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Outfit your entire house with these. Especially bright white types. They're pure white, and much brighter (even if they officially have the same lumens as CFL). I can't stress how much of a difference they make in houses.

Your house is currently bathed in a rather dim ugly yellow light from incandesants or CFL. LEDs make it bright and happy. Total cost will be anywhere from 20-50 dollars. It's absolutely worth it. I swear that I feel better afterwards.
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>>41627856
>I leave my lights on at night
DON'T assume, it makes an ass out of u and me.
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dim yellow lights are more comfy
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>>41627856
i agree they're a lot nicer. the biggest thing i noticed was them being fully bright instantly, rather than cfls which take a minute or two, it really helps coming in the front door with bags and taking my shoes off and shit
and i calculated if i leave every one in my house on 24/7 it would cost $8 a month in electricity, so that's nice
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>>41627856
Most of them have 120Hz flicker due to manufacturers cheaping out on power supply components, which is terrible for your health.
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Dim yellow lights are better for your body clock. If you have these bright white LED's on at night your body will think it's daylight and your sleeping pattern will be messed up. It's the same reason apps like f.lux exist.
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>>41628330
Or 100Hz, in the case of Europe or anywhere with 50Hz mains.

You can test them fairly easily using a camera (phone or otherwise) and putting the camera very close to the bulb. If you see dark lines, you have flicker.
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>>41628330
How to avoid? And wouldn't this just affect the retards that stare directly at the bulbs?
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I have light sensitivity so no thanks.
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>>41628348
flux is great, by the time it's 2 am I already fall asleep in front of my monitor
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>>41628364
>How to avoid?
Unfortunately it's nearly impossible to find the information up front unless someone who is a lighting autist happened to do a review on the particular bulb you're interested in. Otherwise you just have to buy them and test them yourself with a camera or motion test. By motion test I mean something like waving your hand, waving a pencil, spinning a top, etc. under the light. If there is no flicker, motion will always appear smooth/blurred (test this with an incandescent bulb to see what no flicker looks like). With a flickering light, you will see "still frames" of whatever is moving quickly.

>And wouldn't this just affect the retards that stare directly at the bulbs?
No, if you're lighting a room with a flickering light, the entire room is flickering. It's actually almost impossible to notice this if you're staring directly at the bulb. It's easier to notice this in peripheral vision, especially if an object is moving in your peripheral vision. A lot of times the flicker is minor enough to not be visible at all under normal circumstances, but studies back in the day with fluorescent lighting (which had similar 100/120Hz flicker when they used magnetic ballasts) showed that people in places with fluorescent lighting for extended periods (e.g. office workers) experienced increased eyestrain, headaches, and stress in general from the flicker, even if they couldn't actually notice it.

Basically, it's absolute fucking bullshit that they actually sell flickering lights. It's a health hazard and you shouldn't accept it. They can (and some have been) made with zero flicker. All it takes is a proper power supply.

>>41628384
Sensitivity to what in particular?
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>>41628330

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/flickering-fallacy-cfl-bulb-headaches/
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>>41628348

LED Lights can be dimmed you stupid nigger.
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>>41628591
Only if you buy dimming bulbs and have a dimming lamp.
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>>41628584
Almost all CFLs (especially those made after they became popular) have electronic ballasts which do not flicker at 100/120Hz. Any "flicker" they have is at much higher frequencies and very minor and not a health concern. The same applies to modern tubular fluorescent lighting, like T8s with electronic ballasts.

When it comes to LEDs, they are literally flickering at 100/120Hz just like the old magnetic ballast fluorescent lighting that was known to cause all kinds of health problems, not to mention the fact that the flickering is actually visible in certain circumstances.
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Why not force some regulation on lightbulb companies to only produce LEDs, CFLs, etc and at proper flicker spec to avoid health issues? There has to be a way to institute a standard minimum flicker frequency.
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>>41628758
>that was known to cause all kinds of health problems,

Never proven.
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>>41628799
They should have basically no flicker at all unless PWM is used which would only apply to dimming situations. Without dimming, any flicker is just due to power supply ripple coming through at twice the line frequency (100 or 120Hz). The important thing to do would be to limit the flicker percentage (amount of brightness change) to a few percent or so. Some of the worst ones literally have 100% flicker, meaning they completely turn on and off.

There should be a minimum frequency for PWM dimming, though.

>>41628821
The fact of the matter is that LEDs don't have to flicker. All it takes is a proper power supply, and there have been zero-flicker LEDs that weren't even all that huge or expensive, so it's not like it's not viable. It's just a matter of penny pinching.

Even if you can't PROVE that it causes health problems, why should you take the chance on your health just so manufacturers can make a few more pennies on their bulbs? And health issues aside entirely, it's just freaking stupid to your lights flickering all the time, and you can actually see it in some circumstances.
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>>41627856
>pure white
That's horrible at night when lights matter the most. Almost all the CFL lights in my house have been replaced with LED and they're all 2600K warm white.
>>41628287
The instant-on is top comfy.
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>>41628971
>That's horrible at night when lights matter the most.

Why the fuck do you want dim yellow light? Fuck that.
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>>41629036
it's cold and ugly. White lights belong in hospitals and factories, not your own home.
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>>41629195

>muh warm light

Fuck that. I want it to be bright. No shadows. See everything. Don't need an extra light for reading. I love how bright stores are. I want that in my house.
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>>41629195

Enjoy stumbling around in the dark like a dumbass.
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>>41629223
>>41629233

maybe an eye exam is in order for you two. On the subject of street lights, the peach ones around my area were way better than the white ones that replaced them. Don't ruin your night vision. And these days cars have HID's that look very white, so you can clearly see an oncoming car around a blind corner, rather than just blend in with the street lighting like they do now.
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>>41629387
>And these days cars have HID's that look very white, so you can clearly see an oncoming car around a blind corner, rather than just blend in with the street lighting like they do now.

Maybe you're the one who needs an eye exam?
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>>41628821
I don't care if it causes health problems or not, it's fucking annoying. PWM backlights on phones/monitors suck too.

I actually have some LED lights with a good power supply, but there's basically no way to find out if it's good without buying it.
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>>41629233
both sides look pretty comfy to /nightwalk/ in
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>>41629458
>PWM backlights on phones
My condolences go out to anyone with a phone that shitty.
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>>41629542
>anyone with a phone that shitty
It's most of them. Even iPhone X has PWMed backlight.
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>>41627856
t. light salesman
nice try
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>>41629588
>Even iPhone X has PWMed backlight.
OLED displays don't have backlights. It might still use PWM for dimming though.

My mom has an old MacBook Pro which has extreme PWM, but I have a recent MacBook Air and I've also tested recent MacBook Pros and iMacs, and they are all PWM-free now. Not sure about LCD iPhones as I've never tested any of those.
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>>41629588
>using the iPhone X as a benchmark
My $600 Android phone doesn't use PWM on the backlight. My laptop monitor, on the other hand, looks like a CRT monitor through a camera from the massive PWM effect.
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>>41629657
I have a Samsung Galaxy S3 with OLED display which is PWMed. When I read books on it I set the brightness to maximum and use pale gray text on black background.
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>>41629709
Far from an ideal solution...

It does seem at least with LCDs there was a push towards PWM-free backlight controllers. Flicker got really bad when they switched from CCFL to LED because LEDs respond more quickly than fluorescent lamps and the flicker is inherently more severe, and almost every LCD seemed to use PWM for dimming, but in recent years it seems like a lot have ditched it.

I just wish there'd be a push towards eliminating flicker in household lighting.
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>>41627856
>dim ugly yellow light
you mean like a campfire?
sure do want bright sunlight looking light in my house AT NIGHT when i'm getting ready to sleep
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Screen is more than enough light.



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