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Anyone else think they have given up a lot by travelling and living abroad?

On the one hand I feel good that I have fulfilled my ambition to travel, see new places and leave my home country to live in different places (I've always had a calling to leave my home country permanently. I like a lot of things about it, but I don't want to live in it). There have been some great experiences on my time on the road.

But then on the other hand, I feel like I don't belong anywhere and that I have given up a lot for this travelling lifestyle. I have no real friends left in my home country. I am basically completely cut off from my childhood friends. I am thankfully still very close to my family, but I hardly get to spend any time with them because I am away. Skype is never the same as spending time face to face.

I have met a lot of people on the road, but after a while it all feels short and fake. I have made very few deep connections with people. 3 relationships I have been in have broken down in large part because of distance, or because the girl knows that I am eventually going to leave her to go travel or move to a different country.

There are still a lot of places I want to go see but I feel that I am losing my passion for travelling. Sometimes when you are lying in a hostel bed, surrounded by strangers in a country where you don't speak the language, sometimes it doesn't feel worth it.

Can anyone relate?
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I've just finished college and am planning to travel around japan for a month or two, I have the money and am wondering if this kind of lifestyle is worth it also

Everyone says i should spend my money on property or a flat but i don't want to live day to day scraping by just to pay the bills. I want a break from it all and to experience something completely different. Can you give me any advice?
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>>1307610
>I've always had a calling to leave my home country permanently. I like a lot of things about it, but I don't want to live in it
Why? Where are you from?

>or move to a different country
How often do you move and why?

How old are you?
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those feels
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>>1307610
>Anyone else think they have given up a lot by travelling and living abroad?
No because I'm a poorfag from a poor country
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>>1307616
OP here

I think you should go for it. I get the impression that you have not done a lot of travelling but it something that you want to do. Now is the best time to do it, when you have just graduated and don't have obligations. You might regret not doing it in the future. Also one or two months is not a long time. It will be a good experience and will let you find out how much you enjoy travelling.

>Everyone says i should spend my money on property or a flat but i don't want to live day to day scraping by just to pay the bills. I want a break from it all and to experience something completely different.

It's your life and not anyone else's so make your decisions based on what will make you happy, not anyone else.
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>>1307619
>Why? Where are you from?

I'm from a small town in England. I dislike the climate back home, and the fact that I think people have a kind of negative outlook on life.

>How often do you move and why?
>How old are you?

I am 22 and I am currently on my third stint living abroad since 19. I have also been on 4 extended trips since I was 18.
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>>1307610
anyone who tells you there is not a steep cost to travel is an idiot or young or lying

long term travel is not psychologically healthy (more than a year maybe) and people are easily distracted from actual goals by "work abroad"

its not all bad. but people love their narissistic self image more than real achievement. most people are too stupid to understand their own culture. the idea of understanding another is so distant it is laughable
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>>1307654
How old are you?
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>>1307610
Living abroad? No. How long are you staying in each place? Are you like permanently on the move or something.

IMO, for long term, the best approach is to get some job in a country for a few months. Then you will truly make friends, learnt the culture, and have connects for when you return there.

Like if you are doing long term travel by aimlessly hopping hostel to hostel, hell yeah you were burn out, and your experience, over the long term, becomes superficial and samey. You aren't set up to make aconnection to people or a place like that. Yes, there's the whole self discovery meme, but once you do that you have nothing else to look forward to, if hopping hostel to hostel, a few weeks here and there, with no base, is what you are doing.

And with everything there is always trade-off.
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>>1308834
I'm in my mid to late 30s (depending on how you define late 30s), btw.

The tl:dr, if you want to have a life, not just a time period, of living abroad/travelling then get a job that allows you to do so.

Here is a thread where people talk about theirs:

>>1303623
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I recommend you read a book called "the power of now" by eckhart tolle.

My point is that, it doesn't matter where you go, how far you travel. You've convinced yourself you just need to get away, maybe you do. Or maybe you just need to be fully present and here now, and not thinking about the future because that's what causes your grief. There are special moments, especially when you travel... where you are just there, in that beauty of that strange place and that's what pulls you here to the present, that's what brings out bliss.

Peace exists within you, there's nowhere else it can be found, you traveling gives you an inner emotional reaction of freedom and bliss, which can truly be felt anywhere at anytime; just stop thinking, no past no future.
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>>1309369
>>1307654
This stuff, maybe it is for some people but it's not for me. I just enjoy traveling and I always have. It's like my hobby.

>>1307610
Some people lose their friends and their connections because of their job, their relationship, an illness. You got some great experiences and you made a trade off. I did the same. I'm surprised at the friends I can still get along with because they understand I was just doing something I enjoyed. I'm also surprised at the people that wanted me to do something else because "it's just what you do". I have no issue with people that want to get wealthy and have a stable life, and I respect them if they can achieve that. I don't like people that try to find some underlying meaning to my lifestyle that is negative. I'm not escaping anything, I dreamed of seeing the places I have seen since I was a kid. I lived out my dream, and compared to a lot of the things other people want to do with their lives it happens to be a very humble and attainable dream. I sacrified for that, but what do you expect? I didn't fuck people over, I was there for the people that really needed me when they needed me back home, and I was honest with the women I encountered along the way. I would definitely change some things, but that's life. I don't see myself as being any different than a guy that always wanted to be a doctor and became one. You have to be realistic when you start out doing something, look at the end of the road and what you will be giving up. Don't be romantic about it, be pragmatic. I wouldn't tell people I made the right choice, because I won't know that until I die. I can't tell people to live like me either, because they might hate it. If you keep going you better be able to live with yourself and the things you have given up to do it though, so be real about what you are giving up.
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I dropped out of college my freshman year to move to Europe. I initially planned to study and live there but I blew my entire college fund on traveling and bad decisions over 18 months. Sure, I got to see much of Europe, try new things, eat new foods, meet different people but nothing lasted and now I'm 2 years behind everyone else of my age.

Now I'm back home, working full time just to pay for my own education at a school I despise just thinking about escaping back to Europe. I hate myself sometimes
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>>1307610
"The person that is everywhere is nowhere."
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>>1307610
>Sometimes when you are lying in a hostel bed, surrounded by strangers in a country where you don't speak the language, sometimes it doesn't feel worth it.
Definitely. I never thought that could have been my lifestyle. I did it, of course, but travelling with another person (just one, for my part) has always been the goal. Being alone a couple times is fine, being alone all the time is just stupid. You see a bunch of things but you don't experience life.
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>>1307610
there is no other way to find yourself a new place outside your small England town, other than travel and see for yourself, so you didn't loose anything, what are you doing is searching for a new home, which is normal if that is what you need, hence keep looking and when you found it just settle in
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I may have given up having a family and kids one day. I have a fairly well paid job with a generous amount of time off that lets me afford traveling wherever I want, so /trv/ling has become part of my life. I could easily afford to settle down and have a family one day, but I'm not sure if I want to. If I settle down and have kids, I would have to give up traveling for the most part. It's not something I want to lose.




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