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What does the edge of the universe look like, /sci/?
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>>10127891
No such thing.
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>>10127893
Surely there is. There is finite space in the universe.
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What happens if you go to the edge of the universe and stab it with a spear? I want to know.
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>>10127913
>finite space in the universe.
We don't know this for sure, we have to know its shape first
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>>10127913
The observable universe is smaller than the objective universe.
If you could instantly transport yourself to the particle horizon of the universe you'd just see a universe that looks pretty much like the one you just left but with a slightly different arrangement of stuff.
The CMB represents the oldest light in the universe from when the universe cooled enough to become transparent, and its traveled so far and long that it's red-shifted from visible light to microwaves.
The further out in space you look, the farther back in time it is.
Thanks to inflation and expansion, the observable universe is bigger than it is old, and things like distant protogalaxies and CMB will eventually redshift into oblivion because the light being emitted from it "Now" can't ever get "here" because the space between them is expanding faster than the light can make up the difference.
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Like black nothing. Even if there was light there (and technically if there was light there it wouldn't be the edge of the universe) there is nothing there to see.

Behind this point though, closer to us, it is likely that matter has formed a symmetrical layer of dissassociated pieces of particles like the glowing skin of a bubble made of pure energy.

Why does this happen? Well when matter encounters the infinite vacuum that exists outside the universe it would be pulled apart as it rushes out into the infinite void forever.
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>>10127891
>What does the edge of the universe look like, /sci/?
edgy
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>>10127913
Do you even hypersphere?
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>>10127948
You'll make the universe asplode like a balloon
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>>10127891
We can only see as far as the microwave background left over from the big bang.
It's opaque.
That may as well be 'the edge'
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>>10127948
It would be extremely painful.
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>>10127891
Like Eastern Europe but it’s darker.
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>>10127969
>The observable universe is smaller than the objective universe.
Is it possible that the universe actually is smaller than we think it is? Maybe we already see our own Milky Way some billion years in the past, because the light already traveled around the closed universe and returned to us. Maybe we already see us multiple times. Would there be any possibility to identify our past galaxies?
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It looks like Jolly Pirate Donuts
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>>10129135
Donut universe would work like that.
I don't think there's any evidence to support it though.
The point I was making though was that the "edge of the universe" isn't a hard border, it's a particle horizon.
Think of earth, pick one direction and go in it, forever. You will never reach the horizon because it isn't a "place" one can get to.
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>>10127913
Space is curved. The question would be what is it expanding into?
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>>10129395
It's making it up as it goes along.
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>>10128910
You're an infinite reality.
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>>10127891

a giant wall of galaxies
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>>10127891
that's when you find out we are all just in a simulation from some kids science fair project.
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>>10129395
It's expanding into itself.

OP here. After some thought, It's possible the universe just connects to itself through a fourth spacial dimension and just loops you back around to the other "end." In the same way that flat objects moving on a balloon would be able to go in circles around it because it loops into a sphere in the third dimension.
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>>10127913
>There is finite space in the universe.
Prove it.
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>>10127891
>What does the edge of the universe look like, /sci/?
It looks like the place where the clear water a diver sees turns into a blue wall.
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>>10127891
goddess pussies
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>>10130346
/thread





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