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File: geothermal energy.png (152 KB, 700x614)
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Will someone please tell me why we still have coal power plants when there is virtually endless free energy in the earth's crust?

I feel like coal mines and coal plants are much much more difficult to maintain than a fucking tube going down into the earth to heat up water.

It's safer, it's simpler, there's no risk of ever running out of energy, it's 100% clean for the environment.

Fuck, they dig for oil deeper than you need to dig for thermal plants.
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>>9859073
If we steal too much heat from the earth it will freeze.
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>>9859073
>there is virtually endless free energy in the earth's crust?
200 VIRM liked this post
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>>9859073
Yeah lemme just go grab a shovel and dig through the entire crust
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>>9859073
Didn't you play ff7? I'm not fighting a black guy with a minimum arm over geothermal vents.
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>>9859073
Because not every place is near a geothermally active area.
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>>9859079
I know you're being retarded but our core is still molten because its a huge nuclear reactor.
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>>9859122
What in the fuck please read that again and stab yourself in the chest 5 times
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>>9859122
>our core
>still molten
The absolute state of /SCI/.
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>>9859123
mantle, crust, whatever the fuck you want to call it, the middles still gooey because of nuclear material.
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>>9859073
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kola_Superdeep_Borehole
>The project attempted to drill as deep as possible into the Earth's crust.
>However, because of higher-than-expected temperatures at this depth and location, 180 °C (356 °F) instead of expected 100 °C (212 °F)
>drilling deeper was deemed unfeasible and the drilling was stopped. With the projected further increase in temperature with increasing depth, drilling to 15,000 m (49,000 ft) would have meant working at a temperature of 300 °C (570 °F), where the drill bit would no longer work.
>Similar projects
>The KTB superdeep borehole was drilled down to a depth of 9,101 m (29,859 ft) reaching temperatures of more than 260 °C (500 °F).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_Continental_Deep_Drilling_Programme
>the temperature gradient was higher than originally expected. The drilling ended at a depth of 9,101 metres showing a temperature of 265 °C.
>The drill head was also designed to withstand temperatures between 250 and 300 °C. The original expectations had been that this temperature would be reached at a depth about 10 to 14 km. This is also the reason that the ZEV place was chosen - there was another location in the Black Forest that had been considered equal in the scientific interest level but it was expected to have a higher temperature gradient.
>For one thing the temperature rose much more quickly than expected which inflicted a reform of the theories about the temperature gradient at very deep drillholes.
>Quite unexpectedly however the rock layers were not solid at that depth and instead large amounts of fluid and gas were met pouring into the drillhole. Due to the heat and fluids the rock was of a dynamic nature which changes the way that the next superdeep drilling would be planned.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertha_Rogers
>reach 31,441 feet (9,583 m). During drilling, the well encountered enormous pressure – almost 25,000 psi. hit a molten sulfur deposit which melted the drill bit.
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>>9859073
You can drill down to heat in most places with current tech -- but unless the area is geothermally active, if you start pumping hat ut to extract energy, the area cools very quickly and you have a worthless hole.

Geothermal areas, where magma flows get close to the surface, are widely scattered and often not near population centers. Worse, they are ACTIVE -- you tend to get Earthquakes and shit that can fuck up your equipment, driving costs up. Even with that, in areas like Iceland where a lot of heat gets close to the surface and is renewed constantly, geothermal is a great way to power your society -- elsewhere it makes no sense.
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>>9859143
Apart from the molten pool of sulphur its obvious that heavy duty cyro cooling integrated into the head, cnc style, would solve the heat problems instantly, but of course, given the context of the drilling industry. Its obvious that this proposition, as simple as it is, would be inflated to a quarter billion in R&D, and thus would never be undertaken by an established company.
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>>9859143
use a tube that deposits dynamite or any other safer explosive and dig that way god
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>>9859122
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>>9859193
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth%27s_internal_heat_budget

YES. Why do you think Mars is a desolate wasteland? Its core cooled because it didnt contain enough radiogenic material to extend its life significantly, thus the protective magnetic field died out, and its atmosphere was blown away.
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>>9859200
>the earth's core is a nuclear reactor
GTFO
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>>9859206
Essentially, yes. Why is this difficult for you to accept, human?
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>>9859073
>I feel like coal mines and coal plants are much more difficult to maintain than a fucking tube going down into the earth to heat up water
>I feel
>feel
found the problem
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>>9859191
>dynamite
Thinking too small. Use nukes. There's stockpiles of them lying aound anyways, right?
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>>9859079
And that would be perfect solution for the global warming we have at our hands right now.
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>>9859143
What is your point? That geothermal energy isn't viable? Because it is and people use it

>It gets too hot the deeper you go
>This is bad for some reason, despite being the reason you're digging in the first place

Wow fascinating.
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>>9859079
Earth-chan has a nice coat to keep her warm anon.
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>>9859210
>>9859200
From your "source"
>For the Earth's core, geochemical studies indicate that it is unlikely to be a significant source of radiogenic heat due to an expected low concentration of radioactive elements.
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>>9859298
>It gets too hot the deeper you go
It's the opposite.
Unless you are in a place with high geothermal activity you can dig miles down before getting to temperatures that are useful for power generation.
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>>9859386
no no no, thats just a general wiki article, if you perused the actual articles being referenced it would've lead you to this.

https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/nuclear-fission-confirmed-as-source-of-more-than-half-of-earths-heat/

The earths core is quite literally, a nuclear reactor

>hurr a nuclear reactor, thats impossilbru!!!!L!!LL!L!

For a moment, ponder what happens to heavier shit in a solution, it settles right? Well, WHY THE FUCK WOULDNT THAT APPLY TO EARTH?
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>>9859418
>the nuclear decay happens primarily in the crust and mantle
Do you have a learning disability?
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>>9859073

Big Business:

--> BIG OIL
...and, most rich ppl own stock ... :-\
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>>9859954
You know how big the mantle is, right?
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>>9859073
Because it is unstable. You can't regulate it. It would cause blackouts in the network. Factories demand stable power. Dumb fuck..
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>>9859401
Meanwhile, California is drawing power from the Hoover Dam.
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>>9859200
The Earth's core remains hot because the moon is causing a rotational differential between the inner and outer layers, rather than due to radiogenic particles.
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>>9859073
The cost of drilling increases exponentially with depth drilled. Future drilling technologies could change this.
www.hypersciences.com/hyperdrill/
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>>9859073
The energy produced by a geothermal borehole is a fraction of a percent of the energy produced by a petroleum borehole. Drilling boreholes is incredibly expensive.
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>>9859126

/x/
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>>9859073
One, you're an idiot.
Two, you're an idiot.
Three, do some more research.
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>>9859073
The magma represents the klaxosaurs' bonds, it would be disrespectful.
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>>9859418
>For a moment, ponder what happens to heavier shit in a solution, it settles right? Well, WHY THE FUCK WOULDNT THAT APPLY TO EARTH?

Turns out gravity behaves weirdly, and there for so does buoyancy, at the center of the earth
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>>9859073
Why not just plug into the sun directly? It has even more endless virtual energy than earth.
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The real question is why we aren't using LFTR (liquid fluoride thorium reactor) technology ? Really makes you think.
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>>9863531
>calling people idiots and not explaining to them why they are wrong
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>>9859073
literally this
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>>9861583
You know that the core and the mantle are different things right?
If I can give a totally on point analogy it would be like saying the most nutritious part of the apple is the core and then we are call you a retard and then you come back at us with "don't you know how many calories are in an apple?".

let me boil this down for you, crust, mantle, core.
core no make radiation
mantle and crust make radiation
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>>9864626
not much benefit compared to regular fission reactors. Nuclear power is going away in the US at least:
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/06/26/1804655115
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to make kikes and their shabbos goyim rich

/thread
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>>9859073
1) Most places on the earth don't have geothermal resources close enough to the surface to be economically exploitable. Most of the geothermal areas are not near large population centers. Drilling deeper incurs
2) The geothermal industry must compete with the oil industry for drill rigs and the oil industry can afford to pay much more.
3) The geology of geothermal fields is often a much harder rock as well making drilling more difficult and expensive.
4) These geothermal wells tend to decay over time and you have to have a rotation to allow the well to rejuvenate or just stop using the field for a few years.
5) natural gas is really cheap and so is coal
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>>9865001
There's been a hype train about thorium for a long time, which makes you wonder why it was never adopted on a large scale. Specifically, they promised safer reactors (because thorium itself isn't very effective until it's converted in the reactor to something else) and that thorium was much more abundant than traditional nuclear fuels.
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>>9864671
Gotta power that space gun somehow.
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>>9865084
>which makes you wonder why it was never adopted on a large scale
regulation
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>>9859073
You'll get klaxosaurs m8
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>>9859180
>just put some cold cooling in there bro 300 degrees ain't shit
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>>9859073
Basically nothing can compete with the energy output/cost ratio of fossil fuels.




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