheat bran into sawdust as their substrate, and the mixture must be pasteurized somehow. Usually with a pressure cooker, but some people get away with steam methods or microwaving.

And like this >>995811 anon said, you can take wild mushrooms and develop cultures through spores, stem butts, or tissue culture on agar. Stem butts are the only viable option for a beginner who doesn't want to make any investment, and works best with wood-loving species like Oyster mushrooms and Shiitakes.
>>
>>996094

Bromeliads are slow, you should know this by now.
>>
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>>995993
Don't repot too often, plants usually don't like that, but:
When youi notice that your habanero stops growing or only grows slowly, repot.
Also habaneros like space, consider an even bigger pot ifyou want a bigger harvest.
>>
i'm building compost bins, this might be going to far, but what the hell.I also got plans for a cistern, because why not.
>>
>>996298
i got about an acre of woods. i'd like to see a stream our pond again might work on that.
>>
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Any idea what's ailing my pepper plants? My fear is bacterial spots, but this is my first garden. I live in the South.

Also, I have been over watering them, which I'm pulling back on now. Nitrogen is also low, and blood meal should be here this afternoon.

1/3
>>
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>>996384

2/3
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>>996386

3/3
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>>995811
>so much work...

This is what happens when you fill a permanent bed over the years with compost material and you don't add sand to it over those years. You end up adding all the sand at the same time and mixing it forever.
>>
>>996299
well i watered the corn yesterday, and then it rained all day the next day. so they might drown? they sent me 50 feet of 36" high chicken wire, i only need about 12" high. i did order wire cutters thought.
>>
>>996442
i think a couple small high bins, yeah that will work.
>>
>>996444
well put out the first bin, starting to feel gay though. but what the hell.
>>
One of my garden beds drains like shit and is lower than the surrounding area, so water tends to pool in it during heavy rain.
Thing is, we've been getting heavy rain nearly every day for the past few days. I'm worried the plants in the bed are going to drown.

Is there anything I can do in the short term to drain the water a bit?
>>
>>996501
i would dig a ditch, unless it's in a hole then your fucked.
>>
>>996501
French drain to a lower area or plant cattail and watercress.
>>
How do I decide when to move my pepper seedlings out of the tray?
At what point do they need less water?
>>
>>996646

If you see roots at the bottom it's fine to move them, or they're about as tall as the soil they're in OR they've got a set of true leaves, that's all OK for moving.

I don't know how much you're watering them now. They don't need a lot of water. If the leaves droop you should water them. They need a lot of light.
>>
Whats the best way to make furrows with no actual plow?
>>
>>996801
Hoe
>>
>>994704

Morels require months of cold climate, over which they slowly develop sclerotia. These knotty masses of mycellium eventually grow into the mushrooms that we pick.

You can emulate this indoors using bins of inoculated substrate put in the fridge for ~3 months. After which you set them out under bright light and let them dry slightly for a day or two. Soak them good with cool water, and keep humidity high. They'll start popping up.

Morels are also more difficult to collect spores from. They don't slowly drop their spores over the course of several days, they "squirt" them all out at once. You need to pick the morel at *just* the right age and humidity, before hanging it upside down in a glass, or beaker. It will disperse it spores all over the side of the glass, which you can then rinse and inoculate with.
>>
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>>996153
>>996806

Oh fuck me, you got it down.
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>>996421

I got this tip from /out/ when I was filling my raised beds last year.

Shoved all the dirt out onto a tarp in an open area. Add the sand evenly.

Then "diaper" it around the yard, pulling corners up, tossing the soil around.

Worked like a charm
>>
>>996290
>>996125
like, abuse my plant longer?
>>
>>996810
Moving the soil that many times in and out of he bed is more work than double digging it once in the same place. Also, that's like 10 tons of compost and sand.

Also, I recommended your method to someone last year, in these threads, because they had only a little bit of mixing to do. It is a common technique for anything from mixing cob to mixing potting soil.

>>996811
Just wait longer for it to react to what has already happened. That might take a month or more.
>>
>>996815
>Just wait longer for it to react to what has already happened. That might take a month or more.
ohh okay, I'll wait another few weeks then torture him again.
>>
>>996421

Dumb question, but, coarse sand? Or just regular fine sand? And for what purpose?
>>
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>>996815
>Also, I recommended your method to someone last year

lol, was it me? Equal parts peat moss, compost, and vermiculite

>>996849
Moist soil weights ~100lbs per cubic foot. I don't know the volume of BrickBro's beds but they seem pretty sizable.

Two 4'x4' beds holds about a ton of soil, so he's probably not far off.
>>
>>996849
>>996859
6.41 cubic yards of soil.
1 cubic yard of dirt is equivalent to 1.25 - 1.5 tons depending on moisture content

8.0125 to 9.615 tons + 1.07 tons of sand = 9.0825 to 10.685 tons

I was close enough. 10 tons of soil, sand, or gravel really isn't that much.

>>996826
Course sand. As >>996852 states.
>>
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Went and checked my greenhouse, and found that my tub of my SRA had fruited! These put portobellos to shame. Each one weighs atleast a pound, that is a quarter for scale. Oyster mushroom that came off an old block to the right. There are atleast 5 more baby mushrooms coming up as well.

>>996806
Yeah, I am actually going to be performing a number of trials, some based off the Ower method, some off of the Sichaun method, but eventually the goal is to establish it completely indoors, and hopefully without refrigeration.
One of the other things I am focusing on is sclerotia formation, and the best way to induce and maximize growth.

With the amount of spores that get left in Asci, there are usually enough spores that will drop off onto foil for it to be useful no matter the age -as long as they aren't immature. The Importuna I was working with was also super spore heavy, even the tiny ones were giving me a big print. I have noticed that Morel spores are really adhesive, they crust onto foil. I like foil prints because I can reuse them over and over again, and they store dry.
If I have a fresh mature specimen, I will usually take one gill/fold surface, and rinse it in water. Skips the whole spore-print step.
>>
>>996916
Wow, nice flush.
>>
Should I be cutting off the runners on my broad bean plants?
>>
>>997034
No. There's no need
>>
>>997036
Alright, great because the plant has already invested a lot of power in it. I guess it wouldn't harm tying it to the stake right?
>>
>>996877

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=what+is+rain
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>>997039
Keeping it off the ground is a good thing.
>>
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>>996646
>>996678
Basically: Do they look like pic related?
>>
>>997065
>>997065
Thanks. Most are at that stage, yes. I'll move those to a bigger pot then, and cut back on the water. Light is taken care off, they're sunbathing right now in the living room, with a fan blowing over them to harden them a bit. In the morning and evening they are under cfl lighting (relative high wattage, daylight color).
This is all still very new to me, thanks for the input!
>>
Hi /gardners/
im new to hydroponics and would liek to try something simple, (kratky method basil).
but can I use some standard liquid fertilizer mixed with water? or do I need to invest in hydroponics fertilizer and PH analyzer and stuff? remember I just want to try something small to begin with.
>>
>>997094
Read the labels, if it doesn't have instructions for mixing it in a hydro set up then don't use it. Foxfarm will have some stuff that is cheaper than the stuff in the giant pink jugs made exclusively for hydro. Stuff like emulsified fish and seaweed you'll want to avoid.
>>
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At what point should I thin my tomato seedlings? Right now they're three to a container (pic related is the container) and they each have a set of true leaves.

Also, I've heard that it's possible to get away with not thinning them, by taking the root ball out and trying to "unthread" them. I imagine this has a pretty low success rate, but if that rate is still higher than say 40% it would still be worth it.
>>
>>997065
>>997082
They need 2-4 true leaves before you transplant. It seems those are just starting their first 2 true leaves.

>I'll move those to a bigger pot then

Where are they going as their final location? That is where you need to plant them. The fewer times you transplant the better. Sometimes it can't be helped due to various reasons.

>>997126
>At what point should I thin my tomato seedlings?

That depends a lot on what you will be doing with them early on. Like are they outside in the ground where frost, cutworm, or dampening off is a risk? Then leave them until they can get past those early stages. If you are going to transplant within a week or two also leave them until a week after you transplant.

This ensures that there are survivors should something happen.

You should never untangle their roots. Simply cut off the smaller, thinner, weaker plants leaving only the largest thickest healthiest plant.
>>
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>>997143
I transplanted the ones that had their first true leaves for a few days and/or the 2nd set starting to come up, pic related.
The ones I can keep alive long enough to need another transplant will go into a big pot, and spend time outside on the big balcony or in the plastic greenhouse thingy I set up there.
>>
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>>997177
Left these in their first pot for now.
>>
>>997178
Does peper need that much perlite? Damn!
>>
>>997185
No idea man, I'm a firsttimer. I probably overdid it a bit for those, on >>997177 you can see my latest mix, trying for a 2-1 soil-perlite.
>>
more corn is coming up, for pretty much not doing anything to them that is not to bad. planted some maters yesterday.
>>
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What's wrong with my lemon?
>>
>>997239
Classic case of burned leaves! Get it out of the direct sun.
>>
>>997240
Okay thanks, I did move it from mostly artificial light to a South East facing full sun window
>>
>>997239
Oi mate, can i ask.. why do you keep a lemon tree? is it aesthetic? I mean, it's likely never going to give fruit.
>>
>>997251
It's super easy to grow, and sometimes the leaves smell like lemon when you rub them (but not always, and I have no idea why). It's also just a good-looking plant in all its simplicity.
>>
>>997251
The leaves smell nice and it's a cool looking plant
>>
I just got two 55 gallons rainwater barrels and was wondering how should I use it to collect water for vegitable garden? Most of the research come up and said not to use roof runoff , should i just let it collect naturally when it rain?
>>
>>997251
Most citrus trees indoors flower and fruit. It is one of the main reasons people grow them.
>>
>>997278
yes, just make sure there's a mesh covering the hole or you'll get hella mosquitoes
>>
>>997279
Nice, I'll have to check that out. Thanks for the info!
>>
>>997298
Thanks, it a used rain barrels so it come with all the mesh already
>>
>>997278
It depends, what material is your roof?

Glazed Tiles: great
Enameled steel: great
Untreated thatch: great
Untreated wood: great
Slate and copper: great
Galvenized metal: not good
Aluminum: bad
Flat tar roof: bad
Asphalt shingles: bad (zinc, lead, chromium, arsenic, and polyaromatic hydrocarbon)
Slate and lead: worst
Anti-moss/anti-lichen treatments on the roof within 5 years: bad

You can use rainwater for plants that you are not going to eat from any roof.
>>
>>997317
Runoff from asphalt shingles is fine
>>
>>997317
I'm growing vegitable so deffinately eating them. Thanks for the info, thought all roof were the same
>>
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Found these little red bugs crawling all over my young squash plant.
Anyone recognize them?
>>
>>997327
>Runoff from asphalt shingles is fine

It isn't. PAHs are not good for you or your plants. The plants uptake it, concentrate it, and you eat it. Long term affects on health are not good because they cause cancers.

https://www.twdb.texas.gov/innovativewater/rainwater/projects/rainquality/2011_02_rainquality_final_rpt.pdf

>>997433
Probably Leaf-footed bug nymph, which feed on plants. There's a chance they are assassin bug nymphs which feed on other insects, but since these are on your squash, I doubt it. Watch them to see if they cluster around new growth on the plant. If they do then wipe them out asap.
>>
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Will this make willow water correctly?
I feel like I should have more willow.

Also:
>node count on cuttings between 5 and 12
>5gal bucket filled 1/3 with well water
>>
>>997185
Nah, but it wont hurt either. Good potting soil will do as well.
>>
>>997143
But putting them in a too big pot too earlier isn't a goodidea either.
But yeah, just repot as little as neccessary, >>996296.
>>
>>997502
That will work fine. Let them be until the roots are like 2 inches long. Remember this is a mild solution when compared to that extraction methods that make a tea from the chopped up stem pieces. Those methods are also faster, but you can't get tons of willow trees from them.
>>
>>997509
The pot size doesn't matter so long as it is big enough. "Too early" just means you shouldn't be transplanting at all yet.
>>
There suppose to be sand in rain barrels? i just recieve one and trying to clean it out until I found out it suppose to contain sand....
>>
>>997502
>>997511
Woah now! I don't want willowl trees exactly, I just want cloning solution for all my other plants.

So I just dice up some willow branches and let them sit for how long in the water?
>>
>>997529
Sand is one of the filtering methods for chemicals leached from the roof. Specifically MAH, PAH, and PCBs. That's normally in the first barrel which drains into the main water barrel. If charcoal filtration is added after the sand filter, up to 80% of these chemicals can filtered out. Normally that is only done when the rainwater is used for potable water.

>>997532
lol You can use cold water of boiling water. You normally steep them over night, the day before you need to use it. Just google "how to make willow water".
>>
>>994704

Hey, mushroomfag, or any other mushroomfags that see this post. I was thinking about buying a small container of oysters from the market, and making a slurry with them. Was going to put them in a ventilated container inside my house filled with some sterile food like straw with boiling water poured over it or something.

I heard they were a more forgiving variety. Think I have any good chance of success? Maybe putting them outside would be better? I'm working off of NEETbux and alcoholism atm so cant afford fancy petri dish cultures or starting kits. thanks
>>
>>997548
Pasteurize the straw, don't sterilize it. You want some of the beneficial microbes to be left. There's 100s of guides on how to do this online.

Google "pasteurize straw for mushroom growing".
>>
>>997548
>>997555

Worth mentioning you can chemically pasteurize straw very easily with lime and water. Lime is very cheap, you might be able to buy it loose from a brew supply store or hippie garden center.
>>
>>997541
Thanks! Sorry little potential willow trees but daddy needs to clone rare rose rootstock.
>>
>>997548
This has a good chance to work, but it is important that the straw stays hot for a while, and that you can drain it very well, all while staying clean. I know people who pour boiling water onto straw inside buckets or tubs, and place it into a cooler to stay insulated.
Slurry is hit and miss, so I would try a few batches with separate mushrooms. Go for ones that look absolutely impeccable, or have lots of white growth at their bases.
>>
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Pepper Starts are looking great.
>>
>>997449
Should I just crush them as I see them or is there something I can put on the plant to drive them off?
>>
>>997541
How long does the filter process usually take? Can i use the filtered on vegetable that I will be eating?
>>
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Happy Spring /grow/
>>
>>997765
SLEEP TIGHT MELLER
>>
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>>997765
~SLEEP TIGHT MELLER

>>997708
Looking good man. Mine have slowed down a bit, I blame the lack of warmth since our heater broke last week. Hope those fucks can finally fix it today.
>>
>>997712
You should squash them. You can deeply water you plant to cause a "flood" that will have insects climbing to the tops of the leaves where you can nab them easily. Works great for squash bugs.

>>997714
Not sure how long. I personally will use water on my veggies or drink it if it came from a roof that I did not inspect according to >>997317 Which sucks because I have a MASSIVE roof and get 1000s of gallons of water off it all the time. Mine happens to be a metal roof with lots of that thick, silver, roof "paint" on it.
>>
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Anyone know what plant this is?
Google insists it's pokeweed, but the peduncles are the wrong shape and color, the stem is the wrong color as well.
>>
Not exactly gardening but I don't want to make a new thread for it:

I have terrible grass allergies and a push mower. If I were to get a riding lawn tractor would it help nof have shit flung around me? I thought about wearing pants and pushing the mower but in the NC humidity and heat I would die, but riding with pants wouldn't be bad. I ask because I had to mow today and everything was kicking up and my bare legs have yet to stop itching after about 14 hours.

I also want to wear a dust mask but exertion in the heat causes me to breathe heavily and it fogs up my glasses if I'm wearing one. I'm trying to convince my family to get one. Not underage just live at home.

Thoughts? We can't pay someone else to do it.
>>
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>>997895
Why not use a push mower with a bag attached to catch and hold the grass it picks up?
>>
>>997902

I mulch it. To be honest I am halfway looking for excuses to sell to my family because I am tired of pushing the mower for the past five years in almost 100f heat and humidity. I'm tired of itching too, but I hate mowing the lawn in the heat. Even at dusk it's insanely humid.
>>
>>997895
I think a riding lawn mower kicks up more shit because of it's faster and larger blades.
>>
>>997765
SLEEP TIGHT MELLER
>>
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>>997895
A riding lawn mower will work better, but wind will still be your enemy. You'll need to keep that in mind when you are turning and such. A deflector is a must.

Using one of these: >>997902 will have you dumping the bag nearly constantly and thus handling tons of grass and juices from the grass. The frequency of dumping depends on how lush and/or tall your lawn is, if it rained the day before, how large the lawn is, and how fast you push the mower. I spent 1 summer using one of those and gave up because I could only mow like 5 mins before it filled up completely. And it was fucking heavy by the 50th load.

A riding lawn mower with a grass vacuum attachment is fucking awesome. You rarely come in contact with the grass. I own one of these beasts with that style of vacuum attachment. It allows me to mow, pick up the grass automatically then pull around to the compost pile to dump the full load without ever getting off the lawn mower. I just pull a lever.

I have allergies too. At one point I was wearing a big "Respirator Mask" with two filters one on each side. It was so nice to breath filtered air while mowing. I highly recommend getting one. They exhaust the air away from glasses, fyi. The down side is that if you have a beard, it will be hard to get it to seal on your face properly. Thankfully, I don't need that anymore due to the big lawn mower and vacuum attachment.
>>
>>997894
Looks like a nightshade family plant. Not sure what one without seeing more of the plant and such. Maybe black nightshade. Not poke at all.
>>
>>997829
How old are they now?
>>
>>997986
They went into the ground on 30/3, most sprouted in 3~7 days, so 2~3 weeks now.
Those on the windowsill were transplanted yesterday, and have an oscillating fan aimed at em, hopefully that'll toughen em up a bit.
Heater has been fixed too, happy days.
>>
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The purple tomatillo plants are blooming now. Some of those and the tomato plants have some sun scalding on their oldest leaves. The newer leaves look fine. The plants have been in the tunnel since the 9th of this month. I can't wait to move them to their final locations. I've already moved one squash plant out and into the ground since its leaves were turning yellow due to watering problems its pot. I'm hoping after the next few cool days I'll be able to leave the plastic off and start moving plants.

I also took some time to mark wasp nests under the bricks. There were 8 nests around 1 bed alone.
>>
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>>998020
Oh and the strawberry plants are going nuts with blooms.
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>>997969

Could I use my shemagh for a deflector? I usually wear it to catch my sweat and to wipe it off. I assume I could wear it over the mask? Will people care who I am once it's on?

Will I need the vacuum thing if I mulch the grass?
>>
/ck/ here.
What are your best tips for growing sage?
I've been doing fine with all my other plants but sage has never took off as much as I wanted it to.
>>
>>998046
Are you a large fella?
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>>998094
>>998097
I don't know what I expected.
>>
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I have a couple of clover patches in my yard with extremely high numbers of 4 and 5-leaf varieties but they're directly in the path of a concrete walkway I want to build sometime in the future. Can I transplant these to elsewhere in my yard, or can I transplant them to a pot to keep indoors without losing whatever factor is causing this mutation? Would the seeds from this patch produce more 4/5-leaf plants also?
>>
>>998102

I dare say I'm a big guy.
>>
>>997765
SLEEP TIGHT MELLER
>>
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>>998046
No. This is a deflector. It keeps the grass out of the wind.

If the mower does not throw grass out and instead mulches it, you don't need a deflector. However, mulching it with the mower causes an extreme amount of allergens to be released into the air by the entire lawn.

>>998050
Sage needs well draining soil. It like medium to full sun. Hold back on fertilizer because it will decrease the flavor. Remember it originally came from the Mediterranean.

>>998146
Trifolium repens commonly has up to 5 petals. It is probably just that.
>>
>>998317
>Trifolium repens commonly has up to 5 petals. It is probably just that.
These are the only 3 patches among the many hundreds on my land with this kind of yield.
>>
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>work in a greenhouse
>can put old seeds in trays on bottom heat to have much more successful germination then at home
>can get unique plants straight from commercial greenhouses

I love having good job perks.
>>
>>995640
>>994704
I came here hoping the mycologist would be in to ask the exact same question. Done a lot of youtubing on the subject of mushrooms in general and was wondering what you can tell me about what got you interested in mushrooms and what kinds of jobs are out there for people looking to turn it into a career.
>>
>>998020
Aren't wasps fucking cunts compared to bees?
How do you not get stung while near the nests?
>>
>>998365
Not that anon, but they are only bad when their nest gets disturbed or when they are going after sugary food, they swarmed my humming bird feeder bad when it was leaking. They don't care about people when they are just doing their thing on plants. I'm not sure if I would encourage that much nesting, but I have a lot of woods around me.
>>
>>998343
Mycologist here. I think I already answered >>995640 's question, so look that over.
Mycology for me started as foraging, I had been interested in wild edible plants and fungi, and safely foraging fungi involves doing some research and becoming familiar with their morphology, but foraging knowledge doesn't go much further than that. It was the moment I learned they could be grown that I jumped on that ship. At that point I hadn't actually had much luck with bringing native plants into controlled cultivation, so I figured I was going to see how fungi turned out. As soon as I got familiar with the basics I was addicted to mushroom growing, it is like catching pokemon or something, the rush of finding a mushroom in the wild, and bringing it home and cultivating it. The work/reward cycle was way too satisfying to not get into.
From there the majority of the knowledge was self-taught. I bought textbooks on mycology and books on mushroom growing, and that pretty much filled in my knowledge as it is. I got a great chance to start running experiments at my college, which really cemented the whole thing together. Also, the mycology community is extremely open and interconnected, atleast in the northwest, so I have been talking to a lot of seasoned mycologists about any questions, and just generally having discussions. There is a lot of room for amateurs.
>>
>>998343
>>998389
If there isn't any current standing market in your area, I would seriously recommend starting a mushroom growing company. It is where the big bucks are. The investment is tiny, the startup-production time gap is tiny compared to any other agricultural business, and you can teach classes and do workshops to bring in extra income. The amount of education it takes to run a company is also tiny, but any extra education you gather helps you huge amounts. It only gets better from there. Many restaurants and markets will snap up locally grown organic mushrooms like they are discount gold nuggets or something. That is the whole "no competition" part. Most areas in the US do not have active companies, so if you live anywhere but the northwest you are covered there.

Other money-making projects include selling them out of your house instead, working for an existing company, or selling Psilocybe, although growing Psilocybe is way too sketchy IMO.

>TLDR Start a low-investment mushroom growing company, teach classes, find employment as a grower, or grow illegal species.
>>
I seem to have chunk of clay from digging for my garden, how exactly do I turn those clay chunk into clay I can use for pottery?
>>
>>998394
I made a little clay cup some time ago from garden clay.
I just washed the non-clay dirt off it in the sink and then worked the clay like I would any other clay.
I think it came out alright enough.
>>
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>>997970
Here's a full picture of a smaller one.
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>>998389
Say, friend, you mentioned a particular book in a previous thread, was wondering if you could give us the title again since I was too stupid to search it up then.
>>
>>998329
Odd, its all over like that in my yard.

>>998365
>>998369
I have them all over. I can actually pluck a large wasp nest bristling with wasps off and dispose of it without getting stung or angering the wasps (until they are in the bag of course.) It is all about speed. You have to do it very slowly. Also, the hotter it is the slower you need to be.

The last time I was stung was when one was on me, I didn't know it, and brushed my arm over it. That's like 1 wasp sting in about 15 years I think. I can't say the same for the honeybees in my hive. They recognize what a face is and will go on the attack. This is more true with my current "wild" hive that came in on its own. I can't even approach the hive without a bee suit and smoker.

The only reason I marked the wasp nests was to prevent accidentally destroying them when moving bricks around for various things.
>>
>>998394
>>>/diy/

Form a small 1 inch diameter ring out of the clay. Set it upright and see if it holds. The more plastic feeling the clay the better it is for pottery. If the ring just cracks up give it some water and try making a new ring. If it still cracks, it isn't good enough for making pottery on its own. You make need to "slip" the clay. You do that my filling a tub with water, putting the clay in it and stirring it so there's muddy water. Let it settle until it is clear, gently pour the water off and there should be a thin layer of clay as part of the sediment on the bottom. You can gather that and use it to make pottery.
>>
>>998402
Those flowers are a bit droopy and not fully open. Do they always look like that? It still looks like it is in the nightshade family. What it is beyond that requires more info and location.
>>
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>>998442
It may not be in the best of health, a few of that one's branches are nearly covered with tiny winged black insects.
I'm in southern US.

Also the stinkbug nymphs seem to LOVE it.
>>
>>998406
I think I mentioned 2 or 3.
"Mycelium Running" by Paul Stamets, "Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms" by Paul Stamets, and "The Fifth Kingdom" by Bryce Kendrick.
Myc running is a great beginners intro to fungi, and it has a lot of outdoor growing techniques. GGMM includes a wide array of methods for growing a lot of mushrooms indoors. If you want to get started right away, just get GGMM.
>>
>>998449
Oh, and the fifth kingdom is a textbook on fungi in general, it is tailored to those with just a bit of bio education. (understanding of cells, basic genetics, a little chemistry) You can browse wiki to fill in any knowledge gaps pretty easy.
>>
What are some insects I can introduce to my garden that will fuck up other insects, but not me or my plants?
>>
>>998441
thanks, this help a lot, also gonna check out diy if they have any other clay thread
>>
>>998447
Yeah, the ones here are covered in aphids being farmed by ants. The flea beetles totally eat them up.
>>
>>998455
you can buy preying mantis eggs
>>
>>998464
It is a nightshade, but not deadly nightshade. Most likely a Eastern black nightshade. Which means they are edible, but only when 100% ripe, otherwise, they have too much solanine in them when green. Personally, I'd ID the plant in person before telling someone they can eat them. The garden variety is called "garden huckleberry". I grow Eastern Black Nightshade in my garden. They are quite tasty, but have a delicate flavor. I find that they go best in muffins and cookies that have no other flavoring other than vanilla in them and use white flour.
>>
>>998455
lady bugs
parasitic wasps (they are super tiny)
mantids
lacewings

there's more but you can google. you can buy each of those
>>
>>998317

I see. We call that a hood for some reason at my house. We're going to Lowe's tomorrow to look at mowers but I want a John Deere after reading reviews.
>>
>>998485
I use the same approach to test mushrooms, unfamiliar dogs and prostitutes.
>>
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I planted two eastern white pines in my backyard as specimen trees at the back of my concrete pool deck, I put the emerald ceders and a blue chip juniper in the corner

I choose the eastern white pine because it will grow in the location (near a conifer) and is the provincial tree of Ontario (I live in Niagara)
>>
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>>998503

I also started the one on the opposite side of the pool deck, I intend to dig more down and lay some gravel for drainage and backfill with better soil but for this area I choose to plant

2x blue star junipers
Lots of blue chip junipers for a border
2x emerald ceder
And 4x gold cone junipers

Should I try something else?

I also have a Chinese magnolia going into the front lawn around a brick circle and surrounded some perennials
>>
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>>998506

Perspective from the opposite side of the pool
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>>998507

jfc get rid of some of those mongrels
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>>998513

The 5 dogs or my daughter ?
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>>998514

yes
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>>998516

Then I'd be lonley like you
>>
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>>998519
don't be mean
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>>998517

You know you're supposed to give the nose back after you play "got your nose"
>>
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>>998528
>>
>>998535
This girl is so fucking ugly it's hilarious. We got a future whore over here.
>>
>>998535
They sure are anon. It's probably a good thing they'll never reproduce. She's a cutey!
>>
>>998575
Huh, bit salty.
>>
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I bought about 90 olive seeds in the earlier part of the year, planted them last month in jimmy-rigged pots, and have the intent of transplanting them into the soil when they are big enough - problem is; I have no clue what they look like. Never seen an olive seedling in my life, so the things of different forms that are sprouting are a mystery to me. Here's the pic. Are any of these olive seedlings? Google yielded nothing.
>>
How difficult is it to grow and sell mushrooms? I need to make some money and I don't want to invest in knee pads. My search for potential competition only turned up something three hours away in the capital of my state, so I don't think I have to worry about fighting someone already established.

I just want to do something relaxing and get paid for it. I don't want to work under anyone else ever again.
>>
>>998602
The hardest and most expensive part is sterilizing all that material.
>>
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>>998616
what's the problem anon?
>>
>>998602
Not very. If you want to be producing at company levels, you want to invest in a couple large pressure cookers, and big electric coils to heat them. Then you need a bunch of jars, some raw grain, Heat-safe bags with filter patches, hardwood fuel pellets, and alfalfa. Buy a humidifier and set up a moisture-safe room to grow them in. Some bright lightbulbs to light them.

Aside from getting a room/facility to do it in, the startup costs are around 600$. The biggest expense is getting new pressure cookers, a 41 qt All American pressure cooker costs around 400$. Compared to most businesses, 600$ is a minuscule startup cost.

If you wanted to start small, and get your hands into small supplementary income, your investment scales back to about 200$. That allows for decent production.

>>998611
>>998613
Sterilizing is sort of necessary. While the term "sterilizing" is a bit off, you can knock bacterial populations low enough to not matter, and wipe out fungal contamination. That is the job of the pressure cooker/steam apparatus that is used to produce grain spawn.
The substrate you are inoculating only has to be boiled or lime-pasteurized though.
>>
>>998608

How much do you charge for x amount?

>>998623

I see. Well, I can't afford anything large scale so that limits me I guess. Start small, you know.
>>
>>998631

23 qt Presto pressure cooker is a great starting size, holds 7 quart jars at a time.

Sterile handling setup is the most important of all the process, actually, for that you'll want a TALL, clear plastic container with holes cut in it. There are many ways to make a still air box, but it's essential to producing good spawn and new cultures. You do all your spawn inoculation in this box and all the procedures that require sterile handling like culture work, cloning, etc.
>>
>>998631
I dont know if he is trolling, but you cannot grow lobster mushrooms. (Hypomyces lactifluorum)
They are a parasite on Russula species, and Russulas are mycorrhizal and cannot be grown consistently.
>>
>>997993
They look more than fine for that age. And you don't really need the fan. Never hardened mine before, never had an issue.

But look up pruning. Nothing to do with hardening, but interesting for increasing your harvest.
>>
I have this project to get started in a small aeroponics (or hydroponics but mist is cooler than bubbles) that could fit in my small apartment.

Any pitfalls for the nutriments to put in the water?
>>
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>>997765
SLEEP TIGHT MELLER
>>
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>>998648
Thanks man. Already informed myself about pruning, yes, that does seem like something I'll have to do for sure, I'm hoping for stocky bushy plants.
I was wondering, they always turn towards the light, should I let em be, or is there a benefit in turning em around every now and then? They seem to turn around really quickly, I'm not sure if this would make the stems just longer (what I don't want) or thicker.
>>
If I've got a shit ton of very tiny, black, winged insects all clustered onto a plant, they've got to be aphids, right?
>>
>>998722
If you want to be sure, you'd better take a picture and cry for help on /an/
If you just want to get rid of them, then spray them with soapy water.
>>
>>998687
If they lean towards the sun, turn them. Otherwise they might fall over. If they lean to much, like basically "reaching" for the sun, they don't get enough light.
>>
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>>998737
My peppers atm.
Repotted them all now, some got a little too leggy, some seem to take tgeir sweet time.
>>
The leaves of my swiss chard are growing much faster then the stems so some of them are bigger then most of the plant and arnt being supported properly by the stems and are touching the ground.

Wot do?
>>
>>998756
Prune?
>>
>>998740
They probably need more warmth. Also, you are going to have a shit ton of peppers.

>>998756
That's normal. I usually eat the lower leaves before they touch the ground. Though you can mulch under them with a thin layer of straw to help keep them clean.
>>
>>998771
>They probably need more warmth.
The room is pretty warm as is, 25°-28°C and they are under a south facing roof-window. There is also a lamp for shady days.
Any tips or ideas how I could improve conditions for them?

>Also, you are going to have a shit ton of peppers.
Oh yeah. Ain't it beautiful?
>>
>>998737
What you see on the pic is how much they lean, I think they're just trying to maximize the light hitting the leaves, the ones under a lamp seem to be doing the same.
>>
>>998796
>Ain't it beautiful

I am jelly.
You make my 5 chilli plants look pathetic.
>>
>>998802
Well then they are fine, a bit of turning wont hurt anyway though.
>>
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>>997765
Sleep tight meller
>>
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>>997894
Ive been waiting forever to use this
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>>998804
I started with ONE, two years ago. It was a single, leftover plant on sale at the local gardening store.
Just wait.
>>
>>998808
Alright, thanks!
Just noticed the 3 plants that are the furthest ahead are starting to grow extra sideleafs, I'll take that as a sign I'm doing not too bad, lol.
>>
>>998836
It's pretty harsh but you could probably already cut off everything above those buds, it will make the plant a lot stronger in the end. As you have lots of plants anyway, you could try it out on a few and see the differences as they grow.
>>
>>998836
Yeah, no worries here.
I have a few that grew a little too leggy and now I have to deal with wonky plants.
>>
>>998845
If you still need to plant them out or in a different pot you can bury them up to the cotyledon without problems.
>>
>>998862
I was wondering if that would work and was about to ask, good to know. Thank you.
>>
>>998844
Yeah, I have 2 of those, both going strong, guess I'll risk it. Imma put that one back under the light then though, it's been cloudy the past few days.
(I'm not >>998740 btw. I have about 8 good ones right now, 2 still very small, and 2 that might not make it).
>>
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do you guys think my tree will survive in the corner like this or should i move it
>>
>>998943
lol Did the seed move when watering it? You can move it now, just use a lot of soil around the roots to prevent disturbing it.
>>
Any tomato and pepper growers here?

My seedlings suffered some sun damage when I left them out in the sun for too long. On the older seedlings, some of the newer leaves are ok, while the older leaves have been obliterated. In the case of the newer seedlings, all their leaves have some sun damage (though they are not dead).

Should I scrap them and start again? I want to get as much of a head start as possible, but I don't want to count on plants that have been irreversibly damaged.

Thanks.
>>
>>999015
If new growths are fine, I wouldn't mind at all. (Anyway you'll be at least two-three weeks late in your planning if you decide to restart everything)
>>
>>999018
Cool, thanks.
>>
>>994704
Hello anon, I posted a thread in /diy/ and got pointed to your post here. You're going for the exact same thing that I am with the morel mushrooms. I would really like to grow them indoors in my basement. All year round would be great, but I would settle for just the cooler seasons.

Any tips? Morels grow near me but there is a lot of competition, so I can never get a good haul. I have plenty of space indoors to dedicate for this.
>>
>>994704
What does it take to grow morels?

Have they figured out all the major environmental factors that are needed?
>>
Do chillies always grow slowly in there first 2-3 months of life?
>>
>>999058
That has been my experience. I live in Southern Ontario, which is quite north of where pepper usually grow, maybe that is why.
>>
>>999058
In my experience it depends on the variant. What are you growing? How many leaves so far?
>>
>>999059
Im in the south of England so it probably is normal for cooler environments.
>>
>>999075
about 16 leaves in total and all of my chilli plants are short variety's that put out large amounts of small chillies.
Such as

Basket of fire.
Numex twilight
Sparkler
Rooster spur
>>
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NEW THREAD: >>999083
NEW THREAD: >>999083
NEW THREAD: >>999083
>>
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Grow fags I have three 8x4 raised beds with a variety of veggies and I made this pvc irrigation system, not to save on water but to make watering everything easier. My long term goal is to hook it into my lawn sprinkler and put it on a timer.

I placed 1/16" holes 6" apart down the length of 2 pvc pipes in each bed. They spray out on both sides of the pipe and I have 3 rows of plants so it hits all of them. Long story short, I thought the moisture would spread out but it seems very localized. I suppose I could drill another row of holes making them 3" apart.... I don't have any capacity issues right now. What are your thoughts? Do you think the wet spots will seep into the dry spots and it's no big deal?
>>
>>999182
They make perforated hoses specifically for this purpose, you run water through them and it gently seeps out through the sides along the entire length of the hose.
You can buy a kit with a bunch of hose and various plastic joints for it, so you can cut the hose up and make all kinds of shapes depending on the layout of your plants.
>>
Can anyone recommend some good resources for getting started with raising silkworms for consumption? They taste really good and I think it would be an interesting summer project for me.
>>
>>998447
bet you could make a stink bug trap with those berries maybe worth looking into
>>
>>997765
this reminds me, I'm going to start my water melon inside
>>
>>998390
I've been farming for few years, got into queen bees and have hit a lull and need some cash to buy land. Thank you for this advice, I'll start reading.
>>
>>994943
hey anon would you mind sharing the recipe for that bread? looks delicious and id love to try it
>>
>>993697
That looks lovely.
>>
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What could this be? It grew between my parsley and sage in a little box outside on my balcony. I live next to a forest
>>
>>998592
those are tree seedlings, I have the same ones. don't know the name of the tree tho

id be obliged if anyone could name it for me I've been wondering for a while




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