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File: 1538021670231.png (27 KB, 741x609)
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I recall seeing an article that listed SI prefixes smaller than yocto and greater than yotta but I can't find it anymore. Anyone have the article link or know what the smaller prefixes than yocto and larger than yotta are?
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>>10064986
Probably ennéa or xena
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>>10064986
>Several personal proposals have been made for extending the series of prefixes, with ascending terms such as xenna, weka, vendeka (from Greek ennea (9), deka (10), endeka (11)) and descending terms such as xono, weco, vundo (from Latin novem/nona (9), dec (10), undec (11). Using Greek for ascending and Latin for descending would be consistent with established prefixes such as deca, hecto, kilo vs deci, centi, milli).[25] Although some of these are repeated on the internet, none are in actual use.[26]
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_prefix#Unofficial_prefixes


There's also:
>https://googology.wikia.com/wiki/Prefix_10%5E27
>http://jimvb.home.mindspring.com/unitsystem.htm
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>>10065103
thanks





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