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Swear on me mum edition

This is the invertebrate general. If you have any questions about invertebrates, want to look into owning one or more, or want to simply discuss them, this is the thread to do so, whether its

>Tarantulas and other spiders
>Myriapods
>Mollusks
>Crustaceans
>Insects
>Or anything without a backbone

Feel free to post it.

Resources/help and information

>Tarantulas
https://tomsbigspiders.wordpress.com/beginner-guides/
http://www.theraphosidae.be/en
>Mantids
http://www.mantisonline.eu/index.php?lan=en
>Phasmids
http://www.phasmatodea.com/web/guest/home

Discord
https://discord.gg/mKSdghW

Old thread >>2455225
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a boi
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My handsome young man is getting so big
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>>2472093
>>2472094
dems be some pretty bois

What species, respectively.
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>>2472098
My big boy is a procambarus alenni I think
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>>2472098
Pseudocreobotra wahlbergii
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I want to keep a jumping spider; I've got a few I can consistently find on my fence here in WI. thoughts on a minimum enclosure size for it?

>>2472075
>Spikeposting

never gets old
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This fat pretty lady has nestled herself between a tree and my porch and has done a phenomenal job of thinning out the local annoying bug population. Could a kind anon please identify? NC Piedmont area.
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>>2472203
Neoscona crucifera
>>
Alright guys, there seems to be a ton of Arachnid-keepers here, one of you should know the answer.

I had a pet Phidippus audax, fed her mostly other spiders and random bugs, and she laid eggs. She has now passed, but the egg have turned into a million little baby spiderlings. They are adorable, and each one is slightly under a mm long, but surprisingly bulky as far as non-tarantula slings go.

What can I feed them? Would they be able to catch and eat flightless Drosophila at this point?
>>
What kind of substrate can I give my jumping spider?
Would coir be ok?
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>>2472248
Thank you!
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>>2472265
Coir's fine, but really so is a paper towel. Jumping spiders aren't picky.
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>>2472318
Do they have a preference?
My spider seems to only want to stand on the sides of the container or on the top of plastic parts instead of touching the ground.
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First superpredators reporting for duty!
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>>2472400
Names of these bois?
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>>2472401
Anomalacarids, mah boi!
>Going clockwise from the lower left, the animals are: Anomalocaris canadensis, Amplectobelua symbrachiata, Hurdia victoria, Opabinia regalis, Kerygmachela kierkegaardi, Schinderhannes bartelsi, Pambdelurion whittingtoni and Laggania cambria
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Hello, I'm not sure if this is the right place to ask, but can any of you identify this spider for me? Its a wild one, not a pet, found in southern US. I think it resembles a male black widow a little, with the alternating colors on its legs, and the yellow/orange pattern on its body. But on the other hand, the base color of the body is a bit too brown, and the legs look kinda bumpy. I'm not by any means a spider expert, but it interests me, so I would really appreciate it.
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>>2472413
Seems to be a Golden Orb Weaver. Totally harmless.
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>>2472414
That seems to be it. Thank you anon!
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>>2472421
any time
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I wanna start breeding feeder roaches. Are dubias the best choice or are there lesser known species that work even better?
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>>2472423
How about this one?
Friend is buying a house in kentucky and saw this chilling there.
Looks pretty cool.
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>>2472524
I'm retarded.
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>>2472515
what're you feeding
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>>2472529
turtles, frogs, tarantulas, assassin bugs
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>>2472525
Kinda blurry but it's an orbweaver, probably Araneus sp. or Neoscona sp.
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so what end of the fuckhuge crab spectrum do you prefer; the STR coconut crab or the DEX japanese spider crab?
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>>2472546
Who would be the INT caster in that party? Mantis shrimp?
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>>2472531
I like dubias. I almost always have fresh babies in my breeder tank. I don't really heat my big tub of nymphs so they tend to grow a little slow. There are species which breed faster but ive only dealt with dubias as feeders
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>>2472562
Decorator crab
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>>2472546
What would it take to have a coconut crab as a pet? Especially in a non tropical environment?
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>>2472607
a room sized enclosure
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>>2472603
Oh my. And to complete, we only need cleric and/or bard
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>>2472642
this
and substrate about a meter high, and it should be able to hold burrows

also, One BIG bowl with Saltwater, one with freshwater and lots of things to climb on

so basically like Coenobita sp. but bigger

that's what I was told by a seller
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>>2472269
I have one of these in my reef tank. Hardly ever see him, he's a sneakboi
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>>2472546
STR all the way
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>>2472524
LEXINGTON
>>
My jumping spiders don't seem to eat anything I give them, they'd just rather climb around the container.
Should I be worried?
I've tried to give them house flies, small garden flies and tiny cockroaches but they haven't done anything yet.
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>>2472607
>>2472682
now the real question is how to keep a spider crab
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>>2473130
I'd imagine twice the dimensions, but all submerged.
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>>2473268
so an aquarium
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>>2473277
pretty much. They can't stand up on land
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Ok, so my A. seemanni has been in her hide for almost a month. Is she finally in actual premolt, or is it subadult shyness? I know most Ts get bolder as they grow, and I'm pretty sure my female isn't mature just yet. Still, I've had one pre-molt scare earlier this year, and it turned out she was just a picky eater (No broccoli and dubias for her. Just honey buns and crickets). She has a bald spot, but I can't see it while she's dug in there. I don't wanna disturb her of she's in pre-molt, but I want to know for sure if she's about to pop so I can know when to humidify her enclosure
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>>2472607
>>2472642
>>2472682
Balls, fingers and toes of steel.
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Anyone in the UK want a tarantula free of charge? Comes with waterbowl and substrate? And tank of course. Pic related.
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>>2473367
Is that fucking gravel?
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>>2473377
>>2473367
Even worse. it looks liek bath salts

Dear lord, dude. I know you plan no giving her away, but at least make sure you can take care of her on the interim. Give her some organic potting soil at least
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anyone know what kind of spooder this is
what should i name him
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Can anyone help me with this guy? Pic is from august the 8th, made in franconia (middle- to southern-germany)
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>>2473456
Pterophorus pentadactyla
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>>2473378
>>2473377
have you guys ever seen Vermiculite?
because that's what it looks like to me
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>>2473458
thanks mate
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>>2473431
Phiddipus sp. Regius. Maybe? Kinda blurry
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>>2473431
I put my glasses on...
Platycryptus undatus not what i said here >>2473493
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>>2472249
Can anyone help?
>tldr
Suitable food for 1mm jumping spider slings. (Phidippus audax)
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>>2472249
>>2473707
pinhead crickets, fruit flies, and anything tiny should work, but you should wait until they mold. after hatching they usually don't eat until after their first molt and subsequent hardening of exoskeleton. for jumpers, the rule is: it should be smaller than them, and it should move. my lil girl who lived under my window sill a few years ago ate aphids that lived on my hibiscus til she was big enough to eat hover flies and whatnot. she was the same species as yours
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>hear a hellscape sound of dissonance and screeching
>it's just my mantis catching a hoverfly 10 minutes after I expected it to
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I feel like owning a pet praying mantis is like having a fairy in a bottle. And that mantids may actually be a major contributor to the fairy mythology. So I went full autist and made a video about it.

https://youtu.be/qUdw_FHypQg
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>>2473813
Oh wow nice video!
Do you have any recommended species?
Do you have a breeding setup?
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>>2473813
>0:17: 0:18
>>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXtHd25RyV4
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>>2473816

I always direct people to ghosts as an easy to keep species.
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I'm so proud of my Camponotus chromaiodes queen. Just three months in and she's got 13 workers and a huge pile of eggs, larvae, and pupae. They'll nearly be ready for a proper formicarium by hibernation time.
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>>2473888
Do you start giving them food after the workers start hatching?
Any unexpected difficulties/problems that you encountered?
I'm considering doing that when summer comes around in a few months.
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>>2473798
Thanks!
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>>2473903
I started giving them sugar water after the first worker emerged. Just a little drop to start with. Now it takes about 5-6 drops twice a week to keep them happy. I'm also giving them a cricket once a week as well. So far they haven't been difficult to raise at all.
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>>2474073
same with plants
yet i like plants
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>>2474073
Fascinating to watch and observe. No one is buying these expecting to pet them or anything. They're fascinating little creatures.
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>>2474073
Why would I want to humanize something that isn't human? You don't need an emotional bond to find something fascinating or cool, the fact that they're so different from us is the most interesting part about them.
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>>2474076
Yes, but plants are pretty, smell nice and don't have gorillion legs and eyes staring at you blankly
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>>2474085
>>2474093
So, literally 'for science'?
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>>2474100
Kind of

More like for "ooo" and "aaa" because of science
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>>2474099
>Implying inverts that are kept as pets aren't prettier than most plants
>Implying most plants smell like anything
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>>2474087
are peacock spiders just normal house jumpers after a pride parade? they look so similar
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>>2473345
You shouldn't need to "humidify" the enclosure. Just keep the substrate deep and partially damp as is normal for this species. And get used to not seeing it for long periods of time.

Iirc There is little/no evidence that higher humidity aids in molting. That's just something carried over from reptile hobbyists. She will, however, appreciate fresh watwr hefore and aftwr molting so make sure thats available (as always).

You'll learn that when your T molts, the most important thing you can do is just ignore it.
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>>2474119
Funny I get a reply just now.

I wake up this morning to see her webbed up burrow entrance is now completely swept away, like she got out while I was sleeping. I look in there and her colors seem more vibrant. It seems like she's gotten bigger, but I can't spot an exuvia anywhere, though it might be under her.

I'll see if I can get a pic.
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>>2474100
Kinda. Most of us just think they're pretty.

I'm completely aware most people don't think that and that's why it's hard to relate to, but most people also only ever see house spiders and such, which I have to admit are kind of ugly looking. That's where the "gorillion legs and eyes" also comes from I think. Long thin legs that move fast, looks creepy.

Once you get over that there are a lot of stunningly pretty species. That combined with the fact that they don't cost much and don't require much work makes it possible to collect them, and still care for all of them properly.
Also a nice setup in a glass or acrylic enclosure, with plants, good light and so on just looks great, it's a piece of living decoration and it has an animal inside that's living it's life completely unaware of you, and you can watch. I promise you any invert owner that has had these animals for more than 2 or 3 years has seen stuff no documentary ever managed to film in the wild.
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>>2474124
OK, sorry I couldn't get a better pic. It's a tricky shot

This >>2474085 is an older pic of her form around three months ago

In my opinion she looks much fresher, but what do you guys think?
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>>2474131
P.S.

I want to know if it would be safe for me to get her out because Irma's coming my way (FL) and we might be evacuating to a shelter. I was hoping to get her into a temporary enclosure for the evac
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>>2474131
Yeah, looks freshly molted. Congrats.

>>2474134
How much time do you have? Getting her into a temporary box should be no problem. Any plastic box with a lid will do, you won't even need ventilation if you open it once a day (if the box is decently big). Some substrate, a waterbowl and a hide should be sufficient.
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>>2474143
Irma's projected to hit Tampa by Sunday or Saturday night. Might weaken to Cat 4 after landfall on the east coast, but that's still pretty bad. Thanks for the advice. I know it's just best to leave your T alone. I just worry about her safety.

Once again, thank you. Little Felicia will be safe and sound now.
>>
I like almost everything about spooders, but molting freaks me the fuck out, goddamn ayy lmao coming out of it's own husk makes my skin crawl
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>>2474155
>makes my skin crawl

Theirs too

But seriously, just think about how good that has to feel. Cramped inside that old skin, restricting your movement, making it hard to breathe. If you've ever worn a suit that doesn't fit you, then you know what I'm talking about. Then, you just lie down on your back, take a few deep breaths, push really hard, and it all slowly comes off. You can finally stretch after all those many weeks. You can feel your body de-compressing.Your breaths increase in volume. it feels like you've just emerged from underwater with how much you can breath now. You feel the fresh air brushing against your skin and everything feels so new and clean and roomy.
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>>2474146
It might not hit the west coast directly at all. Don't get your information from the MSM, producing panic and announcing the end of the world is more profitable than real and calm advice. This dude knows his shit, updates more frequently and is not a nutjob:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eFO180l-UA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5uHow7EVRY
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>>2474176
Forgot my image
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>>2474158
YAMERO
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The first L7! These molts are getting stressful to watch. Those legs are so damn long.
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Oh my goodness, she's absolutely gorgeous. Decided to extract her exuvia, but i couldn't find a scrap of it. She's cleaned her plate.

>>2474176
>>2474178
Okay. I'll still keep that in mind
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>>2472269
Woah what the fuck is that? Its amazing
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>>2474277
it's called a pom pom crab, I'll let you guess why
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>>2472832
I had an aquarium years ago and we had two sneakybois
one was a tiny hermit crab, he somehow found an intact shell in the gravel and just spent weeks completely camouflaged until he changed
the other (apologies for bringing a spine into invert gen) was a banded snake eel, dug itself underground, and stayed there only occasionally poking its head out
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>>2472075
It should be holding a Mora
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>>2474216
Looks like ours are following the same schedule now. I had my first L7 just 2 days ago.
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Iv starting to consider getting beetles, I really like them so I just started skimming some care info online
ill need to look at species specific info once I know exactly what I want though

Would you guys recommend them? also how many is a good number for a beginner?
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>>2474319
I've still got a pretty large variance in my bunch though. My slowest growers are a female that turned L6 on August 21st and a male that molted on September 3rd. They eat just as much as the others, so I have no idea what's the reason for this. A cause of inbreeding perhaps?

My P. paradoxas display an even more extreme case of this. The slowest male reached adulthood today, while the quickest one of the same hatch did so in early June. It's like it just put development to a halt for some time, despite living under the same conditions.
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It was pointed out to me that the pinned collection I got for what I thought was a steal, might actually be a cursed item and I think some of you might get a kick out of seeing it.
>Roach nymphs
>frankenbeetle that is two heads glued together
>a tag that doesn't relate to anything i can find
>herc missing it's tarsi
>a lot of other shit i don't know about because beetles are for nerds
>>
>>2474351
I think someone used those to practice Wicca or voodoo, anon.
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>>2474351
The random ass roaches are cracking me up.
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>>2474327
If you just want to test the waters with something very easy and decently fast grub development you could try out Pachnoda marginata peregrina.

Flowers beetles of the genera Coelorrhina and Eudicella are also good starting choices.
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>>2473888
Very nice. They remind me of our native Camponotus ligniperdus. Brood development seems just as slow too.

Anyway pic related is my Camponotus rufipes Colony after 4 months. Pretty fast growers and they get pretty big too. Majors have huge heads and mandibles. Gave them the nest of my old Camponotus nicobarensis colony whose Queen died randomly.
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>>2474397
Pic related when I first got them. They had like 5-7 Workers but almost no brood.
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>>2474400
Did you feed them after the workers hatch?
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>>2474401
Yeah 1 roach/fly a week was enough for them back then.

Now they get 3 roaches every 2-3 days. I expect the colony size to double or triple in the next 1-2 months.
>>
What's a cool, cheap bug that's hard to kill?
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>>2474409
Asbolus verrucosus
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Got my hands on some beautiful snails for my fishtank. Planning on getting some more to breed in a tank of their own.
>>
>>2474397
>>2474400
Nice. I'm guessing that these don't require hibernation based on their range? Although I'll be kind of glad to have a break this winter, it's still a bit of a bummer to pack them all away and know the colonies won't be developing for the next couple of months.
>>
>>2474351
you got it for cheap because it's shit

every specimen is heavily damaged, badly set, and it's all very common stuff that you can get for a few bucks at sellers
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>>2474631
It's like you ignored all of the text in that anon's post, but replied thinking others should read yours for some reason.
>>
>>2474455
looks like Faunus ater, they don't breed like you think they do

or is this a Tylo?
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>>2474227
Her butt-fingers look extremely lewd.
>>
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I just caught myself a spider to keep as a pet. It's a large female araneus, probably araneus diadematus, and I caught her while she was rebuilding her web between some shrubs.

I put her in a smallish plastic pet carrier with some dirt on the bottom. Then I realized she wasn't able to climb the plastic walls - not sure why I expected otherwise in the first place. So I covered one wall with a paper towel so she could climb it. She climbed it but instead of starting to make a web she's resting.

How much time should I give her to sort of get used to the new environment? As in, when should I get worried that she won't get used to it at all and let her out again?

And then, if I keep her, how often do you reckon I should feed her?

Picture is from Wikipedia but looks almost exactly like mine.
>>
>>2474736
>I put her in a smallish plastic pet carrier with some dirt on the bottom.

That sounds terrible for an orbweaver. Let her go back outside.
>>
>>2474736
It will probably build the web over night. Just dump in flies that you find in your house, they don't need much food.
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>>2474739
How can I improve it? Work with me here, I'm more than willing to let her out if I can't figure this out, but it's only been like half an hour.
>>
>>2474418
Oh fuck those look beautiful, too bad I can't get them anywhere in australia.
God damn it, I love their carapace and colouration.
>>
>>2474741
She was rebuilding her old web in broad daylight though.

But I guess it won't hurt to give her a day to get acclimatized. If she hasn't built anything until tomorrow morning then I'll let her out.
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>>2474736
She's not gonna build her web in a container.

The best thing you can do is put her back outside and stop taking animals from nature.

The next best thing you can do is get her an empty, wooden picture frame and let her build the net inside that. Once she is established in there you can put it back outside, she will stay in the same place and rebuild the net every night.
>>
>>2474755
>throwing a bitchfit over some random orbweaver
I always put them in jars when I was a kid and they built webs just fine.
>>
>>2474755
>stop taking animals from nature

You see, it's kinda difficult to take you seriously after this because you seem to be against keeping pets in general, as anything that got domesticated, bought at a pet store, etc., was originally at some point in history "taken from nature" (or at least its ancestors were). So why are you even on this board?
>>
>>2474756
Hens in a laying battery also lay eggs just fine. They even eat!

>assuming animals executing basic behaviors is indicative of well being

>>2474757
>You see, it's kinda difficult to take you seriously after this because you seem to be against keeping pets in general
No, that's just what you have somehow interpreted from my post because you're not very bright.

>was originally at some point in history "taken from nature"
And that exactly is the difference, my slow witted friend. Those animals were taken from nature and then successfully bred in captivity, with no further impact on their wild population.
>>
>>2474758
>more bitching and thinking he's better than others

This is fucking embarrassing. Just stop posting.
>>
>>2474759
I think I will, since it looks like you have nothing to say.
>>
>>2474760
You should stick to nothing in the future instead of unconstructive shitflinging and an unwarranted sense of superiority.
>>
>>2474758
>assuming animals executing basic behaviors is indicative of well being
It's a fucking spider. It builds a web and eats. What more does it need? 2 hours of classical music each day?
>Those animals were taken from nature and then successfully bred in captivity, with no further impact on their wild population.
Oh no! A specimen of the most common orbweaver is being taken from nature, clearly this will have a devastating impact on the population!
>>
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>>2474540
Nah Camponotus rufipes is from South America so they don't.
And yeah hibernation sucks.
>>
>>2474672
>butt-fingers
Holy shit, lmao.
>>
>>2474758
Please never-ever-ever-ever come back to invert general.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=odMv4zehJ6w
>>
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>>2474672
All tarantulas have that, my guy. Thems be her spinnerets.
>>
>>2472075
G R I P B O Y E
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>>2474850
>not calling them butt-fingers
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>>2474871
Okay fine, butt fingers.

And yes, they're lewd.
>>
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUMndjb77SU

>tfw no solifuges on your continent
feels bad man
>>
>>2475060
>People somehow find these adorable retards scary
>>
>>2475064
I think it's mostly an american thing. even though they exist in north america, many americans didn't become aware of them until they saw the famous photo by the soldiers in iraq, where the size of the solifuge was exaggerated by the lens used. there's also that hideous fishing lure that comes up when you google "camel spider".
>>
>>2475076
I think most people know by now that that old image is fake. That image came out circa 2004 and most 11B grunts have seen enough of them to know its fake, so even in the military, the myths have died down.
>>
>>2474736
A grown orbweaver will make for a pretty short term pet, man.
>>
Help my mantis keeps losing tarsi
>>
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Need an ID on this spider. Went out looking for wolfies and I think this is one. About less than a size of a penny.
>>
>>2475220
It's a wolf, but that picture looks like it was run through DeepDream so I can't ID down to genus or species.
>>
>>2475232
Yeah, need to find my better camera. maybe tomorrow.
>>
>>2475192
Tell that silly boi to stop then
>>
>>2475253
faggot

>>2475192
to clarify: plastic window-screen roof, twig transition, topsoil ground, transparent plastic 2/3 gallon bucket.
no heat lamp
>>
>>2475272
Oh don't be so sensitive. What, is he having trouble molting? just injuring himself from falls or environmental hazards?
>>
>>2475272
>>2475274
Whoop, didn't read

I think it may be your screens. I know Ts have trouble with those, what with losing limbs in them by dangling off and whatnot after taking a misstep
>>
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First adult Haania!

Probably a male.
>>
>>2475424
Can I get a picture of your setup? Looks p comfy
>>
>>2475276
Screens are pretty standard (necessary?) In the mantid hobby
>>
>>2475713
Will post one tomorrow. It's very basic.
>>
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I'm looking into getting into tarantulas and I really like the green bottle blue's temperament as a webber that will (apparently) be out more that the brachypelmas. However the price puts me off. Are there any spiders that are easy to keep and share some these qualities as the GBB but cost a bit less? Also I've just been looking up prices online but I plan on getting the spider at a show, are they generally cheaper there?
>>
>>2476104
Most shows are a bit cheaper, if only because you're not paying shipping.
>>
>>2476104
species on gif?
>>
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>>2476119
Mastophora timuqua(?) it's a bolas spider, they are orb weavers that hunt by snagging moths with their bolas that they bait with pheromones
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I dont really know why but i want a centipede. So tell me all about them. Care tips, what to do, what not to do, why i should get one, why i shouldnt, trivia. I want it all.
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>>2476182
Read some caresheets to get a grip on the basics and ask more specific questions here.
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>>2476299
Do we have any resources? I remember we had a pede keeper in the early threads who was gathering up some resources, but I don't know if he ever got back to us on that.
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Has anyone kept M. balfouri before? Looking at a female for my first Old World. How big of an enclosure should I get for a 3"?
>>
>>2474672
>>2474874
Do not sex your spider.
>>
>>2476104
Yeah, the spiders will be cheaper at a show and most people expect a bit of haggling there so you can usually get it even lower.

How expensive do you think the GBB you want is? Are you looking at adult females? GBBs are great and I suggest you stick with your idea of getting one, but don't buy an adult or subadult.
Look for a juvenile, half-grown or less. Something that's gotten out of the sling stage and has a bit of size on it. That will not only be a A LOT cheaper, it will also be a lot of fun to watch grow in your care.
>>
>>2476604
Not like I can. by the time she came out of her burrow, I couldn't find a shred of her exuvia. She was sold to me as female, and I'll believe that until I see a molted spermathecae that points to the contrary, but right now, there's nothing. Zip. Zilch. nada. She's eaten every last scrap.
>>
>>2476350
I'm still here but I have been very busy as of late. I'm still working on it but I haven't made much progress.

>>2476182
Alright, let's start with why you shouldn't get one.

They are very fast, a lot faster than you can react and their behavior is (to a novice keeper) completely unpredictable. They easily panic, don't have any qualms about biting (their venom is extremely painful. For you.) and they are escape artists. If you haven't had any other fast inverts before the chances are high the pede is gonna escape, because you'll be making rookie mistakes that people usually learn to avoid on slower, calmer animals before they move up to get a pede. And even if it's not gonna escape it could be quite the nerve wracking experience every time you open the enclosure or have to do maintenance because you got an animal you're not ready for.

>Why you should get one
They are very active and super interesting, their aggression is great to watch and they eat like machines. You'll get a lot more action out of watching a pede than any tarantula or pretty much any other invert there is.

>cont.
>>
>>2476182
>Care tips, what to do, what not to do

Care for them is quite easy if you keep in mind a few very basic things. The first is that they are escape artists and your chosen enclosure must be absolutely and completely escape proof. It has to be top opening. Anything that open on the front is completely unsuitable (if you don't immediately see why you probably shouldn't get a pede). The lid needs to be tight. Ventilation needs to be perforated metal plates or air holes in the container. Plastic vents and mesh are unsuitable as pedes get through them eventually. Any airholes need to be a good bit smaller than the width of the head of the pede (the actual head, not the head+maxillipedes). Ideally the enclosure has enough room above the soil that the pede can't reach the top, that is the safest way.

Alright now that that is out of the way, care for them is quite easy. Enclosure needs to be at least 2x the length of the animal in width and length and provide at least 1/2 of the length of the animal of diggable substrate (ideally 1x), and still provide a good bit of room above the soil for the reason mentioned above. "Diggable soil" means no coco-fiber (at least not pure). Topsoil with a bit of sand works well. With very few exceptions the substrate needs to be kept moist but not wet at all times, never let it dry out, they are very, very sensitive to that and need a lof of moisture. A small waterbowl is optional.

>cont.
>>
>>2476681
Other decorations should include a hide. A flat piece of bark is usually enough, they don't need or want a little pre-made cave like a tarantula, they want to squeeze under something as tight as possible. Adding some sticks and leaf litter will give the enclosure a more natural look and it also actually encourages the animal to come out a lot more. They feel a lot safer when they don't have to move over open ground, so adding more places for them to hide makes them come out more. It's quite counterintuitive at first, I know.

Temperatures are another important factor. They like room temperature, ideally around 22-24 C. Temperature lower than 20C are bad and temperatures higher than 28C are VERY bad. They DO NOT tolerate heat. Too much heat is one of the two main reasons for centipedes "mysteriously" dying for so many people experienced with tarantulas (the #1 reason is dessication, no tarantula is quite as sensitive to lack of moisture as a centipede).

Lastly, feeding. They eat a lot, more than people expect when they've been keeping tarantulas for example. The pleural membrane (the skin between the top and bottom "plates") should be bent outward slightly, not folded and cumpled, though not completely taut either. The pede should have a generally "thick" look. Feed however many feeders you need to get to that look, most pedes will be underfed when you get them. They will eat almost anything, but you should feed stuff that is not longer than 1/3rd the length of the animal.

>cont.
>>
>>2476692
Well, that's about all the advice I can give you. I hope I have informed you enough to see why I'd still recommend you get something else first.

Oh and
>trivia
>They can and will run up tweezers, when working with pedes always have a second one ready, because you might need to drop the first one. It's the only thing you can do because you can sure as hell not shake it off
>They run upwards and backwards as fast as forwards
>They can almost instantly rear up to 2/3rds of their height
>Instead of biting they will often strike with their spiny back legs first, which is very fast, surprisingly painful and can leave marks. People often assume they have been bitten because of the sharp pain and marks
>When getting ready to molt they can burrow and often stay burrowed for months, completely closing off their chamber. If your pede does this DO NOT dig it up, it's fine. Just leave it be.
>They seem to always try to go for the head/neck of their prey. They will search unfamiliar prey for the head.
>When they feel bothered but not hungry they will kill their prey and leave it uneaten
>They can hunt, hold, kill and eat multiple prey items at once
>>
>>2476489
I have an adult pair. Good choice for a first baboon, pretty relaxed.

>How big of an enclosure should I get for a 3"?
Well, at least a 6" cube if we go by the standard minimum sizes, but this spider is quite active and will completely redecorate your setup, digging, webbing, moving stuff around so I'd give it more, ideally with like 5" of substrate and another 5" above, decorated with some sticks, because it will use all of it.
>>
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehS-OLD0_jg
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>>2476646
I'm flexible on price, I was just fishing for options more than anything. I would like a smaller spider to watch it grow but i don't really want a sling. Will juveniles be able to be accurately sexed or will I be taking a gamble?
>>
Not the other anon, but looking to get a proper enclosure for my S. heros. Would this work?

https://jamiestarantulas.com/Complete%20Terrestrial%20Tarantula%20cage/
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>>2472546
man that sucker looks dangerous, coconut crab all the way.

Fun fact: these big crabbys might be responsible for the disappearance of Amelia Earhearts remains. They might have ate her corpse and stashed her bones in some crab-lair on some island in buttfuck nowhere, because they are omnivores. They will eat pretty much anything and that spans from kittens and rats, to other coconut crabs. Rotting meat etc. If they eat too many of this certain type of mango their meat can become poisonous.

These fellas are considered a delicacy, and in some parts of the world pacific islanders have almost hunted them to extinction. They must be pretty tasty to be almost eaten out of existence.
>>
>>2473349
I don't know if you're keeping that crab in a good environment if your cock is near it
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>>2476904
wait or did you mean you have to have guts, not literal balls of steel, to keep a coconut crab.

I assumed you meant you would have to have balls of steel because they would get pinched by the crab like your fingers and toes
>>
>>2476831
>Will juveniles be able to be accurately sexed or will I be taking a gamble?
Anything with a 1" body and up is easily sexed by looking at molts. All you need is a 10x magnifying glass or something else with similar magnififaction. Any seller worth their salt will have one and offer sexed juveniles at that size.
>>
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>>2477304
Frogot image. I got this GBB yesterday, body is a little less than 1" and I paid 60€ for it and the A. seemanni (which is even smaller and also sexed) together.
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>>2475713
Here. Like I said, very basic. Just a few pieces of bark with moss on them, ventilation only on the top for very high humidity, light comes from an LED so it doesn't get hot. Around 80% humidity and 22 to 24 C in there at all times, seems to work well. There's 4 of them in there.

(Ignore the hard water stains)
>>
>>2476868
Yeah, that works. Get the bare enclosure though, not the set. The stuff that's in the set is mostly useless for a pede.
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>>2472104
Bless you
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>>2477308
Did you get the vented tops from somewhere or did you make them yourself?

I'm guessing you made it.
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>>2477584
Yeah, a boxcutter, some flyscreen and some hot glue. Takes about 15 minutes to make one.
>>
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Anyone here got Hermit Crabs? I've set up a tank and my crabs are becoming more active since purchase a weekish ago.

Quick question about heat lamps, is it OK to have a glass lid under it if there's space and air flow between it (as in, the lamp isn't placed on top of it but mounted up higher)? I need heat but I also need humidity, and I'd like to make sure this doesn't shatter my glass.
>>
Does anyone have any documentaries on inverts (preferably spiders) that they can recommend? I'm going to have like three days off with jack shit to do and I want stuff to binge on.
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GUESS WHAT?

First Metallyticus splendids ootheca just hatched!

Totally unexpected, I was thinking October at the earliest, but here we are. I've found 13 of these tiny little fuckers so far.
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>>2477768
Moved them into a container with some moist egg carton and springtails for them to eat. They are so tiny. Even big Drosophila are probably too big for them.

My god, I haven't been this excited in a long time.
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>>2476668
>>2476681
>>2476692
>>2476698
Wow thats a lot of info anon. Thank you. Some of it i had in mind, other parts give me a lot to consider.

My thought for choosing (or making) an enclosure was "theres no way in or out without external help" and preferably the lid is well beyond its reach.

For keeping the substrate moist is regular misting acceptable? Not sure if the water would get deep enough.

>decorations
Do you happen to know if theres any specific plants that are good or bad for that?

>Temperatures
Thats a bit higher than average here so i would need a heating source. Can heating lamps be used? Is there certain types of lights to use and not to use? Also im curious about night viewing lights.

>When getting ready to molt they can burrow and often stay burrowed for months
Is there any way to tell if theyre molting or if something is wrong?
>>
>>2477768
>>2477771
Also they all seem to be totally fine. I have no idea why some of them decided to lay on their back in the vial.
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>>2472075
>Or anything without a backbone
Like OP lol

I have a couple of rabdotus. I haven't decided a name for them yet. They both look similar.
>>
Any australia tarantula keepers here?
What species would you rec for a beginner?
>>
>>2477768
>>2477771
Holy shit, nice! Did you have to fish them out of the adult tank?
>>
>>2477773
>For keeping the substrate moist is regular misting acceptable?
Depends on what substrate and how much ventilation you have. I generally don't have a lot of ventilation and I use unfertilized regular gardening soil mixed with sand, which seems to stay moist well enough with regular misting.

>Do you happen to know if theres any specific plants that are good or bad for that?
Regular terrarium plants work just fine. Pothos for example.

>Can heating lamps be used?
>Is there certain types of lights to use and not to use?
You can, but temps can drop at night. In fact that's preferable to emulate a realistic day/night cycle. As long as it doesn't drop below around 20C at night you don't need a special heat lamp to be on all the time. To get day temperatures from 22 to 25 it's best to use simple halogen bulbs in any sort of lamp that fits your situation. A simple clamp-on lamp with a 25W bulb on a 10 to 12 hour timer works perfectly.

>Also im curious about night viewing lights
RGB LED strips set to pure red is what I use for that. They work perfectly, are completely invisible to the animal and don't produce any heat.

>Is there any way to tell if theyre molting or if something is wrong?
Not really, but generally they will molt when they're well fed and seem in otherwise good condition.
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>>2478512
Yeah, it's a miracle I saw them this quickly, they are absolutely tiny and well camouflaged. I think they must have hatched just hours before I found them.

From now on I'll be looking for them though. And by dismantling the entire tank to look for more I saw that I have at least 9 ootheca, instead of the 5 I thought I had.
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Could I get an ID on this red lass? found in NC, preying on Agelenopsis sp.
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>>2478688
Alright. Thanks for all the help.
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She's starting to become a big girl. The growth on her is insane, 3 months between molts and she now has a legspan of over 15 cm.
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>>2479035
Dayum son
>>
So irma did end up hitting me. Power's been out for two days, No air circulation until now, since we finally have a working generator.

How much humidity is good.bad for a A. seemanni? Current enclosure readings say 85%. I want to say it's fine because it's a tropical species, but I want to be sure. Fans are on now, and the humidity should be stifled just a bit, but it'll still hang around 78-80%. Are there any additional measures I should take if that's already too much?
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bump
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>>2479525
Measuring humidity for tarantulas is a waste. If there's a moisture gradient in the substrate. About half, maybe a little more. You'll be good.
>>
>>2480046
>>2479525
Also, Is that you're? Fugg I need a blue A. seemanni
>>
Anyone going to the AES Exhibition later this month?
>>
>>2477745
I have Hermit crabs too

I have the heat source inside the terrarium, but as you say, you really need to watch out humidity-wise if you do that..

I think you should be ok if you keep a bit of a distance between the glass and the lamp
>>
redpill me on dank Japanese beetles
I really like the huge ones but are there breeds that don't constantly live underground? I'd like to watch it mill about and do whatever it does for fun. Sort of like a patrician aquarium.
>>
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>>2480083
>all these buzzwords
>breeds
leave
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>>2480083
>dank
>I really like the huge ones
>Japanese
>breeds
>live underground
>patrician
Jesus Christ.
>>
>>2480083
I'd assume that by "dank Japanese beetles" you mean Allomyrina dichotoma, so I'm confused as to what you mean by "the huge ones" and "breeds". Are you using "Japanese beetles" to actually mean "rhinoceros beetles" ? Are you using "breeds" to mean "species" ?

You really should do your own research before asking terribly confusing and badly worded questions. Check out information on the care and breeding of the species you're interested in, that'll give you the answer you need.

I'd also just advise you not to get any beetles, because you obviously have no idea what beetles are.
>>
>>2480083
>redpill me on dank

Your parents probably wouldn't let you have any.
>>
>>2480099
>>2480114
>>2480117
>>2480118
Just wanted to know if Hercules beetles don't cover themselves in soil
yes or no
>>
>>2480132
>Hercules beetle
>Japanese
This has to be a ruse. Nobody is this stupid.
>>
>>2480066
oh no, that one's not mine, This one is
>>2474227
>>
>>2480132
There's no way you could own a beetle with an IQ this damn low
>>
>>2480530
>>2480142
this

also, yes, D. hercules are undergound most of the time
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Not very exotic but I'm in love with scorpions.
I'll just put a couple links here, I apologize for their amateur nature and my autistic voice.

Eating Grasshopper:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPIXOX0JvXg&t=2s

Grooming Himself:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDqudO94wkw

Showing off my feeder cricket setup:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=daJiiIchwZ8
>>
>>2479035
I don't mean to show my power level but that's so FUCKING amazing, anon! When I saw her I just had to let you know how amazing she is!

I'm getting a camel spider, soon, myself.
>>
>>2480636
>camel spider
I hope you know what there REALLY need.
They are really hard to keep (especially for an inexperienced keeper)

All I want to say is:
DEEP substrate with a lot of clay, completely dry, just the bottom 2-3cm moist, pre-dig a little burrow, the camel spider will expand it on it´s own. Don´t keep it as hot as you think.

Don´t feed it often, in fact, feed it rarely, every ten days or so.
And no fucking waterbowl

these are just the basics tho, depending on which species you get it might need to hibernate, etc.
>>
>>2480636
You are aware that camel spiders are seasonal animals, right? If you manage to keep it alive in captivity (which is already hard enough) it's still only going to live for a few months. And since no one has managed to breed them in captivity that will be it.
>>
>>2480665
Not that guy but some people have managed to keep them a long tome. Turns out most people overfeed them, provide too much heat, and dont provide enough substrate, darkness, and cooler temps for them to hibernate
>>
>>2480665
>no one has managed to breed them in captivity
some have, I only know of two people tho, one of them managed to raise the young ones. they molt once a year after their initial molt to the first "feeding stage"

I'm sure it's not the same for every species tho
>>
>>2480759
>Turns out most people overfeed them, provide too much heat, and dont provide enough substrate, darkness, and cooler temps for them to hibernate

It's not overfeeding or too much heat. What people are doing is extending their lifespans by slowing their metabolism with lower temperatures and limited food. They are seasonal animals in nature and they do not get much older than 10 to 12 months. Keeping them cool and restricting food keeps them alive longer than their natural lifespan. People are going for maximum lifespan instead of trying to emulate their natural environment.
>>
>>2480784
That sounds great if you ask me. Like how stray dogs luve 5 or 6 years instead of 15.

I mean i get what youre saying i think, but i don't see how its a bad thing.
>>
>>2480876
Different anon here.
I think that's a terrible comparison.
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My Scolopendra heros seems to be enjoying it's new cage.
>>
>>2481025
eh should have given it a bit more substrate.
>>
I'm only starting to get into learning about bugs, what would be a good type of moth for someone who wants to raise cute moths?
>>
There was a praying mantis trapped in my workout building and I helped free it after it latched on to my face
Tonight was a good night
>>
>>2480946
i agree that its a bad comparison but i couldn't think of a better analogy. ultimately you're increasing the life expectancy of a creature that would otherwise be snuffed out sooner. sure, dogs evolved for human companionship and therefore should naturally flourish with humans, and sure, you don't increase a dog's lifespan by restricting its diet more than would occur in the wild...but i think, if you want to keep an arthropod as a pet and there are steps you can take to increase the time spent with that pet without reducing that creatures quality of life, I see that situation as a win/win.

but yeah, the analogy itself was a pretty big stretch
>>
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Lupe has gotten big, which means her bum leg looks even more smol. Hopefully she's due for another molt this season.
>>
>>2480132

Hercules beetles, just like most rhinoceros beetles (Dynastinae) bury themselves in soil to maintain their body moisture. Theyre nocturnal and mostly eclose during humid periods; they on't like direct sunlight and dryness. Beetles kept in dry enclosures with no moist soil and too much ventilation will die within a few days.
All of my rhino beetle enclosures are damp and only allow enough ventilation for the animals to breathe and to prevent excessive moisture. From my observation however, male beetles spend more time on the surface than females while feeding on fruit/jelly for days. Males usually don't bury themselves deeper than 2-3 inches because their horns get in the way.
That aside, Dynastes aren't good beginner beetles and tend to live for only 2-4 months which is average for Scarabaeidae (rhino beetles, scarabs, flower beetles etc.) but devastating for the breeder/keeper considering that it takes 2+ years for the beetle to develop from a first instar grub, which is also why they're rather pricey. People buy living hercules beetles in order to breed them, not to watch them crawl around in a terrarium for a few months until they die.
>>
>>2472075
Oh hell yeah, my hand is the OP image for invert general. I've made it.
>>
>>2481292
Tell Spike I'm proud of him.
>>
>>2481292
Your hand beholds a powerful being.
>>
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18 more M. splendidus have hatched, and this time I took some proper images.
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>>2481349
They are tiny.
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>>2481352
>>
>>2473813
That mythology in reality stuff was really cool m8, earned yourself a sub.
>>
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>>2481353
This is what the ooths look like.
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>>2481355
And this is a hatched one with the L1 skins.

Sorry for spamming but I'm quite excited.
>>
>>2481352
cute/10
>>
>>2481202
Beautiful spider, anon. How big is she?
>>
>>2480636
Thank you. I'm sure she would appreciate the compliment if she could.
>>
>>2481352
What do you even feed tiny nymphs like that? Pinheads? They don't even look big enough for pinheads
>>
>>2481385
They're eating springtails at the moment. I'm gonna try small fruit flies too.
>>
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>>2481380
1 1/2"
>>
>>2476104
I'd recommend an O. diamentenensis. They may be harder to find, but they're smaller, have similar color patterns, and behave very similarly to cyanopubescens. mine has been an absolute blast to keep as they are voracious predators and grow fairly quickly.
>>
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First adult Idolomantis! A male, a bit smaller than expected, but still.

I wonder how long the color change takes.
>>
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>>2482136
Also got an adult female H. orientalis a few days ago. Somehow forgot to mention that.
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>>2482138
And a second adult male M. violaceus
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>>2482136
Woah, already? The males are adult in L8, right? Mine are both still L6.
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>>2482154
I think I must have missed a molt somewhere, because I was sure he has still L6 too. I'm quite surprised.
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>>2472408
Did Soren Kierkegaard discovered one of this ?
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Found this beautiful little mantis up in the mountains of Tennessee, anyone want to identify it?
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>>2482189
Male Stagmomantis, probably Stagmomantis carolina.
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>found 13 more M. splendidus nymphs today

Welp. Initially I was planning to keep all of them and raise the F1 myself, but I'm at 43 of the little fuckers now, I might sell some. I think I'm gonna wait until at least L3 though, to get an idea of their mortality rate. I got mine as L5, and not a single one of those has died an early death in my care, so I think if I can raise them to L3 I'm on the safe side.
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>>2472075
Where can I buy pet beetles online in the US. Everysite I can find is Japan only, or just dried dead beetles.
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Doin some yard work today and found this stubby bitch on my pant-leg. I think it's some kind of trapdoor spider.
Can I get an ID?

South Carolina
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>>2482661
some sort of Ummidia sp.
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>>2482670
Thank you
Any idea why it climbed on me? I was thinking if felt my footstep and thought it was a prey item it would have latched onto me.
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>>2482677
She may have been roving around looking for somewhere to burrow. A spooder's adventures take them far and wide. When did you notice she was on you? In the garden maybe? Perhaps she was looking for somewhere with pliable soil so she could set up shop
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>>2482678
Yeah that makes sense. I was walking through th lawn to get to a outbuilding then I looked down to pick up something, I put her in the shade outside. Hopefully she finds some place to build, I've never seen one before.
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>>2482680
I haven't either, and supposedly they're here in Florida. Not surprising, I guess. They're very secretive. I'd consider myself lucky to spot one
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Thinking about getting some beetles, how difficult are they to care for?

from doing a bit of research it seems easy enough
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>>2483024
>how difficult are they to care for?
Taking care of beetles isn't hard but in the end it depends on the species. Since you've already stated that you've done some research, you should know that most beetles don't live very long and that keeping beetles includes breeding them as a result.
When it comes to the family Scarabaeidae (flower beetles, rhinoceros beetles, dung beetles etc), Pachnoda marginata is the go-to species for beginners. But if it has to be something more impressive, Xylotrupes (pic related) are also easy to rear.
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>>2472075
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>>2482661
>dem palps
Goddamn she basically has 10 legs
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>>2483188
>needle

...
and I guess that's it.
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What is the best invertebrate, and why is it the Octopus?
Just try to disprove me
Protip: you can't.
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>>2483566
>males die few days after they loose virginity
>females die as soon as babies hatched
>suicide glands can be surgically removed and they will live just fine without them and won't kill themselves
Octopuses are really fucked up animals.
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>>2483595
that's glass
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>>2483566
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>>2483627
Active camo boi got dropped
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>>2482136
2 days later and he's already starting to turn very slightly green. I thought this would take longer.
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What's the one invert you want no matter what, /an/? Your endgame acquisition, your dream bug, your Pearl of Great Price? What would the crown jewel of your collection?
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>>2481305
He is a very good boy. We got to be on the BBC, and a lot of other cool opprtunities. Taking dumb pics of your bugs pays off, who knew??

>>2482552
Titan beetle shop ships to the US.
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I haven't been here in a while, but here's my li'l dude in his cockpit. He always pushes the jelly out and sits in here like a vehicle.
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I actually saw this black beetle in my yard. Do you know what kind it is?
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>>2484307
>spike returns
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>>2483595
>>suicide glands can be surgically removed and they will live just fine without them and won't kill themselves
Explain please
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>>2484358
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octopus#Lifespan
>Octopuses have a relatively short life expectancy; some species live for as little as six months. The giant Pacific octopus, one of the two largest species of octopus, may live for as many as five years. Octopus lifespan is limited by reproduction: males can live for only a few months after mating, and females die shortly after their eggs hatch. Octopus reproductive organs mature due to the hormonal influence of the optic gland but result in the inactivation of their digestive glands, typically causing the octopus to eventually die from starvation.[63]:276–277 Experimental removal of both optic glands after spawning was found to result in the cessation of broodiness, the resumption of feeding, increased growth, and greatly extended lifespans.[64]
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>>2484358
when an octopus mates it stops eating and dies.
This change is regulated by an optic gland that controls the transition to mature mating ability and also shuts down the animal's digestive system. Removing this gland after sexual maturity and mating keeps the animal from dying after mating.

http://science.sciencemag.org/content/198/4320/948
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Fuck my life, the Idolomantis actually cannibalized. One of the females refused all food for two days after her molt. Yesterday evening I still tried to motivate her with both flies and wax moths and she didn't care at all, now this morning she's chomping down on another one that molted tonight.
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>>2484307
That looks comfy as shit.
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>>2484374
Same thing happened to me, though it was a female that was molting that got her head eaten, so now I'm down to one female.

I should have gotten more than 4 of them, fuck me.
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>>2484307
Do you know how old he is? Dorcus live pretty long for a beetle (like 2 years, iirc). He might be pretty old already. I know you know that, but how are you gonna let all the people know that seem so enthralled by the cute lil guy?
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>>2484374
>>2484452
So why do people still think it's ok to keep them in communals? Clearly one of them will eventually violate the NAP
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>>2484500
I don't have enough experience with this species to say if this is a regular occurence or not. Maybe my conditions were also wrong, I simply don't know.

I think I'm gonna try one more time with a new batch of L2s. The ones that I have now can go in with the Heterochaeta, as I only have one pair of them now.
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>>2483035
Have you watched to much Daniel Ambuehl, or what's the reasoning behind the peat pots?
They certainly don't make good artificial pupa cells and get infested with (maybe dangerous) mushrooms easily.

Personally, I use FLORAS, which are water absorbent foam blocks for flower gardening. It's the green stuff true masters use, like in Japan and Taiwan for example.
I find it saddening that there aren't many experienced beetle breeders in our western world. May I ask where you are from? You must be from Europe for sure, right?

I consider myself one of the very few breeders in Europe who are actually good. No offence.
I breed beetles now since 2007 with good to very good results and I've specialized in the breeding of Dynastes hercules ssp. btw.
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>>2484500
Every breeder I know of keeps them in groups and compared to the paradoxas they also always sit tightly clustered together without giving a shit. I suspect it was more of a freak accident where the freshly molted one wasn't able to fight back, as well as the attacker regaining its post-molt appetite at such an inconvenient time.
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>>2484081
Goliath birbeater
Mantis shrimp
Regal jumping spiders
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>>2484515
>Have you watched to much Daniel Ambuehl, or what's the reasoning behind the peat pots?
Indeed his videos inspired me to try the peat pot method myself.
So far I didn't have a single deformed beetle emerge from them; 100% success rate as long as the grub made it to pupa stage. And they're less likely to be infested with mites or nematodes than their natural counterparts as long as you keep them far away from infested substrate. Never had problems with mushrooms either. Years ago I tried the foam block method with fatal results because I didn't know how to store them properly and retain their moisture.

>May I ask where you are from?
Germany.

Since you mentioned how there are only a few good beetle breeders in Europe I'd like to ask you: What makes a good breeder?
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RIP in peices my little male carolina mantis
He died doing what he loved: being a total fuck up

Coincidentally he did succeed in mating with my female carolina mantis shortly before his demise.
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>>2484532
>What makes a good breeder?
I am guessing the attached picture of the post from you earlier, is a photo you've taken yourself? Judging by the size of the males, you are definitely not one of them. And Xylotrupes sp. are very hardy, I would be surprised to hear that you breed several years now, but still don't reach 70mm +.
But please don't take that as a offence.

Regarding your question; a good breeder is not someone who can breed beetles to sizes comparable or even exceeding nature standards (except for Gohliatus, but that's a whole bother story).
You are not a good breeder just because you can breed them from larva to adulthood. That's like finishing school, but still having bad marks.
Being good is in the details.

I wonder now you mentioned you are from Germany, are you registered or active on any forums? I've heard a lot about a German beetle forum, but never figured out which forum it is. Maybe you can help?
Btw. am I right with my guess that you are rather young?
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>>2484550
I've meant to say "you are a good breeder" and not "you are not".
Excuse me for my mistake.
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>>2484550
>calls other breeders bad
>can't even spell Goliathus right

I've seen you do this twice now, and with different errors. I can not really take you seriously, sorry. Besides, he has at least posted a picture, you have absolutely nothing except empty words so far. We have not seen any of your beetles.
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>>2484550
>I am guessing the attached picture of the post from you earlier, is a photo you've taken yourself?
The group in the image is from my second F1 generation which I'll combine with the leftovers of another F1 generation in order to achieve a genetically diverse F2.
>Judging by the size of the males, you are definitely not one of them. ...I would be surprised to hear that you breed several years now, but still don't reach 70mm +.
My first attempts date back to 2002 but they were as unprofessional as it gets. Didn't make any serious attempts until last year and I'm more than pleased with the results. The largest males I've raised so far measured 55-57mm and I have 2 male pupa which look like they could turn out bigger. But to be very honest, I don't care about raising mayor males. Healthy beetles without deformities and minimalizing losses is all I aim for.
>But please don't take that as a offence.
No problem, I won't.

>are you registered or active on any forums? I've heard a lot about a German beetle forum, but never figured out which forum it is.
kaeferforum.com

>I right with my guess that you are rather young?
No, I'm 27.
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>>2484585
Thank you very much. I really enjoy reading your lines, you are quite a good speaker.
Perhaps you have a username so I kind find you on the forum? I would happily register too. Are there many non Germans on this forum?
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>>2484612
>Perhaps you have a username so I kind find you on the forum?
My username is Sandwich. Sounds a bit silly but it was back in 2009. I also don't post very frequently and prefer to use the search function when I'm looking for specific info.

>Are there many non Germans on this forum?
There are plenty; that's why it's also called "the international beetle community".

You don't attend expos or fairs internationally, do you? If it's not too far from where you live, the international insect fair in Frankfurt could be of interest to you.

That aside, It was a pleasant conversation and I'm looking forward to your participation in the beetle community.
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>>2484356
I've been busy with crazy stuff happening (bugs pay off?) but I should post here more. It's a chill general.

>>2484454
After some googling, I found anywhere from "two to several" to "2 to 7" (that MUST include larval period, though) years for dorcus alcides, so my guess for him is 2 -4/5 year lifespan... I don't know how old he is, but he's very perky. I had a dorcus curvidens that slowed down for ~6 months before he passed, and Spike is still full of spunk.

Given this, hopefully I'll have some time to let the internet know when he's in his golden years. I think people will be nice about it... He will have made a big impression for a little dude.
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>>2472075
Anyone know where I can order giant stag beetles in the states as pets?
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>>2483188
You mess with stag
You get the shag
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>>2485093
I think the 7 years comes from their lifespan in the wild. They actually live in pretty seasonal climates with cool winters, so they hibernate for a few months. That's how they can get so old. Without extended hibernation they don't get that old.

Since I don't think you want to stick spike in a fridge for 5 months I think 2 to 3 years lifespan is more realistic. And yeah, he looks young and fresh too. Still active, shiny, and none of this feet are missing (they sometimes seem to break off on old beetles, not that that would slow them down).
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>>2485239
reposting to a more appropriate thread

What terrestrial inverts are kept as pets that live at least 3 years or more?

>Invert pets that are "bugs"
Tarantulas
Scorpions
Vinegaroons
??? other Arachnids (not sure how long tailless whip scorpions live?)
Giant Centipedes
Giant Millipedes

>Invert pets that are not "bugs"
Hermit Crabs
Halloween/Moon Crabs
*Fiddler Crabs (usually sold alongside brackish aquariums)

>????, not considered pets in the traditional sense, other, etc.
Ant colonies (ant queens can live for several years). Potentially invasive if keeping a non-local species.
Giant African Snail (just no). Also invasive.


Am I forgetting anything? Mantids are cool but they only live about a year. I was saddened to find out camel spiders don't live very long either.
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>>2485256
Asbolus verrucosus and other death feigning and ironclad beetles are pretty popular in the US as far as I know. They can apparently get up to 8 years old. Bunch of other predatory beetles like Anthia and Hemiphileurus can live some years too. They usually(always?) fail to breed in captivity though, so you're taking a gamble with wild caughts.

Velvet worms can potentially live a bunch of years too.
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>>2485282
>usually(always?) fail to breed in captivity though
Some have bred them, but it's not easy and most people provide conditions, in which they won't breed at all.


>Asbolus verrucosus and other death feigning and ironclad beetles
Please stop
I will never be able to keep them. I'm looking for a few years now, but here in europe, they are apparently not in the hobby..
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>>2485282
Velvet worms are easy to keep?
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>>2485296
The only velvet worms I've seen on sale were species from New Zealand, which need it a few degrees colder than room temperature. Beyond that they don't seem to need much, just a very humid and moist tank. With little information available it's hard to say if they do well in captivity like that and reach longer life spans/breed or if it's just imports that die off at some point.
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>>2485282
>They can apparently get up to 8 years old.
How much of that lifespan is spent as an adult?

It's terribly disappointing knowing that a lot of really cool beetles only live for a few weeks or months upon reaching adulthood.
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>>2485340
That is the adult life span. The book "Field Guide to Beetles of California" says there is a recorded individual of A. verrucosus that has made it to 17 years in captivity.
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>>2485307
They need i quite a few degreed below 20
But as you said, humid and cool at all times. They breed under those conditions

They are not for beginners tho, as they do not tolerate mistakes at all
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>>2485098

It's pretty much impossible thanks to the United States Department of Agriculture; it holds the belief that every exotic insect imported to the US could become Popillia japonica 2.0.
It is possible to aquire a special permit but I highly doubt they're being handed out for free. You can always try to catch native stag beetles; they're still impressive and have been successfully bred in captivity too.
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>>2485098
Go away APHIS, there are no illegal bugs here.
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LOOKS LIKE WE GOT OURSELVES A FRESH MOLT UP IN 'ERE
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>>2485416
Ruh roh

At least yours left their exuvia. Mine ate hers before I ever laid eyes on it
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>>2485385
thats a shame, I wanted a big beetlebro
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>>2484081
Well I have just received my dream spooder.
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>>2472075

my knife is much bigger
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Could anybody ID this for me? Found in northern kentucky. I know it's kinda hard to ID caterpillars in some cases, I was thinking Colias
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>>2485544
>my knife
They're both Spike's knifes, you knob.
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>>2472075
Best Youtube channels for Invert keeping?
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>>2485256
Ant colonies are honestly one of the most interesting invert pet choices. Not only do they often live for years with proper care, but they're extremely lively and intelligent.
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>>2485709
i like the Dark Den
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New thread, guise

>>2485980
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Say Hi to my new adquisition. Been waiting for one of these fuckers for months.




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