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Do you have a job that allows you to travel the world? What is it? Would you recommend?
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>>1303623
Yes. Litterally McDonald's.
My suburban town is full of rich people that like to eat lots of fastfood, but nobody who wants to work at the restaurants, we are way too isolated to take advantage of illegal border crosser labor.

Fast food joints have open interviews thrice a week.
Take the job.
Work crazy overtime every single week.
Quit in the summer.
Travel
Come back.
Gimme my old job. No?
Walk next door and get hired immediately at diffetent neighboring fast food place.
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I'm a photoshop wizard. 30-45 bucks an hour depending on difficulty. Got lucky getting hired by a guy who will let me work from anyway. Was in Taiwan recently, England soon.
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>>1303623
>Do you have a job that allows you to travel the world?
Sort of. I had a job that required a lot of international travel, on top of which I could tack a lot of free weekends or three-day jaunts, and thanks to which I earned a lot of miles for personal use.
>What is it?
I was a director for a big international development NGO; quit a while ago to do similar freelance/consulting work for international development NGOs.
>Would you recommend?
Yes and no. It's a great field in a lot of ways. The work is international and meaningful, and sometimes gets results that are good for people. So it's hard to feel bad about. On the bad side, everyone who does this kind of work is a crazy workaholic--12+ hour days are normal. And the money is not great compared with international business/for-profit work. And there is a lot of bureaucratic bullshit and dull, self-important meetings and receptions. As a freebooter I have a lot less travel, but also a lot more flexibility and less BS.
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>>1303638
no offense but your post sounds like a bunch of buzzwords, like you didn't explain what you actually do on a day-to-day basis despite typing a lot. What does your job actually entail, and how did you get it?
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>>1303645
>no offense but your post sounds like a bunch of buzzword
He worked in business, dude. Nonprofits shit.

If you want to actually travel and do business-y stuff, try a degree in business, public relations, international business or finance, public service, whatever.
After you figure out what you want to do for a living, you get a degree in that, and then you apply to organizations for those jobs that state "must be willing to travel." Believe it or not, married people with kids usually say forget that shit! And, are sick of travel that tears them away from their family, friends, children's games, and other local free time things like enjoying their boat, or being home for the holidays. Fact. So, when it comes to making $50k for year rather than $35k for a year, that ooh and ahh about travel is not worth any money in the world for people who are over it. This is why it is listed like a disclaimer in job ads.
If you really want to travel, try being a pilot. Shortage right now. Or try an international law degree, or maybe accounting. Go for the ambassador jobs with School of Foreign Service.
http://sfs.georgetown.edu/
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I'm a cable guy

Due to various reasons, there is less work during winter, so they have this program called "90/10". What it means is they pay me 90% of my salary during one year, bur in exchange I get a chunk of 5 extra week ok vacations to take.

I live in Canada and winters are shit here, so what I do is take those 5 weeks and add my 3 regular weeks of vacations, so I'm off work from January 15th to march 15th every year. I therefore still get pay checks during that period, which is nice when you're chilling in SEA and still "getting paid"

PS: this might not the standard for all cable/internet providers
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>>1303623
>Do you have a job that allows you to travel the world?
Yes.

>What is it?

Video Editor.

>Would you recommend?

If you enjoy editing, sure, but editors typically don't get to travel. I work for a company that makes content for big conventions around the world and the need videos edited on-site, usually with 24 hour turn arounds.

All my videographer friends, however, travel way more than I do, go to more interesting locations, and get paid way more. I'm trying to make a transition into that field right now.
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>>1303651
uh, thanks for the lecture, but I already have my nomad job lined up. Was just curious about what that guy actually DOES.

>>1303658
what does videographer entail?
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>>1303623
Petitioning is always an option. Collecting signatures on ballot measures. The main benefit is you can come and go as you please and work whatever hours you want. If you organize your time properly, then 8 months of work in a 2 year election cycle is more than enough for 16 months of international travel. Just focus on high paying campaigns, preferably with free housing and accommodation so you can bank everything you make for travel.
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>>1303663
Why not become an engineer? Foreign jobs flock to you like flies on shit, especially if you are single, I got offered Canada, Germany, Italy, France, the UK and I pretty much got to pick which project I went into
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>>1303663
>what does videographer entail?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Videography

In short, you're a cameraman. Most are freelancers meaning you'd need to supply your own camera and equipment.

What it entails depends on what your hired for. You could be filming weddings, training videos for companies, commercials, products at tradeshows and conventions, concerts & music festivals, local news, etc.

Corporate gigs are the most boring but pay the most and have the highest potential for travel. It really depends on who you work for.
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>>1303652
How do you become a cable guy?

I mean they don't offer a degree in cable-stuff at my uni, but at the same time I don't think it's the sort of job you could just walk in and start doing after an hour like Hooter's waitress or something.

Is there a cable tech certification or something?

You know how when you see 3rd world countries they are always stealing Sat TV with those homemade dishes? I saw that a lot in Egypt... how does that work?
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>>1303673
>How do you become a cable guy?
You send your resume

>Is there a cable tech certification or something?
There is a 6-months course where I live, though most companies provide training so it's not a necessity. Any related experience or course (ie: electricity) helps

>You know how when you see 3rd world countries they are always stealing Sat TV with those homemade dishes? I saw that a lot in Egypt... how does that work?
Google it, but it's not worth it if you have an internet connection; you can get the same content with a tv box
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>>1303665
Because not everyone is good at math, and it seems like that sort of shit would go the other direction since you can hire 10 Indian engineers and just ignore every pathetic American resume you come across. There's nothing you can do that Hajii or Wang can't do better.
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I have a contract job in an office...it works out pretty well. Downside is no benefits or paid vacation. Upside is that I have no loyalty to the company and just have to meet the minimum requirements for my duties. It's great knowing you have an end date and you can plan your shit out. I'm still deciding whether Nepal/India or a bit of europe and into the caucasus
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>>1303623
Yeah, I work in an consulting firm. Wouldn't really recommend it, most business travel is short stays in the same sort of dull hotels. The only decent work related travelling was to azerbaijan for six months, that was cool
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1. Yes.
2. I do seasonal tourism, guide and hospitality work. I travel all over the US for work (I'm too old for WHV schemes) and I usually have 1-2 months off between jobs to /trv/ for fun.
3. Maybe. Most people couldn't handle it full time. You live and by the work, you don't have a lot of material possession, and relationships can be hard to maintain. Most of my co-workers are students and younger folk that only do it part of the year, they a some place to go back to. Those of us that do it year round a bit different in the head. Some of us are just hardcore /out/ bums, some are people that used to have normie jobs and bailed on them (me) and some are just frankly kinda weird.
Still, if you don't have a lot of financial or family obligations, I'd recommend trying it for a year at first. Even if you don't like it, you'll get some good stories out of it.
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>>1303665
> Canada, Germany, Italy, France, the UK

the most vanilla countries in the world, yay
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>>1303636
How do you file your taxes?
1099-MISC for each client?
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>>1303652
>I live in Canada
>chilling in SEA and still "getting paid"
Do you just go to Toronto or something? Its pretty cool though, you can travel without actually leaving the country
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>>1303623
1. yes
2. prostitute
3. if you love having a giant foreign meat popsicle rammed down your throat at 400$/hr
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>>1303623
Yes. US Military. A lot of travel for work, plus 30 days of leave of year, but 3 to 4 days off for every public holiday, plus all kind of military exclusive travel deals, and opportunities. Like Space-A travel, ITT (military travel agent/concierge service on every base), discounted event tickets, things like Armed Forces Vacation Club (AFVC).

I would never recommend the military, full stop. I would recommend someone talk to a recruiter, one from each branch, and see if it would be a fit for you, and help you reach your greater goals. It is not for everyone, but is great opportunity for those that it is.

How I'd rank the branches in terms of travel:

1. Navy - part and parcel with being in the Navy is being on Navy ships, for the most part. Granted, this chiefly consists of weeks at sea for days in ports. Still the best way to scratch the most countries off your list, and get ideas of where you want to visit more extensively on your own. Plus a lot of random bases and posts in ports and places throughout the world where you can be stationed ashore. From Rota, Spain, to Sigonella, Italy, to Djibouti, to Singapore, to Bahrain, etc., etc.

2. Marines - Marines have the elast amount of bases, being the smallest branch, which also means they have the least amount of shitty bases, and they also tend to be on the coasts, as the nature of the service is tied to the sea/Navy. Locations are broadly East Coast, West Coast, and Japan/Hawaii. In addition, there are detachments of Marines on almost everyone else's bases, for one reason or another, this is most advantageous to admin or supply guys, as no matter how small the unit they need those things, so these jobs go almost everywhere Marines go. I myself work in supply. Also, Marines work at every US Embassy, so you go Marine Security Guard (MSG), you have that travel opportunity. Or you can try to get stationed in a support billet at the Region HQ. The one for East Asia is in
Bangkok.

To be continued...
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>>1304041
(continued)

3. Air Force. - The Air Force is larger than the Marines, but smaller than the Army and Navy. So this wil lincrease your chances of getting the good duty station or travel opportunity you want, but they are number 3 on my list because they still have a lot of shitty bases, where there are more cows than people. Those shitty bases are tempered with some good unique ones. Like the Air Force runs JUSMAGTHAI in Chiang Mai, also, since they are in charge of Transportation Command (TRANSCOM). They have a presence on at least every base with an airfield where cargo travels. This includes those Naval Bases. In short, excellent travel opportunities in the Air Force, but my be harder to access than one and two. For weebs, the largest presence in Japan are the Marines and Air Force, Navy. AF has Kadena on Okinawa, Marines have a bunch on Okinawa (pic related), Navy has Yokuska, on the mainland, Marines have an air base at Iwakuni on the mainland.

4. Army - Army is the biggest branch, so they technically have the most travel opportunities, but are so large, it is also the branch you are most likely to never experience them, and also they have the most shitty bases, in the middle of nowhere America. It's not all bad though. There are large opportunities in the UK (Air Force, as well), Germany, and Korea, where you should be bale to get to with little effort, specially the latter 2. These offer great jumping off points for Europe and Asia. Even small little known places we have bases, like Honduras, and outposts close to Tokyo.
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>>1304041
>>1304045
Honorable mention to Coast Guard
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I make art, and write about it as a side gig to pay the bills. It's the stuff normalfags love to hate, confusing things in sterile, white cube galleries.
>hey there's a fair/biennale in x city, come write about it, we'll pay for everything
>your work is sick, come to y city for z months to make stuff

It's alright.
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>>1303954
Not him, but I'm sure it's just one of those that reflects the total amount.
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>>1304060
No, you have to report each employer individually. Doing taxes as a freelancer sucks, you really need an accountant to do it right.
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>>1303680
>There's nothing you can do that Hajii or Wang can't do better.
But they won't because their bachelor's degree four years of engineering and no idea how to improve past that. Assuming they got their degree legitimately and not from a mill somewhere.
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>>1303680
Bull Fucking shit, Indians will never replace Americans, Pajeets are so fucking bad at safety it's not even funny, and with the govt so far up our asses with safety this and that, it may be true that they may know textbook shit way better than me, but nothing beats experience in the American market.

But nice try, and you just have to get past the math classes then you don't use most of it
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>>1303663
>Was just curious about what that guy actually DOES.
To oversimplify, I organize and facilitate meetings, and author and edit very lengthy, complicated documents about them. My job is about 70% writing, 30% huddled around conference tables.

To get a little more specific, I'm mostly focused on public private partnerships to promote economic growth by encouraging small businesses. The meetings and documents in my case mostly relate to getting local business associations (industry orgs or chambers of commerce) to the table with local gov't departments, nonprofits/service providers/sometimes banks or biz schools, and sometimes foreign donors, to figure out what local small businesses need to survive and grow, then figure out if some of the assembled company can provide it.
>Protip: Most common barriers I have encountered include complicated/expensive business licensing or registration procedures [almost always worsened by corruption], lack of access to affordable loans/capital, and lack of support for women entrepreneurs [almost everywhere in the poor world, women are more likely to have business ideas, or straight up small businesses, than men, but they have an even harder time than male entrepreneurs do with the two points above].
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>>1304041
Another benefit of the military is that it's an entryway to a slew of other perpetual travel jobs
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>>1303696
This is what I have too. My company pays me 10% more on top of what I earn as a vacation payout. I can take up to 10 months off before coming back and having a job. Recently I went away for 9.5 months, sent an email to HR telling them I'm coming back and when I got back into town on a Tuesday I was back at work the next week on Monday.

I'm leaving again soon and not coming back though.
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I'm getting some bachelors degree in Network admin/ security. Do you cucks think that i'd be able to find a remote job with that?
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Not that it's remotely easy or cheap, but I'm a pilot and travel around the world
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>>1303696
Contract jobs fucking scare me it just sounds too unstable and unpredictable.

I would rather earn less and just be on the payroll to be honest, rather than always hoping for a gig--screw that. It's worse than panhandling because you've actually taking the time to develop credentials and yet you're still basically a beggar.

Fuck contracts, the private sector, and "consulting" in general.
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>>1304320
Becoming a pilot can be cheap if you use scholarships or just join air force first.
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I know its a joke job but teach english in korea. You can save 10 k easily and eat well and travel 3 or 4 times a year to different countries. After first year go to china with your experience and teach there for a year you can get side work doing modeling private english lessons phptography bartending dorrman. Literally made 25k american chilling one year and still traveled like crazy. then you can apply to japan the pay is sit and the C.O.L is high but its the nicest country in the world. I mean it . Then hit taiwan or thailand. Taiwan is really different. I taught overseas for 6 years and came back with 50k now going back to college at 35 for the programming meme to hopefully be able to work in europa before it falls to the muzzies. I brought my korea wife back to candad good luck bro
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>>1304041
I got a bachelor's and am pretty underemployed at the moment with no real prospects. I've been thinking of joining the military to get some more life experience, but would rather not get stuck in some white trash/dindu outfit, if you know what I mean. Which job/branch would be a good fit?
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>>1304344
A friend of mine went to S. Korea to teach English in public school, wound up an associate professor at a university in Seoul for three years, now he's teaching at a private academy in Beijing.
Turns out a master's in English is actually quite useful outside the U.S.
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>>1304391
Since you already have a bachelor's degree apply to the different commissioning programs. You will come in as an officer and be above the rif raff from the gate. More pay, too. You also might get student loan forgiveness
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I think the best option is to just get a normal job with decent vacation time, I have 6 weeks plus I can accumulate overtime and take it as vacation.

Job is software developer
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I had a job that gave me 3 weeks vacation time, but they would never authorize more than a few days at a time because "we really need you here". The most annoying thing was that I'd try to take a week off and instead of just giving me a week of vacation time, they'd switch around my regular days off so that they'd only have to authorize three days of vacation time. This meant I was working a week and a half leading up to my vacation and a week and a half after.
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>>1304742
You sound like an American. We now work longer hours and take less time off than the Japanese.
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>>1304746
Yeah, the only time they ever approved more than three days off was when my Mom was killed in a car accident.
I've since bailed on the 9-5 thing, now I work disposable jobs and travel in between.
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Kind of. I work as a cook, and generally only ask for two weeks off 2-3 times a year to travel. Since I've been at the place so long and they want to keep me around for some reason, they let me go.
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God created war so that Americans could travel. M.T.
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>>1303623
Yes
Network Engineer, i can work anywhere with internets
Over 100k/year
Wouldn't recommend
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>>1304901
It's slightly disturbing the amount og people that know me, and know me well enough to parse out my comments on this anonymous Malaysian crayon drawing board
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>>1304910
Hey dude i commented earlier. Im getting some cuck network admin degree. Are the jobs in this field usually flexible when it comes to travel?

Also why don't you recommend it?
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>>1303664
fill me in on the deets senpai

trying for that blue midterm

how much u get paid
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>>1304915
if you're paying for a degree to go into networking you're wasting your time and money. get CCNA and CCNP they are more valuable then any bullshit degree.
and no, you'll probably be a tier 1 replaceable pleb with little flexibity.
i'm at the point where replacing me would be such a nightmare that they let me work wherever.

i don't recommend it because it's stressful and you get blamed for most problems. it's a thankless job
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>>1304919
Odd years are typically slow for petitioning work, the majority of the money is made during even years. There are a few low paying campaigns going on right now.

Florida - 2 statewide petitions
Restore felon voting rights: Pay is $1.25 per signature plus $200/week for housing if you get over 300 signatures per week, plus $400 for travel.
Open a new casino: Pay is $2.50 per signature plus $150/week for housing if you get more than 250 signatures per week.
Working conditions in FL are atrocious, it's hot, humid, and it rains a lot. I would estimate a $1200/week average if you put in 30 petitioning hours per week and are good at predicting which events will be lucrative and which to avoid.

Michigan - 3 statewide petitions with 1-2 more coming out soon
Marijuana legalization: $1.25 per signature
Repeal the Prevailing Wage law: $1.75 per signature
Part-Time Legislature: $1.50 per signature (I think?)
There are production bonuses on one or two of these petitions for housing, but I am not sure what they are. $1000-1500/week is what I would estimate

California - 1 statewide petition with 3-4 coming out within the next month or two.
Neighborhood Legislature: $2 per signature if you get more than 400 per week
There are also a bunch of local petitions going on around the state paying anywhere from $1.50-5, and as long as you work those as well you should be doing alright, although I don't now anyone in CA who is making more than $1500/week and none of the campaigns have production bonuses as far as I am aware.

Washington - 1 statewide petition
Require violence de-escalation training for police officers: $1 per signature, no production bonuses, no housing
Washington is one of the easiest states to work in and plenty of people are getting 1000 signatures per week, but with nothing else coming out, other states are more attractive
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>>1304919
>>1304971
Other states with paid petitions at the moment:
Missouri: Medical Marijuana. Don't know what the current pay is, but the petition has been going on for 8 months and it is burnt to a crisp. Definitely not worth it
Arkansas: $1.50 per signature, I believe, but I don't know what the petition is. The state sucks to petition in tho, so not worth working on.
Massachusetts: 2 statewide petitions. Not sure what the pay is. Closed jobs, I don't think they are hiring and they will be over within a month
South Dakota: Probably the most lucrative petitions in the country right now, everyone I have talked to is making $2000-2500/week. 3 petitions I believe. But again, it's a closed job, the coordinator running the job is not hiring.

A few more, but nothing particularly exciting. The real money will be next year. I usually save $30-50,000 in the first 6 months of even years, so best to wait until then unless you have nothing going.

As far as hoping for a blue midterm, petitions wont really help you much there. Most petitioning is for ballot initiatives and candidate ballot access. You aren't impacting the election, just getting stuff on the ballot. If your goal is to make money while impacting elections, then GOTV work is what you want. That sort of work usually pops up 3 months before a major election. Pay is usually hourly, $12-18 per hour plus expenses. The best way to make money on GOTV jobs is to sub-coordinate with one of the management firms running those campaigns. Overrides are usually $2-3 per hour, so hire a bunch of people off craigslist and try to get your crew above 1000 billable hours per week and you're making pretty decent money.
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>>1303636
Where do you find work in this line?? I have a degree in Media Design and can use Photoshop well, other adobe software as well.
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>>1303623
I work for an airline.
Where I can't fly standby for free I can get zed fares on partnered airlines and pretty much go anywhere in the world. I usually only pay international taxes. You gotta be with a pretty big international airline to get it good though. And no, I don't work at the airport.

Would only recommend it if you have massive amounts of patience with people, especially coworkers. People will treat you like dirt.
Pay isn't great, but they give you benefits to try to keep you otherwise the turnover would be tremendous and nobody would do airline jobs.
Don't necessarily have to have a degree either, depending.

I'm not really good into conning people into taking shifts, and all my vacation weeks have been during hurricanes (like this one). So I haven't been able to travel much. Coworkers who've been luckier than me have traveled to China, UK, and Africa.
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>>1305020
Pay is shit for airport agents and customer service. Like $12 an hour and part time. Free flights or not, who the fuck can survive on that?
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>>1303623
I work in data warehousing for a relatively large firm. They're not particularly dynamic, so the work is pretty easy for the most part.

35 days holiday a year, and £65k to afford whatever I feel like. Been abroad 3 times this year, with another trip in a few weeks.
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>>1303954
I don't pay taxes
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>>1305536
>35 holidays per year
i fucking hate being an amerilard
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>>1305606
Get a Federal job
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>>1303623
Not necessarily a job that lets me travel but I got lucky this year. I work as assistant controller in our accounting department. Our office manager resigned a couple months ago. Boss is too cheap to hire someone new so I take it on and have two positions in exchange for a nice raise + a "stress week" off accrued every quarter on top of my 2 weeks yearly vacation + 5 sick days and 5 days off so it's 40 days a year off.

Would not recommend accounting unless you want to kill yourself because you have the most boring job on earth.
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>>1303638
I do something similar, I get to travel to conferences around 8-10 times per year and I get 5 weeks of paid holidays which I use to either extent business travel or take some personal holidays
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Oil industry work is the god king of jobs if you want to travel.

1. It is a realistically obtainable job even with no college degree. You just have to be willing to work your ass off when you are at work.

2. Probably the highest paying realistically obtainable job per experience that exists. Redneck idiots with good work ethic routinely make over $100k a year with only a few years experience. If you have some sort of technical ability you can do the same while not having to do manual labor all day. Many of the career paths lead to $150k + year pay with less than 10 years experience.

3. You typically have about 5 months of the year off. Most of the non-shit positions attempt to work you on an equal time on-off rotation. This typically means you will work 2-3 weeks straight and then get 2-3 weeks off.
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>>1303623
Yes, it's called being good at talking people out. They make me go from meeting to meeting around the world every six months.

Would I recommend it? Not really, I'm stressed all the fucking day. Just want to save some extra money and those free flights that come from the loyalty programs.
>>
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